Search results for 'problem of evil' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Daniel Howard-Snyder (2013). The Logical Problem of Evil: Mackie and Plantinga. In Justin McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to the Problem of Evil. Wiley-Blackwell. 19-33.score: 210.0
    J.L. Mackie’s version of the logical problem of evil is a failure, as even he came to recognize. Contrary to current mythology, however, its failure was not established by Alvin Plantinga’s Free Will Defense. That’s because a defense is successful only if it is not reasonable to refrain from believing any of the claims that constitute it, but it is reasonable to refrain from believing the central claim of Plantinga’s Free Will Defense, namely the claim that, possibly, every (...)
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  2. James R. Beebe, Logical Problem of Evil. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 183.0
    The existence of evil and suffering in our world seems to pose a serious challenge to belief in the existence of a perfect God. If God were all-knowing, it seems that God would know about all of the horrible things that happen in our world. If God were all-powerful, God would be able to do something about all of the evil and suffering. Furthermore, if God were morally perfect, then surely God would want to do something about it. (...)
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  3. Moti Mizrahi (2013). The Problem of Natural Inequality: A New Problem of Evil. Philosophia (1):1-10.score: 180.0
    In this paper, I argue that there is a kind of evil, namely, the unequal distribution of natural endowments, or natural inequality, which presents theists with a new evidential (not logical or incompatibility) problem of evil. The problem of natural inequality is a new evidential problem of evil not only because, to the best of my knowledge, it has not yet been discussed in the literature, but also because available theodicies, such the free will (...)
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  4. Joe Mintoff (2013). Recasting Analytic Philosophy on the Problem of Evil. Sophia 52 (1):51-54.score: 180.0
    In his recent book, A Frightening Love: Recasting the Problem of Evil, Andrew Gleeson challenges a certain conception of justification assumed in mainstream analytic philosophy and argues that analytic philosophy is ill-suited to deal with the most pressing, existential, form of the problem of evil. In this article I examine some aspects of that challenge.
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  5. Justin McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.) (2013). The Blackwell Companion to the Problem of Evil. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 180.0
    This book is a collection of 33 new articles on the problem of evil.
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  6. Morgan Luck (2009). Aquinas's Miracles and the Luciferous Defence: The Problem of the Evil/Miracle Ratio. Sophia 48 (2):167-177.score: 177.0
    Miracles and the problem of evil are two prominent areas of research within philosophy of religion. On occasion these areas converge, with God’s goodness being brought into question by the claim that either there is a lack of miracles, or there are immoral miracles. In this paper I shall highlight a second manner in which miracles and the problem of evil relate. Namely, I shall give reason as to why what is considered to be miraculous may (...)
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  7. Andrei A. Buckareff & Allen Plug (2013). Hell and the Problem of Evil. In Justin McBrayer & Daniel Howard-Snyder (eds.), Companion to the Problem of Evil. Wiley-Blackwell. 128-143.score: 174.0
    The case is discussed for the doctrine of hell as posing a unique problem of evil for adherents to the Abrahamic religions who endorse traditional theism. The problem is particularly acute for those who accept retributivist formulations of the doctrine of hell according to which hell is everlasting punishment for failing to satisfy some requirement. Alternatives to retributivism are discussed, including the unique difficulties that each one faces.
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  8. Scott Sehon (2010). The Problem of Evil: Skeptical Theism Leads to Moral Paralysis. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (2):67 - 80.score: 165.0
    Natural disasters would seem to constitute evidence against the existence of God, for, on the face of things, it is mysterious why a completely good and all-powerful God would allow the sort of suffering we see from earthquakes, diseases, and the like. The skeptical theist replies that we should not expect to be able to understand God's ways, and thus we should not regard it as surprising or mysterious that God would allow natural evil. I argue that skeptical theism (...)
