Search results for 'proof of an external world' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Manuel Pérez Otero (2013). Purposes of Reasoning and (a New Vindication of) Moore's Proof of an External World. Synthese 190 (18):4181-4200.score: 1590.0
    A common view about Moore’s Proof of an External World is that the argument fails because anyone who had doubts about its conclusion could not use the argument to rationally overcome those doubts. I agree that Moore’s Proof is—in that sense—dialectically ineffective at convincing an opponent or a doubter, but I defend that the argument (even when individuated taking into consideration the purpose of Moore’s arguing and, consequently, the preferred addressee of the Proof) does not (...)
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  2. Paul Forster (2008). Neither Dogma nor Common Sense: Moore's Confidence in His 'Proof of an External World'. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):163 – 195.score: 1575.0
    (2008). Neither Dogma nor Common sense: Moore's confidence in his ‘proof of an external world’1. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 163-195.
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  3. Charles Landesman (1999). Moore's Proof of an External World and the Problem of Skepticism. Journal of Philosophical Research 24:21-36.score: 1569.0
    Moore’s proof consists of the inference of both “Two hands exist at this moment” and “At least two external objects exist at this moment” from the premise “Here is one hand and here is another.” The paper claims that the proof succeeds in refuting both idealism (“There are no external objects”) and skepticism (“Nobody knows that there are external objects”). The paper defends Moore’s proof against the following objections: Idealism does not deny that there (...)
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  4. Annalisa Coliva (2008). The Paradox of Moore's Proof of an External World. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):234–243.score: 1560.0
    Moore's proof of an external world is a piece of reasoning whose premises, in context, are true and warranted and whose conclusion is perfectly acceptable, and yet immediately seems flawed. I argue that neither Wright's nor Pryor's readings of the proof can explain this paradox. Rather, one must take the proof as responding to a sceptical challenge to our right to claim to have warrant for our ordinary empirical beliefs, either for any particular empirical belief (...)
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  5. Ian Proops (2006). Soames on the Metaphysics and Epistemology of Moore and Russell. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 129 (3):627–635.score: 1215.0
    A critical discussion of selected chapters of the first volume of Scott Soames’s Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century. It is argued that this volume falls short of the minimal standards of scholarship appropriate to a work that advertises itself as a history, and, further, that Soames’s frequent heuristic simplifications and distortions, since they are only sporadically identified as such, are more likely confuse than to enlighten the student. These points are illustrated by reference to Soames’s discussions of Russell’s logical (...)
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  6. George Edward Moore (1939). Proof of an External World. Proceedings of the British Academy 25 (5):273--300.score: 1185.0
  7. H. H. Price (1941). Proof of an External World. Annual Philosophical Lecture, Henriette Hertz Trust, British Academy, 1939. By G. E. Moore, Fellow of the Academy. From the Proceedings of the British Academy, Vol. XXV. (London: Humphrey Milford. 1940. Pp. 30. Price 2s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 16 (61):104-.score: 1170.0
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  8. Avrum Stroll (1979). Moore's Proof of an External World. Dialectica 33 (3‐4):379-397.score: 1170.0
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  9. Annalisa Coliva (2004). Proof of an External World: Transmission Failure, Begging the Question or Dialectical Ineffectiveness? Moore, Wright and Pryor. In Annalisa Coliva & Eva Picardi (eds.), Wittgenstein Today. Il Poligrafo. 411--29.score: 1170.0
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  10. G. E. Moore (2003). 23. Proof of an External World. In Steven Luper (ed.), Essential Knowledge: Readings in Epistemology. Longman. 227.score: 1170.0
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  11. Donald Götterbarn (1971). An Equivocation In Descartes' Proof For Knowledge of the External World. Idealistic Studies 1 (2):142-148.score: 1152.0
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  12. Cecilia Wee (2001). Newman and the Proof of the External World in Descartes's Meditations. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (1):123 – 130.score: 818.4
    In Descartes's _Third Meditation, the mediator states that he may have unknown faculties that could cause his ideas of corporeal things. His proof of the external world in the _Sixth Meditation, however, clearly relies on the assumption that he does not have such unknown faculties. This paper examines Lex Newman's attempt to resolve this apparent inconsistency. I argue that the attempt is not altogether successful.
