Search results for 'poverty' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis (2001). The Poverty of the Stimulus Argument. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (2):217-276.score: 24.0
    Noam Chomsky's Poverty of the Stimulus Argument is one of the most famous and controversial arguments in the study of language and the mind. Though widely endorsed by linguists, the argument has met with much resistance in philosophy. Unfortunately, philosophical critics have often failed to fully appreciate the power of the argument. In this paper, we provide a systematic presentation of the Poverty of the Stimulus Argument, clarifying its structure, content, and evidential base. We defend the argument against (...)
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  2. Pablo Gilabert (2005). The Duty to Eradicate Global Poverty: Positive or Negative? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (5):537 - 550.score: 24.0
    In World Poverty and Human Rights, Thomas Pogge argues that the global rich have a duty to eradicate severe poverty in the world. The novelty of Pogges approach is to present this demand as stemming from basic commands which are negative rather than positive in nature: the global rich have an obligation to eradicate the radical poverty of the global poor not because of a norm of beneficence asking them to help those in need when they can (...)
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  3. Corinna Mieth (2008). World Poverty as a Problem of Justice? A Critical Comparison of Three Approaches. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (1):15 - 36.score: 24.0
    With regard to the problem of world poverty, libertarian theories of corrective justice emphasize negative duties and the idea of responsibility whereas utilitarian theories of help concentrate on positive duties based on the capacity of the helper. Thomas Pogge has developed a revised model of compensation that entails positive obligations that are generated by negative duties. He intends to show that the affluent are violating their negative duties to ensure that their conduct will not harm others: They are contributing (...)
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  4. Thom Brooks (2007). Punishing States That Cause Global Poverty. William Mitchell Law Review 33 (2):519-32.score: 24.0
    The problem of global poverty has reached terrifying proportions. Since the end of the Cold War, ordinary deaths from starvation and preventable diseases amount to approximately 250 million people, most of them children. Thomas Pogge argues that wealthy states have a responsibility to help those in severe poverty. This responsibility arises from the foreseeable and avoidable harm the current global institutional order has perpetrated on poor states. Pogge demands that wealthy states eradicate global poverty not merely because (...)
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  5. Uwafiokun Idemudia (2009). Oil Extraction and Poverty Reduction in the Niger Delta: A Critical Examination of Partnership Initiatives. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):91 - 116.score: 24.0
    The combination of corporate-community conflicts and oil transnational corporations' (TNCs) rhetoric about being socially responsible has meant that the issue of community development and poverty reduction have recently moved from the periphery to the heart of strategic business thinking within the Nigerian oil industry. As a result, oil TNCs have increasingly responded to this challenge by adopting partnership strategies as a means to contribute to poverty reductions in their host communities as well as secure their social licence to (...)
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  6. Kieran Oberman (2011). Immigration, Global Poverty and the Right to Stay. Political Studies 59 (2):253-268.score: 24.0
    This article questions the use of immigration as a tool to counter global poverty. It argues that poor people have a human right to stay in their home state, which entitles them to receive development assistance without the necessity of migrating abroad. The article thus rejects a popular view in the philosophical literature on immigration which holds that rich states are free to choose between assisting poor people in their home states and admitting them as immigrants when fulfilling duties (...)
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  7. Keith Horton (2012). How Academics Can Help People Make Better Decisions Concerning Global Poverty. Ethics and International Affairs: 26 (2):265-278.score: 24.0
    One relatively straightforward way in which academics could have more impact on global poverty is by doing more to help people make wise decisions about issues relevant to such poverty. Academics could do this by conducting appropriate kinds of research on those issues and sharing what they have learned with the relevant decision makers in accessible ways. But aren’t academics already doing this? In the case of many of those issues, I think the appropriate answer would be that (...)
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  8. Alex Voorhoeve (2006). Is Poverty Our Problem? Introduction to the Forum on World Poverty and the Duty of Assistance. The Philosophers' Magazine 36:46-49.score: 24.0
    This paper provides an introductory discussion of questions about three moral duties in the context of global poverty: the duty to aid; the duty not to harm; and the duty to promote just global institutions.
