Search results for 'professor Howard, Don' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  12
    E. W. Whittle (1974). The Seven Against Thebes Howard Don Cameron: Studies on the Seven Against Thebes of Aeschylus. (Studies in Classical Literature, 8.) Pp. 108. The Hague: Mouton, 1971. Paper, Fl. 22. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 24 (01):18-19.
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  2.  6
    Charles Wei-Hsun Fu (1975). Rejoinder to Professor Howard Parsons' Critical Remarks. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 2 (4):447-454.
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  3.  25
    Martin Carrier, Don Howard & Janet A. Kourany (eds.) (2008). The Challenge of the Social and the Pressure of Practice: Science and Values Revisited. University of Pittsburgh Press.
    ISBN-13: 978-0-8229-4317-4 (cloth : alk. paper) ISBN-10: 0-8229-4317-4 (cloth : alk. paper) 1. Science — Philosophy. 2. Science — Social aspects. 3. Values. 4. Science and civilization. I. Carrier, Martin. II. Howard, Don, professor. III. Kourany ...
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  4.  22
    Griffin Trotter (1999). Response to “Bringing Clarity to the Futility Debate: Don't Use the Wrong Cases” by Howard Brody and “Commentary: Bringing Clarity to the Futility Debate: Are the Cases Wrong?” by L.J. Schneiderman. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):527-537.
    In a recent issue of CambridgeQuarterlyofHealthcareEthics, Howard Brody and Lawrence Schneiderman offer contrasting opinions about how to apply the concept of in medicine. Brody holds that are those in which it is reasonably certain that a given intervention when applied for the purpose of attaining a specific clinical goal. To determine which actions are futile, Brody prescribes a division of labor. Patients are charged with choosing the goals of treatment while physicians are charged with determining whether specific treatments will be (...)
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  5.  4
    Arri Eisen & Roberta M. Berry (2002). The Absent Professor: Why We Don't Teach Research Ethics and What to Do About It. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (4):38 – 49.
    Research ethics education in the biosciences has not historically been a priority for research universities despite the fact that funding agencies, government regulators, and the parties involved in the research enterprise agree that it ought to be. The confluence of a number of factors, including scrutiny and regulation due to increased public awareness of the impact of basic research on society, increased public and private funding, increased diversity and collaboration among researchers, the impressive success and speed of research advances, and (...)
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  6.  23
    Jay Foster (2010). Martin Carrier, Don Howard and Janet Kourany, Eds. The Challenge of the Social and the Pressure of Practice: Science and Values Revisited Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 30 (3):169-172.
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  7.  66
    Miriam Solomon (2008). Review of Martin Carrier, Don Howard, Janet Kourany (Eds.), The Challenge of the Social and the Pressure of Practice: Science and Values Revisited. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).
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  8.  15
    Phillip Catton (2003). Don Howard and John Stachel (Eds), Einstein: The Formative Years, 1879–1909. The Einstein Studies Series, Volume. [REVIEW] Metascience 12 (1):71-74.
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  9. Richard E. Grandy (1975). DeLong Howard. A Profile of Mathematical Logic. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Reading, Mass., Menlo Park, Calif., London, and Don Mills, Ontario, 1970, Xiv + 304 Pp.Carroll Lewis. A Logical Paradox. A Reprint of 672. Appendix A. Therein, Pp. 230–232.Carroll Lewis. What the Tortoise Said to Achilles. A Reprint of 673. Appendix B. Therein, Pp. 233–236. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 40 (1):101-102.
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  10. Lewis Pyenson (2003). Michele Zackheim.Einstein’s Daughter: The Search for Lieserl. Xvi + 347 Pp., Frontis., Illus., Bibl., Index. New York: Riverhead Books, 1999. $15 .Don Howard; John Stachel .Einstein: The Formative Years, 1879–1909. Xiv + 258 Pp., Illus., Figs., Index. Basel: Birkhäuser Verlag, 2000. DEM 128, ATS 935, $59.95. [REVIEW] Isis 94 (1):159-161.