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  13. James D. Stuart (1986). Descartes' Proof of the External World. History of Philosophy Quarterly 3 (1):19 - 28.score: 732.0
    I argue that descartes' doubting of the external world does not rest on doubting the truth of clear and distinct ideas. in fact, he denies that we clearly and distinctly perceive the "existence" of material things. thus, their existence is not established through the validation of such ideas and we can understand why descartes' argument for their existence takes the form it does. i suggest that dreams lead him to conclude that the existence of material things is not (...)
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  14. Naomi M. Eilan (1993). Molyneux's Question and the Idea of an External World. In Spatial Representation. Cambridge: Blackwell.score: 700.8
     
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  15. Elliott Sober (2011). Reichenbach's Cubical Universe and the Problem of the External World. Synthese 181 (1):3 - 21.score: 652.8
    This paper is a sympathetic critique of the argument that Reichenbach develops in Chap. 2 of Experience and Prediction for the thesis that sense experience justifies belief in the existence of an external world. After discussing his attack on the positivist theory of meaning, I describe the probability ideas that Reichenbach presents. I argue that Reichenbach begins with an argument grounded in the Law of Likelihood but that he then endorses a different argument that involves prior probabilities. I (...)
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  16. William Barrett (1939). On the Existence of an External World. Journal of Philosophy 36 (13):346-354.score: 616.8
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  17. Wilmot V. Metcalf (1938). Induction of an External World. Philosophy of Science 5 (3):354-358.score: 616.8
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  18. Shadworth H. Hodgson, B. Bosanquet & David G. Ritchie (1891). Symposium: Origin of the Perception of an External World. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 2 (1):26 - 43.score: 616.8
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  19. J. Deely (2001). The Quasi-Error of the External World: An Essay for Thomas A. Sebeok, in Memoriam This Essay is to Be Found in the Proceedings Publication of the Society, Edited by Scott Simpkins and John Deely Semiotics 2001 (New York, Ottawa, Toronto: Legas Press, 2002). [REVIEW] American Journal of Semiotics 17 (4):477-509.score: 609.6
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  20. Michael J. Costa (1988). Hume and Belief in the Existence of an External World. Philosophical Studies 32:99-112.score: 604.8
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  21. Arthur Collier (1713/1978). Clavis Universalis: Or, a New Inquiry After Truth: Being a Demonstration of the Non-Existence, or Impossibility, of an External World: 1713. Garland Pub..score: 604.8
  22. A. Newen (2003). Knowledge and Scepticism: The Role of Radical Doubt Regarding the Existence of an External World. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 110 (1):59-73.score: 604.8
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  23. Kevin Meeker (2009). Review of Fred Wilson, The External World and Our Knowledge of It: Hume's Critical Realism, an Exposition and Defence. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).score: 590.4
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  24. Annalisa Coliva, The Paradox of Moore's Proof Of.score: 588.0
    Moore’s proof of an external world is a piece of reasoning whose premises, in context, are true and warranted and whose conclusion is perfectly acceptable, and yet immediately seems flawed. I argue that neither Wright’s nor Pryor’s readings of the proof can explain this paradox. Rather, one must take the proof as responding to a sceptical challenge to our right to claim to have warrant for our ordinary empirical beliefs, either for any particular empirical belief (...)
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  25. Kenneth G. Ferguson (2009). Meaning and the External World. Erkenntnis 70 (3):299 - 311.score: 585.0
    Realism, defined as a justified belief in the existence of the external world, is jeopardized by ‘meaning rationalism,’ the classic theory of meaning that sees the extension of words as a function of the intensions of individual speakers, with no way to ensure that these intensions actually correspond to anything in the external world. To defend realism, Ruth Millikan ( 1984 , 1989a , b , 1993 , 2004 , 2005 ) offers a biological theory of (...)
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  26. J. Adam Carter (2012). Recent Work on Moores Proof. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 2 (2):115-144.score: 582.0
    Recently, much work has been done on G.E. Moore's proof of an external world with the aim of diagnosing just where the Proof `goes wrong'. In the mainstream literature, the most widely discussed debate on this score stands between those who defend competing accounts of perceptual warrant known as dogmatism (i.e. Pryor and Davies) and conservativism (i.e. Wright). Each account implies a different verdict on Moore's Proof, though both share a commitment to supposing that an (...)
