Search results for 'pharmacology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    S. Malhotra & N. Shafiq (2006). What Clinical Pharmacology Means to Us. Mens Sana Monographs 4 (1):184.
    Clinical Pharmacology is a specialty with many attributes and our association with the subject has allowed us to acquire, apply and disseminate myriad aspects of research and practice. Though clinical pharmacologists are conspicuous by virtue of their small number, recent years have shown a growing need for the course. In the review below we navigate through several aspects of the subject as we encountered them from time to time. From critical appraisal of literature, to application of knowledge of drugs, (...)
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  2.  8
    Lawrence J. Wichlinski (2000). The Pharmacology of Threatening Dreams. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1016-1017.
    The pharmacological literature on negative dream experiences is reviewed with respect to Revonsuo's threat rehearsal theory of dreaming. Moderate support for the theory is found, although much more work is needed. Significant questions that remain include the precise role of acetylcholine in the generation of negative dream experiences and dissociations between the pharmacology of waking fear and anxiety and threatening dreams. [Revonsuo].
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  3.  2
    Peter E. Pormann (2011). The Formation of the Arabic Pharmacology Between Tradition and Innovation. Annals of Science 68 (4):493-515.
    Summary The pharmacological tradition in the medieval Islamic world developed on the basis of the Greek tradition, with the works of Dioscorides and Galen being particularly popular. The terminology was influenced not only by Greek, but also Middle Persian, Syriac, and indigenous Arabic words. Through recent research into Graeco-Arabic translations, it has become possible to discern the evolution of pharmacological writing in Arabic: in the late eighth century, the technical terms were being developed, with transliterations being used; by the mid-ninth (...)
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  4.  1
    S. Goodman (2010). Thrills, Spills and Pills: Bond, Benzedrine and the Pharmacology of Peace. Medical Humanities 36 (1):27-30.
    This paper examines the conjunction of pharmacological science and espionage fiction of the post-war era. This paper argues that, during the 1950s, the relatively new science of pharmacology propounded the possibility that illness and human deficiency could be treated in a way that better reflected the post-war zeitgeist. The use of pharmacological medicine, perceived as cleaner and quicker than more ‘bodily’ forms of treatment, represented progress in contemporary medical science. It is argued that this philosophy extended to more overt (...)
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  5. S. Hyman (forthcoming). Ethical Issues in Pharmacology: Research and Practice. Neuroethics. Mapping the Field. Dana Press, New York.
     
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  6.  4
    David Tkach (2014). What Makes Life Worth Living: On Pharmacology. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (5):788-792.
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  7.  1
    Saskia Klerk (2014). The Trouble with Opium. Taste, Reason and Experience in Late Galenic Pharmacology with Special Regard to the University of Leiden. Early Science and Medicine 19 (4):287-316.
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  8.  4
    R. Abbinnett (2015). The Politics of Spirit in Stiegler's Techno-Pharmacology. Theory, Culture and Society 32 (4):65-80.
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  9.  2
    M. R. C. David (2007). The Cult of Pharmacology: How America Became the World's Most Troubled Drug Culture (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (3):467-471.
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  10.  4
    Paola S. Timiras (1995). Political Pharmacology: Thinking About Drugs. History of European Ideas 21 (2):302-303.
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  11.  4
    Sean Ekins (2002). Indianapolis, USA. He Received His Ph. D. In Clinical Pharmaco-Logy at the University of Aberdeen, M. Sc. In Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Aberdeen and His HND in Applied Biology. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 7:497-500.
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  12.  13
    David Healy (2007). The Cult of Pharmacology: How America Became the World's Most Troubled Drug Culture (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (3):467-471.
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  13.  1
    Herbert H. Jasper (1981). EEG, Pharmacology, and Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):482.
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  14.  1
    S. M. Stern (1965). Mediaeval Arabic Bookmaking and its Relation to Early Chemistry and Pharmacology. History of Science 4:151.
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  15.  13
    Stephen T. Higgins & Stacey C. Sigmon (2000). Implications of Behavioral Momentum for Understanding the Behavioral Pharmacology of Abused Drugs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):101-101.
