Search results for 'principle of charity' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Anthony Brueckner (2009). Moore-Paradoxicality and the Principle of Charity. Theoria 75 (3):245-247.score: 720.0
    In a recent article in Theoria , Hamid Vahid offered an explanation of the phenomenon of Moore-paradoxicality which employed Davidson's Principle of Charity regarding radical interpretation. I argue here that Vahid's explanation fails.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. María Rosario Hernández Borges (2007). The Principle of Charity, Transcendentalism and Relativism. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 6:69-75.score: 549.0
    Relativism has usually been presented as linked to the limits of translation and understanding. The Principle of Charity was developed to decide the reference of words or the best translation of a sentence. However, the principle has been defined in, at least, two different ways: a naturalistic one, as a pragmatic maxim that guides the interpreter generally; or a transcendental one, as an a priori, necessary condition for someone to be understood. In this paper I will focus (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David K. Henderson (1987). The Principle of Charity and the Problem of Irrationality (Translation and the Problem of Irrationality). Synthese 73 (2):225 - 252.score: 540.0
    Common formulations of the principle of charity in translation seem to undermine attributions of irrationality in social scientific accounts that are otherwise unexceptionable. This I call the problem of irrationality. Here I resolve the problem of irrationality by developing two complementary views of the principle of charity. First, I develop the view (ill-developed in the literature at present) that the principle of charity is preparatory, being needed in the construction of provisional first-approximation translation manuals. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Nathaniel Goldberg (2004). The Principle of Charity. Dialogue 43 (4):671-683.score: 540.0
    The recent publication of a third anthology of Donald Davidson’s articles, and anticipated publication of two more, encourages a consideration of themes binding together Davidson’s lifetime of research. One such theme is the principle of charity (PC). In light of the mileage Davidson gets out of PC, I propose a careful examination of PC itself. In Part 1, I consider some ways in which Davidson articulates PC. In Part 2, I show that the articulation that Davidson requires in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Christopher Gauker (1986). The Principle of Charity. Synthese 69 (October):1-25.score: 522.0
  6. Marcin Lewiński (2012). The Paradox of Charity. Informal Logic 32 (4):403-439.score: 480.0
    The principle of charity is used in philosophy of language and argumentation theory as an important principle of interpretation which credits speakers with “the best” plausible interpretation of their discourse. I contend that the argumentation account, while broadly advocated, misses the basic point of a dialectical conception which approaches argumentation as discussion between (at least) two parties who disagree over the issue discussed. Therefore, paradoxically, an analyst who is charitable to one discussion party easily becomes uncharitable to (...)
    Direct download (17 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. David Henderson (1988). The Importance of Explanation in Quine's Principle of Charity in Translation. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (3):355-369.score: 459.0
  8. B. G. Sundholm (1984). Brouwer's Anticipation of the Principle of Charity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 85:263 - 276.score: 459.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. David K. Henderson (1987). Winch and the Constraints on Interpretation: Versions of the Principle of Charity. Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):153-173.score: 459.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. G. ?ran Sundholm (1984). Brouwer's Anticipation of the Principle of Charity. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 85:263 - 276.score: 459.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Maria Caamaño (2011). Davidson's Argument for the Principle of Charity. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 459.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Daniel Laurier (1999). On the Principle of Charity and the Sources of Indeterminacy. In. In Denis Fisette (ed.), Consciousness and Intentionality: Models and Modalities of Attribution. Springer. 229--248.score: 459.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Kirk Ludwig (2004). Rationality, Language, and the Principle of Charity. In Alfred R. Mele & Piers Rawling (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Rationality. Oup Usa.score: 459.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Bruce Vermazen (1982). General Beliefs and the Principle of Charity. Philosophical Studies 42 (1):111 - 118.score: 450.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. David Glidden (1997). Augustine's Hermeneutics and the Principle of Charity. Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):135-157.score: 450.0