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  27. Bruce Aune (1991). Knowledge of the External World. Routledge.score: 568.8
    Many philosophers believe that the traditional problem of our knowledge of the external world was dissolved by Wittgestein and others. They argue that it was not really a problem - just a linguistic `confusion' that did not actually require a solution. Bruce Aune argues that they are wrong. He casts doubt on the generally accepted reasons for putting the problem aside and proposes an entirely new approach. By considering the history of the problem from Descartes to Kant, Aune (...)
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  28. Jack Lyons (2009). Perception and Basic Beliefs: Zombies, Modules, and the Problem of the External World. Oxford University Press.score: 568.8
    Perception and Basic Beliefs brings together an important treatment of these major epistemological topics and provides a positive solution to the traditional problem of the external world.
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  29. Rainer Mausfeld (2001). What's Within? Can the Internal Structure of Perception Be Derived From Regularities of the External World? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):689-690.score: 542.4
    Shepard's approach is regarded as an attempt to rescue, within an evolutionary perspective, an empiricist theory of mind. Contrary to this, I argue that the structure of perceptual representations is essentially co-determined by internal aspects and cannot be understood if we confine our attention to the physical side of perception, however appropriately we have chosen our vocabulary for describing the external world. Furthermore, I argue that Kubovy and Epstein's “more modest interpretation” of Shepard's ideas on motion perception is (...)
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  30. C. Wee (2002). Descartes's Two Proofs of the External World. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (4):487 – 501.score: 508.4
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  31. Susana Nuccetelli (2009). Sosa's Moore and the New Dogmatists. Metaphilosophy 40 (2):180-186.score: 507.0
    Abstract: Some seventy years ago, G. E. Moore invoked his own sensory experience (as of a hand before him in the right circumstances), added some philosophical analysis about externality, and took himself to have offered his "Proof" of the existence of an external world. Current neo-Mooreans either reject completely the standard negative assessment of the Proof or qualify it substantially. For Sosa, the Proof can be persuasive, but only when read literally as offering reasons for (...)
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  32. Brian Glenney (2011). Adam Smith and the Problem of the External World. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 9 (2):205-223.score: 470.4
    How does the mind attribute external causes to internal sensory experiences? Adam Smith addresses this question in his little known essay ‘Of the External Senses.’ I closely examine Smith's various formulations of this problem and then argue for an interpretation of his solution: that inborn perceptual mechanisms automatically generate external attributions of internal experiences. I conclude by speculating that these mechanisms are best understood to operate by simulating tactile environments.
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  33. Jaakko Hintikka (1979). Virginia Woolf and Our Knowledge of the External World. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 38 (1):5-14.score: 465.6
    The longstanding critical refrain that Virginia Woolf's fiction represents a turn "inward" to the vagaries of the inner life has more recently been countered with an "outward" approach emphasizing Woolf's interest in the material world, its everyday objects and their social and political significance. Yet one of the most curious and pervasive features of Woolf's oeuvre is that characters are so frequently wrong in their perceptions. This essay consolidates the inward and outward approaches by tracing the trope of misperception (...)
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  34. Crispin Wright & Annalisa Coliva (eds.) (2012). Mind, Meaning, and Knowledge: Themes From the Philosophy of Crispin Wright. Oxford University Press.score: 465.0
    This volume is a collective exploration of major themes in the work of Crispin Wright, one of today's leading philosophers. These newly commissioned papers are divided into four sections, preceded by a substantial Introduction, which places them in the context of the development of Wright's ideas. The distinguished contributors address issues such as the rule-following problem, knowledge of our meanings and minds, truth, realism, anti-realism and relativism, as well as the nature of perceptual justification, the cogency of arguments such as (...)
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  35. David William Harker (2013). Discussion Note: McCain on Weak Predictivism and External World Scepticism. Philosophia 41 (1):195-202.score: 460.8
    In a recent paper McCain (2012) argues that weak predictivism creates an important challenge for external world scepticism. McCain regards weak predictivism as uncontroversial and assumes the thesis within his argument. There is a sense in which the predictivist literature supports his conviction that weak predictivism is uncontroversial. This absence of controversy, however, is a product of significant plasticity within the thesis, which renders McCain’s argument worryingly vague. For McCain’s argument to work he either needs a stronger version (...)
