Search results for 'positivism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nadeem J. Z. Hussain (2004). Nietzsche's Positivism. European Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):326–368.score: 18.0
    Nietzsche’s favourable comments about science and the senses have recently been taken as evidence of naturalism. Others focus on his falsification thesis: our beliefs are falsifying interpretations of reality. Clark argues that Nietzsche eventually rejects this thesis. This article utilizes the multiple ways of being science friendly in Nietzsche’s context by focussing on Mach’s neutral monism. Mach’s positivism is a natural development of neo-Kantian positions Nietzsche was reacting to. Section 15 of Beyond Good and Evil is crucial to Clark’s (...)
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  2. Robert Alexy (2002). The Argument From Injustice: A Reply to Legal Positivism. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    At the heart of this book is the age-old question of how law and morality are related. The legal positivist, insisting on the separation of the two, explicates the concept of law independently of morality. The author challenges this view, arguing that there are, first, conceptually necessary connections between law and morality and, second, normative reasons for including moral elements in the concept of law.
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  3. Thom Brooks (2007). Between Natural Law and Legal Positivism: Dworkin and Hegel on Legal Theory. Georgia State University Law Review 23 (3):513-60.score: 18.0
    In this article, I argue that - despite the absence of any clear influence of one theory on the other - the legal theories of Dworkin and Hegel share several similar and, at times, unique positions that join them together within a distinctive school of legal theory, sharing a middle position between natural law and legal positivism. In addition, each theory can help the other in addressing certain internal difficulties. By recognizing both Hegel and Dworkin as proponents of a (...)
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  4. Kenneth M. Ehrenberg (2011). The Anarchist Official: A Problem for Legal Positivism. Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 36:89-112.score: 18.0
    I examine the impact of the presence of anarchists among key legal officials upon the legal positivist theories of H.L.A. Hart and Joseph Raz. For purposes of this paper, an anarchist is one who believes that the law cannot successfully obligate or create reasons for action beyond prudential reasons, such as avoiding sanction. I show that both versions of positivism require key legal officials to endorse the law in some way, and that if a legal system can continue to (...)
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  5. Michael Friedman (1999). Reconsidering Logical Positivism. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    In this collection of essays one of the preeminent philosophers of science writing today offers a reinterpretation of the enduring significance of logical positivism, the revolutionary philosophical movement centered around the Vienna Circle in the 1920s and '30s. Michael Friedman argues that the logical positivists were radicals not by presenting a new version of empiricism (as is often thought to be the case) but rather by offering a new conception of a priori knowledge and its role in empirical knowledge. (...)
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  6. Tom Campbell (2004). Prescriptive Legal Positivism: Law, Rights and Democracy. Cavendish Publishing.score: 18.0
    Tom Campbell is well known for his distinctive contributions to legal and political philosophy over three decades. In emphasising the moral and political importance of taking a positivist approach to law and rights, he has challenged current academic orthodoxies and made a powerful case for regaining and retaining democratic control over the content and development of human rights. This collection of his essays reaches back to his pioneering work on socialist rights in the 1980s and forward from his seminal book, (...)
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  7. Auguste Comte, A General View of Positivism.score: 18.0
    CHAPTER I THE INTELLECTUAL CHARACTER OF POSITIVISM The object of The object of all true Philosophy is Philosophy is to frame a system which shall compre- to ...
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  8. Robert P. George (ed.) (1996). The Autonomy of Law: Essays on Legal Positivism. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This collection of original papers from distinguished legal theorists offers a challenging assessment of the nature and viability of legal positivism, a branch of legal theory which continues to dominate contemporary legal theoretical debates. To what extent is the law adequately described as autonomous? Should law claim autonomy? These and other questions are addressed by the authors in this carefully edited collection, and it will be of interest to all lawyers and scholars interested in legal philosophy and legal theory.
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  9. Wilfrid J. Waluchow (1994). Inclusive Legal Positivism. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This book develops a general philosophical theory about the nature of law and its relationship with morality called inclusive legal positivism. In addition to articulating and defending his own version of legal positivism, which is a refinement and development of the views of H.L.A. Hart as expressed in his classic book The Concept of Law, the author clarifies the terms of current jurisprudential debates about the nature of law. These debates are often clouded by failures to appreciate that (...)
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  10. Matthew H. Kramer (1999). In Defense of Legal Positivism: Law Without Trimmings. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This book is an uncompromising defense of legal positivism that insists on the separability of law and morality. After distinguishing among three facets of morality, Kramer explores a variety of ways in which law has been perceived as integrally connected to each of those facets. The book concludes with a detailed discussion of the obligation to obey the law--a discussion that highlights the strengths of legal positivism in the domain of political philosophy as much as in the domain (...)
