Search results for 'philosophy of neuroscience' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Bickle, Pete Mandik & Anthony Landreth, The Philosophy of Neuroscience. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 750.0
    Over the past three decades, philosophy of science has grown increasingly “local.” Concerns have switched from general features of scientific practice to concepts, issues, and puzzles specific to particular disciplines. Philosophy of neuroscience is a natural result. This emerging area was also spurred by remarkable recent growth in the neurosciences. Cognitive and computational neuroscience continues to encroach upon issues traditionally addressed within the humanities, including the nature of consciousness, action, knowledge, and normativity. Empirical discoveries about brain (...)
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  2. Carsten Held, Markus Knauff & Gottfried Vosgerau (eds.) (2006). Mental Models and the Mind: Current Developments in Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. Elsevier.score: 696.0
    "Cognitive psychology," "cognitive neuroscience," and "philosophy of mind" are names for three very different scientific fields, but they label aspects of the same scientific goal: to understand the nature of mental phenomena. Today, the three disciplines strongly overlap under the roof of the cognitive sciences. The book's purpose is to present views from the different disciplines on one of the central theories in cognitive science: the theory of mental models. Cognitive psychologists report their research on the representation and (...)
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  3. Ian Gold & Daniel Stoljar (1999). A Neuron Doctrine in the Philosophy of Neuroscience. Behavioral And Brain Sciences 22 (5):809-830.score: 666.0
    It is widely held that a successful theory of the mind will be neuroscientific. In this paper we ask, first, what this claim means, and, secondly, whether it is true. In answer to the first question, we argue that the claim is ambiguous between two views–one plausible but unsubstantive, and one substantive but highly controversial. In answer to the second question, we argue that neither the evidence from neuroscience itself nor from other scientific and philosophical considerations supports the controversial (...)
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  4. Michel Weber & Anderson Weekes (eds.) (2010). Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. State University of New York Press.score: 636.0
    This collection opens a dialogue between process philosophy and contemporary consciousness studies. Approaching consciousness from diverse disciplinary perspectives—philosophy, psychology, neuroscience, neuropathology, psychotherapy, biology, animal ethology, and physics—the contributors offer empirical and philosophical support for a model of consciousness inspired by the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead (1861–1947). Whitehead’s model is developed in ways he could not have anticipated to show how it can advance current debates beyond well-known sticking points. This has trenchant consequences for epistemology (...)
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  5. John Bickle (ed.) (2009). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.score: 558.0
    The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience is a state-of-the-art collection of interdisciplinary research spanning philosophy (of science, mind, and ...
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  6. John Bickle (2005). Precis of Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (3):231-238.score: 540.0
    This book precis describes the motives behind my recent attempt to bring to bear “ruthlessly reductive” results from cellular and molecular neuroscience onto issues in the philosophy of mind. Since readers of this journal will probably be most interested in results addressing features of conscious experience, I highlight these most prominently. My main challenge is that philosophers (even scientifically-inspired ones) are missing the nature and scope of reductionism in contemporary neuroscience by focusing exclusively on higher-level cognitive (...), and ignoring the discipline's cell-physiological and molecular-biological core. (shrink)
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  7. Huib L. de Jong & Maurice K. D. Schouten (2005). Ruthless Reductionism: A Review Essay of John Bickle's Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):473-486.score: 540.0
    John Bickle's new book on philosophy and neuroscience is aptly subtitled 'a ruthlessly reductive account'. His 'new wave metascience' is a massive attack on the relative autonomy that psychology enjoyed until recently, and goes even beyond his previous (Bickle, J. (1998). Psychoneural reduction: The new wave. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.) new wave reductionsism. Reduction of functional psychology to (cognitive) neuroscience is no longer ruthless enough; we should now look rather to cellular or molecular neuroscience at the (...)
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  8. Patricia Smith Churchland, The Impact of Neuroscience on Philosophy.score: 522.0
    Philosophy, in its traditional guise, addresses questions where experimental science has not yet nailed down plausible explanatory theories. Thus, the ancient Greeks pondered the nature of life, the sun, and tides, but also how we learn and make decisions. The history of science can be seen as a gradual process whereby speculative philosophy cedes intellectual space to increasingly wellgrounded experimental disciplines—first astronomy, but followed by physics, chemistry, geology, biology, archaeology, and more recently, ethology, psychology, and neuroscience. Science (...)
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  9. Philipp Koralus (forthcoming). Can Visual Cognitive Neuroscience Learn Anything From the Philosophy of Language? Ambiguity and the Topology of Neural Network Models of Multistable Perception. Synthese:1-24.score: 522.0
    The Necker cube and the productive class of related stimuli involving multiple depth interpretations driven by corner-like line junctions are often taken to be ambiguous. This idea is normally taken to be as little in need of defense as the claim that the Necker cube gives rise to multiple distinct percepts. In the philosophy of language, it is taken to be a substantive question whether a stimulus that affords multiple interpretations is a case of ambiguity. If we take into (...)
