Search results for 'pharmacology' (try it on Scholar)

191 found
Sort by:
  1. S. Malhotra & N. Shafiq (2006). What Clinical Pharmacology Means to Us. Mens Sana Monographs 4 (1):184.score: 18.0
    Clinical Pharmacology is a specialty with many attributes and our association with the subject has allowed us to acquire, apply and disseminate myriad aspects of research and practice. Though clinical pharmacologists are conspicuous by virtue of their small number, recent years have shown a growing need for the course. In the review below we navigate through several aspects of the subject as we encountered them from time to time. From critical appraisal of literature, to application of knowledge of drugs, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Lawrence J. Wichlinski (2000). The Pharmacology of Threatening Dreams. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1016-1017.score: 12.0
    The pharmacological literature on negative dream experiences is reviewed with respect to Revonsuo's threat rehearsal theory of dreaming. Moderate support for the theory is found, although much more work is needed. Significant questions that remain include the precise role of acetylcholine in the generation of negative dream experiences and dissociations between the pharmacology of waking fear and anxiety and threatening dreams. [Revonsuo].
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. S. Goodman (2010). Thrills, Spills and Pills: Bond, Benzedrine and the Pharmacology of Peace. Medical Humanities 36 (1):27-30.score: 12.0
    This paper examines the conjunction of pharmacological science and espionage fiction of the post-war era. This paper argues that, during the 1950s, the relatively new science of pharmacology propounded the possibility that illness and human deficiency could be treated in a way that better reflected the post-war zeitgeist. The use of pharmacological medicine, perceived as cleaner and quicker than more ‘bodily’ forms of treatment, represented progress in contemporary medical science. It is argued that this philosophy extended to more overt (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Peter E. Pormann (2011). The Formation of the Arabic Pharmacology Between Tradition and Innovation. Annals of Science 68 (4):493-515.score: 12.0
    Summary The pharmacological tradition in the medieval Islamic world developed on the basis of the Greek tradition, with the works of Dioscorides and Galen being particularly popular. The terminology was influenced not only by Greek, but also Middle Persian, Syriac, and indigenous Arabic words. Through recent research into Graeco-Arabic translations, it has become possible to discern the evolution of pharmacological writing in Arabic: in the late eighth century, the technical terms were being developed, with transliterations being used; by the mid-ninth (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2012). Intervention, Causal Reasoning, and the Neurobiology of Mental Disorders: Pharmacological Drugs as Experimental Instruments. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):542-551.score: 10.0
    In psychiatry, pharmacological drugs play an important experimental role in attempts to identify the neurobiological causes of mental disorders. Besides being developed in applied contexts as potential treatments for patients with mental disorders, pharmacological drugs play a crucial role in research contexts as experimental instruments that facilitate the formulation and revision of neurobiological theories of psychopathology. This paper examines the various epistemic functions that pharmacological drugs serve in the discovery, refinement, testing, and elaboration of neurobiological theories of mental disorders. I (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Stephen T. Higgins & Stacey C. Sigmon (2000). Implications of Behavioral Momentum for Understanding the Behavioral Pharmacology of Abused Drugs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):101-101.score: 9.0
    We briefly discuss some potential contributions of behavioral momentum research to the study of the behavioral effects of abused drugs. Contributions to the study of the direct effects of drugs on operant responding and to the study of drugs as reinforcers are addressed. Too little empirical evidence is available to thoroughly evaluate the relevance of behavioral momentum concepts to the study of drugs and behavior, but we note several reasons for optimism regarding its potential to make positive contributions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. David Healy (2007). The Cult of Pharmacology: How America Became the World's Most Troubled Drug Culture (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (3):467-471.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. W. Paton (1983). Vivisection, Morals, Medicine: Commentary From a Vivisecting Professor of Pharmacology. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):102-104.