Search results for 'plant succession' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  16
    Jeanne Millet, André Bouchard & Claude Édelin (1998). Plant Succession and Tree Architecture: An Attempt at Reconciling Two Scales of Analysis of Vegetation Dynamics. Acta Biotheoretica 46 (1):1-22.
    Plant succession is a phenomenon ascribed to vegetation dynamics at the scale of the plant community. The study of plant succession implies the analysis of the species involved and their relationships. Depending on the research done, the characteristics of trees have been studied according to either static, dimensional or partial approaches. We have revised the principal theories of succession, the methods of describing structure and development of tree and relationship established between tree species' attributes (...)
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  2.  5
    Dr John S. Plant (2005). Modern Merthods and a Controversial Surname: Plant. Philosophical Explorations.
    In the past few years, DNA testing has begun to contribute to our understanding. It is currently emerging more clearly which surnames are multi-origin, originating with many different forefathers, and which descend from a single male ancestor. As a case study, I shall describe the application of modern, multidisciplinary methods to the surname Plant, which has been ascribed a different meaning each time an authority has written about it. The recent emergence of a different view anout this name's (...)
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  3. Arnold G. Van der Valk (2013). From Formation to Ecosystem: Tansley's Response to Clements' Climax. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology:1-29.
    Arthur G. Tansley never accepted Frederic E. Clements’ view that succession is a developmental process whose final stage, the climax formation, is determined primarily by regional climate and that all other types of vegetation are some kind of successional stage or arrested successional stage. Tansley was convinced that in a given region a variety of environmental factors could produce different kinds of climax formations. At the heart of their dispute was Clements’ organicist view of succession, i.e., the formation (...)
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  4.  4
    Bob Plant, Death, Fear, and Self-Mourning.
    Attitudes to our own mortality are characterized by more than just fear, suggests Bob Plant.
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  5.  13
    Bob Plant (2005). Wittgenstein and Levinas: Ethical and Religious Thought. Routledge.
    Wittgenstein and Levinas examines the oft-neglected relationship between the philosophies of two of the most important and notoriously difficult thinkers of the twentieth century. By bringing the work of each philosopher to bear upon the other, Plant navigates between the antagonistic intellectual traditions that they helped to share. The central focus on the book is the complex yet illuminating interplay between a number of ethical-religious themes in both Wittgenstein's mature thinking and Levinas's distinctive account of ethical responsibility.
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  6. Christopher H. Eliot (2011). Competition Theory and Channeling Explanation. Philosophy and Theory in Biology 3 (20130604):1-16.
    The complexity and heterogeneity of causes influencing ecology’s domain challenge its capacity to generate a general theory without exceptions, raising the question of whether ecology is capable, even in principle, of achieving the sort of theoretical success enjoyed by physics. Weber has argued that competition theory built around the Competitive Exclusion Principle (especially Tilman’s resource-competition model) offers an example of ecology identifying a law-like causal regularity. However, I suggest that as Weber presents it, the CEP is not yet a causal (...)
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  7.  7
    Raymond Plant (1973). Hegel. Bloomington,Indiana University Press.
    In his theological explorations, suggests Raymond Plant in this illuminating new guide, Hegel tackled the issues of interest to us all.
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  8.  2
    R. Plant (1977). Gifts, Exchanges and the Political Economy of Health Care. Part I: Should Blood Be Bought and Sold? Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (4):166-173.
    Should blood be bought and sold is in crude terms the question asked and answered by Richard Titmuss in his recent book The Gift Relationship. Dr Raymond Plant, a lecturer in philosophy at Manchester University, analyses Titmuss' arguments in a paper which we are printing in two parts. Titmuss has taken the provision of blood as his example of the gift relationship--and by extension that of health care generally. Dr Plant considers in turn each of Titmuss' arguments that (...)
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  9. Bob Plant (2006). Wittgenstein and Levinas: Ethical and Religious Thought. Routledge.
    _Wittgenstein and Levinas_ examines the oft-neglected relationship between the philosophies of two of the most important and notoriously difficult thinkers of the twentieth century. By bringing the work of each philosopher to bear upon the other, Plant navigates between the antagonistic intellectual traditions that they helped to share. The central focus on the book is the complex yet illuminating interplay between a number of ethical-religious themes in both Wittgenstein's mature thinking and Levinas's distinctive account of ethical responsibility.