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  36. James Robert Brown (1999). Philosophy of Mathematics: An Introduction to the World of Proofs and Pictures. Routledge.score: 456.0
    Philosophy of Mathematics is clear and engaging, and student friendly The book discusses the great philosophers and the importance of mathematics to their thought. Among topics discussed in the book are the mathematical image, platonism, picture-proofs, applied mathematics, Hilbert and Godel, knots and notation definitions, picture-proofs and Wittgenstein, computation, proof and conjecture.
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  37. Lex Newman (1994). Descartes on Unknown Faculties and Our Knowledge of the External World. Philosophical Review 103 (3):489-531.score: 453.6
    How are we to understand philosophical claims about sense perception being direct versus indirect? There are multiple relevant notions of perceptual directness, so I argue. Perception of external objects may be direct on some notions, while indirect on others. My interest is with the sense in which ideas count as perceptual mediators in the philosophy of Descartes and Locke. This paper has two broader aims. The first is to clarify four main notions of perceptual directness. The second is to (...)
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  38. Annalisa Coliva (2010). Moore's Proof And Martin Davies's Epistemic Projects. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (1):101-116.score: 450.0
    In the recent literature on Moore's Proof of an external world, it has emerged that different diagnoses of the argument's failure are prima facie defensible. As a result, there is a sense that the appropriateness of the different verdicts on it may depend on variation in the kinds of context in which the argument is taken to be a move, with different characteristic aims. In this spirit, Martin Davies has recently explored the use of the argument within (...)
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  39. Mairi Levitt & Hub Zwart (2009). Bioethics: An Export Product? Reflections on Hands-on Involvement in Exploring the “External” Validity of International Bioethical Declarations. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):367-377.score: 448.8
    As the technosciences, including genomics, develop into a global phenomenon, the question inevitably emerges whether and to what extent bioethics can and should become a globalised phenomenon as well. Could we somehow articulate a set of core principles or values that ought to be respected worldwide and that could serve as a universal guide or blueprint for bioethical regulations for embedding biotechnologies in various countries? This article considers one universal declaration, the UNESCO Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights ( 2005a (...)
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  40. Annalisa Coliva (2012). Moore's Proof, Liberals, and Conservatives : Is There a (Wittgensteinian) Third Way? In Crispin Wright & Annalisa Coliva (eds.), Mind, Meaning, and Knowledge: Themes From the Philosophy of Crispin Wright. Oxford University Press.score: 447.0
    In the last few years there has been a resurgence of interest in Moore’s Proof of the existence of an external world, which is now often rendered as follows:1 (I) Here’s a hand (II) If there is a hand here, there is an external world Therefore (III) There is an external world The contemporary debate has been mostly triggered by Crispin Wright’s influential—conservative —“Facts and certainty” and further fostered by Jim Pryor’s recent—liberal—“What’s wrong (...)
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  41. W. M. Stuckey, Michael Silberstein & Michael Cifone, Reversing the Arrow of Explanation in the Relational Blockworld: Why Temporal Becoming, the Dynamical Brain and the External World Are All "in the Mind".score: 446.4
    We introduce the Relational Blockworld (RBW) as a paradigm for deflating the mysteries associated with quantum non-separability/non-locality and the measurement problem. We begin by describing how the relativity of simultaneity implies the blockworld, which has an explanatory potential subsuming both dynamical and relational explanations. It is then shown how the canonical commutation relations fundamental to non-relativistic quantum mechanics follow from the relativity of simultaneity. Therefore, quantum mechanics has at its disposal the full explanatory power of the blockworld. Quantum mechanics exploits (...)
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  42. Christopher Menzel (1989). On an Unsound Proof of the Existence of Possible Worlds. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 30 (4):598-603.score: 445.6
    In this paper, an argument of Alvin Plantinga's for the existence of abstract possible worlds is shown to be unsound. The argument is based on a principle Plantinga calls "Quasicompactness", due to its structural similarity to the notion of compactness in first-order logic. The principle is shown to be false.