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  11. Lewis Pyenson (1995). The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. Volume 3: The Swiss Years: Writings, 1909-1911Albert Einstein Martin J. Klein A. J. Kox Jurgen Renn Jed Buchwald Jean Eisenstaedt Don Howard John Norton Tilman SauerThe Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. Volume 3: The Swiss Years: Writings, 1909-1911Albert Einstein Anna BeckThe Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. Volume 5: The Swiss Years: Correspondence, 1902-1914Albert Einstein Martin J. Klein A. J. Kox Robert Schulmann Paolo Brenni Klaus Hentschel Jurgen Renn Laura Ruetsche. [REVIEW] Isis 86 (3):514-515.
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  12. Alan Richardson (2009). Martin Carrier; Don Howard; Janet Kourany .The Challenge of the Social and the Pressure of Practice: Science and Values Revisited. Vii + 262 Pp., Bibls., Index. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2008. $50. [REVIEW] Isis 100 (1):202-203.
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  13. Andrew Warwick (1996). Martin J. Klein, A. J. Kox, Juergen Renn and Robert Schulmann , The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein. Volume 5: The Swiss Years: Correspondence, 1902–1914. English Translation by Anna Beck and Don Howard. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995. Pp. Xvii + 384. ISBN 0-691-00099-9. £29.95, $19.50. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 29 (1):109.
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  14.  4
    Don Ross, David Spurrett, Harold Kincaid & G. Lynn Stephens (eds.) (2007). Distributed Cognition and the Will: Individual Volition and Social Context. A Bradford Book.
    Recent scientific findings about human decision making would seem to threaten the traditional concept of the individual conscious will. The will is threatened from "below" by the discovery that our apparently spontaneous actions are actually controlled and initiated from below the level of our conscious awareness, and from "above" by the recognition that we adapt our actions according to social dynamics of which we are seldom aware. In Distributed Cognition and the Will, leading philosophers and behavioral scientists consider how much, (...)
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  15.  20
    Alan R. Perreiah & professor Howard, Don (1982). History of Logic. Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (1):101-106.
  16.  3
    Gerald Mast (1984). On Framing. Critical Inquiry 11 (1):82-109.
    One of the common and commonsensical ways to distinguish cinema from every other art and semiotic system, and to define the property of its uniqueness, is to claim that cinema is the only art/”language” that links images. This “linking” can imply three different yet complementary operations. First, cinema links individual still photographs into an apparently continuous sequence of movement by pushing the individual frames or photographs through a camera or projector at sixteen or twenty-four or however many frames per second. (...)
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  17. Don Howard, Bas van Fraassen, Otávio Bueno, Elena Castellani, Laura Crosilla, Steven French & Décio Krause (2011). The Physics and Metaphysics of Identity and Individuality. Metascience 20 (2):225-251.
    The physics and metaphysics of identity and individuality Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9463-7 Authors Don Howard, Department of Philosophy and Graduate Program in History and Philosophy of Science, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA Bas C. van Fraassen, Philosophy Department, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94132, USA Otávio Bueno, Department of Philosophy, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124, USA Elena Castellani, Department of Philosophy, University of Florence, Via Bolognese 52, 50139 (...)
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  18.  15
    David B. Malament (ed.) (2002). Reading Natural Philosophy: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics. Open Court.
    In this book, 13 leading philosophers of science focus on the work of Professor Howard Stein, best known for his study of the intimate connection between ...
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  19. Katie Davis, Scott Seider & Howard Gardner (2008). When False Representations Ring True (and When They Don't). Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (4):1085-1108.
    We examine the circumstances under which young people engage in fabricated self-representations and explore the individual and societal factors that compel and sanction these fabrications. There are circumstances under which self-fabrications may have beneficial effects and are, thus, authorized representations of the self. In contrast, a false, or unauthorized, self-representation is one that results in harm to the self, to others, and/or society. We discuss an educational curriculum designed to encourage students to reflect on their roles and responsibilities in the (...)
     
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  20.  5
    Howard Brody (1998). Bringing Clarity to the Futility Debate: Don't Use the Wrong Cases. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (3):269-273.