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  10. Axel Seemann (ed.) (2012). Joint Attention: New Developments in Psychology, Philosophy of Mind, and Social Neuroscience. The Mit Press.score: 522.0
    The writers for this volume address these and related questions by drawing on a variety of disciplines, including developmental and comparative psychology, philosophy of mind, and social neuroscience.
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  11. Edward M. Hundert (1989). Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Neuroscience: Three Approaches to the Mind: A Synthetic Analysis of the Varieties of Human Experience. Oxford University Press.score: 498.0
    In this book Hundert proposes a new, unified view of the mind, one that integrates the insights of philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists. Through a detailed discussion of major theories from these and related disciplines, he gradually reveals links between what were previously unconnected approaches to human thought and experience.
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  12. Carl F. Craver & David M. Kaplan (2011). Towards a Mechanistic Philosophy of Neuroscience. In Steven French & Juha Saatsi (eds.), Continuum Companion to the Philosophy of Science. Continuum. 268.score: 492.0
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  13. A. Goldman (2006/2008). Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience of Mindreading. Oxford University Press.score: 486.0
    People are minded creatures; we have thoughts, feelings and emotions. More intriguingly, we grasp our own mental states, and conduct the business of ascribing them to ourselves and others without instruction in formal psychology. How do we do this? And what are the dimensions of our grasp of the mental realm? In this book, Alvin I. Goldman explores these questions with the tools of philosophy, developmental psychology, social psychology and cognitive neuroscience. He refines an approach called simulation theory, (...)
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  14. Olivier Houdé (ed.) (2004). Dictionary of Cognitive Science: Neuroscience, Psychology, Artificial Intelligence, Linguistics, and Philosophy. Psychology Press.score: 486.0
    A translation of the renowned French reference book, Vocabulaire de sciences cognitives , the Dictionary of Cognitive Science presents comprehensive definitions of more than 120 terms. The editor and advisory board of specialists have brought together 60 internationally recognized scholars to give the reader a comprehensive understanding of the most current and dynamic thinking in cognitive science. Topics range from Abduction to Writing, and each entry covers its subject from as many perspectives as possible within the domains of psychology, artificial (...)
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  15. Bickle John, Mandik Peter & Anthony Landreth (2007). The Philosophy of Neuroscience. In Thaddeus Metz (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 486.0
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  16. Nathaniel F. Barrett (2011). Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 32 (2):197-200.score: 480.0
    I imagine that many readers of AJTP will find it hard to get excited about a new collection of essays about consciousness from the process perspective, no matter how good it is purported to be, because they are bored with the so-called "problem of consciousness" and uninterested in playing the role of the choir for what looks like a lot of old-fashioned Whiteheadian preaching. But in fact this book was conceived with the intention to do much more than preach to (...)
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  17. Peter Godfrey-Smith & Kim Sterelny (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Developmental Systems Perspective in the Philosophy of Biology-Development, Evolution, and Adaptation. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  18. Peter Godfrey-Smith & James Griesemer (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Developmental Systems Perspective in the Philosophy of Biology-Development, Culture, and the Units of Inheritance. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  19. Peter Godfrey-Smith & Susan Oyama (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Developmental Systems Perspective in the Philosophy of Biology-Causal Democracy and Causal Contributions in Developmental Systems Theory. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  20. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Developmental Systems Perspective in the Philosophy of Biology-Explanatory Symmetries, Preformation, and Developmental Systems Theory. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  21. Gary Hatfield & Brian L. Keely (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-Studies in the Interaction of Psychology and Neuroscience-Neuroethology and the Philosophy of Cognitive Science. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  22. Gary Hatfield (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-Studies in the Interaction of Psychology and Neuroscience-The Brain's New Science: Psychology, Neurophysiology, and Constraint. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  23. Gary Hatfield & William Hirstein (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-Studies in the Interaction of Psychology and Neuroscience-Self-Deception and Confabulation. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  24. Manfred D. Laubichier & Kenneth F. Schaffner (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Organism in Philosophical Focus-Behavior at the Organismal and Molecular Levels: The Case of C. Elegans. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  25. Manfred D. Laubichier & Jack A. Wilson (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Organism in Philosophical Focus-Ontological Butchery: Organism Concepts and Biological Generalizations. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  26. Manfred D. Laubichier, Manfred D. Laubichler & Gunter P. Wagner (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Organism in Philosophical Focus-Organism and Character Decomposition: Steps Towards an Integrative Theory of Biology. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  27. Manfred D. Laubichier & Rachel A. Ankeny (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Organism in Philosophical Focus-Fashioning Descriptive Models in Biology: Of Worms and Wiring Diagrams. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  28. Steven Savitt & Mark Hinchliff (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-The Prospects for Presentism in Spacetime Theories-A Defense of Presentism in a Relativistic Setting. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  29. Eric Scerri & Andrea I. Woody (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-Philosophy of Chemistry-Putting Quantum Mechanics to Work in Chemistry: The Power of Diagrammatic Representation. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  30. J. R. Smythies (1993). The Impact of Contemporary Neuroscience and Introspection Psychology on the Philosophy of Perception. In Edmond Leo Wright (ed.), New Representationalisms: Essays in the Philosophy of Perception. Brookfield: Avebury. 205--31.score: 477.0
  31. Andrew Wayne & Gordon N. Fleming (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-Conceptual Foundations of Field Theories in Physics-Reeh-Schlieder Meets Newton-Wigner. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  32. Andrew Wayne & Sunny Y. Auyang (2000). Philosophy of Biology, Psychology, and Neuroscience-Conceptual Foundations of Field Theories in Physics-Mathematics and Reality: Two Notions of Spacetime in the Analytic and Constructionist Views. Philosophy of Science 67 (3).score: 477.0
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  33. Ian Gold (2003). Philosophy of Neuroscience. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.score: 459.0
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  34. Stephen Asma, Jaak Panksepp, Rami Gabriel & Glennon Curran (2012). Philosophical Implications of Affective Neuroscience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (3-4):6-48.score: 450.0
    These papers are based on a Symposium at the COGSCI Conference in 2010. 1. Naturalizing the Mammalian Mind (Jaak Panksepp) 2. Modularity in Cognitive Psychology and Affective Neuroscience (Rami Gabriel) 3. Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self (Stephen Asma and Tom Greif) 4. Affective Neuroscience and Law (Glennon Curran and Rami Gabriel).
