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  1. George Masterton (2012). Physical Necessity is Not Necessity Tout Court. Metaphysica 13 (2):175-182.score: 90.0
    The very last of words of Naming and Necessity are ‘The third lecture suggests that a good deal of what contemporary philosophy regards as mere physical necessity is actually necessary tout court. The question how far this can be pushed is one I leave for further work.’ Kripke (1980). To my knowledge he never conducted that further work; moreover, no one following him has wished to take up the baton either. Herein, I argue that in general, (...) necessity is neither reducible to, nor implies, tout court necessity. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that even if Kripke’s speculations are restricted to a subset of the physical necessities where it might be granted that all such are necessary tout court, physical necessity is still not reducible to tout court necessity. (shrink)
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  2. Christopher Byrne (2002). Aristotle on Physical Necessity and the Limits of Teleological Explanation. Apeiron 35 (01):19-46.score: 90.0
    Some commentators have argued that there is no room in Aristotle's natural science for simple, or unconditional, physical necessity, for the only necessity that governs all natural substances is hypothetical and teleological. Against this view I argue that, according to Aristotle, there are two types of unconditional physical necessity at work in the material elements, the one teleological, governing their natural motions, and the other non-teleological, governing their physical interaction. I argue as well that (...)
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  3. George Masterton (2012). Physical Necessity is Not Necessity Tout Court. Metaphysica 13 (2):175-182.score: 90.0
    The very last of words of Naming and Necessity are ‘The third lecture suggests that a good deal of what contemporary philosophy regards as mere physical necessity is actually necessary tout court. The question how far this can be pushed is one I leave for further work.’ Kripke (1980). To my knowledge he never conducted that further work; moreover, no one following him has wished to take up the baton either. Herein, I argue that in general, (...) necessity is neither reducible to, nor implies, tout court necessity. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that even if Kripke’s speculations are restricted to a subset of the physical necessities where it might be granted that all such are necessary tout court, physical necessity is still not reducible to tout court necessity. (shrink)
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  4. Marcin Tkaczyk (2007). A Formal Theory of Physical Necessity. Logic and Logical Philosophy 16 (1):65-83.score: 90.0
    A system HW of normal modal logic, developed by R. Bigelow & R. Pargetter is presented. Some formal issues concerning the system are examined, such as completeness, number of distinct modalities and relations to other systems. Some philosophical topics are also discussed. The Authors interpret the system HW as the system of physical (nomic) modalities. It is questioned, whether or not the system HW is justified to be claimed to be the logic of physical necessity. The answer (...)
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  5. Synonymy Necessity (2003). Ii. Necessity, Synonymy, and Logic. Grazer Philosophische Studien 66:141.score: 80.0
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  6. Physical Necessity (1992). Roberto torret'I 'I (puerto rico). In Javier Echeverria, Andoni Ibarra & Thomas Mormann (eds.), The Space of Mathematics. De Gruyter. 132.score: 80.0
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  7. Edwin H. -C. Hung (2001). Kuhnian Paradigms as Representational Spaces: New Perspectives on the Problems of Incommensurability, Scientific Explanation, and Physical Necessity. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (3):275 – 292.score: 60.0
    This paper starts with an intuitive notion of representational spaces, which is intended to provide an improved version of Kuhn's concept of paradigms. It then proceeds to study the following topics in terms of this new notion: incommensurability, paradigm change, explanation of anomalies, explanation of regularities, explanation of irregularities, and physical necessity. In the course of the investigation, "representational space" gets clarified and defined. It is envisaged that this new concept should throw light on many issues in the (...)
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  8. Richard Montague (1960). Logical Necessity, Physical Necessity, Ethics, and Quantifiers. Inquiry 3 (1-4):259 – 269.score: 57.0
    Some philosophers, for example Quine, doubt the possibility of jointly using modalities and quantification. Simple model-theoretic considerations, however, lead to a reconciliation of quantifiers with such modal concepts as logical, physical, and ethical necessity, and suggest a general class of modalities of which these are instances. A simple axiom system, analogous to the Lewis systems S1 —S5, is considered in connection with this class of modalities. The system proves to be complete, and its class of theorems decidable.