    Among those who criticize the concept of a common refrain is that we really have no idea what futility means. For example, physicians seem to disagree on whether a treatment being futile means that it has a less than 5% chance of working or a 20% chance of working. If the concept is so unclear, then it seems a thin reed upon which to base a momentous ethical decision—namely, that the physician's judgment should be allowed to override the wishes of (...)
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  21.  58
    Frances Howard-Snyder (2008). Damned If You Do; Damned If You Don't! Philosophia 36 (1):1-15.
    This paper discusses the Principle of Normative Invariance: ‘An action’s moral status does not depend on whether or not it is performed.’ I show the importance of this principle for arguments regarding actualism and other variations on the person-affecting restriction, discuss and rebut arguments in favor of the principle, and then discuss five counterexamples to it. I conclude that the principle as it stands is false; and that if it is modified to avoid the counterexamples, it is gutted of any (...)
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  22.  90
    Various Authors, 60 Philosophical Papers Dedicated to Professor Wlodek Rabinowicz.
    Contributing Authors: Lilli Alanen & Frans Svensson, David Alm, Gustaf Arrhenius, Gunnar Björnsson, Luc Bovens, Richard Bradley, Geoffrey Brennan & Nicholas Southwood, John Broome, Linus Broström & Mats Johansson, Johan Brännmark, Krister Bykvist, John Cantwell, Erik Carlson, David Copp, Roger Crisp, Sven Danielsson, Dan Egonsson, Fred Feldman, Roger Fjellström, Marc Fleurbaey, Margaret Gilbert, Olav Gjelsvik, Kathrin Glüer & Peter Pagin, Ebba Gullberg & Sten Lindström, Peter Gärdenfors, Sven Ove Hansson, Jana Holsanova, Nils Holtug, Victoria Höög, Magnus Jiborn, Karsten Klint Jensen, (...)
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  23.  29
    Howard M. Robinson (1972). Professor Armstrong on 'Non-Physical Sensory Items'. Mind 81 (January):84-86.
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  24.  26
    Howard Young (2000). Game of Circles: Conversations Between Don Quixote and Sancho. Philosophy and Literature 24 (2):377-386.
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  25.  12
    Karin Buhmann (2012). Damned If You Do, Damned If You Don't? The Lundbeck Case of Pentobarbital, the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, and Competing Human Rights Responsibilities. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 40 (2):206-219.
    In 2011 it emerged that to induce the death penalty, United States authorities had begun giving injections of pentobarbital, a substance provided by Danish pharmaceutical company Lundbeck. Lundbeck's product pentobarbital is licensed for treatment of refractory forms of epilepsy and for usage as an anaesthetic, thus for a very different purpose. The Lundbeck case offers a difficult, but also interesting Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) dilemma between choices facing a pharmaceutical company to stop the distribution of a medical substance in order (...)
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  26.  16
    Bob Sandmeyer (2006). Howard N. Tuttle. Human Life is Radical Reality: An Idea Developed From the Conceptions of Dilthey, Heidegger, and Ortega y Gasset. New York: Peter Lang, 2005. Pp. X + 200. Cloth, $59.95. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):128-129.
    Excerpt: This is a book which seeks to sketch out a coherent philosophy of life. By arguing that "human life is radical reality," Professor Tuttle places the ontological priority of "my life" over and against that of every reality encountered in that life. Yet the life at issue in this book is no solus ipse, and the things or pragmata of this life do not therefore depend on the I for their being. As Ortega y Gasset asserts, I am (...)
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  27.  5
    Elizabeth M. Fenton, Kyle L. Galbraith, Susan Dorr Goold, Elisa J. Gordon, Lawrence O. Gostin, Hilde Lindemann, Anna C. Mastroianni, Mary Faith Marshall, Howard Minkoff & Joshua E. Perry (forthcoming). Raymond G. De Vries is a Professor At. Hastings Center Report.
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  28.  13
    A. O. Lovejoy, J. E. Creighton, W. E. Hocking, E. B. McGilvary, W. T. Marvin, G. H. Head & Howard C. Warren (1914). The Case of Professor Mecklin: Report of the Committee of Inquiry of the American Philosophical Association and the American Psychological Association. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 11 (3):67-81.