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  9. Nick Trakakis (2008). Theodicy: The Solution to the Problem of Evil, or Part of the Problem? Sophia 47 (2):161-191.score: 164.0
    Theodicy, the enterprise of searching for greater goods that might plausibly justify God’s permission of evil, is often criticized on the grounds that the project has systematically failed to unearth any such goods. But theodicists also face a deeper challenge, one that places under question the very attempt to look for any morally sufficient reasons God might have for creating a world littered with evil. This ‘anti-theodical’ view argues that theists (and non-theists) ought to reject, primarily for moral (...)
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  10. Mark T. Nelson (1993). Temporal Wholes and the Problem of Evil. Religious Studies 29 (3):313 - 324.score: 153.0
    I borrow an idea from the fiction of C. S. Lewis that future outcomes may affect the value of past events, defend this idea via the concept of a 'temporal whole' and show its promise as a partial theodicy and its resonance with Christian theism and a robust personalism.
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  11. Peter Hutcheson (1992). Omniscience and the Problem of Evil. Sophia 31 (1-2):53-58.score: 150.0
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  12. Jennifer L. Soerensen (2013). The Local Problem of God's Hiddenness: A Critique of van Inwagen's Criterion of Philosophical Success. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (3):297-314.score: 135.0
    In regards to the problem of evil, van Inwagen thinks there are two arguments from evil which require different defenses. These are the global argument from evil—that there exists evil in general, and the local argument from evil—that there exists some particular atrocious evil X. However, van Inwagen fails to consider whether the problem of God’s hiddenness also has a “local” version: whether there is in fact a “local” argument from God’s hiddenness (...)
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  13. Mark Piper (2007). Skeptical Theism and the Problem of Moral Aporia. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (2):65 - 79.score: 133.0
    Skeptical theism seeks to defend theism against the problem of evil by invoking putatively reasonable skepticism concerning human epistemic limitations in order to establish that we have no epistemological basis from which to judge that apparently gratuitous evils are not in fact justified by morally sufficient reasons beyond our ken. This paper contributes to the set of distinctively practical criticisms of skeptical theism by arguing that religious believers who accept skeptical theism and take its practical implications seriously will (...)
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  14. Calvin O. Schrag (2006). Otherness and the Problem of Evil: How Does That Which Is Other Become Evil? [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):149 - 156.score: 129.0
    In seeking to answer the question "How does that which is other become evil?" the author provides a discussion of four entwined aspects of the issue at stake: (1) difficulty in achieving clarity on the grammar of evil; (2) genocide as a striking illustration of otherness becoming evil; (3) the challenge of postnationalism as a resource for dealing with otherness in the socio-political arena; and (4) the ethico-religious dimension as it relates to the wider problem of (...)
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  15. Nick Trakakis, The Evidential Problem of Evil. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 129.0
    The Evidential Problem of Evil The evidential problem of evil is the problem of determining whether and, if so, to what extent the existence of evil (or certain instances, kinds, quantities, or distributions of evil) constitutes evidence against the existence of God, that is to say, a being perfect in power, knowledge and goodness. Evidential […].
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  16. David Koepsell (2010). Peter Hare and the Problem of Evil. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (1):53-59.score: 129.0
    Peter Hare and Edward Madden's collaborative book Evil and the Concept of God (968) has become a staple in literature about the problem of evil and remains frequently cited by supporters and critics alike. The major concepts of the work arose out of earlier papers in which they first began to formulate their arguments about the problem of evil. Their article "Evil and Unlimited Power" embodies many of their arguments against quasi-theist attempts to resolve (...)
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  17. Catalin Vasile Bobb (2011). From the Problem of “Evil” to Interpretation. "Hermeneutic Phenomenology" As a Method for Understanding the Religious Discourse. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (30):299-317.score: 129.0
    800x600 Normal 0 21 false false false RO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabel Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of hermeneutic phenomenology in Paul Ricoeur’s philosophy. A major thesis of this study is that Paul Ricoeur’s hermeneutic phenomenology is never freed from religious insights. If in a text like “Hermeneutics and existence”, written in 1965, one (...)
