Search results for 'proof of an external world' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Manuel Pérez Otero (2013). Purposes of Reasoning and (a New Vindication of) Moore's Proof of an External World. Synthese 190 (18):4181-4200.score: 318.0
    A common view about Moore’s Proof of an External World is that the argument fails because anyone who had doubts about its conclusion could not use the argument to rationally overcome those doubts. I agree that Moore’s Proof is—in that sense—dialectically ineffective at convincing an opponent or a doubter, but I defend that the argument (even when individuated taking into consideration the purpose of Moore’s arguing and, consequently, the preferred addressee of the Proof) does not (...)
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  2. Paul Forster (2008). Neither Dogma nor Common Sense: Moore's Confidence in His 'Proof of an External World'. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):163 – 195.score: 315.0
    (2008). Neither Dogma nor Common sense: Moore's confidence in his ‘proof of an external world’1. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 163-195.
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  3. Charles Landesman (1999). Moore's Proof of an External World and the Problem of Skepticism. Journal of Philosophical Research 24:21-36.score: 313.8
    Moore’s proof consists of the inference of both “Two hands exist at this moment” and “At least two external objects exist at this moment” from the premise “Here is one hand and here is another.” The paper claims that the proof succeeds in refuting both idealism (“There are no external objects”) and skepticism (“Nobody knows that there are external objects”). The paper defends Moore’s proof against the following objections: Idealism does not deny that there (...)
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  4. Annalisa Coliva (2008). The Paradox of Moore's Proof of an External World. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):234–243.score: 312.0
    Moore's proof of an external world is a piece of reasoning whose premises, in context, are true and warranted and whose conclusion is perfectly acceptable, and yet immediately seems flawed. I argue that neither Wright's nor Pryor's readings of the proof can explain this paradox. Rather, one must take the proof as responding to a sceptical challenge to our right to claim to have warrant for our ordinary empirical beliefs, either for any particular empirical belief (...)
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  5. Ian Proops (2006). Soames on the Metaphysics and Epistemology of Moore and Russell. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 129 (3):627–635.score: 243.0
    A critical discussion of selected chapters of the first volume of Scott Soames’s Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century. It is argued that this volume falls short of the minimal standards of scholarship appropriate to a work that advertises itself as a history, and, further, that Soames’s frequent heuristic simplifications and distortions, since they are only sporadically identified as such, are more likely confuse than to enlighten the student. These points are illustrated by reference to Soames’s discussions of Russell’s logical (...)
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  6. George Edward Moore (1939). Proof of an External World. Proceedings of the British Academy 25 (5):273--300.score: 237.0
  7. H. H. Price (1941). Proof of an External World. Annual Philosophical Lecture, Henriette Hertz Trust, British Academy, 1939. By G. E. Moore, Fellow of the Academy. From the Proceedings of the British Academy, Vol. XXV. (London: Humphrey Milford. 1940. Pp. 30. Price 2s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 16 (61):104-.score: 234.0
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  8. Annalisa Coliva (2004). Proof of an External World: Transmission Failure, Begging the Question or Dialectical Ineffectiveness? Moore, Wright and Pryor. In Annalisa Coliva & Eva Picardi (eds.), Wittgenstein Today. Il Poligrafo. 411--29.score: 234.0
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  9. G. E. Moore (2003). 23. Proof of an External World. In Steven Luper (ed.), Essential Knowledge: Readings in Epistemology. Longman. 227.score: 234.0
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  10. Avrum Stroll (1979). Moore's Proof of an External World. Dialectica 33 (3‐4):379-397.score: 234.0
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  11. Donald Götterbarn (1971). An Equivocation In Descartes' Proof For Knowledge of the External World. Idealistic Studies 1 (2):142-148.score: 230.4
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  12. Cecilia Wee (2001). Newman and the Proof of the External World in Descartes's Meditations. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):123 – 130.score: 204.6
    In Descartes's _Third Meditation, the mediator states that he may have unknown faculties that could cause his ideas of corporeal things. His proof of the external world in the _Sixth Meditation, however, clearly relies on the assumption that he does not have such unknown faculties. This paper examines Lex Newman's attempt to resolve this apparent inconsistency. I argue that the attempt is not altogether successful.