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  9. Pradeep Dhillon (2011). The Role of Education in Freedom From Poverty as a Human Right. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (3):249-259.score: 24.0
    Education lies at the heart of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR): ‘Education shall be directed to the full development of the human personality and to the strengthening of respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms’. However, when education is mentioned in the philosophical literature on human rights, or even within the literature on educational policy, it is usually within the context of its being treated as a specific right—as education as a human right rather than human rights education. (...)
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  10. Nicole Hassoun (2011). Free Trade, Poverty, and Inequality. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (1):5-44.score: 24.0
    Anyone familiar with The Economist knows the mantra: Free trade will ameliorate poverty by increasing growth and reducing inequality. This paper suggests that problems underlying measurement of poverty, inequality, and free trade provide reason to worry about this argument. Furthermore, the paper suggests that better evidence is necessary to establish that free trade is causing inequality and poverty to fall. Experimental studies usually provide the best evidence of causation. So, the paper concludes with a call for further (...)
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  11. Peter Higgins, Audra King & April Shaw (2008). What is Poverty? In Rebecca Whisnant & Peggy DesAutels (eds.), Global Feminist Ethics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 24.0
    Invoking three desiderata (empirical adequacy, conceptual precision, and sensitivity to social positioning), this paper argues that poverty is best understood as the deprivation of certain human capabilities. It defends this way of conceiving of poverty against standard alternatives: lack of income, lack of resources, inequality, and social exclusion.
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  12. Gottfried Schweiger & Gunter Graf (2014). Poverty and Freedom. Human Affairs 24 (2):258-268.score: 24.0
    The capability approach, which is closely connected to the works of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, is one possible theoretical framework that could be used to answer the question as to why poverty is a problem from a moral point of view. In this paper we will focus on the normative philosophical capability approach rather than the social scientific and descriptive perspective. We will show that the approach characterizes poverty mainly as a limitation of freedom and that it (...)
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  13. Ronald Paul Hill & Justine M. Rapp (2009). Globalization and Poverty: Oxymoron or New Possibilities? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):39 - 47.score: 24.0
    The presentation and paper for this conference go to the heart of the relationship between globalization and poverty worldwide. Data from the United Nations reveal the dramatic increase in exports and imports from 1990 to 2004, along with the uneven economic performance/quality of life across development groupings and geographical regions. Thus, findings suggest the possibility that trade growth has failed expectations that developing countries would rise to greater levels of productivity and subsequendy reduce abject poverty. Nonetheless, the situation (...)
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  14. Gottfried Schweiger (2013). Poverty and Critique in the Modern Working Society. Critique 41 (4):515-529.score: 24.0
    Poverty is more than a ‘welfare status’ among others. In this paper I want to show that poverty is not only a failure of distribution of income but that it is a state of humiliation. In the first section I will examine poverty knowledge, how poverty is conceptualised and what norms are inherent in the measures of the poor. In the second section I will show that poverty is humiliating because it is bound to failure (...)
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  15. William A. Galston & Peter H. Hoffenberg (eds.) (2010). Poverty and Morality: Religious and Secular Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction William A. Galston and Peter H. Hoffenberg; 2. Global poverty and uneven development Sakiko Fukuda-Parr; 3. The karma of poverty: a Buddhist perspective David R. Loy; 4. Poverty and morality in Christianity Kent A. Van Til; 5. Classical liberalism, poverty, and morality Tom G. Palmer; 6. Confucian perspectives on poverty and morality Peter Nosco; 7. Poverty and morality: a feminist perspective Nancy J. Hirschmann; 8. Hinduism and poverty (...)
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  16. Diana Tietjens Meyers (ed.) (2014). Poverty, Agency, and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This collection of thirteen new essays analyzes how human agency relates to poverty and human rights respectively as well as how agency links poverty to human rights. It is divided into four parts. Part 1 considers the diverse meanings of poverty from the standpoint of the poor and the relatively well-off. Part 2 examines morally appropriate responses to poverty on the part of persons and institutions who are better-off. Part 3 identifies economic development strategies that secure (...)