    We briefly discuss some potential contributions of behavioral momentum research to the study of the behavioral effects of abused drugs. Contributions to the study of the direct effects of drugs on operant responding and to the study of drugs as reinforcers are addressed. Too little empirical evidence is available to thoroughly evaluate the relevance of behavioral momentum concepts to the study of drugs and behavior, but we note several reasons for optimism regarding its potential to make positive contributions.
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  16.  3
    G. Paul Bolwell (1990). Plant Polyphenols: Vegetable Tannins Revisited (1989). By E. Haslam. Chemistry and Pharmacology of Natural Products (J. D. Phillipson, D. C. Ayres and H. Baxter, Eds). Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, Pp. 230, £35/$70. [REVIEW] Bioessays 12 (9):453-453.
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  17.  2
    Ilan Golani (1994). The Practicality of Using the Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation in Behavioral Pharmacology and Kinesics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):754.
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  18.  2
    Paul Lechat (1988). Pharmacology, the Golden Bridge Between Biology and Medicine. Bioessays 8 (5):139-140.
  19.  6
    W. Paton (1983). Vivisection, Morals, Medicine: Commentary From a Vivisecting Professor of Pharmacology. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (2):102-104.
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  20.  1
    Michael B. Sporn (1991). Peptide Hormones. Peptide Hormones as Prohormones: Processing, Biological Activity, Pharmacology. Edited by Jean Martinez. Ellis Horwood, Chichester, 1989. 354pp. £45, $88. [REVIEW] Bioessays 13 (10):556-556.
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  21.  4
    David Healy (2007). The Cult of Pharmacology: How America Became the World's Most Troubled Drug Culture (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (3):467-471.
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  22.  1
    Kavita Sekhri (2012). Teaching Methodologies in Pharmacology: A Survey of Students′ Perceptions and Experiences. Journal of Education and Ethics in Dentistry 2 (1):40.
  23.  1
    Marsha Rosengarten (2004). Consumer Activism in the Pharmacology of HIV. Body and Society 10 (1):91-107.
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  24.  1
    C. F. Juritz (1905). Some Notes Regarding South African Pharmacology. Transactions of the South African Philosophical Society 16 (1):111-133.
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  25.  1
    J. K. Shepherd & C. T. Dourish (1994). Implications of Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation for Behavioural Pharmacology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):754.
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  26. Earl Barker, Eugene Braunwald, K. K. Chen, Joseph R. DiPalma, Edward Freis, Magnus I. Gregersen, Niels Haugaard, Orville Horwitz, Hugh Montgomery & Neil C. Moran (1965). Pharmacology (Heart and Vascular System). In Karl W. Linsenmann (ed.), Proceedings. St. Louis, Lutheran Academy for Scholarship
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  27. Mark B. N. Hansen (2016). Bernard Stiegler.What Makes Life Worth Living: On Pharmacology. Trans. Daniel Ross. Cambridge: Polity, 2013. 200 Pp.For a New Critique of Political Economy. Trans. Daniel Ross. Cambridge: Polity 2010. 100 Pp. [REVIEW] Critical Inquiry 42 (2):421-422.
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  28. François Dagognet (2009). Pharmacology as a Physical Object. In A. Brenner & J. Gayon (eds.), French Studies in the Philosophy of Science: Contemporary Research in France. Springer 276--189.
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  29. D. Healy (2008). The Cult of Pharmacology: How America Became the World's Most Troubled Drug Culture by Richard DeGrandpre. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (3):467.
     
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  30. I. E. Hughes (1999). Instant Pharmacology, By K. Saeb-Parsy, RG Assomull, FZ Kahn, K. Saeb-Parsy, and E. Kelly. Bioessays 21:980-981.
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  31. I. E. Hughes (1999). Instant Success for Instant Pharmacology. Bioessays 21 (11):980-981.
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  32. Chauncey Leake (1965). Readings in Pharmacology by B. Holmstedt; G. Liljestrand. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 56:467-469.