  16. N. Shanks (1981). On Davidson's Principle of Charity. Philosophical Inquiry 3 (3-4):167-181.score: 450.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Rita C. Manning (1983). A More Charitable Principle of Charity. Informal Logic 5 (2).score: 450.0
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Neven Sesardić (1986). Psychology Without Principle of Charity. Dialectica 40 (3):229-240.score: 450.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Timothy M. Renick (1994). Charity Lost: The Secularization of the Principle of Double Effect in the Just-War Tradition. The Thomist 58 (3):441-462.score: 435.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Chuang Ye (2008). The Limit of Charity and Agreement. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (1):99-122.score: 327.0
    Radical interpretation is used by Davison in his linguistic theory not only as an interesting thought experiment but also a general pattern that is believed to be able to give an essential and general account of linguistic interpretation. If the principle of charity is absolutely necessary to radical interpretation, it becomes, in this sense, a general methodological principle. However, radical interpretation is a local pattern that is proper only for exploring certain interpretation in a specific case, and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Ye Chuang (2008). The Limit of Charity and Agreement. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (1):99 - 122.score: 327.0
    Radical interpretation is used by Davison in his linguistic theory not only as an interesting thought experiment but also a general pattern that is believed to be able to give an essential and general account of linguistic interpretation. If the principle of charity is absolutely necessary to radical interpretation, it becomes, in this sense, a general methodological principle. However, radical interpretation is a local pattern that is proper only for exploring certain interpretation in a specific case, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Paul Saka (2007). Spurning Charity. Axiomathes 17 (2):197-208.score: 315.0
    The principle of charity (“Charity”), in one form or other, is held by many and for various reasons. After cataloging discernible kinds of Charity, I focus on the most familiar versions as found in Davidson, Dennett, Devitt, Lewis, Putnam, Quine, Stich, and others. To begin with, I argue that such versions of Charity are untenable because beliefs cannot be counted, and even if they could be counted there is reason to believe that true beliefs need (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Daniel N. Boone (1999). The Cogent Reasoning Model of Informal Fallacies. Informal Logic 19 (1).score: 315.0
    An infonnal fallacy is a reasoning error with three features: the reasoning employs an implicit cogent pattern; the fallacy results from one or more false premises; there is culpable ignorance or deception associated with the falsity of the premises. A reconstruction and analysis of the cogent reasoning patterns in fourteen standard infonnal fallacy types plus several variations are given. Defense of the CMR account covers: a general failure to apply the principle of charity in informal fallacy contexts; empirical (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Daniel Dohrn, Interpretive Charity and Content Externalism.score: 312.0
    Interpretive charity is an important principle in devising the content of propositional attitudes and their expression. I want to argue that it does not square well with externalism about content. Although my argument clearly also applies to a principle of maximizing truth (as it requires only the true belief - component of knowledge), I will focus my attention to Timothy Williamson’s more intriguing recent proposal of maximizing knowledge.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Kathrin Glüer (2006). The Status of Charity I: Conceptual Truth or a Posteriori Necessity? International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (3):337 – 359.score: 309.0
    According to Donald Davidson, linguistic meaning is determined by the principle of charity. Because of Davidson's semantic behaviourism, charity's significance is both epistemic and metaphysical: charity not only provides the radical interpreter with a method for constructing a semantic theory on the basis of his data, but it does so because it is the principle metaphysically determining meaning. In this paper, I assume that charity does determine meaning. On this assumption, I investigate both its (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Peter Pagin (2006). The Status of Charity II: Charity, Probability, and Simplicity. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (3):361 – 383.score: 309.0
    Treating the principle of charity as a non-empirical, foundational principle leads to insoluble problems of justification. I suggest instead treating semantic properties realistically, and semantic terms as theoretical terms. This allows us to apply ordinary scientific reasoning in meta-semantics. In particular, we can appeal to widespread verbal agreement as an empirical phenomenon, and we can make use of probabilistic reasoning as well as appeal to theoretical simplicity for reaching the conclusion that there is a high rate of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. John Paul Slosar, Mark F. Repenshek & Elliott Bedford (2013). Catholic Identity and Charity Care in the Era of Health Reform. HEC Forum 25 (2):111-126.score: 279.0