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  9. Stephen Leeds (2007). Physical and Metaphysical Necessity. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (4):458–485.score: 51.0
    I propose a different way of thinking about metaphysical and physical necessity: namely that the fundamental notion of necessity is what would ordinarily be called "truth in all physically possible worlds" – a notion which includes the standard physical necessities and the metaphysical ones as well; I suggest that the latter are marked off not as a stricter kind of necessity but by their epistemic status. One result of this reconceptualization is that the Descartes-Kripke argument (...)
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  10. Bradford McCall (2011). The Religion and Science Debate: Why Does It Continue? Edited by Harold W. Attridge and Beyond Kuhn: Scientific Explanation, Theory Structure, Incommensurability, and Physical Necessity. By Edwin H-C. Hung. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 52 (2):343-344.score: 45.0
  11. Hanne Andersen (2010). Edwin H.-C. Hung Beyond Kuhn. Scientific Explanation, Theory Structure, Incommensurability and Physical Necessity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (1):237-239.score: 45.0
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  12. James A. Harris (2003). Hume's Reconciling Project and 'the Common Distinction Betwixt Moral and Physical Necessity'. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):451 – 471.score: 45.0
  13. Peter Forrest (1996). Physical Necessity and the Passage of Time. In P. Riggs (ed.), Natural Kinds, Laws of Nature and Scientific Methodology. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 49--62.score: 45.0
  14. Alex Levine (2010). Thomas Kuhn's Cottage Fred d'Agostino ,Naturalizing Epistemology: Thomas Kuhn and the Essential Tension(London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010) Edwin H.-C. Hung ,Beyond Kuhn: Scientific Explanation, Theory Structure, Incommensurability and Physical Necessity(Hants: Ashgate, 2006) Hanne Andersen , Peter Barker , and Xiang Chen ,The Cognitive Structure of Scientific Revolutions(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006). [REVIEW] Perspectives on Science 18 (3):369-377.score: 45.0
  15. Peter Forrest (2006). General Facts, Physical Necessity and the Metaphysics of Time. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 2:137-154.score: 45.0
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  16. A. Bayart (1967). Review: Richard Montague, Logical Necessity, Physical Necessity, Ethics, and Quantifiers. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 32 (3):400-401.score: 45.0
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  17. I. I. Anima & T. O. de Anima (2002). Aristotle on Physical Necessity and the Limits of Teleological Explanation Christopher Byrne. Apeiron 35:19.score: 45.0
     
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  18. A. Flew (1990). Hume and Physical Necessity. Iyyun:251-266.score: 45.0
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  19. Roberto Torretti (1992). Mathematical Structures and Physical Necessity. In Javier Echeverria, Andoni Ibarra & Thomas Mormann (eds.), The Space of Mathematics. De Gruyter. 132.score: 45.0
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  20. Janet Broughton (forthcoming). Necessity and Physical Laws in Descartes's Philosophy. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.score: 39.0
    I argue that although in his earlier work descartes thought of the laws of motion as "eternal truths," he later came to think of them as truths whose necessity is of a different type.
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  21. Jordi Cat (2012). Into the 'Regions of Physical and Metaphysical Chaos': Maxwell's Scientific Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy of Action (Agency, Determinacy and Necessity From Theology, Moral Philosophy and History to Mathematics, Theory and Experiment). Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (1):91-104.score: 36.0
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  22. Barbara Sattler (2012). A Likely Account of Necessity: Plato's Receptacle as a Physical and Metaphysical Foundation for Space. Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (2):159-195.score: 36.0
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  23. Michael Ruse (1988). Rigorous Regularism: Physical Laws Without Necessity. Dialogue 27 (03):523-.score: 36.0
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  24. H. Heath Bawden (1904). The Necessity From the Standpoint of Scientific Method of a Reconstruction of the Ideas of the Psychical and the Physical. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 1 (3):62-68.score: 36.0
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  25. William J. Wainwright (1972). God and the Necessity of Physical Evil. Sophia 11 (2):16-19.score: 36.0
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  26. Gesa Lindemann (2007). Medicine as Practice and Culture: The Analysis of Border Regimes and the Necessity of a Hermeneutics of Physical Bodies. In Regula Valérie Burri & Joseph Dumit (eds.), Biomedicine as Culture: Instrumental Practices, Technoscientific Knowledge, and New Modes of Life. Routledge. 6--47.score: 36.0
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  27. Tuomas E. Tahko (2012). Counterfactuals and Modal Epistemology. Grazer Philosophische Studien 86 (1):93–115.score: 34.0
    What is our epistemic access to metaphysical modality? Timothy Williamson suggests that the epistemology of counterfactuals will provide the answer. This paper challenges Williamson's account and argues that certain elements of the epistemology of counterfactuals that he discusses, namely so called background knowledge and constitutive facts, are already saturated with modal content which his account fails to explain. Williamson's account will first be outlined and the role of background knowledge and constitutive facts analysed. Their key role is to restrict our (...)
