Search results for 'plant succession' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeanne Millet, André Bouchard & Claude Édelin (1998). Plant Succession and Tree Architecture: An Attempt at Reconciling Two Scales of Analysis of Vegetation Dynamics. Acta Biotheoretica 46 (1).score: 180.0
    Plant succession is a phenomenon ascribed to vegetation dynamics at the scale of the plant community. The study of plant succession implies the analysis of the species involved and their relationships. Depending on the research done, the characteristics of trees have been studied according to either static, dimensional or partial approaches. We have revised the principal theories of succession, the methods of describing structure and development of tree and relationship established between tree species' attributes (...)
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  2. Valerie K. Brown (1984). Secondary Succession: Insect-Plant Relationships. BioScience 34 (11):710-716.score: 120.0
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  3. Arnold G. Van der Valk (2013). From Formation to Ecosystem: Tansley's Response to Clements' Climax. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology:1-29.score: 72.0
    Arthur G. Tansley never accepted Frederic E. Clements’ view that succession is a developmental process whose final stage, the climax formation, is determined primarily by regional climate and that all other types of vegetation are some kind of successional stage or arrested successional stage. Tansley was convinced that in a given region a variety of environmental factors could produce different kinds of climax formations. At the heart of their dispute was Clements’ organicist view of succession, i.e., the formation (...)
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  4. Christopher H. Eliot (2011). Competition Theory and Channeling Explanation. Philosophy and Theory in Biology 3 (20130604):1-16.score: 62.0
    The complexity and heterogeneity of causes influencing ecology’s domain challenge its capacity to generate a general theory without exceptions, raising the question of whether ecology is capable, even in principle, of achieving the sort of theoretical success enjoyed by physics. Weber has argued that competition theory built around the Competitive Exclusion Principle (especially Tilman’s resource-competition model) offers an example of ecology identifying a law-like causal regularity. However, I suggest that as Weber presents it, the CEP is not yet a causal (...)
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  5. W. Brad Barbazuk, Joseph A. Bedell & Pablo D. Rabinowicz (2005). Reduced Representation Sequencing: A Success in Maize and a Promise for Other Plant Genomes. Bioessays 27 (8):839-848.score: 50.0
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  6. Temple Grandin (2010). Successful Technology Transfer of Behavioral and Animal Welfare Research to the Farm and Slaughter Plant. In , Improving Animal Welfare: A Practical Approach. Cab International.score: 50.0
     
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  7. John D. Thompson (1991). The Biology of an Invasive Plant What Makes Spartina Anglica so Successful? BioScience 41 (6):393-401.score: 50.0
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  8. Johann Baumgärtner & Josef Hartmann (2001). The Design and Implementation of Sustainable Plant Diversity Conservation Program for Alpine Meadows and Pastures. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (1):67-83.score: 38.0
    The paper describes the design and implementation of a plant biodiversity conservation program that was developed under funding and time constraints for diverse ecological, social, and institutional environments. The biodiversity program for alpine meadows and pastures located in the Swiss Canton of the Grisons is used as an example. The design of the sustainable program relied on existing legislation, accounted for limited ecological knowledge and expertise, and considered biodiversity as a common-pool resource. The trend to intensified cultivation of restricted (...)
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  9. Thomas Wieland (2006). Scientific Theory and Agricultural Practice: Plant Breeding in Germany From the Late 19th to the Early 20th Century. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (2):309 - 343.score: 38.0
    The paper deals with the transformation of plant breeding from an agricultural practice into an applied academic science in the late 19th and early 20th centuries Germany. The aim is to contribute to the ongoing debate about the relationship between science and technology. After a brief discussion of this debate the first part of the paper examines how pioneers of plant breeding developed their breeding methods and commercially successful varieties. The focus here is on the role of scientific (...)
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  10. V. G. Thomas & P. G. Kevan (1993). Basic Principles of Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (1):1-19.score: 36.0
    In the final analysis, sustainable agriculture must derive from applied ecology, especially the principle of the regulation of the abundance and distribution of species (and, secondarily, their activities) in space and time. Interspecific competition in natural ecosystems has its counterparts in agriculture, designed to divert greater amounts of energy, nutrients, and water into crops. Whereas natural ecosystems select for a diversity of species in communities, recent agriculture has minimized diversity in favour of vulnerable monocultures. Such systems show intrinsically less stability (...)