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  17. Reto Givel (2007). The Button to Make Poverty History & How to Double Your Donation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (4):335 - 338.score: 24.0
    Even if together we could make poverty history, we would not all do our part. The paper presents a device that makes it more likely for everybody to do his part. This is achieved by making everybody’s contribution dependent on the other people’s commitment to contribute given that certain conditions are fulfilled. Furthermore, a device is introduced which, based on the same general idea, doubles everybody’s donation. Finally, possibilities, assumptions and limitations of such devices are addressed.
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  18. Scott Wisor (2012). Measuring Global Poverty: Toward a Pro-Poor Approach. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Global poverty measurement is important. It is used to allocate scarce resources, evaluate progress, and assess existing projects, policies, and institutional designs. But given the diversity of ways in which poverty is conceived, how can we settle on a conception and measure that can be used for interpersonal and inter-temporal global comparison? -/- This book lays out the key contemporary debates in poverty measurement, and provides a new analytical framework for thinking about poverty conception and measurement. (...)
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  19. Varun Gauri & Jorn Sonderholm (2012). Global Poverty: Four Normative Positions. Journal of Global Ethics 8 (2-3):193-213.score: 24.0
    Global poverty is a huge problem in today's world. This survey article seeks to be a first guide to those who are interested in, but relatively unfamiliar with, the main issues, positions and arguments in the contemporary philosophical discussion of global poverty. The article attempts to give an overview of four distinct and influential normative positions on global poverty. Moreover, it seeks to clarify, and put into perspective, some of the key concepts and issues that take center (...)
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  20. Robert Lockie (forthcoming). Perspectivism, Deontologism And Epistemic Poverty. Social Epistemology.score: 24.0
    The epistemic poverty objection is commonly levelled by externalists against deontological conceptions of epistemic justification. This is that an ‘oughts’ based account of epistemic justification together with ‘ought’ implies ‘can’ must lead us to hold to be justified, epistemic agents who are objectively not truth-conducive cognizers. The epistemic poverty objection has led to a common response from deontologists, namely to embrace accounts of bounded (perspectival) rationality – subjective, practical or regulative accounts rather than objective, absolute or theoretical accounts. (...)
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  21. Albert Mosley (2004). Does Hiv or Poverty Cause Aids? Biomedical and Epidemiological Perspectives. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (5-6):399-421.score: 24.0
    This paper contrasts biomedical and epidemiological approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of disease, and uses Collingwoods principle of the relativity of causes to show how different approaches focus on different causal factors reflecting different interests. By distinguishing between the etiology of a disease and an epidemic, the paper argues that, from an epidemiological perspective, poverty is an important causal factor in the African AIDS epidemic and that emphasizing this should not be considered incompatible with recognizing the causal necessity (...)
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  22. Russell Daye (2009). Poverty, Race Relations, and the Practices of International Business: A Study of Fiji. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):115 - 127.score: 24.0
    This article examines the practices of international business in the South Pacific island nation of Fiji. After an investigation of past practices of international businesses and the ways these have helped to shape the major social challenges confronting the nation today, the article turns to an exploration of those challenges, especially poverty and race relations. It is argued that there are two paramount responsibilities for international business operating in a context like Fiji: to conduct their business operations in ways (...)
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  23. Gustavo Barboza & Sandra Trejos (2009). Micro Credit in Chiapas, México: Poverty Reduction Through Group Lending. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):283 - 299.score: 24.0
    Micro Credit (MC) programs lend money to poor borrowers using innovative mechanisms such as group lending under joint liability while successfully accounting for the presence of asymmetric information in underdeveloped financial markets. MC programs have achieved what the conventional financial institutions and the government have not been able to: lend to the poor, impressive loan recuperation, and a positive impact in poverty reduction. This article analyzes the performance of ALSOL, an MC program in Chiapas, México, for 2151 participants in (...)