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. R. Abbinnett (forthcoming). The Politics of Spirit in Stiegler's Techno-Pharmacology. Theory, Culture and Society.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. G. Paul Bolwell (1990). Plant Polyphenols: Vegetable Tannins Revisited (1989). By E. Haslam. Chemistry and Pharmacology of Natural Products (J. D. Phillipson, D. C. Ayres and H. Baxter, Eds). Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, Pp. 230, £35/$70. [REVIEW] Bioessays 12 (9):453-453.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Joseph Bonaventra (1989). Marine Pharmacology. Bioscience 39 (5):332-334.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Paul Lechat (1988). Pharmacology, the Golden Bridge Between Biology and Medicine. Bioessays 8 (5):139-140.score: 9.0
  13. A. R. Singh (2010). Modern Medicine: Towards Prevention, Cure, Well-Being and Longevity. Mens Sana Monographs 8 (1):17.score: 9.0
    Modern medicine has done much in the fields of infectious diseases and emergencies to aid cure. In most other fields, it is mostly control that it aims for, which is another name for palliation. Pharmacology, psychopharmacology included, is mostly directed towards such control and palliation too. The thrust, both of clinicians and research, must now turn decisively towards prevention and cure. Also, longevity with well-being is modern medicine's other big challenge. Advances in vaccines for hypertension, diabetes, cancers etc, deserve (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Paola S. Timiras (1995). Political Pharmacology: Thinking About Drugs. History of European Ideas 21 (2):302-303.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Sean Ekins (2002). Indianapolis, USA. He Received His Ph. D. In Clinical Pharmaco-Logy at the University of Aberdeen, M. Sc. In Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Aberdeen and His HND in Applied Biology. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 7:497-500.score: 9.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. C. F. Juritz (1905). Some Notes Regarding South African Pharmacology. Transactions of the South African Philosophical Society 16 (1):111-133.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Kenemans J. (2009). Visual Mismatch: Some Applications in Pharmacology, Pathology, and Development. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 9.0
  18. Marsha Rosengarten (2004). Consumer Activism in the Pharmacology of HIV. Body and Society 10 (1):91-107.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. J. K. Shepherd & C. T. Dourish (1994). Implications of Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation for Behavioural Pharmacology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):754.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Earl Barker, Eugene Braunwald, K. K. Chen, Joseph R. DiPalma, Edward Freis, Magnus I. Gregersen, Niels Haugaard, Orville Horwitz, Hugh Montgomery & Neil C. Moran (1965). Pharmacology (Heart and Vascular System). In Karl W. Linsenmann (ed.), Proceedings. St. Louis, Lutheran Academy for Scholarship.score: 9.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. François Dagognet (2009). Pharmacology as a Physical Object. In A. Brenner & J. Gayon (eds.), French Studies in the Philosophy of Science: Contemporary Research in France. Springer. 276--189.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. M. R. C. David (2007). The Cult of Pharmacology: How America Became the World's Most Troubled Drug Culture (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (3):467-471.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Ilan Golani (1994). The Practicality of Using the Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation in Behavioral Pharmacology and Kinesics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):754.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. D. Healy (2008). The Cult of Pharmacology: How America Became the World's Most Troubled Drug Culture by Richard DeGrandpre. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (3):467.score: 9.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. I. E. Hughes (1999). Instant Pharmacology, By K. Saeb-Parsy, RG Assomull, FZ Kahn, K. Saeb-Parsy, and E. Kelly. Bioessays 21:980-981.score: 9.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. I. E. Hughes (1999). Instant Success for Instant Pharmacology. Bioessays 21 (11):980-981.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. S. Hyman (forthcoming). Ethical Issues in Pharmacology: Research and Practice. Neuroethics. Mapping the Field. Dana Press, New York.score: 9.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Herbert H. Jasper (1981). EEG, Pharmacology, and Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):482.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Rosengarten Marsha (2004). Consumer Activism in the Pharmacology of Hiv. Body and Society 10 (1).score: 9.