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  13. James D. Stuart (1986). Descartes' Proof of the External World. History of Philosophy Quarterly 3 (1):19 - 28.score: 183.0
    I argue that descartes' doubting of the external world does not rest on doubting the truth of clear and distinct ideas. in fact, he denies that we clearly and distinctly perceive the "existence" of material things. thus, their existence is not established through the validation of such ideas and we can understand why descartes' argument for their existence takes the form it does. i suggest that dreams lead him to conclude that the existence of material things is not (...)
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  14. Naomi M. Eilan (1993). Molyneux's Question and the Idea of an External World. In Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.score: 175.2
     
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  15. Elliott Sober (2011). Reichenbach's Cubical Universe and the Problem of the External World. Synthese 181 (1):3 - 21.score: 163.2
    This paper is a sympathetic critique of the argument that Reichenbach develops in Chap. 2 of Experience and Prediction for the thesis that sense experience justifies belief in the existence of an external world. After discussing his attack on the positivist theory of meaning, I describe the probability ideas that Reichenbach presents. I argue that Reichenbach begins with an argument grounded in the Law of Likelihood but that he then endorses a different argument that involves prior probabilities. I (...)
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  16. William Barrett (1939). On the Existence of an External World. Journal of Philosophy 36 (13):346-354.score: 154.2
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  17. Shadworth H. Hodgson, B. Bosanquet & David G. Ritchie (1891). Symposium: Origin of the Perception of an External World. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 2 (1):26 - 43.score: 154.2
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  18. Wilmot V. Metcalf (1938). Induction of an External World. Philosophy of Science 5 (3):354-358.score: 154.2
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  19. J. Deely (2001). The Quasi-Error of the External World: An Essay for Thomas A. Sebeok, in Memoriam This Essay is to Be Found in the Proceedings Publication of the Society, Edited by Scott Simpkins and John Deely Semiotics 2001 (New York, Ottawa, Toronto: Legas Press, 2002). [REVIEW] American Journal of Semiotics 17 (4):477-509.score: 152.4
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  20. Michael J. Costa (1988). Hume and Belief in the Existence of an External World. Philosophical Studies 32:99-112.score: 151.2
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  21. Arthur Collier (1713/1978). Clavis Universalis: Or, a New Inquiry After Truth: Being a Demonstration of the Non-Existence, or Impossibility, of an External World: 1713. Garland Pub..score: 151.2
  22. A. Newen (2003). Knowledge and Scepticism: The Role of Radical Doubt Regarding the Existence of an External World. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 110 (1):59-73.score: 151.2
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  23. Kevin Meeker (2009). Review of Fred Wilson, The External World and Our Knowledge of It: Hume's Critical Realism, an Exposition and Defence. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).score: 147.6
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  24. Bruce Aune (1991). Knowledge of the External World. Routledge.score: 142.2
    Many philosophers believe that the traditional problem of our knowledge of the external world was dissolved by Wittgestein and others. They argue that it was not really a problem - just a linguistic `confusion' that did not actually require a solution. Bruce Aune argues that they are wrong. He casts doubt on the generally accepted reasons for putting the problem aside and proposes an entirely new approach. By considering the history of the problem from Descartes to Kant, Aune (...)
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  25. Jack Lyons (2009). Perception and Basic Beliefs: Zombies, Modules, and the Problem of the External World. Oxford University Press.score: 142.2
    Perception and Basic Beliefs brings together an important treatment of these major epistemological topics and provides a positive solution to the traditional problem of the external world.
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  26. Rainer Mausfeld (2001). What's Within? Can the Internal Structure of Perception Be Derived From Regularities of the External World? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):689-690.score: 135.6
    Shepard's approach is regarded as an attempt to rescue, within an evolutionary perspective, an empiricist theory of mind. Contrary to this, I argue that the structure of perceptual representations is essentially co-determined by internal aspects and cannot be understood if we confine our attention to the physical side of perception, however appropriately we have chosen our vocabulary for describing the external world. Furthermore, I argue that Kubovy and Epstein's “more modest interpretation” of Shepard's ideas on motion perception is (...)
