Search results for 'psychiatric diagnosis' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jerome C. Wakefield (2010). False Positives in Psychiatric Diagnosis: Implications for Human Freedom. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):5-17.score: 156.0
    Current symptom-based DSM and ICD diagnostic criteria for mental disorders are prone to yielding false positives because they ignore the context of symptoms. This is often seen as a benign flaw because problems of living and emotional suffering, even if not true disorders, may benefit from support and treatment. However, diagnosis of a disorder in our society has many ramifications not only for treatment choice but for broader social reactions to the diagnosed individual. In particular, mental disorders impose a (...)
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  2. Marga Reimer (2010). Moral Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis: The Cluster B Personality Disorders. Neuroethics 3 (2):173-184.score: 156.0
    Medical professionals, including mental health professionals, largely agree that moral judgment should be kept out of clinical settings. The rationale is simple: moral judgment has the capacity to impair clinical judgment in ways that could harm the patient. However, when the patient is suffering from a "Cluster B" personality disorder, keeping moral judgment out of the clinic might appear impossible, not only in practice but also in theory. For the diagnostic criteria associated with these particular disorders (Antisocial, Borderline, Histrionic, Narcissistic) (...)
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  3. John Z. Sadler (2005). Values and Psychiatric Diagnosis. Oxford University Press.score: 132.0
    The public, mental health consumers, as well as mental health practitioners wonder about what kinds of values mental health professionals hold, and what kinds of values influence psychiatric diagnosis. Are mental disorders socio-political, practical, or scientific concepts? Is psychiatric diagnosis value-neutral? What role does the fundamental philosophical question "How should I live?" play in mental health care? In his carefully nuanced and exhaustively referenced monograph, psychiatrist and philosopher of psychiatry John Z. Sadler describes the manifold kinds (...)
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  4. Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed (2013). Culture, Salience, and Psychiatric Diagnosis: Exploring the Concept of Cultural Congruence & its Practical Application. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):5.score: 126.0
    Cultural congruence is the idea that to the extent a belief or experience is culturally shared it is not to feature in a diagnostic judgement, irrespective of its resemblance to psychiatric pathology. This rests on the argument that since deviation from norms is central to diagnosis, and since what counts as deviation is relative to context, assessing the degree of fit between mental states and cultural norms is crucial. Various problems beset the cultural congruence construct including impoverished definitions (...)
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  5. S. Brian Hood & Benjamin J. Lovett (2011). Realism and Operationism in Psychiatric Diagnosis. Philosophical Psychology 24 (2):207-222.score: 120.0
    In the context of psychiatric diagnosis, operationists claim that mental disorders are nothing more than the satisfying of objective diagnostic criteria, whereas realists claim that mental disorders are latent entities that are detected by applying those criteria. The implications of this distinction are substantial in actual clinical situations, such as in the co-occurrence of disorders that may interfere with one another's detection, or when patients falsify their symptoms. Realist and operationist conceptions of diagnosis may lead to different (...)
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  6. Sue V. Rosser (1992). Is There Androcentric Bias in Psychiatric Diagnosis? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (2):215-231.score: 120.0
    Flaws, biases, and ethical problems surrounding research and diagnosis may lead to inappropriate or inequitable treatments that exacerbate or fail to improve the misery that some individuals face due to their psychiatric conditions. Possible androcentric biases in the choice and definition of categories for diagnosis available in DSM-III-R may in turn influence the approaches of therapists to clients, particularly male therapists towards female clients. Androcentric bias in diagnosis, which may also be reflected in the values of (...)
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  7. George Szmukler (forthcoming). When Psychiatric Diagnosis Becomes an Overworked Tool. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101761.score: 120.0
    A psychiatric diagnosis today is asked to serve many functions—clinical, research, medicolegal, delimiting insurance coverage, service planning, defining eligibility for state benefits (eg, for unemployment or disability), as well as providing rallying points for pressure groups and charities. These contexts require different notions of diagnosis to tackle the particular problem such a designation is meant to solve. In a number of instances, a ‘status’ definition (ie, a diagnostic label or category) is employed to tackle what is more (...)
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  8. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Scott Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue. Part 4: General Conclusion. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):14-.score: 120.0
    In the conclusion to this multi-part article I first review the discussions carried out around the six essential questions in psychiatric diagnosis – the position taken by Allen Frances on each question, the commentaries on the respective question along with Frances’ responses to the commentaries, and my own view of the multiple discussions. In this review I emphasize that the core question is the first – what is the nature of psychiatric illness – and that in some (...)
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  9. Tim Thornton, Ajit Shah & Philip Thomas (2009). Understanding, Testimony and Interpretation in Psychiatric Diagnosis. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (1):49-55.score: 120.0
    Psychiatric diagnosis depends, centrally, on the transmission of patients’ knowledge of their experiences and symptoms to clinicians by testimony. In the case of non-native speakers, the need for linguistic interpretation raises significant practical problems. But determining the best practical approach depends on determining the best underlying model of both testimony and knowledge itself. Internalist models of knowledge have been influential since Descartes. But they cannot account for testimony. Since knowledge by testimony is possible, and forms the basis of (...)