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  11. Peter E. Millspaugh (1990). Plant Closing Ethics Root in American Law. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (8):665 - 670.score: 30.0
    The harsh consequences of the American plant closing epidemic in recent years on workers, their families, and their communities, has raised widespread ethical and moral concerns. In the early 1970s, a diverse group of academics, social activists, public policy analysts, and special interest organizations developed a number of legislative proposals designed to restrict closings by law. The proposals encountered many formidable obstacles in an increasingly hostile free-market environment. The business community was itself moved to assume some of the burdens (...)
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  12. Nina Shishkoff (1993). Plant Diseases and Their Control by Biological Means in Cuba. Agriculture and Human Values 10 (3):24-30.score: 30.0
    Beginning in 1989, the breakup of the Soviet Bloc disrupted trade and cut off Cuba's source of subsidized fuel oil, making many modern agricultural practices impossible, including the wide use of pesticides. Among Cuba's responses was an emphasis on biological control of plant diseases. Research into biological control began in the 1930s, and after the revolution many scientists maintained an unofficial interest. When the 1989 economic crisis occurred, the government placed a high priority on biocontrol, and researchers were in (...)
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  13. Ramona Walls, Balaji Athreya, Laurel Cooper, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Pankaj Jaiswal, Christopher J. Mungall, Justin Preece, Stefan Rensing, Barry Smith & Dennis W. Stevenson (2012). Ontologies as Integrative Tools for Plant Science. American Journal of Botany 99 (8):1-13.score: 24.0
    Bio-ontologies are essential tools for accessing and analyzing the rapidly growing pool of plant genomic and phenomic data. Ontologies provide structured vocabularies to support consistent aggregation of data and a semantic framework for automated analyses and reasoning. They are a key component of the Semantic Web. This paper provides background on what bio-ontologies are, why they are relevant to botany, and the principles of ontology development. It includes an overview of ontologies and related resources that are relevant to (...) science, with a detailed description of the Plant Ontology (PO). We discuss the challenges of building an ontology that covers all green plants (Viridiplantae). Key results: Ontologies can advance plant science in four keys areas: 1. comparative genetics, genomics, phenomics, and development, 2. taxonomy and systematics, 3. semantic applications and 4. education. Conclusions: Bio-ontologies offer a flexible framework for comparative plant biology, based on common botanical understanding. As genomic and phenomic data become available for more species, we anticipate that the annotation of data with ontology terms will become less centralized, while at the same time, the need for cross-species queries will become more common, causing more researchers in plant science to turn to ontologies. (shrink)
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  14. Christophe Bonneuil (2006). Mendelism, Plant Breeding and Experimental Cultures: Agriculture and the Development of Genetics in France. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (2):281 - 308.score: 24.0
    The article reevaluates the reception of Mendelism in France, and more generally considers the complex relationship between Mendelism and plant breeding in the first half on the 20th century. It shows on the one side that agricultural research and higher education institutions have played a key role in the development and institutionalization of genetics in France, whereas university biologists remained reluctant to accept this approach on heredity. But on the other side, plant breeders, and agricultural researchers, despite an (...)
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  15. Paul D. Brinkman (2010). Charles Darwin's Beagle Voyage, Fossil Vertebrate Succession, and "The Gradual Birth & Death of Species". [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):363 - 399.score: 24.0
    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he (...)
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  16. Richard Doyle (2012). Healing with Plant Intelligence: A Report From Ayahuasca. Anthropology of Consciousness 23 (1):28-43.score: 24.0
    Numerous and diverse reports indicate the efficacy of shamanic plant adjuncts (e.g., iboga, ayahuasca, psilocybin) for the care and treatment of addiction, post-traumatic stress disorder, cancer, cluster headaches, and depression. This article reports on a first-person healing of lifelong asthma and atopic dermatitis in the shamanic context of the contemporary Peruvian Amazon and the sometimes digital ontology of online communities. The article suggests that emerging language, concepts, and data drawn from the sciences of plant signaling and behavior regarding (...)
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  17. Edith T. Lammerts Van Bueren & Paul C. Struik (2005). Integrity and Rights of Plants: Ethical Notions in Organic Plant Breeding and Propagation. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (5):479-493.score: 24.0
    In addition to obviating the use of synthetic agrochemicals and emphasizing farming in accordance with agro-ecological guidelines, organic farming acknowledges the integrity of plants as an essential element of its natural approaches to crop production. For cultivated plants, integrity refers to their inherent nature, wholeness, completeness, species-specific characteristics, and their being in balance with their (organically farmed) environment, while accomplishing their “natural aim.” We argue that this integrity of plants has ethical value, distinguishing integrity of life, plant-typic integrity, genotypic (...)