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  29.  2
    Howard Brody (1998). Felicia Ackerman, Ph. D., is Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. A Recipient of an O'Henry Award, Many of Her Published Short Stories Deal with Issues in Med-Ical Ethics. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:235-237.
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  30.  4
    Daniel S. Goldberg & Howard Brody (2007). Spirituality: Respect but Don't Reveal. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):21 – 22.
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  31. V. A. Howard (1974). On Sociological History: A Reply to Professor Goldstein. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 4 (3):353-357.
  32. Mike LaBossiere (2008). What Don't You Know?: Philosophical Provocations. Continuum.
    _ "LaBossiere brilliantly tackles many of the toughest ethical dilemmas of our times, from gender selection, cloning and sexual inequality to violence in the media and the conduct of warfare. In an age of snap judgments and stereotypes, he approaches his topics in a refreshingly open-minded fashion. His quick wit and firm knowledge of contemporary culture bring philosophy full-force into the 21st century." —Paul Halpern, Professor Of Physics, University Of The Sciences in Philadelphia and author of What's Science Ever (...)
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  33. Howard Tuttle (1976). Comment on Professor Jordan's Paper. Social Research 43.
     
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  34.  8
    Howard H. Schweber (2011). Democracy and Authenticity: Toward a Theory of Public Justification. Cambridge University Press.
    Professor Howard Schweber analyzes whether there are limits to what counts as an appropriate justification for coercive government actions.
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  35.  39
    Michael Gibbons (ed.) (1994). The New Production of Knowledge: The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. Sage Publications.
    As we approach the end of the twentieth century, the ways in which knowledge--scientific, social, and cultural--is produced are undergoing fundamental changes. In The New Production of Knowledge, a distinguished group of authors analyze these changes as marking the transition from established institutions, disciplines, practices, and policies to a new mode of knowledge production. Identifying such elements as reflexivity, transdisciplinarity, and heterogeneity within this new mode, the authors consider their impact and interplay with the role of knowledge in social relations. (...)
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  36. Don Howard (2004). Who Invented the “Copenhagen Interpretation”? A Study in Mythology. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):669-682.
    What is commonly known as the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, regarded as representing a unitary Copenhagen point of view, differs significantly from Bohr's complementarity interpretation, which does not employ wave packet collapse in its account of measurement and does not accord the subjective observer any privileged role in measurement. It is argued that the Copenhagen interpretation is an invention of the mid‐1950s, for which Heisenberg is chiefly responsible, various other physicists and philosophers, including Bohm, Feyerabend, Hanson, and Popper, having (...)
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  37.  3
    Don R. Swanson (1978). Toward a Psychology of Metaphor. Critical Inquiry 5 (1):163-166.
    How and why does a metaphor work? What happens to us when we hear or read one? My guess is that a metaphor, because it is an erroneous statement, conflicts with our expectations. It releases, triggers, and stimulates our predisposition to detect error and to take corrective action. We do not dismiss or reject a metaphor as simply a false statement for we recognize it as a metaphor and know as [Donald] Davidson suggests that it alludes to something else that (...)
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  38.  2
    Howard Felperin (1980). Romance and Romanticism. Critical Inquiry 6 (4):691-706.
    The work of Northrop Frye, evenly divided as it is between those earlier and later literatures and equally influential in both fields, will serve to illustrate the literary-historical myth I have begun to describe. "Romanticism," he writes, "is a 'sentimental' form of romance, and the fairy tale, for the most part, a 'sentimental' form of folk tale."1 Frye's terms are directly adopted from Schiller's famous essay, "Über naive und sentimentalische Dichtung," though "naive" for Frye means simply "primitive" or "popular" and (...)
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  39. Howard Nemerov (1979). On the Measure of Poetry. Critical Inquiry 6 (2):331-341.
    To sum up on forms and rightness. No one wants poetry to be like filling out a form, though plenty of poems look dismally like it. The forms were there to be wrestled with mightily, because they silently and emptily, till one filled them up with the thing said, stood for the recalcitrant outside and other that knows nothing of the human will. The mindless rigidity in principle of the verse patterns suggestively compounded with the sinewy nature of the speaking (...)