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  43. Ulrike Hahn & Mike Oaksford (2007). The Burden of Proof and Its Role in Argumentation. Argumentation 21 (1):39-61.score: 436.8
    The notion of “the burden of proof” plays an important role in real-world argumentation contexts, in particular in law. It has also been given a central role in normative accounts of argumentation, and has been used to explain a range of classic argumentation fallacies. We argue that in law the goal is to make practical decisions whereas in critical discussion the goal is frequently simply to increase or decrease degree of belief in a proposition. In the latter case, (...)
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  44. Annalisa Coliva (2012). Varieties of Failure (of Warrant Transmission: What Else?!). Synthese 189 (2):235-254.score: 435.0
    In the contemporary expanding literature on transmission failure and its connections with issues such as the Closure principle, the nature of perceptual warrant, Moore’s proof of an external world and the effectiveness of Humean scepticism, it has often been assumed that there is just one kind of it: the one made familiar by the writings of Crispin Wright and Martin Davies. Although it might be thought that one kind of failure is more than enough, Davies has recently (...)
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  45. Chris Ranalli (2013). Skepticism, Invulnerability, and Epistemological Dissatisfaction. In C. Illies & C. Schaefer (eds.), Metaphysics or Modernity? Bamberg University Press. 113-148.score: 429.6
    How should we understand the relationship between the contents of our color, causal, modal, and evaluative beliefs, on the one hand, and color, causal, modal, and evaluative properties, on the other? According to Barry Stroud (2011), because of the nature of the contents of those types of beliefs, we should also think that what he calls a “negative metaphysical verdict” on the latter is not one that we could consistently maintain. The metaphysical project aims to arrive at an improved conception (...)
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  46. Ernest Sosa (2009). Responses to Nuccetelli, Lemos, and Bueno. Metaphilosophy 40 (2):203-213.score: 427.2
    Abstract: Susana Nuccetelli discusses critically my account of Moore's Proof of the External World. Noah Lemos takes up my views on skepticism and my distinction between animal knowledge and reflective knowledge. Otávio Bueno focuses on my treatment of dream skepticism. In this article I offer replies to my three critics.
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  47. Nigel Pleasants (2009). Wittgenstein and Basic Moral Certainty. Philosophia 37 (4):669-679.score: 420.0
    In On Certainty, Wittgenstein’s reflections bring into view the phenomenon of basic certainty. He explores this phenomenon mostly in relation to our certainty with regard to empirical states of affairs. Drawing on these seminal observations and reflections, I extend the inquiry into what I call “basic moral certainty”, arguing that the latter plays the same kind of foundational role in our moral practices and judgements as basic empirical certainty does in our epistemic practices and judgements. I illustrate the nature and (...)
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  48. Richard Mark Fincham (2011). Transcendental Idealism and the Problem of the External World. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (2):221-241.score: 405.6
    Kant's transcendental idealism is often praised for resolving antinomies and attacked for representationalism. Such an attitude prevailed even among Kant's contemporaries. As early as 1787 Friedrich Heinrich Jacobi noted that the "main advantage" of the doctrine that we cognize only appearances and not things in themselves is that it resolves the antinomical conflicts in which previous metaphysics was embroiled and thus "sets reason at rest." Yet, at the same time, Jacobi bemoaned that the transcendental idealist cannot consistently uphold the positive (...)
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  49. William J. Gavin (1984). The 'Will to Believe' in Science and Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 15 (3):139 - 148.score: 396.0
    “The Will to Believe” defines the religious question as forced, living and momentous, but even in this article James asserts that more objective factors are involved. The competing religious hypotheses must both be equally coherent and correspond to experimental data to an equal degree. Otherwise the option is not a live one. “If I say to you ‘Be a theosophist or be a Mohammedan’, it is probably a dead option, because for you neither hypothesis is likely to be alive.” James, (...)
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  50. Alec Gordon (2008). The Philosophical Poetics of Counter-World, Anti-World, and Ideal World. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:87-92.score: 393.6
    What might the project be of lyric poetry in late global capitalism in the early years of the new millennium which acknowledges both a post-romantic and modernist lineage, and which faces the critical challenge of postmodernist theorizing? This paper endeavors to respond to this question forwarding the Adorno-inspired viewpoint that the praxes of individual lyric poems reveal orientations of affirmation or negation be they intended or not. The thesis is stated that the “arguments” of modern poets are creative litigations posing (...)
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