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  27. Christopher Menzel (1989). On an Unsound Proof of the Existence of Possible Worlds. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 30 (4):598-603.score: 128.0
    In this paper, an argument of Alvin Plantinga's for the existence of abstract possible worlds is shown to be unsound. The argument is based on a principle Plantinga calls "Quasicompactness", due to its structural similarity to the notion of compactness in first-order logic. The principle is shown to be false.
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  28. Bertrand Russell (1914/2009). Our Knowledge of the External World: As a Field for Scientific Method in Philosophy. Routledge.score: 121.2
    Philosophy, from the earliest times, has made greater claims, and achieved fewer results, than any other branch of learning. In Our Knowledge of the External World , Bertrand Russell illustrates instances where the claims of philosophers have been excessive, and examines why their achievements have not been greater.
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  29. Ernst-Joachim Hossner & Felix Ehrlenspiel (2010). Time-Referenced Effects of an Internal Vs. External Focus of Attention on Muscular Activity and Compensatory Variability. Frontiers in Psychology 1:230-230.score: 120.6
    The paralysis-by-analysis phenomenon, i.e., attending to the execution of one’s movement impairs performance, has gathered a lot of attention over recent years (see Wulf, 2007, for a review). Explanations of this phenomenon, e.g., the hypotheses of constrained action (Wulf and colleagues, e.g., McNevin et al., 2003) or of step-by-step execution (Beilock et al., 2002; Masters, 1992), however, do not refer to the level of underlying mechanisms on the level of sensorimotor control. For this purpose, a “nodal-point hypothesis” is presented here (...)
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  30. Robert Russell Matthew Schlesinger, Jared Porter (2012). An External Focus of Attention Enhances Manual Tracking of Occluded and Visible Targets. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 119.4
    The present study investigated the enhancement effects of an external focus-of-attention (FOA) in the context of a manual-tracking task, in which participants tracked both visible and occluded targets. Three conditions were compared, which manipulated the distance of the FOA from the participant as well as the external/internal dimension. As expected, an external FOA resulted in lower tracking errors than an internal FOA. In addition, analyses of participants' movement patterns revealed a systematic shift toward higher-frequency movements in the (...)
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  31. Matthew Schlesinger, Jared Porter & Robert Russell (2012). An External Focus of Attention Enhances Manual Tracking of Occluded and Visible Targets. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 119.4
    The present study investigated the enhancement effects of an external focus-of-attention (FOA) in the context of a manual-tracking task, in which participants tracked both visible and occluded targets. Three conditions were compared, which manipulated the distance of the FOA from the participant as well as the external/internal dimension. As expected, an external FOA resulted in lower tracking errors than an internal FOA. In addition, analyses of participants' movement patterns revealed a systematic shift toward higher-frequency movements in the (...)
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  32. Muna Golmohamad (2004). World Citizenship, Identity and the Notion of an Integrated Self. Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (2/3):131-148.score: 118.8
    In light of the complex notions ofidentity, this paper attempts to consider howto perceive the notion of world citizenship.The paper looks to discussions on the self andidentity; focusing on the writing of CharlesTaylor and Alasdair MacIntyre, with particularattention given to the notion of an integratedself.
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  33. Takahiro Seki (2012). An Algebraic Proof of the Admissibility of Γ in Relevant Modal Logics. Studia Logica 100 (6):1149-1174.score: 118.8
    The admissibility of Ackermann's rule γ is one of the most important problems in relevant logics. The admissibility of γ was first proved by an algebraic method. However, the development of Routley-Meyer semantics and metavaluational techniques makes it possible to prove the admissibility of γ using the method of normal models or the method using metavaluations, and the use of such methods is preferred. This paper discusses an algebraic proof of the admissibility of γ in relevant modal logics based (...)
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  34. Annalisa Coliva, The Paradox of Moore's Proof Of.score: 117.6
    Moore’s proof of an external world is a piece of reasoning whose premises, in context, are true and warranted and whose conclusion is perfectly acceptable, and yet immediately seems flawed. I argue that neither Wright’s nor Pryor’s readings of the proof can explain this paradox. Rather, one must take the proof as responding to a sceptical challenge to our right to claim to have warrant for our ordinary empirical beliefs, either for any particular empirical belief (...)
