Search results for 'phonology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elena Simonato (2008). 'Social Phonology' in the Ussr in the 1920s. Studies in East European Thought 60 (4):339 - 347.score: 24.0
    In the 1920s and 1930s, some of the most talented linguists of the Soviet Union, among whom one can highlight N.F. Jakovlev and E.D. Polivanov, were involved in the process of “language building”. Their role in the success of this process is examined from the point of view of the phonological theory that they developed for creating scripts for the numerous peoples of the Soviet Union, Turkic and Caucasian above all. Jakovlev’s phonology, that Polivanov termed “social phonology”, was (...)
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  2. Amanda Seidl (2001). Minimal Indirect Reference: A Theory of the Syntax-Phonology Interface. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This book investigates the nature of the relationship between phonology and syntax and proposes a theory of Minimal Indirect Reference that solves many classic problems relating to the topic. Seidl shows that all variation across languages in phonological domain size is due to syntactic differences and a single domain parameter specific to phonology.
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  3. Lisa Davidson (2006). Phonotactics and Articulatory Coordination Interact in Phonology: Evidence From Nonnative Production. Cognitive Science 30 (5):837-862.score: 21.0
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  4. Colin Wilson (2006). Learning Phonology With Substantive Bias: An Experimental and Computational Study of Velar Palatalization. Cognitive Science 30 (5):945-982.score: 21.0
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  5. Jiayu Zhan, Hongbo Yu & Xiaolin Zhou (2013). fMRI Evidence for the Interaction Between Orthography and Phonology in Reading Chinese Compound Words. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
  6. Bencie Woll & Jechil S. Sieratzki (1998). Echo Phonology: Signs of a Link Between Gesture and Speech. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):531-532.score: 18.0
    This commentary supports MacNeilage's dismissal of an evolutionary development from sign language to spoken language but presents evidence of a feature in sign language (echo phonology) that links iconic signs to abstract vocal syllables. These data provide an insight into possible mechanism by which iconic manual gestures accompanied by vocalisation could have provided a route for the evolution of spoken language with its characteristically arbitrary form–meaning relationship.
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  7. Paul Kiparsky, The Amphichronic Program Vs. Evolutionary Phonology.score: 18.0
    Evolutionary Phonology. Evolutionary Phonology seeks to derive typological generalizations from recurrent patterns of language change, themselves assumed to be rooted in perception, production, and acquisition. The goal is to eliminate UG by providing diachronic explanations for the cross-linguistic evidence that has been used to motivate it. (2) shows a schema of this program, where the arrows can be read as “explains” and/or “constrains”.
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  8. Lorenzo Peña, Phonology.score: 18.0
    Phonemes are minimal segments within the spoken message whose presence is relevant for distinguishing one message from a different one with another meaning. Each phoneme underlies different phonetic realizations. What sets a phoneme from another is fuzzy cluster of the fuzzy features. Thus the study of phonemic structures is likely to have much to gain from a gradualistic approach. Through a gradualistic treatment synchronic phonology could tally with the diachronic study in a simpler way than is customary. In this (...)
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  9. Marisol Henríquez & Gastón Salamanca (2012). Prominent Features Of Chedungun' Segmental Phonology Spoken By Alto Bío-Bío Students. Alpha (Osorno) 34 (34):153-171.score: 18.0
    En este artículo se presenta una descripción del sistema fonológico del mapudungun hablado por escolares pehuenches de la VIII Región del Bío-Bío. Este sistema fonológico se compara con el que se presenta en las descripciones fonemáticas existentes del mapudungun en general y de la variante pehuenche en particular. Los colaboradores corresponden a un grupo de 20 escolares de entre 12 y 15 años que cursan 7° y 8° año básico en escuelas rurales adscritas al Programa de Educación Intercultural Bilingüe (PEIB) (...)
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  10. Giordana Grossi (1999). Which Phonology? Evidence for a Dissociation Between Articulatory and Auditory Phonology From Word-Form Deafness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):290-291.score: 16.0
    Pulvermüller's Hebbian model implies that an impairment in the word form system will affect phonological articulation and phonological comprehension, because there is only a single representation. Clinical evidence from patients with word-form deafness demonstrates a dissociation between input and output phonologies. These data suggest that auditory comprehension and articulatory production depend on discrete phonological representations localized in different cortical networks.
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  11. Virginia A. Marchman (1997). Children's Frequency , Productivity Phonology, in the and English Past Tense : The Role of Neighborhood Structure. Cognitive Science 21 (3):283-304.score: 16.0
    The productive use of English past tense morphology in school-aged children (N= 74; 3 years, 8 months to 13 years, 5 months) is explored using on elicited production task. Errors represented 20% of the responses overall. Virtually all of the children demonstrated productivity with regular (e.g., good) and irregular patterns (zero-marking, e.g., sit + sit; vowel-change, e.g., ride -+ rid). Overall frequency of errors decreased with age, yet the tendency for certain types of irregularizations increased in the older groups. Analyses (...)