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  11. G. Pino (1999). The Place of Legal Positivism in Contemporary Constitutional States. Law and Philosophy 18 (5):513-536.score: 18.0
    The aim of the paper is that of discussing some recent antipositivist theses, with specific reference to the arguments that focus on the alleged incapability of legal positivism to understand and explain the complex normative structure of constitutional states. One of the central tenets of legal positivism (in its guise of ``methodological'' or ``conceptual'' positivism) is the theory of the separation between law and morality. On the assumption that in contemporary legal systems, constitutional law represents a point (...)
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  12. Anthony James Sebok (1998). Legal Positivism in American Jurisprudence. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This book represents a serious and philosophically sophisticated guide to modern American legal theory, demonstrating that legal positivism has been a misunderstood and underappreciated perspective through most of twentieth-century American legal thought. Anthony Sebok traces the roots of positivism through the first half of the twentieth century, and rejects the view that one must adopt some version of natural law theory in order to recognize moral principles in the law. On the contrary, once one corrects for the mistakes (...)
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  13. Stephen K. McLeod (2008). Knowledge of Necessity: Logical Positivism and Kripkean Essentialism. Philosophy 83 (324):179-191.score: 18.0
    By the lights of a central logical positivist thesis in modal epistemology, for every necessary truth that we know, we know it a priori and for every contingent truth that we know, we know it a posteriori. Kripke attacks on both flanks, arguing that we know necessary a posteriori truths and that we probably know contingent a priori truths. In a reflection of Kripke's confidence in his own arguments, the first of these Kripkean claims is far more widely accepted than (...)
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  14. John Stuart Mill (1961). Auguste Comte and Positivism. [Ann Arbor]University of Michigan Press.score: 18.0
    FOE, some time much has been said, in England and on the Continent, concerning " Positivism " and " the Positive Philosophy." Those phrases, which during ...
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  15. Joe Cain (2000). Woodger, Positivism, and the Evolutionary Synthesis. Biology and Philosophy 15 (4):535-551.score: 18.0
    In Unifying Biology, Smocovitis offers a series of claimsregarding the relationship between key actors in the synthesisperiod of evolutionary studies and positivism, especially claimsentailing Joseph Henry Woodger and the Unity of Science Movement.This commentary examines Woodger''s possible relevance to key synthesis actors and challenges Smocovitis'' arguments for theexplanatory relevance of logical positivism, and positivism moregenerally, to synthesis history. Under scrutiny, these arguments areshort on evidence and subject to substantial conceptual confusion.Though plausible, Smocovitis'' minimal interpretation – that somegeneralised (...)
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  16. Pierluigi Chiassoni (2011). Constitutionalism Out of a Positivist Mind Cast: The Garantismo Way. [REVIEW] Res Publica 17 (4):327-342.score: 18.0
    Among contemporary forms of constitutionalism, Luigi Ferrajoli’s Garantismo may be considered as the rather unfashionable attempt to build up a comprehensive and multi-layered theory, which still takes seriously the positivist heritage. This paper offers, in brief outline, a synthetic view of the social setting, the philosophical background, and the basic features of this conception of constitutionalism, when compared with legal positivism and other mainstream forms of (neo)constitutionalism.
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  17. John H. Zammito (2012). The Last Dogma of Positivism: Historicist Naturalism and the Fact/Value Dichotomy. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (3):305-338.score: 18.0
    Has the emergence of post-positivism in philosophy of science changed the terms of the “is/ought” dichotomy? If it has demonstrated convincingly that there are no “facts” apart from the theoretical frames and evaluative standards constructing them, can such a cordon sanitaire really be upheld between “facts” and values? The point I wish to stress is that philosophy of science has had a central role in constituting and imposing the fact/value dichotomy and a revolution in the philosophy of science should (...)
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  18. Robert C. Scharff (2013). Being Post-Positivist . . . Or Just Talking About It? Foundations of Science 18 (2):393-397.score: 18.0
    Hans Ruin and Patrick Heelan join me in celebrating the rise of post-positivist and phenomenological approaches to scientific and technological practice. Yet as they both know, I am also concerned that the very presence of all the new accounts which give voice to this trend may tempt us into concluding prematurely that the traditional understanding of science and technology has already been displaced. With especially Ruin’s encouragement, I expand my original discussion of this concern by explaining why I agree with (...)
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  19. Jim Mackenzie (2011). Positivism and Constructivism, Truth and 'Truth'. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):534-546.score: 18.0
    This paper is concerned with the reversal in meaning of the word positivism, which has come to mean ‘theory which assumes the existence of a world beyond our ideas’ whereas once it meant ‘theory which is agnostic about the existence of a world beyond our ideas', and with educational writers’ persistent mistakes in using quotation marks, as a consequence of this reversal.
