Search results for 'popular philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  24
    William James (1979). The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. Harvard University Press.
    This is the sixth volume to be published in The Works of William James, an authoritative edition sponsored by the American Council of Learned Societies.
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  2. J. E. King (2007). Popular Philosophy and Popular Economics: Bertrand Russell, 1919–70. Russell 27 (2).
    By 1918 Bertrand Russell had well-formed and distinctive opinions on many aspects of economic philosophy, theory and policy. In the second half of his life he wrote at great length on a very wide range of economic issues, including modern technology and the prospects for abolishing scarcity; population growth, eugenics and birth control; the economic development of China; the case for democratic socialism; the case against Soviet communism; the causes of economic crises; and the economic background to war and (...)
     
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  3. William James (1956). The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. Human Immortality; Two Supposed Objections to the Doctrine. Dover Publications.
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  4. William James (1956). The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy, and Human Immortality. Dover Publications.
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  5. F. C. S. Schiller (1935). Must Philosophers Disagree? And Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. Philosophical Review 44 (4):397-398.
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  6.  74
    David Wittenberg (2013). Time Travel: The Popular Philosophy of Narrative. Fordham University Press.
    Introduction: Time travel and the mechanics of narrative -- Macrological fictions: evolutionary utopia and time travel (1887-1905) -- Historical interval I: the first time travel story -- Relativity, psychology, paradox: Wertenbaker to Heinlein (1923-1941) -- Historical interval II: three phases of time travel--the time machine -- The big time: multiple worlds, narrative viewpoint, and superspace -- Paradox and paratext: picturing narrative theory -- Theoretical interval: the primacy of the visual in time travel narrative -- Viewpoint-over-histories: narrative conservation in Star Trek (...)
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  7. William James (2014). The Will to Believe: And Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    For this 1897 publication, the American philosopher William James brought together ten essays, some of which were originally talks given to Ivy League societies. Accessible to a broader audience, these non-technical essays illustrate the author's pragmatic approach to belief and morality, arguing for faith and action in spite of uncertainty. James thought his audiences suffered 'paralysis of their native capacity for faith' while awaiting scientific grounds for belief. His response consisted in an attitude of 'radical empiricism', which deals practically rather (...)
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  8.  8
    Eduard Zwierlein (1988). Popular Philosophy and Experiential Psychology in the Work of Karl Philipp Moritz. Philosophy and History 21 (2):148-149.
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  9.  4
    John Laird (1935). Must Philosophers Disagree? And Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. By F. C. S. Schiller . (London: Macmillan & Co. 1934. Pp. Xi + 359 Price 12s. 6d. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 10 (39):373-.
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  10. Peter Heinegg (2007). Oh, Wait-Now I Get It: Essays in Popular Philosophy. Hamilton Books.
    Like war and politics, philosophy is too important to be left to professionals. Oh Wait_Now I Get It illustrates this basic truth by tackling a broad spectrum of issues, which include: history, religion, government, sex, family, and death. In fact, the entire contemporary cultural scene from the perspective of a thoughtful amateur philosopher is brought forth within this book. Recalling Neitzsche's dictum that all philosophy is also confession, Professor Peter Heinegg begins with some autobiographical pieces on his background, (...)
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  11. P. H. Partridge (1935). Must Philosophers Disagree? And Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 13:82.
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  12. John D. Lantos (2001). Confessions of a Medicine Man: An Essay in Popular Philosophy (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 44 (1):132-134.
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  13. Roger Smith (2002). Alfred Tauber: Medicine is Ethics Alfred I. Tauber (1999) Confessions of a Medicine Man: An Essay in Popular Philosophy. Cambridge, MA: Bradford Book, MIT Press. Xviii + 159 Pp. Alfred I. Tauber (2001) Thoreau and the Moral Agency of Knowing. Berkeley: University of California Press. Xi + 317 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 15 (4):145-151.
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  14.  2
    Alfred I. Tauber (2000). Confessions of a Medicine Man: An Essay in Popular Philosophy. A Bradford Book.
    This book probes the ethical structure of contemporary medicine in an argument accessible to lay readers, healthcare professionals, and ethicists alike.