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  24. Alan E. Singer (2006). Business Strategy and Poverty Alleviation. Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2-3):225 - 231.score: 24.0
    Currently, entrepreneurs and corporations overwhelmingly do not view the alleviation of global poverty as a strategic priority. Yet business activity can have a negative as well as a positive effect on each distinctive form of poverty. In order to reduce poverty, entrepreneurs have to find ways of limiting the negative aspects. This might be achieved by deliberately augmenting strategies so that they can achieve a synthesis, in partnership with governments and NGO’s.
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  25. Gerald R. McDermott (2003). Poverty, Patriotism, and National Covenant: Jonathan Edwards and Public Life. Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (2):229 - 251.score: 24.0
    In this essay I address three ways in which Edwards can inform Christian understanding of public life. First I show how Edwards provides both philosophical and theological rationales for social engagement and thereby resists the separation of religion from public life, and use his consideration of poverty as an illustration. Part II examines Edwards's dialectical treatment of patriotism, demonstrating both its importance to the Christian life and its susceptibility to deceptive accommodation to culture. Finally, in Part III I discuss (...)
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  26. Borany Penh (2009). New Convergences in Poverty Reduction, Conflict, and State Fragility: What Business Should Know. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):515 - 528.score: 24.0
    A common moral imperative to reduce human suffering in developing countries has helped to bring the international poverty reduction and conflict mitigation agendas together. But while research and practice are well established in the fields of poverty and conflict, the nexus between these two fields at the theoretical and practical levels is largely nascent. Lack of a shared body of knowledge has arguably impeded the ability of these communities to work together toward the overlapping goals of reducing (...) and conflict in countries affected by violence and instability. Business, as a key sector of the international community, could potentially make significant contributions to the joint agenda if it were better integrated in efforts to develop the nexus. This article surveys the current states-of-knowledge in the fields of poverty and conflict, including the increasing influence of the fragile states theory. It then discusses some of the major schools of thought helping to bring poverty reduction efforts into alliance with conflict mitigation efforts. The third section identifies important conceptual convergences and divergences between the fields and reconsiders the prominent assumption that economic opportunity can be a powerful incentive for peace and stability. Finally, this article discusses potential areas that could advance the nexus of poverty and conflict at both a theoretical and practical level. (shrink)
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  27. Gottfried Schweiger (2013). Recognition and Social Exclusion. A Recognition-Theoretical Exploration of Poverty in Europe. Ethical Perspectives 20 (4):529-554.score: 24.0
    Thus far, the recognition approach as described in the works of Axel Honneth has not systematically engaged with the problem of poverty. To fill this gap, the present contribution will focus on poverty conceived as social exclusion in the context of the European Union and probe its moral significance. It will show that this form of social exclusion is morally harmful and wrong from the perspective of the recognition approach. To justify this finding, social exclusion has to fulfil (...)
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  28. H. P. P. Lotter (2003). The Significance of Poverty and Wealth in Plato’s Republic. South African Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):189-206.score: 24.0
    Plato’s views on the significance of poverty and wealth in The Republic challenge us to rethink the role and position assigned to wealth in contemporary society. These ideas on poverty and wealth play an important role in shaping the central arguments of the Republic. The themes and views expressed in the opening dialogue of Plato’s Republic (328b - 331d) serve to introduce some of the core ideas of the Republic. I start with an analysis of the opening dialogue (...)
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  29. Oscar Javier Cárdenas Rodríguez (2009). Poverty Reduction Approaches in Mexico Since 1950: Public Spending for Social Programs and Economic Competitiveness Programs. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):269 - 281.score: 24.0
    Mexico has long suffered from poverty. Two common government approaches to poverty reduction are public spending for social programs, and public spending for economic competitiveness programs. This article summarizes the nature and effects of these two approaches based on information published in Mexican journals and international research institution reports written in Spanish. Since 1990, public spending for social programs has increased at an annual rate of 7%, whereas spending for economic competitiveness programs has become stagnant. Researchers report that: (...)
