Search results for 'physician assisted death' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  5
    Jukka Varelius (1st ed. 2015). Mental Illness, Lack of Autonomy, and Physician-Assisted Death. In Jukka Varelius & Michael Cholbi (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer International Publishing 59-77.
    In this chapter, I consider the idea that physician-assisted death might come into question in the cases of psychiatric patients who are incapable of making autonomous choices about ending their lives. I maintain that the main arguments for physician-assisted death found in recent medical ethical literature support physician-assisted death in some of those cases. After assessing several possible criticisms of what I have argued, I conclude that the idea that physicianassisted (...) can be acceptable in some cases of psychiatric patients who lack autonomy ought to be taken into account in assessing the moral and legal acceptability of physician-assisted death. (shrink)
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  2.  12
    Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan L. McGregor (2009). Brain Death, States of Impaired Consciousness, and Physician-Assisted Death for End-of-Life Organ Donation and Transplantation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):409-421.
    In 1968, the Harvard criteria equated irreversible coma and apnea with human death and later, the Uniform Determination of Death Act was enacted permitting organ procurement from heart-beating donors. Since then, clinical studies have defined a spectrum of states of impaired consciousness in human beings: coma, akinetic mutism, minimally conscious state, vegetative state and brain death. In this article, we argue against the validity of the Harvard criteria for equating brain death with human death. (...)
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  3.  5
    Erich H. Loewy (1999). Physician Assisted Dying and Death with Dignity: Missed Opportunities and Prior Neglected Conditions. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):189-194.
    This paper argues that the world-wide debate about physician assisted dying is missing a golden opportunity to focus on the orchestration of the end of life. Such a process consists of far more than adequate pain control and is a skill which, like all other skills, needs to be learned and taught. The debate offers an opportunity to press for the teaching of this skill. Beyond this, the desire to assure that all can have access to palliative care (...)
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  4.  42
    Sam Rys, Reginald Deschepper, Freddy Mortier, Luc Deliens, Douglas Atkinson & Johan Bilsen (2012). The Moral Difference or Equivalence Between Continuous Sedation Until Death and Physician-Assisted Death: Word Games or War Games? [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):171-183.
    Continuous sedation until death (CSD), the act of reducing or removing the consciousness of an incurably ill patient until death, often provokes medical–ethical discussions in the opinion sections of medical and nursing journals. Some argue that CSD is morally equivalent to physician-assisted death (PAD), that it is a form of “slow euthanasia.” A qualitative thematic content analysis of opinion pieces was conducted to describe and classify arguments that support or reject a moral difference between CSD (...)
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  5. Stuart J. Youngner & Gerrit K. Kimsma (eds.) (2012). Physician-Assisted Death in Perspective: Assessing the Dutch Experience. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first comprehensive report and analysis of the Dutch euthanasia experience over the last three decades. In contrast to most books about euthanasia, which are written by authors from countries where the practice is illegal and therefore practised only secretly, this book analyzes empirical data and real-life clinical behavior. Its essays were written by the leading Dutch scholars and clinicians who shaped euthanasia policy and who have studied, evaluated and helped regulate it. Some of them have themselves (...)
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  6.  6
    Gerrit Kimsma & Evert van Leeuwen (2001). The New Dutch Law on Legalizing Physician-Assisted Death. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):445-450.
    On April 10, 2001, after extensive committee deliberations, the Second Chamber of the Dutch Parliament passed a bill that was introduced in August 1999 legalizing physician-assisted death. The bill is officially called It was passed by a majority vote in the Second Chamber of Parliament and was supported by the majority parties constituting the present coalition government (i.e., liberals and socialists). Opposition to the law came mainly from a minority of Christian parties. In this report we explore (...)
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  7.  1
    J. M. Cuperus-Bosma, G. van Der Wal, C. W. Looman & P. J. van Der Maas (1999). Assessment of Physician-Assisted Death by Members of the Public Prosecution in The Netherlands. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (1):8-15.
    OBJECTIVES: To identify the factors that influence the assessment of reported cases of physician-assisted death by members of the public prosecution. DESIGN/SETTING: At the beginning of 1996, during verbal interviews, 12 short case-descriptions were presented to a representative group of 47 members of the public prosecution in the Netherlands. RESULTS: Assessment varied considerably between respondents. Some respondents made more "lenient" assessments than others. Characteristics of the respondents, such as function, personal-life philosophy and age, were not related to (...)
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  8.  2
    Peter M. McGough (1993). Washington State Initiative 119: The First Public Vote on Legalizing Physician-Assisted Death. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (1):63.