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  20. Jane Duran (2005). Realism, Positivism and Reference. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (2):401 - 407.score: 18.0
    Depending on the realist or instrumentalist twist that is given to positivism, interesting arguments can be made for both causal and classical theories of reference with regard to the use of scientific terms in the language of theory. But my claim is that the rigid foundationalism that supports the theoretical terms via the correspondence rules of the Received View undercuts the notion that it is possible to argue coherently for a causal theory of reference as allied to a positivistic (...)
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  21. Robert C. Scharff (1995). Comte After Positivism. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This book provides a detailed, systematic reconsideration of the neglected nineteenth-century positivist Auguste Comte. Apart from offering an accurate account of what Comte actually wrote, the book argues that Comte's positivism has never had greater contemporary relevance than now. The aim of the first part of the book is to rescue Comte from the influential misinterpretation of his work by John Stuart Mill. The second part argues that this deep historically-minded concern with the tradition of philosophy for current philosophical (...)
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  22. Jane Duran (1995). Positivism's Heir. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 26 (1):25 - 34.score: 18.0
    Several lines of argument support the notion that the legacy of positivism (if cast in terms of the realist/instrumentalist debate) is more realist than not. Work by Joia Lewis and Alberto Coffa on both Schlick and Carnap is cited, and contemporary work from Van Fraassen and Boyd briefly alluded to. Note is made of the differences within contemporary realist theory, and it is included that Carnap's essay "Empiricism, Semantics and Ontology" is crucial for resolution of the debate. In closing (...)
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  23. Mario Jori (ed.) (1992). Legal Positivism. New York University Press.score: 18.0
    The aim of this collection of essays on legal positivism is to complete the already easily available English material on this subject. This is not a collection of writings by legal positivists, but about legal positivism.
     
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  24. Michael Singer (2005). The Legacy of Positivism. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 18.0
    This book gives a unique historical and interpretive analysis of a widely pervasive mode of thought that it describes as the legacy of positivism. Viewing Auguste Comte as a pivotal figure, it charts the historical origins of his positivism and follows its later development through John Stuart Mill and Emile Littre. It shows how epistemological shifts in positivism influenced parallel developments in the human and legal sciences, and thereby treats legal positivism and positivism as it (...)
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  25. George Steinmetz (ed.) (2005). The Politics of Method in the Human Sciences: Positivism and its Epistemological Others. Duke University Press.score: 18.0
     
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  26. T. R. Wright (1986). The Religion of Humanity: The Impact of Comtean Positivism on Victorian Britain. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    The Religion of Humanity, first expounded by the founder of Positivism, Auguste Comte, focused the minds of a wide range of prominent Victorians on the possibility of replacing Christianity with an alternative religion based on scientific principles and humanist values. This new book traces the impact of Comte's 'religion' on Victorian Britain, showing how its ideas were championed by John Stuart Mill and George Henry Lewes before being institutionalised by Richard Congreve and Frederic Harrison, the leaders of the two (...)
     
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  27. M. J. Detmold (1984). The Unity of Law and Morality: A Refutation of Legal Positivism. Routledge & Kegan Paul.score: 15.0
    I REASONS FOR ACTION.i Practical thought is concerned with action. Reasons for action are sometimes thought to be either conditional (conditional upon some ...
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  28. Kenneth Einar Himma, Legal Positivism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 15.0
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  29. Laurence D. Smith (1986). Behaviorism And Logical Positivism: A Reassessment Of The Alliance. Stanford: Stanford University Press.score: 15.0
    ONE Introduction The history of psychology in the twentieth century is a story of the divorce and remarriage of psychology and philosophy. ...
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  30. Frederick C. Copleston (2002/1979). Contemporary Philosophy: Studies of Logical Positivism and Existentialism. Continuum.score: 15.0
    Originally written in 1956 and revised in 1972, this book explores the work of many of the most important thinkers of the 20th century, including Ayer, ...
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  31. Koshy Tharakan (2006). Methodology of Social Sciences: Positivism, Anti-Positivism and the Phenomenological Mediation. Indian Journal of Social Work 67 (1):16-31.score: 15.0
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  32. Gary Gates (2001). Physicalism, Empiricism, and Positivism. In Carl Gillett & Barry M. Loewer (eds.), Physicalism and its Discontents. Cambridge University Press.score: 15.0
     
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  33. Ruth Groff (2004). Critical Realism, Post-Positivism, and the Possibility of Knowledge. Routledge.score: 15.0
    At the heart of contemporary relativism, is the idea that the world has no mind-independent characteristics. As there is no way that the world is on its own, any opinions held may be regarded as valid. Critical realism is a promising alternative to such a position. Critical realism allows for the conclusion that certain processes lead to specific outcomes regardless of how we think about them, which in turn places a limited but crucial check on relativism. Groff defends "realism about (...)