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  30. Maike Schölmerich (2013). On the Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Poverty in Cambodia in the Light of Sen's Capability Approach. Asian Journal of Business Ethics 2 (1):1 - 33.score: 24.0
    Abstract The debate on corporate social responsibility (CSR) has been going on for decades, without leading to a clearer understanding of the term. Furthermore, the current literature on the topic remains relatively silent on the actual impact of CSR, especially the impact on issues of international development, for example poverty reduction in the Global South. By developing a conceptual assessment framework with a bipolar differentiated definition of CSR and a Sen-based notion of poverty, the article analyses the effects (...)
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  31. Isolde Daiski, Nancy Viva Davis Halifax, Gail J. Mitchell & Andre Lyn (2012). Homelessness in the Suburbs: Engulfment in the Grotto of Poverty. Studies in Social Justice 6 (1):103-123.score: 24.0
    This paper describes findings of a research inquiry into the lived experience of homelessness in Peel, a suburban region located in the Greater Toronto Area in Ontario, Canada. It is based on the data from a collaborative project undertaken by members of the Faculties of Health and Education of York University with two local community organizations. The dominant theme of the narratives was that suburban homelessness is similar to being engulfed in a grotto of poverty , isolated from the (...)
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  32. Pauline Kleingeld (2014). Patriotism, Peace and Poverty: Reply to Bernstein and Varden. Kantian Review 19 (2):267-284.score: 24.0
    In this essay I reply to Alyssa Bernstein and Helga Varden's comments on my book, Kant and Cosmopolitanism. In response to Bernstein, I argue that Kant's opposition to the coercive incorporation of states into an international federation should be interpreted as permitting no exceptions. In response to Varden, I clarify Kant's conception and defence of patriotism as a duty, and I show how Kantian cosmopolitans can rebut Bernard Williams's objection. I also explicate why, given a specific feature of Kant's defence (...)
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  33. Krishna Mani Pathak (2010). Poverty and Hunger in the Developing World: Ethics, the Global Economy, and Human Survival. Asia Journal of Global Studies 3 (2):88-102.score: 24.0
    The large number of hungry people in a global economy based on industrialization, privatization, and free trade raises the question of the ethical dimensions of the worsening food crisis in the world in general and in developing countries in particular. Who bears the moral responsibility for the tragic situation in Africa and Asia where people are starving due to poverty? Who is morally responsible for their poverty - the hungry people themselves? the international community? any particular agency or (...)
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  34. Craig V. VanSandt & Mukesh Sud (2012). Poverty Alleviation Through Partnerships: A Road Less Travelled for Business, Governments, and Entrepreneurs. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (3):321-332.score: 24.0
    While investigating the role of business and accepting that profitable partnerships are the primary solution for poverty alleviation, we voice certain concerns that we hope will extend the authors’ discourse in Alleviating Poverty through Profitable Partnerships . We present a model that we believe can serve as an effective framework for addressing these issues. We then establish the imperative of inclusive growth. Here, we engage with the necessity of formulating strategies that focus on the pace and, importantly, the (...)
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  35. Helga Varden (2014). Patriotism, Poverty, and Global Justice: A Kantian Engagement with Pauline Kleingeld's Kant and Cosmopolitanism. Kantian Review 19 (2):251-266.score: 24.0
    In this article I critically engage some of the philosophical ideas Kleingeld presents in Kant and Cosmopolitanism, namely patriotism, poverty and global justice. Against Kleingeld, I propose, first, that perhaps democracy is less important and affectionate love more so to both Kant himself as well as to an account that can successfully refute a Bernard Williams style objection to Kantian patriotism; second, that guaranteeing unconditional poverty relief for all its citizens is constitutive of the minimally just state for (...)
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  36. H. P. P. Lotter (2007). Are ICTs Prerequisites for the Eradication of Poverty? International Review of Information Ethics 7:09.score: 24.0
    I provide a philosophical analysis of the claim that ICTs are necessary preconditions for the eradication of poverty. What are the links between information and communication technologies (ICTs) and poverty? I first define technology and then give a brief depiction of ICTs. Thereafter I define poverty and give a brief explanation of its context and causes. Next I discuss the relationship between poverty and ICTs in three paradigm cases: [i] the role of ICTs in poor societies, (...)