    Catholic healthcare institutions live amidst tension between three intersecting primary values, namely, a commitment of service to the poor and vulnerable, promoting the common good for all, and financially sustainability. Within this tension, the question sometimes arises as to whether it is ever justifiable, i.e., consistent with Catholic identity, to place limits on charity care. In this article we will argue that the health reform measures of the Affordable Care Act do not eliminate this tension but actually increase the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. John Horden (2014). Ontology in Plain English. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (255):225-242.score: 270.0
    In a series of papers, Eli Hirsch develops a deflationary account of certain ontological debates, specifically those regarding the composition and persistence of physical objects. He argues that these debates are merely verbal disputes between philosophers who fail to correctly express themselves in a common language. To establish the truth in plain English about these issues, Hirsch contends, we need only listen to the assertions of ordinary speakers and interpret them charitably. In this paper, I argue that Hirsch's conclusions rest (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jens David Ohlin (forthcoming). The One or the Many. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-15.score: 270.0
    The following Review Essay, inspired by Tracy Isaacs’ new book, Moral Responsibility in Collective Contexts, connects the philosophical literature on group agency with recent trends in international criminal law. Part I of the Essay sketches out the relevant philosophical positions, including collectivist and individualist accounts of group agency. Particular attention is paid to Kornhauser and Sager’s development of the doctrinal paradox, Philip Pettit’s deployment of the paradox towards a general argument for group rationality, and Michael Bratman’s account of shared or (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Pablo Quintanilla Pérez Wicht (2004). Comprender Al Otro Es Crear Un Espacio Compartido: Caridad, Empatía y Triangulación. Ideas y Valores 125:81-97.score: 270.0
    This paper analyzes Davidson´s classical version of the principle of charity,in order to suggest a reformulation from which it is possible to extractsome consequences regarding the nature of understanding. Thus, it is putforward an abandonment of the intencionalist hermeneutics as well as theCartesi..
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Aaron Ben-Zeev (1995). Analysis of Argument Strategies of Attack and Cooption: Stock Cases, Formalization, and Argument Reconstruction. Informal Logic 17 (2).score: 267.0
    Three common strategies used by informal logicians are considered: (1) the appeal to standard cases, (2) the attempt to partially formalize so-called "informal fallacies," and (3) restatement of arguments in such a way as to make their logical character more perspicuous. All three strategies are found to be useful. Attention is drawn to several advantages of a "stock case" approach, a minimalist approach to formalization is recommended, and doubts are raised about the applicability, from a logical point of view, of (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Robert Wachbroit (1987). Theories of Rationality and Principles of Charity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (1):35-47.score: 250.3
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Bernard Bosanquet (1893). The Principles and Chief Dangers of the Administration of Charity. International Journal of Ethics 3 (3):323-336.score: 245.3
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Dale Jacquette (1996). Charity and the Reiteration Problem for Enthymemes. Informal Logic 18 (1).score: 234.0
    Any enthymeme can be made logically valid by adding as a suppressed premise a conditional that reiterates the argument's stated content and inferential structure in if-then form, We cannot blanketly prohibit reiteration to avoid this sort of trivialization, because some enthymemes legitimately require completion by reiterative conditionals, The solution proposed here is to allow reiterative expansions, but to rank them, other things being equal, as less charitable than nonreiterative expansions. Reiterative expansions can then be chosen as the most charitable only (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Greg Novack (2010). A Defense of the Principle of Indifference. Journal of Philosophical Logic 39 (6):655-678.score: 230.0
    The principle of indifference (hereafter ‘Poi’) says that if one has no more reason to believe A than B (and vice versa ), then one ought not to believe A more than B (nor vice versa ). Many think it’s demonstrably false despite its intuitive plausibility, because of a particular style of thought experiment that generates counterexamples. Roger White ( 2008 ) defends Poi by arguing that its antecedent is false in these thought experiments. Like White I believe Poi, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Patricia Kauark-Leite (2009). The Transcendental Role of the Principle of Anticipations of Perception in Quantum Mechanics. In Michel Bitbol, Jean Petitot & Pierre Kerszberg (eds.), CONSTITUTING OBJECTIVITY The Western Ontario Series in Philosophy of Science.score: 230.0