    In the fall of 1991, voters in Washington state were asked to consider a public initiative that sought to legalize physician-assisted death: Initiative 119. Drafted by Washington Citizens for Death with Dignity, the initiative was intended to amend the existing state natural death act in several ways:1) expand the definition of “terminal condition” to include patients in irrevers ible coma or persistent vegetative state;2) specifically name “artificial nutrition and hydration” as life-sustaining medical procedures that could (...)
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  9.  13
    Paul T. Menzel & Bonnie Steinbock (2013). Advance Directives, Dementia, and PhysicianAssisted Death. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (2):484-500.
    Physician-assisted suicide laws in Oregon and Washington require the person's current competency and a prognosis of terminal illness. In The Netherlands voluntariness and unbearable suffering are required for euthanasia. Many people are more concerned about the loss of autonomy and independence in years of severe dementia than about pain and suffering in their last months. To address this concern, people could write advance directives for physician-assisted death in dementia. Should such directives be implemented even though, (...)
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  10.  24
    Franklin G. Miller (1995). The Good Death, Virtue, and Physician-Assisted Death: An Examination of the Hospice Way of Death. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (1):92.
    The problem of physician-assisted death, assisted suicide and active euthanasia, has been debated predominantly in the ethically familiar vocabulary of rights, duties, and consequences. Patient autonomy and the right to die with dignity vie with the duty of physicians to heal, but not to kill, and the specter of “the slippery slope” from voluntary euthanasia as a last resort for patients suffering from terminal illness to PAD on demand and mercy killing of “hopeless” incompetent patients. Another (...)
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  11.  1
    Franklin G. Miller (1997). A Communitarian Approach to Physician-Assisted Death. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):78-87.
    The standard argument in favor of the practice of voluntary physician-assisted death, by means of assisted suicide or active euthanasia, rests on liberal, individualistic grounds. It appeals to two moral considerations: personal self-determination—the right to choose the circumstances and timing of death with medical assistance; and individual well-being—relief of intolerable suffering in the face of terminal or incurable, severely debilitating illness. One of the strongest challenges to this argument has been advanced by Daniel Callahan. Callahan (...)
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  12.  15
    Martin Gunderson (1993). Physician Assisted Death and Hard Choices. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):329-341.
    We argue that after the passage of a physician assisted death law some inequities in the health care system which prevent people from getting the medical care they need will become reasons for choosing assisted death. This raises the issue of whether there is compelling moral reason to change those inequities after the passage of an assisted death law. We argue that the passage of an assisted death law will not create (...)
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  13.  16
    David J. Mayo (1993). Altruism and Physician Assisted Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):281-295.
    We assume that a statute permitting physician assisted death has been passed. We note that the rationale for the passage of such a statute would be respect for individual autonomy, the avoidance of suffering and the possibility of death with dignity. We deal with two moral issues that will arise once such a law is passed. First, we argue that the rationale for passing an assistance in dying law in the first place provides a justification for (...)
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  14.  14
    Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde (2010). Retraction: End-of-Life Discontinuation of Destination Therapy with Cardiac and Ventilatory Support Medical Devices: Physician-Assisted Death or Allowing the Patient to Die? BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):20-.
    BackgroundBioethics and law distinguish between the practices of "physician-assisted death" and "allowing the patient to die."DiscussionAdvances in biotechnology have allowed medical devices to be used as destination therapy that are designed for the permanent support of cardiac function and/or respiration after irreversible loss of these spontaneous vital functions. For permanent support of cardiac function, single ventricle or biventricular mechanical assist devices and total artificial hearts are implanted in the body. Mechanical ventilators extrinsic to the body are used (...)
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  15.  4
    D. J. Mayo & M. Gunderson (1993). Physician Assisted Death and Hard Choices. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):329-341.
    We argue that after the passage of a physician assisted death law some inequities in the health care system which prevent people from getting the medical care they need will become reasons for choosing assisted death. This raises the issue of whether there is compelling moral reason to change those inequities after the passage of an assisted death law. We argue that the passage of an assisted death law will not create (...)
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  16.  67
    S. H. Lipuma (2013). Continuous Sedation Until Death as Physician-Assisted Suicide/Euthanasia: A Conceptual Analysis. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (2):190-204.
    A distinction is commonly drawn between continuous sedation until death and physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia. Only the latter is found to involve killing, whereas the former eludes such characterization. I argue that continuous sedation until death is equivalent to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia in that both involve killing. This is established by first defining and clarifying palliative sedation therapies in general and continuous sedation until death in particular. A case study analysis and a look at current practices (...)
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  17. M. Gunderson & D. J. Mayo (1993). Altruism and Physician Assisted Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (3):281-295.