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  18. Anna Lydia Svalastog, Petter Gustafsson & Stefan Jansson (2006). Comparative Analysis of the Risk-Handling Procedures for Gene Technology Applications in Medical and Plant Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):465-479.score: 24.0
    In this paper we analyse how the risks associated with research on transgenic plants are regulated in Sweden. The paper outlines the way in which pilot projects in the plant sciences are overseen in Sweden, and discusses the international and national background to the current regulatory system. The historical, and hitherto unexplored, reasons for the evolution of current administrative and legislative procedures in plant science are of particular interest. Specifically, we discuss similarities and differences in the regulation of (...)
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  19. Søren Løkke & Per Christensen (2008). The Introduction of the Precautionary Principle in Danish Environmental Policy: The Case of Plant Growth Retardants. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (3):229-247.score: 24.0
    In this paper, we investigate the Precautionary Principle (PP) in action. Precaution is a fairly new concept in environmental policy. It emerged back in the 1960s but did not consolidate until the 1980s, as it formed part of the major changes taking place in environmental policies at that time. The PP is examined in three contexts. Firstly, we look at the meaning of the concept and how it is disseminated through the media and public discourses to the political arenas of (...)
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  20. Petra Werner & Frederic L. Holmes (2002). Justus Liebig and the Plant Physiologists. Journal of the History of Biology 35 (3):421 - 441.score: 24.0
    In his book "Organic Chemistry in its Application to Agriculture and Chemistry." Justus Liebig attacked "the plant physiologists" for their support of the humus theory and for their general ignorance of chemistry. Two leading botanists, Matthias Schleiden and Hugo von Mohl, responded by sharply criticizing Liebig for his lack of knowledge of plants and his misrepresentation of the views of plant physiologists. The origin and character of this debate can be understood in part through the temperaments of Liebig (...)
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  21. Asta Dambrauskaitė (2010). Transfer of the Rights of Succession (text only in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 122 (4):111-133.score: 24.0
    The article deals with a specific type of contract that an heir is entitled to conclude—the transfer (or sale) of the rights of succession. As a starting point, the author of the article analyses the formation and further development of the transfer of succession as a whole (hereditas) in the Roman law. Two major proceedings used by Roman lawyers for the purposes of the alienation of hereditas are analysed, one being in iure cessio hereditatis and the second taking (...)
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  22. Birutė Kunigėlytė-Žiūkienė (2013). Diplomatic Protection and Questions Related to Succession of States. Jurisprudence 20 (2):591-609.score: 24.0
    Succession of states regains its importance in current geopolitical situation as now we are witnessing a possible new wave of state succession: South Sudan has been accepted to the United Nations, Kosovo’s independence has been recognized by many countries, Palestine has gained new status in the United Nations, etc. This would lead to the necessity to resolve questions related to succession of states, which might, among other subjects, include issues of diplomatic protection which was subject to international (...)
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  23. Daniel Monk (2011). Sexuality and Succession Law: Beyond Formal Equality. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 19 (3):231-250.score: 24.0
    This article endeavours to open up a dialogue between succession law and the field of gender, sexuality and the law. It presents a detailed analysis of five cases concerning inheritance disputes relating to lesbians or gay men. The sexuality of the parties in the cases is ‘doctrinally irrelevant’ but the analysis demonstrates the significance of sexuality in the resolution of the legal disputes. In doing so it identifies how legal discourse remains a critical site for the production of societal (...)
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  24. Nicolas Rasmussen (1999). The Forgotten Promise of Thiamin: Merck, Caltech Biologists, and Plant Hormones in a 1930s Biotechnology Project. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):245 - 261.score: 24.0
    The physiology of plant hormones was one of the most dynamic fields in experimental biology in the 1930s, and an important part of T. H. Morgan's influential life science division at the California Institute of Technology. I describe one episode of plant physiology research at the institution in which faculty member James Bonner discovered that the B vitamin thiamin is a plant growth regulator, and then worked in close collaboration with the Merck pharmaceutical firm to develop it (...)