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  10.  12
    V. G. Thomas & P. G. Kevan (1993). Basic Principles of Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (1):1-19.
    In the final analysis, sustainable agriculture must derive from applied ecology, especially the principle of the regulation of the abundance and distribution of species (and, secondarily, their activities) in space and time. Interspecific competition in natural ecosystems has its counterparts in agriculture, designed to divert greater amounts of energy, nutrients, and water into crops. Whereas natural ecosystems select for a diversity of species in communities, recent agriculture has minimized diversity in favour of vulnerable monocultures. Such systems show intrinsically less stability (...)
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  11.  48
    Bob Plant (2004). The End(s) of Philosophy: Rhetoric, Therapy and Wittgenstein's Pyrrhonism. Philosophical Investigations 27 (3):222–257.
  12.  14
    Bob Plant (2003). Doing Justice to the Derrida–Levinas Connection: A Response to Mark Dooley. Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (4):427-450.
    Mark Dooley has recently argued (principally against Simon Critchley) that the attempt to establish too strong a ‘connection’ between Jacques Derrida and Emmanuel Levinas not only distorts crucial disparities between their respective philosophies, it also contaminates Derrida’s recent work with Levinas’s inherent ‘political naivety’. In short, on Dooley’s reading, Levinas is only of ‘inspirational value’ for Derrida. I am not concerned with defending Critchley’s own reading of the ‘Derrida–Levinas connection’. My objective is rather to demonstrate, first, the way in (...)
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  13.  36
    Bob Plant (2011). Religion, Relativism, and Wittgenstein's Naturalism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (2):177 - 209.
    Abstract Wittgenstein?s remarks on religious and magical practices are often thought to harbour troubling fideistic and relativistic views. Unsurprisingly, commentators are generally resistant to the idea that religious belief constitutes a ?language?game? governed by its own peculiar ?rules?, and is thereby insulated from the critical assessment of non?participants. Indeed, on this fideist?relativist reading, it is unclear how mutual understanding between believers and non?believers (even between different sorts of believers) would be possible. In this paper I do three things: (i) show (...)
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  14.  27
    B. Plant (2011). Welcoming Dogs: Levinas and 'the Animal' Question. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (1):49-71.
    According to Levinas, the history of western philosophy has routinely ‘assimilated every Other into the Same’. More concretely stated, philosophers have neglected the ethical significance of other human beings in their vulnerable, embodied singularity. What is striking about Levinas’ recasting of ethics as ‘first philosophy’ is his own relative disregard for non-human animals. In this article I will do two interrelated things: (1) situate Levinas’ (at least partial) exclusion of the non-human animal in the context of his markedly bleak conception (...)
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  15. S. Plant (2006). Book Review: Improvisation: The Drama of Christian Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (3):429-432.
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  16. Raymond Plant (1991). Modern Political Thought. Blackwell.
     
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  17. S. Plant (2005). Book Review: The Blackwell Companion to Political Theology. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 18 (1):109-112.
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  18. Bob Plant (2007). Playing Games/Playing Us: Foucault on Sadomasochism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (5):531-561.
    The impact of Foucault's work can still be felt across a range of academic disciplines. It is nevertheless important to remember that, for him, theoretical activity was intimately related to the concrete practices of self-transformation; as he acknowledged: `I write in order to change myself.' 1 This avowal is especially pertinent when considering Foucault's work on the relationship between sex and power. For Foucault not only theorized about this topic; he was also actively involved in the S&M subculture of the (...)
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  19.  87
    S. Plant (2006). Book Review: Ethics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (2):233-237.
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  20.  28
    Robert Plant (2003). Blasphemy, Dogmatism and Injustice: The Rough Edges of on Certainty. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 54 (2):101-135.
    On Certainty remains one the mostprovocative and challenging parts ofWittgenstein's intellectual legacy.Philosophers generally read this text as anassault on the traditional sceptic/anti-scepticdebate. But some commentators identifypolitical – specifically `conservative' –sentiments at work here. Others embraceWittgenstein's (alleged) `pluralism', whilethose less enthused think the latter collapsesinto relativism. Although this mixed receptionis, I will argue, partly due to Wittgenstein'sown troubled engagement with the central themesof On Certainty, the real difficultyand value of this text lies in itsintertwining questions of epistemology,religious belief and ethical-politicaljudgement.
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  21.  12
    Bob Plant (2003). Our Natural Constitution: Wolterstorff on Reid and Wittgenstein. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 1 (2):157-170.
  22.  54
    S. Plant (2002). Book Reviews : The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Punishment, by T. Richard Snyder. Grand Rapids, Mich.: Eerdmans, 2001. 159 Pp. Pb. 12.99. ISBN 0-8028-4807-9: The Executed God: The Way of the Cross in Lockdown America, by Mark Lewis Taylor. Grove City, Ohio: Augsburg/Fortress, 2001. 208 Pp. Pb. $16.00. ISBN 0-8006-3283-. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 15 (2):90-95.