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  15.  14
    Andrew J. Reck (1980). The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 20 (2):236-238.
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  16.  18
    Daniel P. Malloy (2012). Four Recent Works in Philosophy and Popular Culture. Teaching Philosophy 35 (3):293-304.
    Popular culture is ubiquitous. And referencing popular culture can be an excellent pedagogical tool. Used properly, it provides students with easily accessible examples—in some cases examples they have already been interested in. Given these facts, the creation and expansion of the literature on the intersection of popular culture and philosophy is not surprising. The purpose of these volumes has been controversial since their inception, but they do seem ideally suited as introductory texts. This essay examines four (...)
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  17.  6
    M. Clayton (2000). Confessions of a Medicine Man: An Essay in Popular Philosophy: Alfred I Tauber, Cambridge, Mass, The MIT Press, 1999, 159 + Xviii Pages, Pound17.50 (Hb). [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (6):482-a-483.
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  18.  9
    John Huss (2014). Popular Culture and Philosophy: Rules of Engagement. Essays in Philosophy 15 (1):19-32.
    The exploration of popular culture topics by academic philosophers for non-academic audiences has given rise to a distinctive genre of philosophical writing. Edited volumes with titles such as Black Sabbath and Philosophy or Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy contain chapters by multiple philosophical authors that attempt to bring philosophy to popular audiences. Two dominant models have emerged in the genre. On the pedagogical model, authors use popular culture examples to teach the reader (...). The end is to promote philosophical literacy, defined as acquaintance with the key problems, ideas, and figures in the history of philosophy. In contrast, on the applied philosophy model, authors use philosophy to open up new dimensions of the popular culture topic for fans. The end is to illustrate the value of philosophy in understanding the popular culture topic, and ultimately, to demonstrate the value of philosophy in general. Taking stock of the relative strengths and weaknesses of these two models provides an opportunity to reflect more broadly on whether, why, and how philosophers should engage the public. (shrink)
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  19.  9
    William Irwin (2014). Writing for the Reader: A Defense of Philosophy and Popular Culture Books. Essays in Philosophy 15 (1):77-85.
    There are some risks in producing public philosophy. We don’t want to misrepresent the work of philosophy or mislead readers into thinking they have learned all they need to know from a single, short book or article. The potential benefits, though, outweigh the risks. Public philosophy can disseminate important ideas and enhance appreciation for the difficult and complex work of philosophers. Popular writing is often less precise, lacking in fine detail and elaboration, but it can still (...)
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  20.  3
    W. L. Farrer (1935). Must Philosophers Disagree? And Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. The Eugenics Review 26 (4):297.
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  21.  5
    Sven Ove Hansson (2004). Editorial: Popular Philosophy. Theoria 70 (2-3):117-118.
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  22.  2
    Reddy (1925). Scholasticism as a Popular Philosophy. Modern Schoolman 1 (3):8-10.
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  23.  7
    D. S. Miller (1898). Book Review: The Will to Believe, and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. William James. [REVIEW] Ethics 8 (2):254-.
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  24. A. C. Armstrong (1897). The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. Psychological Review 4 (5):527-529.
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  25. Stefano Bacin (2008). Critical Philosophy and Popular Philosophy in'Aufklarung'. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 63 (1):79-87.
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  26. William James (1897). The Will to Believe, and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. Philosophical Review 6 (3):331.
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  27. Rudolf Metz (1935). Schiller, F. C. S., Must Philosophers disagree? and other Essays in popular Philosophy. [REVIEW] Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 40:371.
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  28. D. S. Miller (1898). The Will to Believe, and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy.William James. International Journal of Ethics 8 (2):254-255.
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  29. David L. Miller (1980). William James, "The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy". [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 16 (1):73.
     
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  30. R. Mortier (1984). Diderot and the Project for a Popular Philosophy. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 38 (148):182-195.
     