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  33. Rosengarten Marsha (2004). Consumer Activism in the Pharmacology of Hiv. Body and Society 10 (1).
     
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  34. Ian L. Martin (1988). Molecular Recognition and Pharmacology Molecular Foundations of Drug‐Receptor Ineraction. By P. M. DEAN. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1988. Pp. 381. £45.00; £75.00. [REVIEW] Bioessays 9 (6):216-218.
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  35. Carl F. Schmidt (1962). Pharmacology and Cardiovascular Reflexes. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 5 (2):207-219.
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  36. Gianluca Tosini, Sharon Owino, Jean-Luc Guillaume & Ralf Jockers (2014). Understanding Melatonin Receptor Pharmacology: Latest Insights From Mouse Models, and Their Relevance to Human Disease. Bioessays 36 (8):778-787.
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  37. Sabine Vogt (2008). Pharmacology. In R. J. Hankinson (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Galen. Cambridge University Press
     
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  38. Thomas S. Winokur (1992). Towards a Molecular Pharmacology. Clinical Applications of TGF‐Β (1991) [CIBA Foundation Symposium 157]. Edited by G. R. Bock and J. Marsh. John Wiley & Sons, Chichester. 254pp. £35.95. [REVIEW] Bioessays 14 (7):504-505.
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  39. D. W. Woolley (1958). The Revolution in Pharmacology. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 1 (2):174-197.
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  40.  5
    A. R. Singh (2010). Modern Medicine: Towards Prevention, Cure, Well-Being and Longevity. Mens Sana Monographs 8 (1):17.
    Modern medicine has done much in the fields of infectious diseases and emergencies to aid cure. In most other fields, it is mostly control that it aims for, which is another name for palliation. Pharmacology, psychopharmacology included, is mostly directed towards such control and palliation too. The thrust, both of clinicians and research, must now turn decisively towards prevention and cure. Also, longevity with well-being is modern medicine's other big challenge. Advances in vaccines for hypertension, diabetes, cancers etc, deserve (...)
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  41. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2012). Intervention, Causal Reasoning, and the Neurobiology of Mental Disorders: Pharmacological Drugs as Experimental Instruments. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):542-551.
    In psychiatry, pharmacological drugs play an important experimental role in attempts to identify the neurobiological causes of mental disorders. Besides being developed in applied contexts as potential treatments for patients with mental disorders, pharmacological drugs play a crucial role in research contexts as experimental instruments that facilitate the formulation and revision of neurobiological theories of psychopathology. This paper examines the various epistemic functions that pharmacological drugs serve in the discovery, refinement, testing, and elaboration of neurobiological theories of mental disorders. I (...)
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  42.  15
    Leigh N. Chipman & Efraim Lev (2008). Take a Lame and Decrepit Female Hyena_…: A Genizah Study of Two Additional Fragments of Sābūr Ibn Sahl's _al-Aqrābādhīn Al-Saghīr. Early Science and Medicine 13 (4):361-383.
    Sābūr ibn Sahl's al-Aqrābādhīn al-saghīr is the earliest Arabic pharmacopoeia known to have survived. Finding fragments of Sābūr's pharmacopoeia in the Cairo Genizah shows that it was used by the medical practitioners of the Jewish community of Cairo, possibly long after it is supposed to have been superceded by other works. We present here a synoptic edition of two Arabic fragments, T-S Ar. 40.5 and Ar. 41.90. These fragments overlap to a large extent, but are not exactly the same. We (...)
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  43.  11
    Efraim Lev & Leigh Chipman (2008). Take a Lame and Decrepit Female Hyena…: A Genizah Study of Two Additional Fragments of Sābūr Ibn Sahl's Al-Aqrābādhīn Al-Saghīr. Early Science and Medicine 13 (4):361-383.
    Sābūr ibn Sahl's al-Aqrābādhīn al-saghīr is the earliest Arabic pharmacopoeia known to have survived. Finding fragments of Sābūr's pharmacopoeia in the Cairo Genizah shows that it was used by the medical practitioners of the Jewish community of Cairo, possibly long after it is supposed to have been superceded by other works. We present here a synoptic edition of two Arabic fragments, T-S Ar. 40.5 and Ar. 41.90. These fragments overlap to a large extent, but are not exactly the same. We (...)