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  23.  58
    Bob Plant (2009). Absurdity, Incongruity and Laughter. Philosophy 84 (1):111-134.
    In "The Myth of Sisyphus", Camus recommends scornful defiance in the face of our absurd, meaningless existence. Although Nagel agrees that human life possesses an absurd dimension, he objects to Camus' existentialist 'dramatics'. For Nagel, absurdity arises from the irreducible tension between our subjective and objective perspectives on life. In this paper I do two things: (i) critically reconstruct Camus' and Nagel's positions, and (ii) develop Nagel's critique of Camus in order to argue that humour is an appropriate response to (...)
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  24. Raymond Plant (1980). Political Philosophy and Social Welfare: Essays on the Normative Basis of Welfare Provision. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    First published in 1980. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  25.  40
    Raymond Plant (2011). Religion, Identity and Freedom of Expression. Res Publica 17 (1):7-20.
    This article examines the issues raised by religious adherents’ wish to express their beliefs in the public domain through, for example, their modes of dress, their performance of public roles, and their response to homosexuality. It considers on what grounds religion might merit special treatment and how special that treatment should be. A common approach to these issues is through the notion of religious identity, but both the idea of religious identity and its use to ground claims against others prove (...)
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  26.  39
    Bob Plant (2009). The Banality of Death. Philosophy 84 (4):571-596.
    Notwithstanding the burgeoning literature on death, philosophers have tended to focus on the significance death has (or ought/ought not to have) for the one who dies. Thus, while the relevance one's own death has for others (and the significance others' deaths have for us) is often mentioned, it is rarely attributed any great importance to the purported real philosophical issues. This is a striking omission, not least because the deaths of others - and the anticipated effects our own death will (...)
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  27. Raymond Plant (1983). Hegel: An Introduction. B. Blackwell.
  28.  24
    Bob Plant (2004). The Wretchedness of Belief: Wittgenstein on Guilt, Religion, and Recompense. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):449 - 476.
    In "Culture and Value" Wittgenstein remarks that the truly "religious man" thinks himself to be, not merely "imperfect" or "ill," but wholly "wretched." While such sentiments are of obvious biographical interest, in this paper I show why they are also worthy of serious philosophical attention. Although the influence of Wittgenstein's thinking on the philosophy of religion is often judged negatively (as, for example, leading to quietist and/or fideist-relativist conclusions) I argue that the distinctly ethical conception of religion (specifically Christianity) that (...)
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  29.  20
    Robert Wilkinson, Diane Collinson & Kathryn Plant, Fifty Eastern Thinkers.
    Close analysis of the work of fifty major thinkers in the field of Eastern philosophy make this an excellent introduction to a fascinating area of study. The authors have drawn together thinkers from all the major Eastern philosophical traditions from the earliest times to the present day. The philosophers covered range from founder figures such as Zoroaster and Confucius to modern thinkers such as Fung Youlan and the present Dalai Lama. Introductions to major traditions and a glossary of key philosophical (...)
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  30.  7
    Bob Plant (2000). Resisting Silence In the Face of Evil. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 7 (1):27-34.
    In the following paper I shall outline a number of preliminary ideas concerning the relationship between the Holocaust and certain themes which emerge in the work of Emmanuel Levinas. As this relationship is distinctly twofold, my analysis will include both a textual and a rather more speculative component. That is to say, while I shall argue that reading Levinas specifically as a post-Holocaust thinker clarifies a number of his philosophical and rhetorical motifs, so, in turn, does this challenging body of (...)
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  31.  26
    George J. Stack & Robert W. Plant (1982). The Phenomenon of "the Look". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (3):359-373.
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  32.  3
    R. Plant (1978). Gifts, Exchanges and the Political Economy of Health Care. Part II: How Should Health Care Be Distributed? Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (1):5-11.
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  33.  5
    Ian M. Plant (1999). The Influence of Forensic Oratory on Thucydides' Principles of Method. Classical Quarterly 49 (01):62-73.
    In recent years, there has been considerable debate about the reliability of Herodotus: the attack on his honesty led by Fehling, the defence by Pritchett. The debate, it seems, may have begun at least as far back as Thucydides, but now Thucydides himself may have joined the school of liars. Badian has produced a new reading of Thucydides’ description of the outbreak of the Peloponnesian War, arguing that Thucydides deliberately set out to mislead the reader, misrepresenting the Spartans as the (...)