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  37. Nghia Chi Nguyen (2013). Examination of Existing Arguments on Business Oriented Towards Poverty Reduction with the Case of People with Disabilities in Vietnam. Asian Journal of Business Ethics 2 (2):147-161.score: 24.0
    With an eye ultimately to answering the question of how business can alleviate poverty completely, the paper examines existing arguments about the approach of business to poverty reduction with the case of people with disabilities living in poverty in Vietnam. The paper suggests that business should take the knowledge and potential of poor people into consideration in its interfaces with different types of poor people: consumers, workers, property owners, etc. Furthermore, investigating how business can help reduce (...) while still earning a profit and ensuring customer satisfaction limits research on business approach to poverty, since it assumes that business will have some “not-for-profit” purposes. The findings point out that businesses with “not-for-profit” purposes serve as a promising area for further exploration and research of business approach to poverty alleviation. (shrink)
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  38. Shakuntala A. Singh Ajai R. Singh (2008). Diseases of Poverty and Lifestyle, Well-Being and Human Development. Mens Sana Monographs 6 (1):187.score: 24.0
    _The problems of the haves differ substantially from those of the have-nots. Individuals in developing societies have to fight mainly against infectious and communicable diseases, while in the developed world the battles are mainly against lifestyle diseases. Yet, at a very fundamental level, the problems are the same-the fight is against distress, disability, and premature death; against human exploitation and for human development and self-actualisation; against the callousness to critical concerns in regimes and scientific power centres. While there has been (...)
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  39. Liora Gvion (2006). Cuisines of Poverty as Means of Empowerment: Arab Food in Israel. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):299-312.score: 24.0
    This paper suggests looking at cuisines of poverty as practical and political systems practiced by urban and rural Palestinian citizens of Israel. It is an important and interesting case study within which political and economical considerations govern and enhance the development, change, and acceptance of culinary knowledge. Cuisines of poverty operate in two simultaneous arenas. As systems of practical knowledge, they repeatedly center on the ability to maintain the traditional kitchen, turning it into a tool-kit out of which (...)
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  40. Gunter Graf & Gottfried Schweiger (2013). Capabilities, Recognition and the Philosophical Evaluation of Poverty: A Discussion of Issues of Justification and the Role of Subjective Experiences. International Critical Thought 3 (3):282--296.score: 24.0
    Both the capability and the recognition approach are influential and substantial theories in social philosophy. In this contribution, we outline their main assumptions in their assessment of poverty. The two approaches are set in relation to each other, focusing mainly on (a) their moral evaluation of poverty, (b) issues of justification of their central normative claims, and (c) the role that is attributed to subjective experiences, feelings and emotions in these theories. This comparison reveals that in spite of (...)
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  41. Sofia Naranjo (2012). Enabling Food Sovereignty and a Prosperous Future for Peasants by Understanding the Factors That Marginalise Peasants and Lead to Poverty and Hunger. Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):231-246.score: 24.0
    Dominant development discourse and policy are based on crucial misconceptions about peasants and their livelihoods. Peasants are viewed as inherently poor and hungry and their farming systems are considered inefficient, of low productivity, and sometimes even environmentally degrading. Consequently, dominant development policies have tried to transform peasants into something else: industrialised commercial farmers, wage labourers, urban workers, etc. This article seeks to deconstruct three key misconceptions about peasants by explaining how and why marginalised peasants around the world face poverty (...)
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  42. Heather Grenville & Darlene Ciuffetelli Parker (2013). From Research Assistant to Researcher: Being Wakeful in a Mentorship Journey About Methodology, Poverty, and Deficit Thinking. Journal of Research Practice 9 (2):Article M7 (proof).score: 24.0
    This article explores how insights and new knowledge were incorporated about narrative inquiry methodology, poverty, and deficit ways of thinking through a journey of mentorship. The experiences of a graduate student, as she journeys through the roles of a research assistant and graduate researcher, all the while being part of a positive mentorship experience, are relayed. The article describes the journey of an evolving researcher who becomes wakeful through the narrative inquiry methodology while engaged as a research assistant as (...)