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  34. Roy Wood Sellars (1946). Positivism and Materialism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 7 (1):12-41.score: 15.0
  35. Gustav Bergmann (1978). The Metaphysics of Logical Positivism. Greenwood Press.score: 15.0
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  36. Thomas E. Uebel (1992). Overcoming Logical Positivism From Within: The Emergence of Neurath's Naturalism in the Vienna Circle's Protocol Sentence Debate. Rodopi.score: 15.0
    Chapter INTRODUCTION: OTTO NEURATH, THE VIENNA CIRCLE AND THE PROTOCOL SENTENCE DEBATE Everybody familiar with contemporary analytical philosophy is likely ...
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  37. Maurice Campbell Cornforth (1950). Science Vs. Idealism: In Defence of Philosophy, Against Positivism and Pragmatism. London, Lawrence & Wishart.score: 15.0
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  38. Tony Ward (2006). Two Schools of Legal Idealism: A Positivist Introduction. Ratio Juris 19 (2):127-140.score: 15.0
    This article provides a critical introduction to an issue fo Ratio Juris concerend with two contrasting schools of legal idealism: the so-called Sheffield School (Beyleveld, Brownsword and colleagues) and the “discourse ethics” school of Habermas and Alexy. The article focusses on four issues: (1) whether a "claim to correctness" is a necessary feature of law, (2) the connection between correctness and validity, (3) Alexy's argument for a "qualifying connection" between law and morality, and its counterpart in the Sheffield School's approach, (...)
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  39. Faye S. Routledge (2007). Exploring the Use of Feminist Philosophy Within Nursing Research to Enhance Post-Positivist Methodologies in the Study of Cardiovascular Health. Nursing Philosophy 8 (4):278-290.score: 15.0
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  40. Viktor Kraft (1953). The Vienna Circle, the Origin of Neo-Positivism. New York, Philosophical Library.score: 15.0
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  41. C. E. M. Joad (1950). A Critique of Logical Positivism. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.score: 15.0
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  42. James Connelly (2009). R.G. Collingwood, Analytical Philosophy And Logical Positivism. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 4 (1):2.score: 15.0
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  43. Oswald Hanfling (1981). Logical Positivism. Columbia University Press.score: 15.0
     
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  44. John Henry Bridges (1915/1974). Illustrations of Positivism. New York,B. Franklin.score: 15.0
    CHAPTER I1 BIOLOGY i BICHAT" Six months have passed since the centenary of the death of Bichat, which took place, in his thirty-first year, on July 22, ...
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  45. Barry Smith (1988). Austrian Origins of Logical Positivism. In Barry Gower (ed.), Logical Positivism in Perspective. Croom Helm.score: 15.0
    Recent work on Austrian philosophy has revealed, hitherto, unsuspected links between Vienna circle positivism on the one hand, and the thought of Franz Brentano and his circle on the other. the paper explores these links, casting light also on the Polish analytic movement, on the development of gestalt psychology, and on the work of Schlick and Neurath.
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  46. Alexander Stehn (2012). From Positivism to ‘Anti-Positivism’ in Mexico: Some Notable Continuities. In Gregory Gilson & Irving Levinson (eds.), Latin American Positivism: New Historical and Philosophic Essays. Lexington Books. 49.score: 15.0
    A general consensus has emerged in the scholarship on Latin American thought dating from the latter half of the nineteenth century through the first quarter of the twentieth. Latin American intellectuals widely adapted the European philosophy of positivism in keeping with the demands of their own social and political contexts, effectively making positivism the second most important philosophical tradition in the history of Latin America, after scholasticism. However, as thinkers across Latin America faced the challenges of the twentieth (...)
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  47. Peter Achinstein & Stephen Francis Barker (eds.) (1969). The Legacy of Logical Positivism. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins Press.score: 15.0
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  48. A. J. Ayer (ed.) (1978). Logical Positivism. Greenwood Press.score: 15.0
  49. Mitchell Berbrier (1997). From Logos to Pathos in Social Psychology and Academic Argumentation: Reconciling Postmodernism and Positivism in a Sociology of Persuasion. Argumentation 11 (1):35-50.score: 15.0
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  50. Wolfhard F. Boeselager (1975). The Soviet Critique of Neopositivism: The History and Structure of the Critique of Logical Positivism and Related Doctrines by Soviet Philosophers in the Years 1947-1967. Reidel Pub. Co..score: 15.0
     
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