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  25. Stephen G. Sherwood (1997). Little Things Mean a Lot: Working with Central American Farmers to Address the Mystery of Plant Disease. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 14 (2):181-189.score: 24.0
    Cornell University and Zamorano (ThePanamerican School of Agriculture) facilitatedworkshops that provided Honduran and Nicaraguanfarmers new experience with plant diseases and helpedfarmers assimilate information and identify diseasemanagement alternatives. After learning about thebiology of plant diseases, farmers were able toidentify disease problems in their field, enablingthem to use pesticides more selectively. Furthermore,participants of seven courses conceived 273 pathogen-specificmanagement alternatives, and they identifiedon average 66 percent of the common recommendations by plantpathologists for the control of general disease types.Many ideas were novel (...)
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  26. David A. Cleveland (2001). Is Plant Breeding Science Objective Truth or Social Construction? The Case of Yield Stability. Agriculture and Human Values 18 (3):251-270.score: 24.0
    This article presents a holistic framework for understanding the scienceof plant breeding, as an alternative to the common objectivist andconstructivist approaches in studies of science. It applies thisapproach to understanding disagreements about how to deal with yieldstability. Two contrasting definitions of yield stability are described,and concomitant differences in the understanding and roles ofsustainability and of selection, test, and target environments areexplored. Critical questions about plant breeding theory and practiceare posed, and answers from the viewpoint of the two contrastingdefinitions (...)
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  27. Sylvie Pouteau (2014). Beyond “Second Animals”: Making Sense of Plant Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (1):1-25.score: 24.0
    Concern for what we do to plants is pivotal for the field of environmental ethics but has scarcely been voiced. This paper examines how plant ethics first emerged from the development of plant science and yet also hit theoretical barriers in that domain. It elaborates on a case study prompted by a legal article on “the dignity of creatures” in the Swiss Constitution. Interestingly, the issue of plant dignity was interpreted as a personification or rather an “animalization (...)
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  28. Andrew Alexandra & Adrian Walsh (1997). Exclusion, Commodification and Plant Variety Rights Legislation. Agriculture and Human Values 14 (4):313-323.score: 24.0
    Plant variety rights legislation, now enactedin most Western countries, fosters the commodificationof plant varieties. In this paper, we look at theconceptual issues involved in understanding andjustifying this commodification, with particularemphasis on Australian legislation. The paper isdivided into three sections. In the first, we lay outa taxonomy of goods, drawing on this in the secondsection to point out that the standard justificationof the allocation of exclusionary property rights byappeal to scarcity will not do for abstract goods suchas plant (...)
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  29. Renata Sõukand & Raivo Kalle (2010). Plant as Object Within Herbal Landscape: Different Kinds of Perception. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (3):299-313.score: 24.0
    This contribution takes the notion of herbal landscape (a mental field associated with plants used to cure or prevent diseases and established within specific cultural and climatic zones) as a starting point. The authors argue that the features by which a person recognises the plant in the natural growing environment is of crucial importance for the classification and the use of plants within the folk tradition. The process of perception of the plant can be divided into analytical categories (...)
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  30. Matthew K. Chew (2009). The Monstering of Tamarisk: How Scientists Made a Plant Into a Problem. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 42 (2):231 - 266.score: 22.0
    Dispersal of biota by humans is a hallmark of civilization, but the results are often unforeseen and sometimes costly. Like kudzu vine in the American South, some examples become the stuff of regional folklore. In recent decades, "invasion biology," conservation-motivated scientists and their allies have focused largely on the most negative outcomes and often promoted the perception that introduced species are monsters. However, cases of monstering by scientists preceded the rise of popular environmentalism. The story of tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), flowering (...)
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  31. Franck Varenne (2001). What Does a Computer Simulation Prove? The Case of Plant Modeling at CIRAD. In N. Giambiasi & C. Frydman (eds.), Simulation in industry - ESS 2001, Proc. of the 13th European Simulation Symposium. Society for Computer Simulation (SCS).score: 21.0
    The credibility of digital computer simulations has always been a problem. Today, through the debate on verification and validation, it has become a key issue. I will review the existing theses on that question. I will show that, due to the role of epistemological beliefs in science, no general agreement can be found on this matter. Hence, the complexity of the construction of sciences must be acknowledged. I illustrate these claims with a recent historical example. Finally I temperate this diversity (...)