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  28. Susanne Bobzien (1986). Die Stoische Modallogik (Stoic Modal Logic). Königshausen & Neumann.score: 33.0
    ABSTRACT: Part 1 discusses the Stoic notion of propositions (assertibles, axiomata): their definition; their truth-criteria; the relation between sentence and proposition; propositions that perish; propositions that change their truth-value; the temporal dependency of propositions; the temporal dependency of the Stoic notion of truth; pseudo-dates in propositions. Part 2 discusses Stoic modal logic: the Stoic definitions of their modal notions (possibility, impossibility, necessity, non-necessity); the logical relations between the modalities; modalities as properties of propositions; contingent propositions; the relation between (...)
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  29. Brendan Shea (2013). Two Concepts of Law of Nature. Prolegomena 12 (2):413-442.score: 31.0
    I argue that there are at least two concepts of law of nature worthy of philosophical interest: strong law and weak law. Strong laws are the laws investigated by fundamental physics, while weak laws feature prominently in the “special sciences” and in a variety of non-scientific contexts. In the first section, I clarify my methodology, which has to do with arguing about concepts. In the next section, I offer a detailed description of strong laws, which I claim satisfy four criteria: (...)
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  30. Lars-Göran Johansson (2007). Causation in Collisions - An Empiricist but Non-Humean Account. Theoria 73 (4):317-333.score: 30.0
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  31. Christopher Hughes (2004). Kripke: Names, Necessity, and Identity. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    Saul Kripke, in a series of classic writings of the 1960s and 1970s, changed the face of metaphysics and philosophy of language. Christopher Hughes offers a careful exposition and critical analysis of Kripke's central ideas about names, necessity, and identity. He clears up some common misunderstandings of Kripke's views on rigid designation, causality and reference, and the necessary a posteriori and contingent a priori. Through his engagement with Kripke's ideas Hughes makes a significant contribution to ongoing debates on, inter (...)
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  32. Karol Polcyn (2006). Conceivability, Possibility, and a Posteriori Necessity: On Chalmers' Argument for Dualism. Diametros 7 (March):37-55.score: 27.0
    Chalmers argues that zombies are possible and that therefore consciousness does not supervene on physical facts, which shows the falsity of materialism. The crucial step in this argument – that zombies are possible – follows from their conceivability and hence depends on assuming that conceivability implies possibility. But while Chalmers’s defense of this assumption – call it the conceivability principle – is the key part of his argument, it has not been well understood. As I see it, Chalmers’s defense (...)
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  33. Robert Farrell (1981). Metaphysical Necessity is Not Logical Necessity. Philosophical Studies 39 (2):141 - 153.score: 24.0
    Kripke and putnam have argued that metaphysical necessity is truth in all possible worlds, Hence is a kind of logica necessity; it is this claim I argue against. My argument proceeds by way of my considering and elaborating an example to show that although 'gold has atomic number 79' be counted a metaphysically necessary truth, There is a possible world in which it is false; it turns out to be for all I show here at most a (...) necessity, True in all those worlds structurally similar to the actual world. (shrink)
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  34. Scott A. Shalkowski (1992). Supervenience and Causal Necessity. Synthese 90 (1):55-87.score: 24.0
    Causal necessity typically receives only oblique attention. Causal relations, laws of nature, counterfactual conditionals, or dispositions are usually the immediate subject(s) of interest. All of these, however, have a common feature. In some way, they involve the causal modality, some form of natural or physical necessity. In this paper, causal necessity is discussed with the purpose of determining whether a completely general empiricist theory can account for the causal in terms of the noncausal. Based on an (...)