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  40. Howard Wainer (2011). Picturing the Uncertain World: How to Understand, Communicate, and Control Uncertainty Through Graphical Display. Princeton University Press.
    In his entertaining and informative book Graphic Discovery, Howard Wainer unlocked the power of graphical display to make complex problems clear. Now he's back with Picturing the Uncertain World, a book that explores how graphs can serve as maps to guide us when the information we have is ambiguous or incomplete. Using a visually diverse sampling of graphical display, from heartrending autobiographical displays of genocide in the Kovno ghetto to the "Pie Chart of Mystery" in a New Yorker cartoon, Wainer (...)
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  41.  59
    Don Howard, Einstein, Kant, and the Origins of Logical Empiricism.
    more on the history of the Vienna Circle and its allies, see Coffa 1991; Friedman 1983; Hailer 1982, 1985; Kraft 1950; and Proust 1986, 1989). Without question, however, the crucial, formative, early intellectual experience of at least Schlick, Reichenbach, and Carnap, the experience that did most to give form and content to their emergent philosophies of science, was their engagement with relativity theory. Thus, after a few early writings on more general philosophical themes, Schlick first caught the attention of a (...)
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  42. Don Howard (1985). Einstein on Locality and Separability. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 16 (3):171-201.
  43. Don Howard (1989). Holism, Separability, and the Metaphysical Implications of the Bell Experiments. In James T. Cushing & Ernan McMullin (eds.), Philosophical Consequences of Quantum Theory. University of Notre Dame Press 224--253.
     
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  44. Don Howard (1994). What Makes a Classical Concept Classical? Toward a Reconstruction of Niels Bohr's Philosophy of Physics. In Niels Bohr and Contemporary Philosophy. Kluwer Academic Publishers 201--230.
    — Niels Bohr, 19231 “There must be quite definite and clear grounds, why you repeatedly declare that one must interpret observations classically, which lie absolute ly in thei r essenc e. . . . It must belong to your deepest conviction—and I cannot understand on what you base it.”.
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  45.  33
    Don A. Howard (2003). Two Left Turns Make a Right: On the Curious Political Career of North American Philosophy of Science at Midcentury. In Logical Empiricism in North America. University of Minnesota Press
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  46.  21
    Don A. Howard (2008). Einstein's Philosophy of Science. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  47.  58
    Don Howard (2006). Lost Wanderers in the Forest of Knowledge: Some Thoughts on the Discovery-Justification Distinction. In Jutta Schickore & Friedrich Steinle (eds.), Revisiting Discovery and Justification: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on the Context Distinction. Springer 3--22.
    Neo-positivism is dead. Let that imperfect designation stand for the project that dominated and defined the philosophy of science, especially in its Anglophone form, during the fifty or so years following the end of the Second World War. While its critics were many,1 its death was slow, and some think still to find a pulse.2 But die it did in the cul-de-sac into which it was led by its own faulty compass.
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  48.  9
    Don Howard (2010). Let Me Briefly Indicate Why I Do Not Find This Standpoint Natural" : Einstein, General Relativity, and the Contingent a Priori. In Michael Friedman, Mary Domski & Michael Dickson (eds.), Discourse on a New Method: Reinvigorating the Marriage of History and Philosophy of Science. Open Court 333--355.
  49.  14
    Ioan Muntean & Don Howard (2016). A Minimalist Model of the Artificial Autonomous Moral Agent (AAMA). In SSS-16 Symposium Technical Reports. Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence. AAAI
    This paper proposes a model for an artificial autonomous moral agent (AAMA), which is parsimonious in its ontology and minimal in its ethical assumptions. Starting from a set of moral data, this AAMA is able to learn and develop a form of moral competency. It resembles an “optimizing predictive mind,” which uses moral data (describing typical behavior of humans) and a set of dispositional traits to learn how to classify different actions (given a given background knowledge) as morally right, wrong, (...)
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  50.  5
    Don Howard (2009). Better Red Than Dead: Putting an End to the Social Irrelevance of Postwar Philosophy of Science. Science and Education 18 (2):199-220.
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