    The aim of this work is to analyse the diffrerences between the formal structure of anticipation of perception in classical and in quantum context. I argue that a transcendental point of view can be supported in quantum context if objectivity is defined by an invariant anticipative structure, which has only a predictive character. The classical objectivity, which defined a set of properties having a descriptive meaning must be abandoned in quantum context. I will focus my analysis on Kant's Principle (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Domènec Melé (2005). Exploring the Principle of Subsidiarity in Organisational Forms. Journal of Business Ethics 60 (3):293 - 305.score: 230.0
    The paper starts with a case study of a medium-sized company in which a strong and successful change in the organisational form and job design took place. A bureaucratic organisation with highly-specialised jobs was converted into a new organisation in which employees became much more autonomous in managing their own work. This not only entailed new techniques and managerial systems but also a new anthropological vision. Bureaucratic rules were reduced, but not eliminated completely, and management became less authoritarian. Employees could (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Iñaki San Pedro (2011). Venetian Sea Levels, British Bread Prices and the Principle of the Common Cause: A Reassessment. In H. de Regt, S. Okasha & S. Hartmann (eds.), EPSA Philosophy of Science: Amsterdam 2009. Springer. 341-354.score: 230.0
    It is still a controversial issue whether Reichenbach’s Principle of the Common Cause (RPCC) is a sound method for causal inference. In fact, the status of the principle has been a subject of intense philosophical debate. An extensive literature has been thus generated both with arguments in favor and against the adequacy of the principle. A remarkable argument against the principle, first proposed by Elliott Sober (Sober, 1987, 2001), consists on a counterexample which involves corelations between (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Guido Gorgoni (forthcoming). The Principle of Precaution and the Governance of Insecurity. Governare la Paura. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies.score: 230.0
    After a brief reconstruction of the principle of precaution’s juridical rising, I will discuss in short the question of the juridical nature of the same principle and then examine some of its extra-juridical implications, showing how the intrinsic logic of the principle of precaution implies a strict connection with the needs and proper forms of a conception of democracy as participative.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Shieva Kleinschmidt (forthcoming). Reasoning Without the Principle of Sufficient Reason. In Tyron Goldschmidt (ed.), The Philosophy of Existence: Why Is There Something Rather Than Nothing? Routledge.score: 227.3
    According to Principles of Sufficient Reason, every truth (in some relevant group) has an explanation. One of the most popular defenses of Principles of Sufficient Reason has been the presupposition of reason defense, which takes endorsement of the defended PSR to play a crucial role in our theory selection. According to recent presentations of this defense, our method of theory selection often depends on the assumption that, if a given proposition is true, then it has an explanation, and this will (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Christopher Evan Franklin (2011). Neo-Frankfurtians and Buffer Cases: The New Challenge to the Principle of Alternative Possibilities. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 152 (2):189–207.score: 224.0
    The debate over whether Frankfurt-style cases are counterexamples to the principle of alternative possibilities (PAP) has taken an interesting turn in recent years. Frankfurt originally envisaged his attack as an attempting to show that PAP is false—that the ability to do otherwise is not necessary for moral responsibility. To many this attack has failed. But Frankfurtians have not conceded defeat. Neo-Frankfurtians, as I will call them, argue that the upshot of Frankfurt-style cases is not that PAP is false, but (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Simon Căbulea May (2009). Religious Democracy and the Liberal Principle of Legitimacy. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (2):136-170.score: 224.0
    I argue against Rawls's claim that the liberal principle of legitimacy would be selected in the original position in addition to a democratic principle. Since a religious democracy could satisfy the democratic principle, the parties in the original position would not exclude it as illegitimate.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Andrea Sauchelli (2012). Fictional Objects, Non-Existence, and the Principle of Characterization. Philosophical Studies 159 (1):139-146.score: 224.0