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  18. Peter Van Inwagen (2006). The Problem of Evil: The Gifford Lectures Delivered in the University of St. Andrews in 2003. Oxford University Press.score: 126.0
    The vast amount of suffering in the world is often held as a particularly powerful reason to deny that God exists. Now, one of the world's most distinguished philosophers of religion presents his own position on the problem of evil. Highly accessible and sensitively argued, Peter van Inwagen's book argues that such reasoning does not hold: his conclusion is not that God exists, but that suffering cannot be shown to prove that He does not.
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  19. William L. Rowe (ed.) (2001). God and the Problem of Evil. Blackwell.score: 126.0
    The study of these essays and replies will provide students with a thorough understanding of the central issues involved in the problem of evil.
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  20. Marilyn McCord Adams & Robert Merrihew Adams (eds.) (1990). The Problem of Evil. Oxford University Press.score: 126.0
    The problem of evil is one of the most discussed topics in the philosophy of religion. For some time, however, there has been a need for a collection of readings that adequately represents recent and ongoing writing on the topic. This volume fills that need, offering the most up-to-date collection of recent scholarship on the problem of evil. The distinguished contributors include J.L. Mackie, Nelson Pike, Roderick M. Chisholm, Terence Penelhum, Alvin Plantinga, William L. Rowe, Stephen (...)
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  21. Daniel Howard-Snyder (1996). The Problem of Evil. [REVIEW] The Christian Scholar's Review.score: 126.0
    This is a review of Michael Peterson's The Problem of Evil.
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  22. Andrew Gleeson (2012). A a Frightening Love: Recasting the Problem of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 126.0
    The greater good -- The intellectual and the existential -- The problem of evil and the problem of the slightest toothache -- The God of love -- Is God an agent? -- The real God.
     
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  23. Peter Van Inwagen (2006). The Problem of Evil: The Gifford Lectures Delivered in the University of St. Oxford University Press.score: 126.0
    The vast amount of suffering in the world is often held as a particularly powerful reason to deny that God exists. Now, one of the world's most distinguished philosophers of religion presents his own position on the problem of evil. Highly accessible and sensitively argued, Peter van Inwagen's book argues that such reasoning does not hold: his conclusion is not that God exists, but that suffering cannot be shown to prove that He does not.
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  24. Heimir Geirsson (2006). Plantinga and the Problem of Evil. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 8:109-113.score: 123.0
    The logical problem of evil centers on the apparent inconsistency of the following two propositions: (1) God is omnipotent, omniscient, and wholly good, and (2) There is evil in the world. This is the problem that Alvin Plantinga takes to task in his celebrated response to the problem of evil. Plantinga denies that (1) and (2) are inconsistent, arguing that J.L. Mackie's principle - that there are no limits to what an omnipotent thing can (...)
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  25. Michael P. Levine (1999). The Problem of Evil. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999:127-146.score: 123.0
    The shift from the logical to the empirical argument from evil against the existence of God has been seen as a victory by analytic philosophers of religion who now seek to establish that the existence of evil fails to make the existence of God improbable. I examine several arguments in an effort to establish the following: (i) Their victory is pyrrhic. They distort the historical, philosophical and religious nature of the problem of evil. (ii) In attempting (...)
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  26. Franklin Perkins (2007). The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 7:149-155.score: 123.0
    If the problem of evil is one of justifying how a perfect God could create evil, then there is no problem of evil in early Chinese thought, but my claim in this paper is that the problem of evil is one manifestation of a deeper problem, which is the conflict between the world and human values and desires. This deeper problem appears in early Chinese thought in ways analogous to the (...) of evil in theistic traditions. Daoists respond to this problem with a call to harmonize with heaven by overcoming conventional values and desires. Mencius, a Confucian, offers a more complex response, in which it is natural to cultivate virtue and certain desires even though nature itself is indifferent to them. My paper focuses on this Confucian response. (shrink)
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  27. Nick Trakakis (forthcoming). Evidential Problem of Evil, The. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 123.0
    The Evidential Problem of Evil The evidential problem of evil is the problem of determining whether and, if so, to what extent the existence of evil (or certain instances, kinds, quantities, or distributions of evil) constitutes evidence against the existence of God, that is to say, a being perfect in power, knowledge and goodness. Evidential […].