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  34.  16
    Bob Plant (2003). Ethics Without Exit: Levinas and Murdoch. Philosophy and Literature 27 (2):456-470.
  35.  11
    Bob Plant (2006). The Confessing Animal in Foucault and Wittgenstein. Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (4):533 - 559.
    In "The History of Sexuality", Foucault maintains that "Western man has become a confessing animal" (1990, 59), thus implying that "man" was not always such a creature. On a related point, Wittgenstein suggests that "man is a ceremonial animal" (1996, 67); here the suggestion is that human beings are, by their very nature, ritualistically inclined. In this paper I examine this crucial difference in emphasis, first by reconstructing Foucault's "genealogy" of confession, and subsequently by exploring relevant facets of Wittgenstein's later (...)
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  36. Raymond Plant (1981). Democratic Socialism and Equality. In Anthony Crosland, David Lipsey & R. L. Leonard (eds.), The Socialist Agenda: Crosland's Legacy. Cape
  37.  11
    Bob Plant (2006). Apologies: Levinas and Dialogue. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):79 – 94.
    In his recent article 'Speech and Sensibility: Levinas and Habermas on the Constitution of the Moral Point of View', Steven Hendley argues that Levinas's preoccupation with language as 'exposure' to the 'other' provides an important corrective to Habermas's focus on the 'procedural' aspects of communication. Specifically, what concerns Hendley is the question of moral motivation, and how Levinas, unlike Habermas, responds to this question by stressing the dialogical relation as one of coming 'into proximity to the face of the other' (...)
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  38.  10
    Bob Plant (2006). Perhaps. Angelaki 11 (3):137 – 156.
    The formulae "perhaps" and "perhaps not," [] we adopt in place of "perhaps it is and perhaps it is not" []. But here again we do not fight about phrases [] these expressions are indicative of non-assertion. Sextus Empiricus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism One could spend years on [] the perhaps [] whose modality will render fictional and fragile everything that follows []. One does not testify in court and before the law with "perhaps." Jacques Derrida, Demeure: Fiction and Testimony.
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  39.  6
    S. Plant (2005). The Sacrament of Ethical Reality: Dietrich Bonhoeffer on Ethics for Christian Citizens. Studies in Christian Ethics 18 (3):71-87.
    The paper explicates Bonhoeffer's dense statement, made in a 1932 lecture, that `Reality is the sacrament of [the ethical] command'. It begins with a summary of William T. Cavanaugh's rich description of the Eucharist as that act which makes the Church Christ's body, thereby constituting the true res publica. A comparison is drawn with Bonhoeffer's account of the sacramental foundation of the Church's public proclamation of God's ethical command. Bonhoeffer differs from Cavanaugh, I suggest, not only in his conviction that (...)
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  40.  4
    R. Plant (1975). The Greatest Happiness. Journal of Medical Ethics 1 (2):104-106.
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  41.  3
    Dr John S. Plant (2007). The Tardy Adoption of the Plantagenet Surname. Philosophical Explorations.
    Accounts of the origins of Plantagenet have ignored a tradition of similar names, some of which had a bawdy insinuation. There could have been a mischievous interpretation of Plantagenet, building its currency amongst neighbouring commoners whilst delaying its acceptance for official royal purposes. This and other developments such as the spread of contemporary scholastic teachings can explain the slow but eventual adoption of the Plantagenet nickname as a hereditary royal surname despite the scarcity of its early mentions.
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  42.  5
    Daniel Monk (2011). Sexuality and Succession Law: Beyond Formal Equality. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 19 (3):231-250.
    This article endeavours to open up a dialogue between succession law and the field of gender, sexuality and the law. It presents a detailed analysis of five cases concerning inheritance disputes relating to lesbians or gay men. The sexuality of the parties in the cases is ‘doctrinally irrelevant’ but the analysis demonstrates the significance of sexuality in the resolution of the legal disputes. In doing so it identifies how legal discourse remains a critical site for the production of societal (...)
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  43.  27
    Christophe Bonneuil (2006). Mendelism, Plant Breeding and Experimental Cultures: Agriculture and the Development of Genetics in France. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (2):281 - 308.
    The article reevaluates the reception of Mendelism in France, and more generally considers the complex relationship between Mendelism and plant breeding in the first half on the 20th century. It shows on the one side that agricultural research and higher education institutions have played a key role in the development and institutionalization of genetics in France, whereas university biologists remained reluctant to accept this approach on heredity. But on the other side, plant breeders, and agricultural researchers, despite an (...)