    We assume that a statute permitting physician assisted death has been passed. We note that the rationale for the passage of such a statute would be respect for individual autonomy, the avoidance of suffering and the possibility of death with dignity. We deal with two moral issues that will arise once such a law is passed. First, we argue that the rationale for passing an assistance in dying law in the first place provides a justification for (...)
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  18.  4
    Joseph A. Raho & Guido Miccinesi (2015). Contesting the Equivalency of Continuous Sedation Until Death and Physician-Assisted Suicide/Euthanasia: A Commentary on LiPuma. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (5):529-553.
    Patients who are imminently dying sometimes experience symptoms refractory to traditional palliative interventions, and in rare cases, continuous sedation is offered. Samuel H. LiPuma, in a recent article in this Journal, argues that continuous sedation until death is equivalent to physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia based on a higher brain neocortical definition of death. We contest his position that continuous sedation involves killing and offer four objections to the equivalency thesis. First, sedation practices are proportional in a way that (...)
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  19.  88
    S. Ost (2011). Physician-Assisted Dying Outlaws: Self-Appointed Death in the Netherlands. Clinical Ethics 6 (1):20-26.
    No law in any jurisdiction that permits physician assisted dying offers individuals a medically assisted death without the need to comply with certain criteria. The Netherlands is no exception. There is evidence to suggest that physicians are averse to providing an assisted death even when the Dutch ‘due care criteria’ have been met and the unbearable pain and suffering requirement is especially difficult to satisfy. Some individuals with an enduring desire to die who do (...)
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  20.  15
    Erich H. Loewy (2004). Euthanasia, Physician Assisted Suicide and Other Methods of Helping Along Death. Health Care Analysis 12 (3):181-193.
    This paper introduces a series of papers dealing with the topic of euthanasia as an introduction to a variety of attitudes by health-care professionals and philosophers interested in this issue. The lead in paper—and really the lead in idea—stresses the fact that what we are discussing concerns only a minority of people lucky enough to live in conditions of acceptable sanitation and who have access to medical care. The topic of euthanasia and PAS really has three questions: (1) is killing (...)
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  21.  5
    H. T. Engelhardt (1998). Physician-Assisted Death: Doctrinal Development Vs. Christian Tradition. Christian Bioethics 4 (2):115-121.
    Physician-assisted suicide offers a moral and theological Rorschach test. Foundational commitments regarding morality and theology are disclosed by how the issue is perceived and by what moral problems it is seen to present. One of the cardinal differences disclosed is that between Western and Orthodox Christian approaches to theology in general, and the theology of dying and suicide in particular. Confrontation with the issue of suicide is likely to bring further doctrinal development in many of the Western Christian (...)
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  22.  2
    Mark G. Kuczewski (1998). Physician-Assisted Death: Can Philosophical Bioethics Aid Social Policy? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):339-347.
    The debate regarding physician-assisted suicide continues in our society. Despite the recent opinions of the United States Supreme Court, this issue is unlikely to go away anytime soon. For a variety of reasons, this debate is now conducted in the legalistic terms of individual rights and liberties. As a result, perhaps we philosophers have been left behind. This is now a matter for the legal arena and philosophy is likely to be irrelevant. I would like to suggest otherwise (...)
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  23. J. M. Dieterle (2007). Physician Assisted Suicide: A New Look at the Arguments. Bioethics 21 (3):127–139.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I examine the arguments against physician assisted suicide . Many of these arguments are consequentialist. Consequentialist arguments rely on empirical claims about the future and thus their strength depends on how likely it is that the predictions will be realized. I discuss these predictions against the backdrop of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act and the practice of PAS in the Netherlands. I then turn to a specific consequentialist argument against PAS – Susan M. Wolf's (...)
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  24. Martin Gunderson & David J. Mayo (2000). Restricting PhysicianAssisted Death to the Terminally Ill. Hastings Center Report 30 (6):17-23.
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  25. Susan M. Wolf (2008). Confronting Physician Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: My Father's Death. Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 23-26.
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  26.  14
    Joseph L. Verheijde & Mohamed Y. Rady (2011). Justifying Physician-Assisted Death in Organ Donation. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):52-54.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 8, Page 52-54, August 2011.
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  27.  2
    Franklin G. Miller & Howard Brody (1995). Professional Integrity and PhysicianAssisted Death. Hastings Center Report 25 (3):8-17.
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  28.  54
    Timothy E. Quill (2008). Physician-Assisted Death in the United States: Are the Existing "Last Resorts" Enough? Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 17-22.
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  29.  2
    Udo Schuklenk & Suzanne van de Vathorst (2015). Physician-Assisted Death Does Not Violate Professional Integrity. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (11):887-888.
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  30.  12
    Courtney S. Campbell & Jessica C. Cox (2010). Hospice and Physician-Assisted Death: Collaboration, Compliance, and Complicity. Hastings Center Report 40 (5):26-35.