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  12. Andrew Nevins (2009). On Formal Universals in Phonology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):461-462.score: 16.0
    Understanding the universal aspects of human language structure requires comparison at multiple levels of analysis. While Evans & Levinson (E&L) focus mostly on substantive variation in language, equally revealing insights can come from studying formal universals. I first discuss how Artificial Grammar Experiments can test universal preferences for certain types of abstract phonological generalizations over others. I then discuss moraic onsets in the language Arrernte, and how its apparent substantive variation ultimately rests on a formal universal regarding syllable-weight sensitivity.
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  13. John Coleman & John Local (1991). The “No Crossing Constraint” in Autosegmental Phonology. Linguistics and Philosophy 14 (3):295 - 338.score: 15.0
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  14. Tadeusz Batóg (1969). A Reduction in the Number of Primitive Concepts of Phonology. Studia Logica 25 (1):55 - 60.score: 15.0
  15. Charles Hulme & Margaret Snowling (1991). Deficits in Output Phonology Cause Developmental Phonological Dyslexia. Mind and Language 6 (2):130-134.score: 15.0
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  16. J. H. W. Penney (1984). A New Grammar of Attic Inscriptions Leslie Threatte: The Grammar of Attic Inscriptions, I: Phonology. Pp. Xxxv+737. Berlin–New York: De Gruyter, 1980. DM. 330. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 34 (01):71-73.score: 15.0
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  17. Hoyt Alverson (2007). Phonology and the Foundations of Levi-Strauss'structuralism. American Journal of Semiotics 2 (4):99-123.score: 15.0
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  18. Lise Menn (1998). A Multi-Modal, Emergent View of the Development of Syllables in Early Phonology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):523-524.score: 15.0
    A narrow focus on the jaw (or on motor generators) does not account for individual and language-specific differences in babbling and early speech. Furthermore, data from Yoshinaga-Itano's laboratory support earlier findings that show glottal rather than oral stops in deaf infants' babbling: audition is crucial for developing normal syllables.
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  19. Régine Kolinsky, Pascale Lidji, Isabelle Peretz, Mireille Besson & José Morais (2009). Processing Interactions Between Phonology and Melody: Vowels Sing but Consonants Speak. Cognition 112 (1):1-20.score: 15.0
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  20. L. R. Palmer (1940). Greek Phonology and Morphology E. Schwyzer: Grieckische Grammatik. 2te Lieferung: Wortbildung und Flexion. (Handbuch der Altertumswissenschaft II. i. 1. 2.) Pp. xlvii, 415–842. Munich: Beck, 1939. Paper, RM. 25. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (02):101-102.score: 15.0
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  21. Tadeusz Batóg (1962). A Contribution to Axiomatic Phonology. Studia Logica 13 (1):67 - 80.score: 15.0
  22. Tadeusz Batóg (1961). Critical Remarks on Greenberg's Axiomatic Phonology. Studia Logica 12 (1):195 - 205.score: 15.0
  23. A. J. Beattie (1954). Winfred P. Lehmann: Proto-Indo-European Phonology. Pp. Xv+129. Austin: University of Texas Press and Linguistic Society of America, 1952. Cloth, $4. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 4 (02):173-174.score: 15.0
  24. A. Morpurgo Davies (1976). Attic Phonology Alan H. Sommerstein: The Sound Pattern of Ancient Greek. (Publications of the Philological Society, Xxiii.) Pp. Viii + 216. Oxford: Blackwell, 1973. Cloth, £4·50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 26 (01):87-88.score: 15.0
  25. Elizabeth Jackson (1911). A Mexican-Aryan Comparative Vocabulary. The Radicals of the Mexican or Navatl Language, with Their Cognates in the Aryan Languages of the Old World, Chiefly Sanskrit, Greek, Latin, Germanic. By T. S. Denison, A.M., Author of Mexican in Aryan Phonology, The Primitive Aryans of America. 8vo. Pp. 110. Chicago (163, Randolph Street), T. M. Denison. 1909. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 25 (08):266-267.score: 15.0
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  26. Philomen Probert (2006). (M.) Slavova Phonology of the Greek Inscriptions in Bulgaria. (Palingenesia 83). Stuttgart: Steiner, 2004. Pp. 149. €38. 351508598X. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 126:205-206.score: 15.0
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  27. Robert Browning (1979). A Grammar of Greek Papyri F. T. Gignac: A Grammar of the Greek Papyri of the Roman and Byzantine Periods, Volume I: Phonology. Pp. Viii + 365. Milan: Cisalpino·La Goliardica, 1976. Boards, L. 36,000. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 29 (01):92-94.score: 15.0
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  28. J. C. Brown & Chris Golston (2006). Embedded Structure and the Evolution of Phonology. Interaction Studies 7 (1):17-41.score: 15.0
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  29. Kimberly Wright Cassidy, Michael H. Kelly & Lee'at J. Sharoni (1999). Inferring Gender From Name Phonology. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 128 (3):362.score: 15.0