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  35. Brian Glenney (2011). Adam Smith and the Problem of the External World. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (2):205-223.score: 117.6
    How does the mind attribute external causes to internal sensory experiences? Adam Smith addresses this question in his little known essay ‘Of the External Senses.’ I closely examine Smith's various formulations of this problem and then argue for an interpretation of his solution: that inborn perceptual mechanisms automatically generate external attributions of internal experiences. I conclude by speculating that these mechanisms are best understood to operate by simulating tactile environments.
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  36. Kenneth G. Ferguson (2009). Meaning and the External World. Erkenntnis 70 (3):299 - 311.score: 117.0
    Realism, defined as a justified belief in the existence of the external world, is jeopardized by ‘meaning rationalism,’ the classic theory of meaning that sees the extension of words as a function of the intensions of individual speakers, with no way to ensure that these intensions actually correspond to anything in the external world. To defend realism, Ruth Millikan ( 1984 , 1989a , b , 1993 , 2004 , 2005 ) offers a biological theory of (...)
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  37. Jaakko Hintikka (1979). Virginia Woolf and Our Knowledge of the External World. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 38 (1):5-14.score: 116.4
    The longstanding critical refrain that Virginia Woolf's fiction represents a turn "inward" to the vagaries of the inner life has more recently been countered with an "outward" approach emphasizing Woolf's interest in the material world, its everyday objects and their social and political significance. Yet one of the most curious and pervasive features of Woolf's oeuvre is that characters are so frequently wrong in their perceptions. This essay consolidates the inward and outward approaches by tracing the trope of misperception (...)
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  38. J. Adam Carter (2012). Recent Work on Moores Proof. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 2 (2):115-144.score: 116.4
    Recently, much work has been done on G.E. Moore's proof of an external world with the aim of diagnosing just where the Proof `goes wrong'. In the mainstream literature, the most widely discussed debate on this score stands between those who defend competing accounts of perceptual warrant known as dogmatism (i.e. Pryor and Davies) and conservativism (i.e. Wright). Each account implies a different verdict on Moore's Proof, though both share a commitment to supposing that an (...)
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  39. D. W. Hamlyn (1988). The Problem of the External World. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 24:1-13.score: 116.4
    The paper investigates the senses in which the world may be thought external, and argues that none of them supports doubt about the possibility of knowledge of the world. Scepticism sometimes depends on certain erroneous conceptions of perception, especially those which lead to belief in 'inner, representational states'. How we perceive things depends on the satisfaction of certain general conditions--on what concepts we have, on the kind of senses we have, and so on a kind of anthropocentricity; (...)
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  40. Don Locke (1967). Perception And Our Knowledge Of The External World. Ny: Humanities Press.score: 115.8
    Reissue from the classic Muirhead Library of Philosophy series (originally published between 1890s - 1970s).
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  41. Helmut Schmidt (1978). Can an Effect Precede its Cause? A Model of a Noncausal World. Foundations of Physics 8 (5-6):463-480.score: 115.8
    The world appears causal in the sense that the result of a measurement may depend on the past history of the observed system, but not on what the experimenter will do with the system after the measurement. This raises the question whether noncausality at a macroscopic level would necessarily lead to an “unreasonable” world. The study of a model world with axiomatically well-specified properties shows that noncausal systems can be discussed in a logically consistent manner so that (...)
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  42. Arne Collen (1998). Design of a Life: Sustainability and the Inquirer/Researcher Alias Designer in an Evolving World System. World Futures 51 (3):223-238.score: 115.8
    Taking the individual human being as a point of reference, this paper examines the sustainability of oneself as a contribution to human society and the biosphere in an evolving world. The proactive role as inquirer/researcher alias designer leads to active inquiry and design of one's life with influential consequences on the lives of other human beings and planetary life forms. To sustain a tenable position between the constructive and destructive forces of contemporary existence, a conscientious and ethical stance becomes (...)