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  44.  4
    Bernadette Bensaude Vincent & Sacha Loeve (2014). Metaphors in Nanomedicine: The Case of Targeted Drug Delivery. NanoEthics 8 (1):1-17.
    The promises of nanotechnology have been framed by a variety of metaphors, that not only channel the attention of the public, orient the questions asked by researchers, and convey epistemic choices closely linked to ethical preferences. In particular, the image of the ‘therapeutic missile’ commonly used to present targeted drug delivery devices emphasizes precision, control, surveillance and efficiency. Such values are highly praised in the current context of crisis of pharmaceutical innovation where military metaphors foster a general mobilization of resources (...)
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  45.  12
    Sabine Maasen (2007). Selves in Turmoil. In J. Scott Jordan & Dawn M. McBride (eds.), Journal of Consciousness Studies. Imprint Academic 252-270.
    As the cognitive neurosciences set out to challenge our understanding of consciousness, the existing conceptual panoply of meanings attached to the term remains largely unaccounted for. By way of bibliometric analysis, the following study first reveals the breadth and shift of meanings over the last decades, the main tendency being a more 'brainy' concept of consciousness. On this basis, the emergence of consciousness studies is regarded as a 'trading zone' in which experimental, philosophical and experiential accounts are dialectically engaged. Outside (...)
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  46. Dagmar Koethe, Christoph W. Gerth, Miriam A. Neatby, Anita Haensel, Martin Thies, Udo Schneider, Hinderk M. Emrich, Joachim Klosterkötter, Frauke Schultze-Lutter & F. Markus Leweke (2006). Disturbances of Visual Information Processing in Early States of Psychosis and Experimental Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Altered States of Consciousness. Schizophrenia Research 88 (1-3):142-150.
     
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  47. Isaac Marks (1987). Fears, Phobias, and Rituals. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This book draws on fields as diverse as biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, psychology, psychiatry, and ethology, to form a fascinating synthesis of information on the nature of fear and of panic and anxiety disorders. Dr. Marks offers both a detailed discussion of the clinical aspects of fear-related syndromes and a broad exploration of the sources and mechanisms of fear and defensive behavior. Dealing first with normal fear, he establishes a firm, scientific basis for understanding it. He then presents a thorough (...)
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  48.  10
    Cindy Patton & Hye Jin Kim (2012). The Cost of Science. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (3):295-310.
    Over the past decade AIDS research has turned toward the use of pharmacology in HIV prevention, including pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP): the use of HIV medication as a means of preventing HIV acquisition in those who do not have it. This paper explores the contradictory reasons offered in support of PrEP—to empower women, to provide another risk-reduction option for gay men—as the context for understanding the social meaning of the experimental trials that appear to show that PrEP works in gay (...)
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  49.  52
    Michael Jacovides (2002). The Epistemology Under Locke's Corpuscularianism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 84 (2):161-189.
    The intelligibility of our artifacts suggests to many seventeenth century thinkers that nature works along analogous lines, that the same principles that explain the operations of artifacts explain the operations of natural bodies.1 We may call this belief ‘corpuscularianism’ when conjoined with the premise that the details of the analogy depend upon the sub-microscopic textures of ordinary bodies and upon the rapidly moving, imperceptibly tiny corpuscles that surround these bodies.2 Locke’s sympathy for corpuscularianism comes out clearly where he describes the (...)
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  50.  27
    F. M. Kamm (2002). Genes, Justice, and Obligations to Future People. Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):360-388.
    In this essay, I shall discuss ethical issues that arise with our increasing ability to affect the genetic makeup of the human population. These effects can be produced directly by altering the genotype , or indirectly by aborting, not conceiving, or treating individuals because of their genetic makeup in ways made possible by genetic pharmacology. I shall refer to all of these sorts of procedures collectively as the Procedures. Some of the ethical issues the Procedures raise are old, arising (...)
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