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  43. Will R. Turner, Katrina Brandon, Thomas M. Brooks, Claude Gascon, Holly K. Gibbs, Keith S. Lawrence, Russell A. Mittermeier & Elizabeth R. Selig (2012). Global Biodiversity Conservation and the Alleviation of Poverty. BioScience 62 (1):85-92.score: 24.0
    Poverty and biodiversity loss are two of the world’s dire challenges. Claims of conservation’s contribution to poverty alleviation, however, remain controversial. Here, we assess the flows of ecosystem services provided to people by priority habitats for terrestrial conservation, considering the global distributions of biodiversity, physical factors, and socioeconomic context. We estimate the value of these habitats to the poor, both through direct benefits and through payments for ecosystem services to those stewarding natural habitats. The global potential for biodiversity (...)
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  44. [deleted]Sebastian J. Lipina & Michael I. Posner (2012). The Impact of Poverty on the Development of Brain Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Although the study of brain development in non-human animals is an old one, recent imaging methods have allowed non-invasive studies of the grey and white matter of the human brain over the lifespan. Classic animal studies show clearly that impoverished environments reduce cortical grey matter in relation to complex environments and cognitive and imaging studies in humans suggest which networks may be most influenced by poverty. Studies have been clear in showing the plasticity of many brain systems, but whether (...)
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  45. H. P. P. Lotter (2008). Poverty as a Threat to Democratic Values. Public Affairs Quarterly 22 (2):175-193.score: 24.0
    The reluctance to eradicate poverty shown by citizens and governments of many modern constitutional democracies is puzzling. If poverty threatens societies in various ways, why would many countries with a strongly agreed upon system of democratic governance fail so painfully to find the commitment and appropriate action to eradicate poverty? In this essay I want to investigate the discordance between poverty and democracy. I will first briefly articulate the broad underlying values of modern constitutional democracies. Then (...)
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  46. H. P. P. Lotter (2011). Poverty, Ethics and Justice. University of Wales Press.score: 24.0
    Poverty is one of the most serious moral issues of our time that does not yet get the appropriate response it deserves. This book first gives an in depth moral analysis and evaluation of the complex manifestations of poverty. It then offers a series of ethical reasons to motivate everyone to engage in the struggle to eradicate poverty. -/- Social science research results are synthesized into a definition and explanation of poverty that provide proper background for (...)
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  47. Barbara van Koppen (1998). Water Rights, Gender, and Poverty Alleviation. Inclusion and Exclusion of Women and Men Smallholders in Public Irrigation Infrastructure Development. Agriculture and Human Values 15 (4):361-374.score: 24.0
    Governmental and non-governmentalagencies worldwide have devoted considerablefinancial, technical, and organizational efforts toconstruct or rehabilitate irrigation infrastructure inthe last three decades. Although rural povertyalleviation was often one of their aims, evidenceshows that rights to irrigated land and water wererarely vested in poor men, and even less in poorwomen. In spite of the strong role of irrigationagencies in vesting rights to irrigated land and waterin some people and not in others, the importance ofagencies‘ targeting practices is still ignored.This article disentangles how public (...)
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  48. Scott Wisor (2012). Poverty and Poverty Alleviation. In M. Juergensmeyer & H. K. Anheier (eds.), Encyclopedia of Global Studies. Sage.score: 24.0
    Poverty refers to a core set of basic human deprivations, and poverty alleviation refers to efforts by individuals and institutions to reduce these deprivations. Poverty and poverty alleviation are two of the most important topics in global studies. In a variety of disciplines in global studies, the most important questions include understanding what poverty is, what it is like to be poor, what causes poverty, how poverty can be alleviated, and how poverty (...)
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  49. Pablo Gilabert (2008). Global Justice and Poverty Relief in Nonideal Circumstances. Social Theory and Practice 34 (3):411-438.score: 21.0
  50. Pablo Gilabert (2007). Contractualism and Poverty Relief. Social Theory and Practice 33 (2):277-310.score: 21.0
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