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  35. Sean Sayers (2006). Freedom and the 'Realm of Necessity'. In Douglas Moggach (ed.), The New Hegelians: Politics and Philosophy in the Hegelian School. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The realm of freedom actually begins only where labour which is determined by necessity and mundane considerations ceases; thus in the very nature of things it lies beyond the sphere of actual material production. Just as the savage must wrestle with Nature to satisfy his wants, to maintain and reproduce life, so must civilized man, and he must do so in all social formations and under all possible modes of production. With his development this realm of physical (...) expands as a result of his wants; but, at the same time, the forces of production which satisfy these wants also increase. Freedom in this field can only consist in socialized man, the associated producers, rationally regulating their interchange with Nature, bringing it under their common control, instead of being ruled by it as by the blind forces of Nature; and achieving this with the least expenditure of energy and under conditions most favourable to, and worthy of, their human nature. But it nonetheless still remains a realm of necessity. Beyond it begins that development of human energy which is an end in itself, the true realm of freedom, which, however, can blossom forth only with the realm of necessity as its basis. The shortening of the working day is its basic prerequisite. (Marx 1971, 820). (shrink)
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  36. W. Ehrenberg (1977). Dice of the Gods: Causality, Necessity and Chance. Birkbeck College.score: 23.0
     
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  37. Lydia Patton (2010). Review: Hyder, The Determinate World: Kant and Helmholtz on the Physical Meaning of Geometry. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (7).score: 21.0
    Hyder constructs two historical narratives. First, he gives an account of Helmholtz's relation to Kant, from the famous Raumproblem, which preoccupied philosophers, geometers, and scientists in the mid-19th century, to Helmholtz's arguments in his four papers on geometry from 1868 to 1878 that geometry is, in some sense, an empirical science (chapters 5 and 6). The second theme is the argument for the necessity of central forces to a determinate scientific description of physical reality, an abiding concern of (...)
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  38. Marc Lange (2005). A Counterfactual Analysis of the Concepts of Logical Truth and Necessity. Philosophical Studies 125 (3):277 - 303.score: 21.0
    This paper analyzes the logical truths as (very roughly) those truths that would still have been true under a certain range of counterfactual perturbations.What’s nice is that the relevant range is characterized without relying (overtly, at least) upon the notion of logical truth. This approach suggests a conception of necessity that explains what the different varieties of necessity (logical, physical, etc.) have in common, in virtue of which they are all varieties of necessity. However, this approach (...)
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  39. Lydia Patton (2011). Anti-Psychologism About Necessity: Friedrich Albert Lange on Objective Inference. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (2):139 - 152.score: 21.0
    In the nineteenth century, the separation of naturalist or psychological accounts of validity from normative validity came into question. In his 1877 Logical Studies (Logische Studien), Friedrich Albert Lange argues that the basis for necessary inference is demonstration, which takes place by spatially delimiting the extension of concepts using imagined or physical diagrams. These diagrams are signs or indications of concepts' extension, but do not represent their content. Only the inference as a whole captures the objective content of the (...)
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  40. Broder Breckling & Hauke Reuter (2004). Analysing Biodiversity: The Necessity of Interdisciplinary Trends in the Development of Ecological Theory. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):83-105.score: 21.0
    Technological advancement has an ambivalent character concerning the impact on biodiversity. It accounts for major detrimental environmental impacts and aggravates threads to biodiversity. On the other hand, from an application perspective of environmental science, there are technical advancements, which increase the potential of analysis, detection and monitoring of environmental changes and open a wider spectrum of sustainable use strategies.The concept of biodiversity emerged in the last two decades as a political issue to protect the structural and functional basis of (...)
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  41. Taner Edis & Maarten Boudry (forthcoming). Beyond Physics? On the Prospects of Finding a Meaningful Oracle. Foundations of Science:1-20.score: 21.0
    Certain enterprises at the fringes of science, such as intelligent design creationism, claim to identify phenomena that go beyond not just our present physics but any possible physical explanation. Asking what it would take for such a claim to succeed, we introduce a version of physicalism that formulates the proposition that all available data sets are best explained by combinations of “chance and necessity”—algorithmic rules and randomness. Physicalism would then be violated by the existence of oracles that produce (...)
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  42. L. J. O'Neill (1978). Comments on 'Hume and the Idea of Causal Necessity'. Philosophical Studies 33 (1):61 - 63.score: 21.0
    Stroud's interpretation of hume leaves unexplained (1) 'necessity', In particular causal judgments where no general causal principle is known and (2) why a regular sequence of psychological events, But not of physical events, Can give rise to an idea of compulsion or inevitability.