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Ian L. Martin (1988). Molecular Recognition and Pharmacology Molecular Foundations of Drug‐Receptor Ineraction. By P. M. DEAN. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1988. Pp. 381. £45.00; £75.00. [REVIEW] Bioessays 9 (6):216-218.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Carl L. Scheckel (1966). Psychopharmacology: The Experimental Psychologist in Pharmacology. Bioscience 16 (10):692-695.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Kavita Sekhri (2012). Teaching Methodologies in Pharmacology: A Survey of Students′ Perceptions and Experiences. Journal of Education and Ethics in Dentistry 2 (1):40.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Michael B. Sporn (1991). Peptide Hormones. Peptide Hormones as Prohormones: Processing, Biological Activity, Pharmacology. Edited by Jean Martinez. Ellis Horwood, Chichester, 1989. 354pp. £45, $88. [REVIEW] Bioessays 13 (10):556-556.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. S. M. Stern (1965). Mediaeval Arabic Bookmaking and its Relation to Early Chemistry and Pharmacology. History of Science 4:151.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Sabine Vogt (2008). Pharmacology. In R. J. Hankinson (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Galen. Cambridge University Press.score: 9.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Thomas S. Winokur (1992). Towards a Molecular Pharmacology. Clinical Applications of TGF‐Β (1991) [CIBA Foundation Symposium 157]. Edited by G. R. Bock and J. Marsh. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester. 254pp. £35.95. [REVIEW] Bioessays 14 (7):504-505.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Leigh N. Chipman & Efraim Lev (2008). Take a Lame and Decrepit Female Hyena_…: A Genizah Study of Two Additional Fragments of Sābūr Ibn Sahl's _al-Aqrābādhīn Al-Saghīr. Early Science and Medicine 13 (4):361-383.score: 6.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Efraim Lev & Leigh Chipman (2008). Take a Lame and Decrepit Female Hyena…: A Genizah Study of Two Additional Fragments of Sābūr Ibn Sahl's Al-Aqrābādhīn Al-Saghīr. Early Science and Medicine 13 (4):361-383.score: 6.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Sabine Maasen (2007). Selves in Turmoil. In J. Scott Jordan & Dawn M. McBride (eds.), The Concepts of Consciousness: Integrating an Emerging Science. Imprint Academic. 252-270.score: 6.0
  40. Bernadette Bensaude Vincent & Sacha Loeve (2014). Metaphors in Nanomedicine: The Case of Targeted Drug Delivery. Nanoethics 8 (1):1-17.score: 6.0
    The promises of nanotechnology have been framed by a variety of metaphors, that not only channel the attention of the public, orient the questions asked by researchers, and convey epistemic choices closely linked to ethical preferences. In particular, the image of the ‘therapeutic missile’ commonly used to present targeted drug delivery devices emphasizes precision, control, surveillance and efficiency. Such values are highly praised in the current context of crisis of pharmaceutical innovation where military metaphors foster a general mobilization of resources (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Dagmar Koethe, Christoph W. Gerth, Miriam A. Neatby, Anita Haensel, Martin Thies, Udo Schneider, Hinderk M. Emrich, Joachim Klosterkötter, Frauke Schultze-Lutter & F. Markus Leweke (2006). Disturbances of Visual Information Processing in Early States of Psychosis and Experimental Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Altered States of Consciousness. Schizophrenia Research 88 (1-3):142-150.score: 6.0
  42. David Wasserman & S. Matthew Liao (2008). Issues in the Pharmacological Induction of Emotions. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (3):178-192.score: 4.0
    abstract In this paper, we examine issues raised by the possibility of regulating emotions through pharmacological means. We argue that emotions induced through these means can be authentic phenomenologically, and that the manner of inducing them need not make them any less our own than emotions arising 'naturally'. We recognize that in taking drugs to induce emotions, one may lose opportunities for self-knowledge; act narcissistically; or treat oneself as a mere means. But we propose that there are circumstances in which (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jesper Ryberg (2012). Punishment, Pharmacological Treatment, and Early Release. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):231-244.score: 4.0