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  28. James T. King (1971). The Meta-Ethical Dimension of the Problem of Evil. Journal of Value Inquiry 5 (3):174-184.score: 123.0
    In addition to complexity deriving from the notion of the possibility of a ‘better world,’ the anti-theist argument from evils may possess the appearance of greater effectiveness than critical analysis should recognize it. If the moral language employed in the argument is accepted according to some forms of emotive, intuitive or theonomous interpretations, the so-called problem will vanish - and the question of the existence or nonexistence of God (so far as it is thought to depend on this argument) (...)
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  29. W. Moore (2008). The Atheist Solution to the Problem of Evil. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:221-227.score: 123.0
    In Rethinking the Philosophy of Religion Today, this paper would like to advance the atheist solution to the problem of evil that has occasionally in the past been suggested by philosophers, but has largely been neglected in the Philosophy of Religion. In discussing this solution, the paper focuses on the reasons upon which philosophers regard the giving up of one or more of the attributes of God in theism to be an adequate solution to the problem of (...)
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  30. Elmar J. Kremer & Michael J. Latzer (2002). The Problem of Evil in Early Modern Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (3).score: 123.0
    Many distinct, controvertial issues are to be found within the labyrinthine\ntwists and turns of the problem of evil. For philosophers of the\nseventeenth and early eighteenth centures, evil presented a challenge\nto the consistency and rationality of the world-picture disclosed\nby the new way of ideas. In dealing with this challenge, however,\nphilosophers were also concerned with their positions in the theological\ndebates about original sin, free will, and justification that were\nthe legacy of the Protestant Reformation to European intellectual\nlife. Emerging from a (...)
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  31. T. Ryan Byerly (2011). Intentions, Intentionally Permitting, and the Problem of Evil. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 85:223-236.score: 123.0
    Some of the most persuasive contemporary statements of the problem of evil rely on premises concerning God’s intentionally permitting certain things to occur and premises concerning the moral wrongness of intentionally permitting such things. In this paper, I want to pose a dilemma for the defender of such arguments from evil. Either intentionally permitting p implies intending p or it does not. If it does, then the theist may plausibly resist these arguments from evil by insisting (...)
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  32. J. L. Schellenberg (2010). The Hiddenness Problem and the Problem of Evil. Faith and Philosophy 27 (1):45-60.score: 120.0
    The problem of Divine hiddenness, or the hiddenness problem, is more and more commonly being treated as independent of the problem of evil, and as rivalling the latter in significance. Are we in error if we acquiesce in these tendencies? Only a careful investigation into relations between the hiddenness problem and the problem of evil can help us see. Such an investigation is undertaken here. What we will find is that when certain knots (...)
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  33. Ken Gemes, The Problem of Evil and its Solution.score: 120.0
    The problem of evil can be captured by the following four statements which taken together are inconsistent: 1) God made the world 2) God is a perfect being 3) A perfect being would not create a world containing evil 4) The world contains evil Traditional attempts to grapple with this problem typically center on rejecting (3). Thus Descartes, following Augustine, rejects (3), arguing that evil is the result of man’s exercise of his free will. (...)
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  34. Eleonore Stump (1985). The Problem of Evil. Faith and Philosophy 2 (4):392-423.score: 120.0
    This paper considers briefly the approach to the problem of evil by Alvin Plantinga, Richard Swinburne, and John Hick and argues that none of these approaches is entirely satisfactory. The paper then develops a different strategy for dealing with the problem of evil by expounding and taking seriously three Christian claims relevant to the problem: Adam fell; natural evil entered the world as a result of Adam's fall; and after death human beings go either (...)