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  32. Andreas Blank (2010). Julius Caesar Scaliger on Plant Generation and the Question of Species Constancy. Early Science and Medicine 15 (3):266-286.score: 21.0
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  33. Laurel Cooper, Ramona Walls, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Dennis W. Stevenson & Barry Smith (2013). The Plant Ontology as a Tool for Comparative Plant Anatomy and Genomic Analyses. Plant and Cell Physiology 54:1-23..score: 21.0
    The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/) is a publicly-available, collaborative effort to develop and maintain a controlled, structured vocabulary (“ontology”) of terms to describe plant anatomy, morphology and the stages of plant development. The goals of the PO are to link (annotate) gene expression and phenotype data to plant structures and stages of plant development, using the data model adopted by the Gene Ontology. From its original design covering only rice, maize and Arabidopsis, the scope of (...)
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  34. Scott W. Behie & Michael J. Bidochka (2013). Potential Agricultural Benefits Through Biotechnological Manipulation of Plant Fungal Associations. Bioessays 35 (4):328-331.score: 21.0
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  35. J. M. Stephens (1936). The Conditioned Reflex as the Explanation of Habit Formation: III. The Operation of Two Higher-Order Reactions in Close Succession. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (1):77.score: 21.0
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  36. Donald H. Thor (1970). Discrimination of Succession in Visual Masking by Retarded and Normal Children. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (3p1):380.score: 21.0
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  37. Thejasvi Beleyur, Valiya Kadavu Abdul Kareem, Anil Shaji & Kalika Prasad (2013). A Mathematical Basis for Plant Patterning Derived From Physico-Chemical Phenomena. Bioessays 35 (4):366-376.score: 21.0
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  38. Veronica Vazquez-Garcia (2008). Gender, Ethnicity, and Economic Status in Plant Management: Uncultivated Edible Plants Among the Nahuas and Popolucas of Veracruz, Mexico. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (1):65-77.score: 20.0
    Uncultivated plants are an important part of agricultural systems and play a key role in the survival of rural marginalized groups such as women, children, and the poor. Drawing on the gender, environment, and development literature and on the notion of women’s social location, this paper examines the ways in which gender, ethnicity, and economic status determine women’s roles in uncultivated plant management in Ixhuapan and Ocozotepec, two indigenous communities of Veracruz, Mexico. The first is inhabited by Nahua and (...)
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  39. Michael Pelczar (2010). Must an Appearance of Succession Involve a Succession of Appearances? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (1):49-63.score: 18.0
    It is argued that a subject who has an experience as of succession can have this experience at a time, or over a period of time, during which there occurs in him no succession of conscious mental states at all. Various metaphysical implications of this conclusion are explored. One premise of the main argument is that every experience is an experience as of succession. This implies that we cannot understand phenomenal temporality as a relation among experiences, but (...)
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  40. Ellen Clarke (2012). Plant Individuality: A Solution to the Demographer's Dilemma. Biology and Philosophy 27 (3):321-361.score: 18.0
    The problem of plant individuality is something which has vexed botanists throughout the ages, with fashion swinging back and forth from treating plants as communities of individuals (Darwin 1800 ; Braun and Stone 1853 ; Münch 1938 ) to treating them as organisms in their own right, and although the latter view has dominated mainstream thought most recently (Harper 1977 ; Cook 1985 ; Ariew and Lewontin 2004 ), a lively debate conducted mostly in Scandinavian journals proves that the (...)
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  41. Oliver Rashbrook (2013). An Appearance of Succession Requires a Succession of Appearances. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 87 (3):584-610.score: 18.0
    A familiar slogan in the literature on temporal experience is that ‘a succession of appearances, in and of itself, does not amount to an experience of succession’. I show that we can distinguish between a strong and a weak sense of this slogan. I diagnose the strong interpretation of the slogan as requiring the support of an assumption I call the ‘Seems→Seemed’ claim. I then show that commitment to this assumption comes at a price: if we accept it, (...)
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  42. Annika Beelitz & Doris M. Merkl-Davies (2012). Using Discourse to Restore Organisational Legitimacy: 'CEO-Speak' After an Incident in a German Nuclear Power Plant. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):101-120.score: 18.0
    We analyse managerial discourse in corporate communication (‘CEO-speak’) during a 6-month period following a legitimacy-threatening event in the form of an incident in a German nuclear power plant. As discourses express specific stances expressed by a group of people who share particular beliefs and values, they constitute an important means of restoring organisational legitimacy when social rules and norms have been violated. Using an analytical framework based on legitimacy as a process of reciprocal sense-making and consisting of three levels (...)