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  35. N. Gangopadhyay (2011). Alvin I. Goldman * Simulating Minds: The Philosophy, Psychology and Neuroscience of Mindreading. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (2):437-441.score: 447.0
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  36. Matthew R. Broome (2005). Suffering and Eternal Recurrence of the Same: The Neuroscience, Psychopathology, and Philosophy of Time. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):187-194.score: 444.0
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  37. Stephen T. Asma (2012). Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19.score: 444.0
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  38. José E. Burgos & John W. Donahoe (2006). Of What Value is Philosophy to Science? Areview of Max R. Bennett and Pms Hacker's Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience (Malden, Ma: Blackwell. Behavior and Philosophy 34:71-87.score: 444.0
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  39. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.) (2008). Moral Philosophy Vol. 3: The Neuroscience of Morality. MIT Press.score: 441.0
    For much of the twentieth century, philosophy and science went their separate ways. In moral philosophy, fear of the so-called naturalistic fallacy kept moral philosophers from incorporating developments in biology and psychology. Since the 1990s, however, many philosophers have drawn on recent advances in cognitive psychology, brain science, and evolutionary psychology to inform their work. This collaborative trend is especially strong in moral philosophy, and these three volumes bring together some of the most innovative work by both (...)
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  40. Fred Adams (2007). Review of Andrew Brook, Kathleen Akins (Eds.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (2).score: 435.0
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  41. Geert J. M. van Boxtel & Herman C. D. G. de Regt (2010). Cognitive-Neuroscience Approaches to Issues of Philosophy-of-Mind. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):460-461.score: 435.0
  42. Gary Hatfield (2010). Review of John Bickle (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (5).score: 435.0
  43. David Skrbina (2013). Process Approaches To Consciousness In Psychology, Neuroscience, And Philosophy Of Mind by Michel Weber And Anderson Weekes, Eds. Process Studies 41 (2):358-362.score: 435.0
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  44. Huib Looren de Jong & Maurice K. D. Schouten (2005). Ruthless Reductionism: A Review Essay of John Bickle's Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account. Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):473-486.score: 435.0
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  45. John Bickle (2008). Real Reduction in Real Neuroscience : Metascience, Not Philosophy of Science (and Certainly Not Metaphysics!). In Jakob Hohwy & Jesper Kallestrup (eds.), Being Reduced: New Essays on Reduction, Explanation, and Causation. Oxford University Press.score: 435.0
  46. H. Looren De Jong, Ruthless Reductionism: Review Essay of John Bickle - Philosophy and Neuroscience.score: 435.0
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  47. Iris Ticac (2011). The Freedom From the Perspective of Philosophy and Neuroscience The Critics B. Liberts, G. Roths and W. Singers. Filozofska Istrazivanja 31 (2):335-352.score: 435.0
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  48. Stephan Zimmermann (2010). In Terms of Free Will Kant and the Border Disputes Between Philosophy and Neuroscience. Philosophische Rundschau 57 (3):272 - 290.score: 435.0
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  49. Christopher J. Frost & Augustus R. Lumia (2012). The Ethics of Neuroscience and the Neuroscience of Ethics: A Phenomenological–Existential Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):457-474.score: 426.0
    Advances in the neurosciences have many implications for a collective understanding of what it means to be human, in particular, notions of the self, the concept of volition or agency, questions of individual responsibility, and the phenomenology of consciousness. As the ability to peer directly into the brain is scientifically honed, and conscious states can be correlated with patterns of neural processing, an easy—but premature—leap is to postulate a one-way, brain-based determinism. That leap is problematic, however, and emerging findings in (...)
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