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  31.  1
    Franklin G. MIller (2015). Treatment-Resistant Depression and Physician-Assisted Death. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (11):885-886.
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  32.  3
    David J. Mayo & Martin Gunderson (2002). Vitalism Revitalized: Vulnerable Populations, Prejudice, and PhysicianAssisted Death. Hastings Center Report 32 (4):14-21.
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  33. Margaret A. Somerville (2001). Death Talk: The Case Against Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    There are vast ethical, legal, and social differences between natural death and euthanasia. In Death Talk Margaret Somerville argues that legalizing euthanasia would cause irreparable harm to society's value of respect for human life, which in secular societies is carried primarily by the institutions of law and medicine. Death has always been a central focus of the discussion that we engage in as individuals and as a society in searching for meaning in life. Moreover, we accommodate the (...)
     
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  34.  2
    Jay A. Jacobson, Evelyn M. Kasworm, Margaret P. Battin, Jeffrey R. Botkin, Leslie P. Francis & David Green (1995). Decedents' Reported Preferences for Physician-Assisted Death: A Survey of Informants Listed on Death Certificates in Utah. Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (2):149.
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  35.  5
    Tom Koch (2001). Physician-Assisted Death for the Terminally Ill. Hastings Center Report 31 (3):4.
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  36.  14
    Tito B. Carvalho, Mohamed Y. Rady, Joseph L. Verheijde & Jason Scott Robert (2011). Continuous Deep Sedation in End-of-Life Care: Disentangling Palliation From Physician-Assisted Death. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):60 - 62.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 60-62, June 2011.
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  37.  18
    Nancy S. Jecker (2009). Physician-Assisted Death in the Pacific Northwest. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):1 – 2.
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  38.  3
    Elizabeth Morrow (1996). Attitudes of Women From Vulnerable Populations Toward Physician-Assisted Death: A Qualitative Approach. Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (3):279-289.
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  39.  12
    David J. Doukas, Daniel W. Gorenflo & Barbara Supanich (1999). Primary Care Physician Attitudes and Values Toward End-of-Life Care and Physician-Assisted Death. Ethics and Behavior 9 (3):219 – 230.
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  40.  2
    Liviu Oprea (2005). Physician Assisted Death and Professional Integrity. Romanian Journal of Bioethics 3 (2).
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  41.  6
    Charles Weijer, Learning From the Dutch: Physician-Assisted Death, Slippery Slopes and the Nazi Analogy.
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  42.  1
    W. J. Smith (2003). Physician-Assisted Death. Hastings Center Report 33 (1):7.
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  43.  1
    Joseph C. D'Oronzio (1997). Health Policy Watch: Rappelling on the Slippery Slope: Negotiating Public Policy for Physician-Assisted Death. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (1):113-117.
    The rock climber and the law share in a common etymological allusion when each reaches a steep, high, and hard place. The climber “appeals” to the mountain by inching down on a rope and the law's “rappel” is similarly a route to more comfortable footing. Each step in this common process is germane to the eventual resolution, for it is to be found in the rappel process itself and in the meaning of each appeal.
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  44.  1
    A. P. Porter (2002). Physician-Assisted Death. Hastings Center Report 33 (1):6.
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  45.  1
    Mohamed Y. Rady (2011). Quality Palliative Care or Physician-Assisted Death: A Comment on the French Perspective of End-of-Life Care in Neurological Disorders. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (2).
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  46. Joaquín Barutta & Jochen Vollmann (2015). Physician-Assisted Death with Limited Access to Palliative Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):652-654.
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  47. Gerald Dworkin (2009). Physician-Assisted Death: The State of the Debate. In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. OUP Oxford
     
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  48. Gerald Dworkin (2007). Pt. IV. The End of Life. The Definition of Death / Stuart Youngner ; The Aging Society and the Expansion of Senility: Biotechnological and Treatment Goals / Stephen Post ; Death is a Punch in the Jaw: Life-Extension and its Discontents / Felicia Nimue Ackerman ; Precedent Autonomy, Advance Directives, and End-of-Life Care / John K. Davis ; Physician-Assisted Death: The State of the Debate. [REVIEW] In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press
  49. Kevin Fitzpatrick (2014). Physician-Assisted Death in Perspective: Assessing the Dutch Experience. Edited byS. J. Youngner andG. K. Kimsma.Cambridge University Press,2012, 403pp., £62. ISBN:9781107007567. [REVIEW] Philosophy 89 (4):649-653.
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  50. M. Gunderson & D. Mayo (2001). Physician-Assisted Death for the Terminally Ill-Reply. Hastings Center Report 31 (3):4-5.
     
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