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  31. Hilda D. Oakeley (1934). F. C. S. Schiller, Must Philosophers Disagree, and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. [REVIEW] Hibbert Journal 33:470.
     
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  32. J. G. Schurman & William James (1898). The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy. Philosophical Review 7 (1):86.
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  33.  3
    Alejandro Viveros Espinosa (2016). Perspectives on Rodolfo Kusch’s philosophy: method, popular approach and indigenous people as questioning horizons in Latin American philosophy. Alpha (Osorno) 42:215-232.
    El artículo recorre la obra de Rodolfo Kusch posicionando sus principales propuestas en la construcción de tres enfoques convergentes en su filosofía. El primer enfoque está relacionado con la fenomenología y la cultura. El segundo enfoque se refiere a la influencia de la antropología y el cuestionamiento por el símbolo. El tercer enfoque despliega una aproximación filosófico-política. Estos enfoques permiten introducir tres “horizontes de pregunta” principalmente relacionados con el método, con lo popular y con lo indígena, que son expuestos (...)
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  34.  1
    Linnell Secomb (2007). Philosophy and Love: From Plato to Popular Culture. Indiana University Press.
    Philosophy and Love introduces readers to philosophical reflections on love from Plato to the present. Bringing philosophy together with popular cultural analysis, Linnell Secomb provides an interesting and engaging account of theories of love throughout history. Along the way, reflections on same-sex desire, cross-cultural love, and internet romance are considered against the ideas of Nietzsche, Beauvoir, Irigaray, Derrida, and Fanon, and other contemporary cultural commentators on the human condition. The work also looks at cultural productions of love (...)
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  35.  8
    Debiprasad Chattopadhyaya (1964). Indian Philosophy: A Popular Introduction. [New Delhi]People's Pub. House.
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  36.  10
    Mysore Hiriyanna (1952). Popular Essays in Indian Philosophy. Kavyalaya Publishers.
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  37. James K. Feibleman (1978). Understanding Oriental Philosophy: A Popular Account for the Western World. Philosophy East and West 28 (3):376-378.
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  38. Mary Sanders Pollock & Catherine Rainwater (eds.) (2005). Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Figuring Animals is a collection of fifteen essays concerning the representation of animals in literature, the visual arts, philosophy, and cultural practice. At the turn of the new century, it is helpful to reconsider our inherited understandings of the species, some of which are still useful to us. It is also important to look ahead to new understandings and new dialogue, which may contribute to the survival of us all. The contributors to this volume participate in this dialogue in (...)
     
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  39.  14
    Jon D. Mikalson (2010). Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The chief concepts involved are those of piety and impiety, and after a thorough analysis of the philosophical texts Mikalson offers a refined definition of ...
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  40. Viktor Grigorʹevich Afanasʹev (1968). Marxist Philosophy: A Popular Outline. Moscow, Progress.
     
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  41. Maurice M. Kaunitz (1941). A Popular History of Philosophy. New York, N.Y.,The World Publishing Co..
     
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  42.  16
    Anna Lännström (2012). Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy. By Jon D. Mikalson. Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):446-452.
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  43.  15
    Anna Lännström (2012). Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy. By Jon D. Mikalson. Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):446-452.
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  44.  27
    Anna Lännström (2012). Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy. By Jon D. Mikalson. Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):446-452.
  45.  6
    Anna Lännström (2012). Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy. By Jon D. Mikalson. Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):446-452.
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  46.  5
    Anna Lännström (2012). Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy. By Jon D. Mikalson. Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):446-452.
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  47.  5
    Anna Lännström (2012). Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy. By Jon D. Mikalson. Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):446-452.
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  48.  10
    Jane Duran (1983). Teaching Philosophy as an Exercise in Popular Culture. Teaching Philosophy 6 (2):103-107.
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  49.  4
    Anna Lännström (2012). Greek Popular Religion in Greek Philosophy. By Jon D. Mikalson. Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):446-452.
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  50.  17
    Sigmund Loland (2009). 2. Sport and Popular Movements: Towards a Philosophy of Moving People. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 3 (2):121 – 138.
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