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  35. James Franklin (2003). Leibniz's Solution to the Problem of Evil. Think 5 (5):97-101.score: 120.0
    • It would be a moral disgrace for God (if he existed) to allow the many evils in the world, in the same way it would be for a parent to allow a nursery to be infested with criminals who abused the children. • There is a contradiction in asserting all three of the propositions: God is perfectly good; God is perfectly powerful; evil exists (since if God wanted to remove the evils and could, he would). • The religious (...)
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  36. Whitley R. P. Kaufman (2005). Karma, Rebirth, and the Problem of Evil. Philosophy East and West 55 (1):15-32.score: 120.0
    : The doctrine of karma and rebirth is often praised for its ability to offer a successful solution to the Problem of Evil. This essay evaluates such a claim by considering whether the doctrine can function as a systematic theodicy, as an explanation of all human suffering in terms of wrongs done in either this or past lives. This purported answer to the Problem of Evil must face a series of objections, including the problem of (...)
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  37. Thomas L. Carson (2007). Axiology, Realism, and the Problem of Evil. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):349–368.score: 120.0
    Discussions of the problem of evil presuppose and appeal to axiological and metaethical assumptions, but seldom pay adequate attention to those assumptions. I argue that certain theories of value are consistent with theistic answers to the argument from evil and that several other well-known theories of value, such as hedonism, are difficult, if not impossible, to reconcile with theism. Although moral realism is the subject of lively debate in contemporary philosophy, almost all standard discussions of the (...) of evil presuppose the truth of moral realism. I explain the implications of several nonrealist theories of value for the problem of evil and argue that, if nonrealism is true, then we need to rethink and re-frame the entire discussion about the problem of evil. (shrink)
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  38. Whitley R. P. Kaufman (2007). Karma, Rebirth, and the Problem of Evil: A Reply to Critics. Philosophy East and West 57 (4):556-560.score: 120.0
    The doctrine of karma and rebirth is often praised for its ability to offer a successful solution to the Problem of Evil. This essay evaluates such a claim by considering whether the doctrine can function as a systematic theodicy, as an explanation of all human suffering in terms of wrongs done in either this or past lives. This purported answer to the Problem of Evil must face a series of objections, including the problem of any (...)
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  39. Yujin Nagasawa, The MaximalGod and the Problem of Evil.score: 120.0
    I have argued elsewhere that nearly all existing arguments against Anselmian theism—such as the paradox of the stone, the argument from God’s inability to sin, and the problem of evil—can be refuted all at once by holding that God possesses the maximal consistent set of knowledge, power and benevolence instead of insisting that He is omniscient, omnipotent and omnibenevolent. Some critics suggest, however, that my strategy fails, at least with respect to the problem of evil, because (...)
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  40. Christopher Miles Coope (2001). Good-Bye to the Problem of Evil, Hello to the Problem of Veracity. Religious Studies 37 (4):373-396.score: 120.0
    I start from Mill's words about Mansel and the problem of evil. In this dispute Mansel has generally been thought to have come off worst. However, Mansel was clearly right to this extent: that what would make a man a good man would not be the same as what made God good. This is because, quite generally, what makes something good of its kind, where we can talk about goodness at all, varies with the kind. With Aristotle we (...)
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  41. Ian Wilks (2004). The Structure of the Contemporary Debate on the Problem of Evil. Religious Studies 40 (3):307-321.score: 120.0
    This paper concerns the attempt to formulate an empirical version of the problem of evil, and the attempt to counter this version by what is known as ‘sceptical theism’. My concern is to assess what is actually achieved in these attempts. To this end I consider the debate between them against the backdrop of William Rowe's distinction between expanded standard theism and restricted standard theism (which I label E and R respectively). My claim is that the empirical version (...)
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  42. William L. Rowe (2008). Peter Van Inwagen on the Problem of Evil. Faith and Philosophy 25 (4):425-431.score: 120.0
    In his book The Problem of Evil, Van Inwagen aims to establish that the problem of evil is a failure. My article considers his response to the evidential problem of evil. His response relies on a fundamental assumption: “Every possible world God could have actualized contains patterns of suffering morally equivalent to those of the actual world, or else is massively irregular.” While it may not be unreasonable to suggest that it is logically possible (...)