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  43. Mendel F. Cohen (1964). Motives, Causal Necessity, and Moral Accountability. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 42 (3):322 – 334.score: 21.0
    The author argues, Contra hume, That "the motives of human action are not related to the action in the way in which the causes of the sort of physical behaviour to which hume refers are related to that behaviour." the author contends this because he is opposed to the consequence of hume's theory that "moral appraisal presupposes 'necessity' or determinism." he concludes that we do have to explain morality in terms of human motives, But that a different sort (...)
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  44. Rita Struhkamp (2004). Goals in Their Setting: A Normative Analysis of Goal Setting in Physical Rehabilitation. Health Care Analysis 12 (2):131-155.score: 21.0
    Goal setting is an important professional method and one of the key concepts that structure a practical field such as physical rehabilitation. However, the actual use of goals in rehabilitation practice is much less straightforward than the general acceptance of the method suggests as goals are frequently unattained, modified or contested. In this paper, I will argue that the difficulties of goal setting in day-to-day medical practice can be understood by unravelling the normative assumptions of goal setting, in this (...)
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  45. Christopher Cowley (2004). Moral Necessity and the Personal. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):123-138.score: 21.0
    I claim that the dominant moral-realist understanding of action and moral responsibility cannot provide a comprehensive account of morality since it neglects the irreducibly personal component of the individual’s moral experience. This is not to embrace non-cognitivism, however; indeed, I challenge the whole realist framework of most contemporary moral philosophy. To this end I explore the phenomenon of moral necessity, exemplified by Luther’s declaration that he “has to” continue his protests against the church. I am careful to distinguish this (...)
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  46. Norman Swartz (1985). The Concept of Physical Law. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    The Concept of Physical Law is an original and creative defense of the Regularity theory of physical law, the concept that physical laws are nothing more than descriptions of whatever universal truths happen to be instanced in nature. Professor Swartz clearly identifies and analyzes the arguments and intuitions of the opposing Necessitarian theory, and argues that the standard objection to the Regularity theory turns on a mistaken view of what Regularists mean by 'physical impossibility'; that it (...)
     
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  47. Alexander Gersten (2005). Experiment to Test Whether We Live in a Four-Dimensional Physical Space–Time. Foundations of Physics 35 (8):1445-1452.score: 19.0
    For quantum systems, whose energy ratios En/E0 are integers, and |E0| is the smallest energy, the time dependent wavefunctions and expectation values of time independent operators have time periodicitiy with a time period T equal to T = h/|E0|, where h is the Planck constant. This periodicity is imposed on the wavefunctions due to undersampling in energy, but following a similarity with aliasing in signal analysis, it may allow to probe future and past events under the condition that our world (...)
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  48. Markus Schrenk (2010). The Powerlessness of Necessity. Noûs 44 (4):725-739.score: 18.0
    This paper concerns anti-Humean intuitions about connections in nature. It argues for the existence of a de re link that is not necessity.Some anti-Humeans tacitly assume that metaphysical necessity can be used for all sorts of anti-Humean desires. Metaphysical necessity is thought to stick together whatever would be loose and separate in a Hume world, as if it were a kind of universal superglue.I argue that this is not feasible. Metaphysical necessity might connect synchronically co-existent properties—kinds (...)
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  49. Robin Findlay Hendry & Darrell P. Rowbottom (2009). Dispositional Essentialism and the Necessity of Laws. Analysis 69 (4):668-677.score: 18.0
    We argue that the inference from dispositional essentialism about a property (in the broadest sense) to the metaphysical necessity of laws involving it is invalid. Let strict dispositional essentialism be any view according to which any given property’s dispositional character is precisely the same across all possible worlds. Clearly, any version of strict dispositional essentialism rules out worlds with different laws involving that property. Permissive dispositional essentialism is committed to a property’s identity being tied to its dispositional profile or (...)
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  50. Hilan Bensusan & Manuel de Pinedo, Priority Monism, Physical Intentionality and the Internal Relatedness of All Things.score: 18.0
    Schaffer (2010) argues that the internal relatedness of all things, no matter how it is conceived, entails priority monism. He claims that a sufficiently pervasive internal relation among objects implies the priority of the whole, understood as a concrete object. This paper shows that at least in the case of an internal relatedness of all things conceived in terms of physical intentionality - one way to understand dispositions - priority monism not only doesn't follow but also is precluded. We (...)
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