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  43. Ram Neta (2003). Contextualism and the Problem of the External World. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (1):1–31.score: 115.2
    A skeptic claims that I do not have knowledge of the external world. It has been thought that the skeptic reaches this conclusion because she employs unusually stringent standards for knowledge. But the skeptic does not employ unusually high standards for knowledge. Rather, she employs unusually restrictive standards of evidence. Thus, her claim that we lack knowledge of the external world is supported by considerations that would equally support the claim that we lack evidence for our (...)
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  44. David William Harker (2013). Discussion Note: McCain on Weak Predictivism and External World Scepticism. Philosophia 41 (1):195-202.score: 115.2
    In a recent paper McCain (2012) argues that weak predictivism creates an important challenge for external world scepticism. McCain regards weak predictivism as uncontroversial and assumes the thesis within his argument. There is a sense in which the predictivist literature supports his conviction that weak predictivism is uncontroversial. This absence of controversy, however, is a product of significant plasticity within the thesis, which renders McCain’s argument worryingly vague. For McCain’s argument to work he either needs a stronger version (...)
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  45. Francis Heylighen (2000). Foundations and Methodology for an Evolutionary World View: A Review of the Principia Cybernetica Project. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 5 (4):457-490.score: 114.6
    The Principia Cybernetica Project was created to develop an integrated philosophy or world view, based on the theories of evolution, self-organization, systems and cybernetics. Its conceptual network has been implemented as an extensive website. The present paper reviews the assumptions behind the project, focusing on its rationale, its philosophical presuppositions, and its concrete methodology for computer-supported collaborative development. Principia Cybernetica starts from a process ontology, where a sequence of elementary actions produces ever more complex forms of organization through the (...)
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  46. James Robert Brown (1999). Philosophy of Mathematics: An Introduction to the World of Proofs and Pictures. Routledge.score: 114.0
    Philosophy of Mathematics is clear and engaging, and student friendly The book discusses the great philosophers and the importance of mathematics to their thought. Among topics discussed in the book are the mathematical image, platonism, picture-proofs, applied mathematics, Hilbert and Godel, knots and notation definitions, picture-proofs and Wittgenstein, computation, proof and conjecture.
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  47. C. Wee (2002). Descartes's Two Proofs of the External World. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (4):487 – 501.score: 114.0
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  48. Joanna Golinska-Pilarek, Angel Mora & Emilio Munoz Velasco (2008). An ATP of a Relational Proof System for Order of Magnitude Reasoning with Negligibility, Non-Closeness and Distance. In Tu-Bao Ho & Zhi-Hua Zhou (eds.), PRICAI 2008: Trends in Artificial Intelligence. Springer. 128--139.score: 114.0
    We introduce an Automatic Theorem Prover (ATP) of a dual tableau system for a relational logic for order of magnitude qualitative reasoning, which allows us to deal with relations such as negligibility, non-closeness and distance. Dual tableau systems are validity checkers that can serve as a tool for verification of a variety of tasks in order of magnitude reasoning, such as the use of qualitative sum of some classes of numbers. In the design of our ATP, we have introduced some (...)
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  49. Lex Newman (1994). Descartes on Unknown Faculties and Our Knowledge of the External World. Philosophical Review 103 (3):489-531.score: 113.4
    How are we to understand philosophical claims about sense perception being direct versus indirect? There are multiple relevant notions of perceptual directness, so I argue. Perception of external objects may be direct on some notions, while indirect on others. My interest is with the sense in which ideas count as perceptual mediators in the philosophy of Descartes and Locke. This paper has two broader aims. The first is to clarify four main notions of perceptual directness. The second is to (...)
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  50. Juri Lotman (2002). Mask in an artistic world of Gogol, and the masks of Anatoli Kaplan. Sign Systems Studies 30 (2):704-705.score: 112.8
    Juri Lotman. Mask in an artistic world of Gogol, and the masks of Anatoli Kaplan. The paper deals with an intersemiotic problem — how it is possible to represent a verbal image by the means of sculpture. It was written as an afterword for a German edition of N. Gogol’s Dead Souls (illustrated by photos on mask-sculpures by Anatoli Kaplan) thus using a style meant for general reader. However, it includes a deep analysis and several important conclusions about the (...)
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