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  30. Anna Morpurgo Davies & S. -T. Teodorsson (1981). The Phonemic System of the Attic Dialect 400-340 B.C.The Phonology of Ptolemaic Koine. Journal of Hellenic Studies 101:176.score: 15.0
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  31. Robert D. Hoberman (forthcoming). The Phonology of Pharyngeals and Pharyngealization in Pre-Modern Aramaic. Journal of the American Oriental Society.score: 15.0
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  32. Timmer Kalinka (2011). Second Language Phonology is Active When Using Your First Language. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 15.0
  33. Virginia A. Marchman (1997). Children's Productivity in the English Past Tense: The Role of Frequency, Phonology, and Neighborhood Structure. Cognitive Science 21 (3):283-304.score: 15.0
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  34. H. W. Penney (1978). The Phonology and Morphology of Ancient Greek Helmut Rix: Historische Grammatik des Griechischen. Laut- Und Formenlehre. Pp. Xx + 297. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1976. Cloth, DM. 69 (for Members DM. 39.50). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):290-292.score: 15.0
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  35. Alan H. Sommerstein & L. Threatte (1982). The Grammar of Attic Inscriptions. 1. Phonology. Journal of Hellenic Studies 102:256.score: 15.0
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  36. Catherine P. Browman & Louis Goldstein (1995). Dynamics and Articulatory Phonology. In T. Van Gelder & Robert Port (eds.), Mind as Motion. Mit Press. 175--193.score: 15.0
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  37. W. South Coblin (2003). The Chiehyunn System and the Current State of Chinese Historical Phonology. Journal of the American Oriental Society 123 (2):377.score: 15.0
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  38. Robert Coleman (1980). In Triviis Disperdere Carmen Ernst Pulgram: Latin-Romance Phonology: Prosodies and Metrics. (Ars Grammatica, Ed E. Coseriu, Vol. 4.) Pp. 304. Munich: Wilhelm Fink, 1975. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 30 (01):67-70.score: 15.0
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  39. R. Seymour Conway (1893). Three Books on Italic Phonology Der Vocalismus d. Oskischen Sprache, D. Buck von Carl, Koehler, Leipzig 1892. Mk. 7.50. Grammatik d. Oskisch-Umbrischen Dialekte, von Robert von Planta, Trübner, Strassburg ' 1893' (i.e. September 1892). Band I. 15 Mk. Die Oskischen i- und e- Vocale, G. von Bronisch, Harrassowitz, Leipzig 1892. 6 Mk. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 7 (10):463-470.score: 15.0
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  40. B. Elan Dresher (2005). 5 Chomsky and Halle's Revolution in Phonology. In James A. McGilvray (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Chomsky. Cambridge University Press. 102.score: 15.0
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  41. Samuel Jay Keyser & Steven Pinker (1980). Direct Vs. Representational Views of Cognition: A Parallel Between Vision and Phonology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):389.score: 15.0
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  42. Ronald Kim (forthcoming). On the Historical Phonology of Ossetic: The Origin of the Oblique Case Suffix. Journal of the American Oriental Society.score: 15.0
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  43. M. A. MacConaill (1968). The Axiomatic Method in Phonology. Philosophical Studies 17:256-260.score: 15.0
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  44. Joseph L. Malone (forthcoming). Generative Phonology and Analogical Change: The Case of the Hebrew Suffix [-xƆ̄]'You (R)'. Journal of the American Oriental Society.score: 15.0
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  45. Arlene I. Moskowitz (1973). The Acquisition of Phonology and Syntax: A Preliminary Study. In. In Jaakko Hintikka (ed.), Approaches to Natural Language. D. Reidel Publishing. 48--84.score: 15.0
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  46. L. R. Palmer (1950). Greek Phonology M. Lejeune: Traité de Fihonétique Grecque. (Collection de Philologie Classique, III.) Pp. Xvi+358. Paris: Klincksieck, 1947. Paper, 600 Fr. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 64 (02):68-69.score: 15.0
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  47. Dave Rynard & Derek Besner (1987). Basic Processes in Reading: On the Development of Cross-Case Letter Matching Without Reference to Phonology. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (5):361-363.score: 15.0
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  48. Alan H. Sommerstein (1979). Sven-Tage Teodorsson: The Phonology of Ptolemaic Koine. (Studia Graeca Et Latina Gothoburgensia, XXXVI.) Pp. 278. Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis, 1977. Paper, Sw.Kr. 125. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 29 (01):169-170.score: 15.0
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  49. Alan H. Sommerstein & S. -T. Teodorsson (1980). The Phonology of Attic in the Hellenistic Period. Journal of Hellenic Studies 100:239.score: 15.0
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  50. Stephen R. Anderson (forthcoming). An Outline of the Phonology of Modern Icelandic Vowels. Foundations of Language.score: 15.0
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