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  43. Christoph Hoerl (2013). 'A Succession of Feelings, in and of Itself, is Not a Feeling of Succession'. Mind 122 (486):373-417.score: 18.0
    Variants of the slogan that a succession of experiences (in and of itself) does not amount to an experience of succession are commonplace in the philosophical literature on temporal experience. I distinguish three quite different arguments that might be captured using this slogan: the individuation argument, the unity argument, and the causal argument. Versions of the unity and the causal argument are often invoked in support of a particular view of the nature of temporal experience sometimes called intentionalism, (...)
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  44. Sara T. Scharf (2009). Identification Keys, the "Natural Method," and the Development of Plant Identification Manuals. Journal of the History of Biology 42 (1):73 - 117.score: 18.0
    The origins of field guides and other plant identification manuals have been poorly understood until now because little attention has been paid to 18th century botanical identification guides. Identification manuals came to have the format we continue to use today when botanical instructors in post-Revolutionary France combined identification keys (step-wise analyses focusing on distinctions between plants) with the "natural method" (clustering of similar plants, allowing for identification by gestalt) and alphabetical indexes. Botanical works featuring multiple but linked techniques to (...)
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  45. Mercy Kamara (2009). The Typology of the Game That American, British, and Danish Crop and Plant Scientists Play. Minerva 47 (4):441-463.score: 18.0
    Drawing from contemporary social science studies on the shifting regime of research governance, this paper extends the literature by utilizing a metaphoric image—research is a game—observed in a field engagement with 82 American, British, and Danish crop and plant scientists. It theorizes respondents’ thinking and practices by placing the rules of the research game in dynamic and interactive tension between the scientific, social, and political-economic contingencies that generate opportunities or setbacks. Scientists who play the game exploit opportunities and surmount (...)
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  46. Matthew Hall (2009). Plant Autonomy and Human-Plant Ethics. Environmental Ethics 31 (2):169-181.score: 18.0
    It has recently been asserted that legislative moves to consider plants as ethical subjects are philosophically foolish because plants lack autonomy. While by no means the sole basis or driving criterion for moral behavior, it is possible to directly challenge skeptical attitudes by constructing a human-plant ethics centered on fundamental notions of autonomy. Autonomous beings are agents who rule themselves, principally for their own purposes. A considerable body of evidence in the plant sciences is increasingly recognizing the capacity (...)
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  47. Jon Charles Miller (2008). Hume's Impression of Succession (Time). Dialogue 47 (3-4):603-.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT: In this article I argue that Hume's empiricism allows for time to exist as a real distinct impression of succession, not, as many claim, merely as a nominal abstract idea. In the first part of this article I show how for Hume it is succession and not duration that constitutes time, and, further, that only duration is fictional. In the second part, I show that according to the way Hume describes the functions of the memory and imagination, (...)
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  48. Rolf Sattler (1990). Towards a More Dynamic Plant Morphology. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (3-4).score: 18.0
    From the point of view of a dynamic morphology, form is not only the result of process(es) — it is process. This process may be analyzed in terms of two pairs of fundamental processes: growth and decay, differentiation and dedifferentiation. Each of these processes can be analyzed in terms of various modalities (parameters) and submodalities. This paper deals with those of growth (see Table 1). For the purpose of systematits and phylogenetic reconstruction the modalities and submodalities can be considered dynamic (...)
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  49. T. Zarcone (2005). The Myth of the Mandrake, the 'Plant-Human'. Diogenes 52 (3):115 - 129.score: 18.0
    There is no plant that embodies the encounter between humans and plants better than the mandrake, whose myth, as Arlette Bouloumié writes, ‘has the cosmic sense of a profound correlation between nature and humanity and the possibility of their merging’. Zarcone presents a collection of extracts on this theme, under three main headings: (1) ancient documents in which legend and scholarship are mixed in varying degrees; (2) contemporary scholarly studies; and (3) literary texts.
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  50. Ming Anthony & Rolf Sattler (1990). Pathological Ramification of Leaves and the Pyramid Model of Plant Construction. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (3-4).score: 18.0
    Pathological morphogenesis on leaves of Fraxinus ornus (ash) and Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) under the influence of mites (Aceria fraxinivora and Eriophyes cladophthirus respectively) leads to a range of structures whose morphology and development cannot be reduced to the classical categories of plant morphology, but present a heterogeneous continuum which links fundamental structural categories. These findings support the pyramid model of plant construction.
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