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  43. David B. Myers (2003). Exclusivism, Eternal Damnation, and the Problem of Evil: A Critique of Craig's Molinist Soteriological Theodicy. Religious Studies 39 (4):407-419.score: 120.0
    According to orthodox Christianity, salvation depends on faith in Christ. If, however, God eternally punishes those who die ignorant of Christ, it appears that we have special instance of the problem of evil: the punishment of the religiously innocent. This is called the soteriological problem of evil. Using Molina's concept of middle knowledge, William Lane Craig develops a solution to this problem which he considers a theodicy. As developed by Craig, the Molinist theodicy rests on (...)
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  44. Eleonore Stump (2001). Second-Person Accounts and the Problem of Evil. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 57 (4):745 - 771.score: 120.0
    In this paper, the author argues that a second-person experience is an experience one has when one has conscious awareness of another consciously aware person. The author shows that there are some things we know in second-person experiences which are either difficult or impossible to put in propositional form at all but stories can capture them for us. An account of a second-person experience is what we typically find in narratives. The author argues that the second-person point of view has (...)
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  45. Rik Peels (2006). Divine Foreknowledge and Eternal Damnation: The Theory of Middle Knowledge as Solution to the Soteriological Problem of Evil. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 48 (2):160-75.score: 120.0
    Traditionally, Christians have hold the two following beliefs: the belief that God is omniscient, omnipotent, and perfectly good on the one hand and the belief that God has actualized a possible world in which some people freely reject Christ and are damned eternally, while others freely accept Him and are saved on the other. The combination of these two beliefs seems to result in a contradiction. This serious and well-known problem is called the soteriological problem of evil. (...)
     
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  46. John Martin Fischer & Neal A. Tognazzini (2007). Exploring Evil and Philosophical Failure: A Critical Notice of Peter Van Inwagen's the Problem of Evil. Faith and Philosophy 24 (4):458-474.score: 120.0
    In his recent book on the problem of evil, Peter van Inwagen argues that both the global and local arguments from evil are failures. In this paper, we engagevan Inwagen’s book at two main points. First, we consider his understanding of what it takes for a philosophical argument to succeed. We argue that whilehis criterion for success is interesting and helpful, there is good reason to think it is too stringent. Second, we consider his responses to the (...)
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  47. Eleonore Stump (1997). Saadia Gaon on the Problem of Evil. Faith and Philosophy 14 (4):523-549.score: 120.0
    Considerable effort has been expended on constructing theodicies which try to reconcile the suffering of unwilling innocents, such as Job, with the existence and nature of God as understood in Christian theology. There is, of course, abundant reflection on the problem of evil and the story of Job in the history of Jewish thought, but this material has not been discussed much in contemporary philosophical literature. I want to take a step towards remedying this defect by examining the (...)
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  48. Tim Mawson (1999). The Problem of Evil and Moral Indifference. Religious Studies 35 (3):323-345.score: 120.0
    In this paper, I argue that if the libertarian free will defence were seen to fail because determinism were seen to be true, then another solution to the problem of evil would present itself. I start by arguing that one cannot, by consideration of agents' choices between morally indifferent options, reach any conclusion as to these agents' moral qualities. If certain forms of consequentialism were false, determinism true, and if there were a God who chose to create this (...)
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  49. George I. Mavrodes (1968). The Problem of Evil as a Rhetorical Problem. Philosophy and Rhetoric 1 (2):91 - 102.score: 120.0
    I argue that the problem of evil, As a problem with theological significance, Cannot be specified in terms simply of truth and logic. For a problem specified in this way can be seen to be either trivial or necessarily insoluble before any of the substantive issues are decided. I then argue that it should be construed as a special sort of rhetorical problem, One posed by beliefs about the compatibility of other beliefs. On the basis (...)
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