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  44.  5
    Thomas Wieland (2006). Scientific Theory and Agricultural Practice: Plant Breeding in Germany From the Late 19th to the Early 20th Century. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (2):309 - 343.
    The paper deals with the transformation of plant breeding from an agricultural practice into an applied academic science in the late 19th and early 20th centuries Germany. The aim is to contribute to the ongoing debate about the relationship between science and technology. After a brief discussion of this debate the first part of the paper examines how pioneers of plant breeding developed their breeding methods and commercially successful varieties. The focus here is on the role of scientific (...)
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  45.  49
    Ramona Walls, Balaji Athreya, Laurel Cooper, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Pankaj Jaiswal, Christopher J. Mungall, Justin Preece, Stefan Rensing, Barry Smith & Dennis W. Stevenson (2012). Ontologies as Integrative Tools for Plant Science. American Journal of Botany 99 (8):1-13.
    Bio-ontologies are essential tools for accessing and analyzing the rapidly growing pool of plant genomic and phenomic data. Ontologies provide structured vocabularies to support consistent aggregation of data and a semantic framework for automated analyses and reasoning. They are a key component of the Semantic Web. This paper provides background on what bio-ontologies are, why they are relevant to botany, and the principles of ontology development. It includes an overview of ontologies and related resources that are relevant to (...) science, with a detailed description of the Plant Ontology (PO). We discuss the challenges of building an ontology that covers all green plants (Viridiplantae). Key results: Ontologies can advance plant science in four keys areas: 1. comparative genetics, genomics, phenomics, and development, 2. taxonomy and systematics, 3. semantic applications and 4. education. Conclusions: Bio-ontologies offer a flexible framework for comparative plant biology, based on common botanical understanding. As genomic and phenomic data become available for more species, we anticipate that the annotation of data with ontology terms will become less centralized, while at the same time, the need for cross-species queries will become more common, causing more researchers in plant science to turn to ontologies. (shrink)
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  46.  8
    Andreas Blank (2010). Julius Caesar Scaliger on Plant Generation and the Question of Species Constancy. Early Science and Medicine 15 (3):266-286.
    The sixteenth-century physician and philosopher Julius Caesar Scaliger combines the view that living beings are individuated by a single substantial form with the view that the constituents of the organic body retain their identity due to the continued existence and operation of their own substantial forms. This essay investigates the implications of Scaliger's account of subordinate and dominant substantial forms for the question of the constancy of biological species. According to Scaliger, biological mutability involves not only change on the ontological (...)
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  47.  7
    David A. Cleveland (2001). Is Plant Breeding Science Objective Truth or Social Construction? The Case of Yield Stability. Agriculture and Human Values 18 (3):251-270.
    This article presents a holistic framework for understanding the scienceof plant breeding, as an alternative to the common objectivist andconstructivist approaches in studies of science. It applies thisapproach to understanding disagreements about how to deal with yieldstability. Two contrasting definitions of yield stability are described,and concomitant differences in the understanding and roles ofsustainability and of selection, test, and target environments areexplored. Critical questions about plant breeding theory and practiceare posed, and answers from the viewpoint of the two contrastingdefinitions (...)
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  48.  4
    Nicolas Rasmussen (1999). The Forgotten Promise of Thiamin: Merck, Caltech Biologists, and Plant Hormones in a 1930s Biotechnology Project. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):245 - 261.
    The physiology of plant hormones was one of the most dynamic fields in experimental biology in the 1930s, and an important part of T. H. Morgan's influential life science division at the California Institute of Technology. I describe one episode of plant physiology research at the institution in which faculty member James Bonner discovered that the B vitamin thiamin is a plant growth regulator, and then worked in close collaboration with the Merck pharmaceutical firm to develop it (...)
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  49.  7
    Renata Sõukand & Raivo Kalle (2010). Plant as Object Within Herbal Landscape: Different Kinds of Perception. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (3):299-313.
    This contribution takes the notion of herbal landscape (a mental field associated with plants used to cure or prevent diseases and established within specific cultural and climatic zones) as a starting point. The authors argue that the features by which a person recognises the plant in the natural growing environment is of crucial importance for the classification and the use of plants within the folk tradition. The process of perception of the plant can be divided into analytical categories (...)
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  50.  10
    Paul D. Brinkman (2010). Charles Darwin's Beagle Voyage, Fossil Vertebrate Succession, and "The Gradual Birth & Death of Species". [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):363 - 399.
    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he (...)
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