    Recent studies have shown that pharmacological treatment may have an impact on aggressive and impulsive behavior. Assuming that these results are correct, would it be morally acceptable to instigate violent criminals to accept pharmacological rehabilitation by offering this treatment in return for early release from prison? This paper examines three different reasons for being skeptical with regard to this sort of practice. The first reason concerns the acceptability of the treatment itself. The second reason concerns the ethical legitimacy of making (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Elisabeth Hildt, Klaus Lieb & Andreas G. Franke (2014). Life Context of Pharmacological Academic Performance Enhancement Among University Students – a Qualitative Approach. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):23.score: 4.0
    Academic performance enhancement or cognitive enhancement (CE) via stimulant drug use has received increasing attention. The question remains, however, whether CE solely represents the use of drugs for achieving better academic or workplace results or whether CE also serves various other purposes. The aim of this study was to put the phenomenon of pharmacological academic performance enhancement via prescription and illicit (psycho-) stimulant use (Amphetamines, Methylphenidate) among university students into a broader context. Specifically, we wanted to further understand students’ experiences, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Carlo Miniussi Maria Cotelli, Rosa Manenti, Orazio Zanetti (2012). Non-Pharmacological Intervention for Memory Decline. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 4.0
    Non-pharmacological treatment of memory difficulties in healthy older adults, as well as those with brain damage and neurodegenerative disorders, has gained much attention in recent years (Ball et al., 2002, Willis et al., 2006, Acevedo and Loewenstein, 2007). The two main reasons that explain this growing interest in memory rehabilitation are the limited efficacy of current drug therapies and the plasticity of the human central nervous system (Cotelli et al., 2011c) and the discovery that during aging, the connections in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Jennifer A. Chandler, Alexandra Mogyoros, Tristana Martin Rubio & Eric Racine (2013). Another Look at the Legal and Ethical Consequences of Pharmacological Memory Dampening: The Case of Sexual Assault. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):859-871.score: 4.0
    Research on the use of propranolol as a pharmacological memory dampening treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder is continuing and justifies a second look at the legal and ethical issues raised in the past. We summarize the general ethical and legal issues raised in the literature so far, and we select two for in-depth reconsideration. We address the concern that a traumatized witness may be less effective in a prosecution emerging from the traumatic event after memory dampening treatment. We analyze this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Lizette Heine, Andrea Soddu, Francisco Gómez, Audrey Vanhaudenhuyse, Luaba Tshibanda, Marie Thonnard, Vanessa Charland-Verville, Murielle Kirsch, Steven Laureys & Athena Demertzi (2012). Resting State Networks and Consciousness: Alterations of Multiple Resting State Network Connectivity in Physiological, Pharmacological, and Pathological Consciousness States. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 4.0
    In order to better understand the functional contribution of resting state activity to conscious cognition, we aimed to review increases and decreases in fMRI functional connectivity under physiological (sleep), pharmacological (anesthesia) and pathological altered states of consciousness, such as brain death, coma, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, and minimally conscious state. The reviewed RSNs were the DMN, left and right executive control, salience, sensorimotor, auditory and visual networks. We highlight some methodological issues concerning resting state analyses in severely injured brains mainly (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Matthew Tieu (2010). Romancing Opiates: Pharmacological Lies and the Addiction Bureaucracy [Book Review]. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (3):43.score: 4.0
    Tieu, Matthew Review(s) of: Romancing Opiates: Pharmacological Lies and the Addiction Bureaucracy, by Theodore Dalrymple, Encounter Books, 2006.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Maria Cotelli, Rosa Manenti, Orazio Zanetti & Carlo Miniussi (2012). Non-Pharmacological Intervention for Memory Decline. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 4.0
    Non-pharmacological treatment of memory difficulties in healthy older adults, as well as those with brain damage and neurodegenerative disorders, has gained much attention in recent years (Ball et al., 2002, Willis et al., 2006, Acevedo and Loewenstein, 2007). The two main reasons that explain this growing interest in memory rehabilitation are the limited efficacy of current drug therapies and the plasticity of the human central nervous system (Cotelli et al., 2011c) and the discovery that during aging, the connections in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 191