    I advance an objection to Graham Priest’s account of fictional entities as nonexistent objects. According to Priest, fictional characters do not have, in our world, the properties they are represented as having; for example, the property of being a bank clerk is possessed by Joseph K. not in our world but in other worlds. Priest claims that, in this way, his theory can include an unrestricted principle of characterization for objects. Now, some representational properties attributed to fictional characters, a (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Michael Moehler (2012). A Hobbesian Derivation of the Principle of Universalization. Philosophical Studies 158 (1):83-107.score: 224.0
    In this article, I derive a weak version of Kant's categorical imperative within an informal game-theoretic framework. More specifically, I argue that Hobbesian agents would choose what I call the weak principle of universalization, if they had to decide on a rule of conflict resolution in an idealized but empirically defensible hypothetical decision situation. The discussion clarifies (i) the rationality requirements imposed on agents, (ii) the empirical conditions assumed to warrant the conclusion, and (iii) the political institutions that are (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Srećko Kovač (2008). In What Sense is Kantian Principle of Contradiction Non-Classical? Logic and Logical Philosophy 17 (3):251-274.score: 224.0
    On the ground of Kant’s reformulation of the principle of con- tradiction, a non-classical logic KC and its extension KC+ are constructed. In KC and KC+, \neg(\phi \wedge \neg\phi),  \phi \rightarrow (\neg\phi \rightarrow \phi), and  \phi \vee \neg\phi are not valid due to specific changes in the meaning of connectives and quantifiers, although there is the explosion of derivable consequences from {\phi, ¬\phi} (the deduc- tion theorem lacking). KC and KC+ are interpreted as fragments of an S5-based (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Kristian Skagen Ekeli (2006). The Principle of Liberty and Legal Representation of Posterity. Res Publica 12 (4):385-409.score: 224.0
    This paper considers a guardianship model for the legal representation of future generations. According to this model, national and international courts should be given the competence to appoint guardians for future generations, if agents who care about the welfare of posterity apply for the creation of a guardianship in relation to a dispute that can be resolved by the application of law. This reform would grant guardians of future people legal standing or locus standi before courts, that is, the right (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Göran Hermerén (2012). The Principle of Proportionality Revisited: Interpretations and Applications. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):373-382.score: 224.0
    The principle of proportionality is used in many different contexts. Some of these uses and contexts are first briefly indicated. This paper focusses on the use of this principle as a moral principle. I argue that under certain conditions the principle of proportionality is helpful as a guide in decision-making. But it needs to be clarified and to be used with some flexibility as a context-dependent principle. Several interpretations of the principle are distinguished, using (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jonathan Pugh (2013). Embryos, The Principle of Proportionality, and the Shaky Ground of Moral Respect. Bioethics 28 (7).score: 224.0
    The debate concerning the moral permissibility of using human embryos in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research has long centred on the question of the embryo's supposed right to life. However, in focussing only on this question, many opponents to hESC research have escaped rigorous scrutiny by making vague and unfounded appeals to the concept of moral respect in order to justify their opposition to certain hESC practices. In this paper, I offer a critical analysis of the concept of moral (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Chong Un Choe Smith (2014). Confronting Ethical Permissibility in Animal Research: Rejecting a Common Assumption and Extending a Principle of Justice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (2):175-185.score: 224.0
    A common assumption in the selection of nonhuman animal subjects for research and the approval of research is that, if the risks of a procedure are too great for humans, and if there is a so-called scientific necessity, then it is permissible to use nonhuman animal subjects. I reject the common assumption as neglecting the central ethical issue of the permissibility of using nonhuman animal subjects and as being inconsistent with the principle of justice used in human subjects research (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Rebecca Bennett (2013). When Intuition is Not Enough. Why the Principle of Procreative Beneficence Must Work Much Harder to Justify Its Eugenic Vision. Bioethics 28 (7).score: 224.0
    The Principle of Procreative Beneficence (PPB) claims that we have a moral obligation, where choice is possible, to choose to create the best child we can. The existence of this moral obligation has been proposed by John Harris and Julian Savulescu and has proved controversial on many levels, not least that it is eugenics, asking us to produce the best children we can, not for the sake of that child's welfare, but in order to make a better society. These (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000