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  10. E. M. Shackle (1985). Psychiatric Diagnosis as an Ethical Problem. Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (3):132-134.score: 114.0
    Psychiatrists diagnose mental illness in patients against a climate of opinion in which the value of diagnosis is questioned and non-medical formulations of the problems of psychiatric patients are put forward. Nevertheless the classic diagnostic terminology shows no sign of disappearing. The patients may find that a psychiatric diagnostic label is a stigma and has bad consequences. They may also object to standard methods of treatment. Given this situation the right of the patient to a full explanation (...)
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  11. Serife Tekin (forthcoming). Self-Insight in the Time of Mood Disorders: After the Diagnosis, Beyond the Treatment. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology.score: 108.0
    This paper explores the factors that contribute to the degree of a mood disorder patient’s self- insight, defined here as her understanding of the particular contingencies of her life that are responsive to her personal identity, interpersonal relationships, illness symptoms, and the relationship between these three necessary components of her lived experience. I consider three factors: (i) the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), (ii) the DSM culture, and (iii) the cognitive architecture of the self. I argue that the (...)
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  12. Lisa Bortolotti (2011). Psychiatric Classification and Diagnosis. Delusions and Confabulations. Paradigmi (1):99-112.score: 96.0
    In psychiatry some disorders of cognition are distinguished from instances of normal cognitive functioning and from other disorders in virtue of their surface features rather than in virtue of the underlying mechanisms responsible for their occurrence. Aetiological considerations often cannot play a significant classificatory and diagnostic role, because there is no sufficient knowledge or consensus about the causal history of many psychiatric disorders. Moreover, it is not always possible to uniquely identify a pathological behaviour as the symptom of a (...)
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  13. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah Decker, Michael First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew Hinderliter, Warren Kinghorn, Steven LoBello, Elliott Martin, Aaron Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph Pierre, Ronald Pies, Harold Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome Wakefield, G. Scott Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 2: Issues of Conservatism and Pragmatism in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):1-16.score: 96.0
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the (...)
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  14. T. Szasz (1994). Psychiatric Diagnosis, Psychiatric Power and Psychiatric Abuse. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (3):135-138.score: 96.0
    Psychiatric abuse, such as we usually associate with practices in the former Soviet Union, is related not to the misuse of psychiatric diagnoses, but to the political power intrinsic to the social role of the psychiatrist in totalitarian and democratic societies alike. Some reflections are offered on the modern, therapeutic state's proclivity to treat adults as patients rather than citizens, disjoin rights from responsibilities, and thus corrupt the language of political-philosophical discourse.
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  15. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 2: Issues of Conservatism and Pragmatism in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):8-.score: 96.0
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the (...)
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  16. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 3: Issues of Utility and Alternative Approaches in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):9-.score: 96.0
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the (...)
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  17. James Phillips, Allen Frances, Michael A. Cerullo, John Chardavoyne, Hannah S. Decker, Michael B. First, Nassir Ghaemi, Gary Greenberg, Andrew C. Hinderliter, Warren A. Kinghorn, Steven G. LoBello, Elliott B. Martin, Aaron L. Mishara, Joel Paris, Joseph M. Pierre, Ronald W. Pies, Harold A. Pincus, Douglas Porter, Claire Pouncey, Michael A. Schwartz, Thomas Szasz, Jerome C. Wakefield, G. Scott Waterman, Owen Whooley & Peter Zachar (2012). The Six Most Essential Questions in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Pluralogue Part 1: Conceptual and Definitional Issues in Psychiatric Diagnosis. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):1-29.score: 96.0
    In face of the multiple controversies surrounding the DSM process in general and the development of DSM-5 in particular, we have organized a discussion around what we consider six essential questions in further work on the DSM. The six questions involve: 1) the nature of a mental disorder; 2) the definition of mental disorder; 3) the issue of whether, in the current state of psychiatric science, DSM-5 should assume a cautious, conservative posture or an assertive, transformative posture; 4) the (...)
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  18. P. Thomas, A. Shah & T. Thornton (2009). Language, Games and the Role of Interpreters in Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Wittgensteinian Thought Experiment. Medical Humanities 35 (1):13-18.score: 96.0
    British society is becoming increasingly culturally and linguistically diverse. This poses a major challenge to mental health services charged with the responsibility to work in ways that respect cultural and linguistic difference. In this paper we investigate the problems of interpretation in the diagnosis of depression using a thought experiment to demonstrate important features of language-games, an idea introduced by Ludwig Wittgenstein in his late work, Philosophical investigations. The thought experiment draws attention to the importance of culture and contexts (...)
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  19. Lennard J. Davis (2010). The Bioethics of Diagnosis: A Biocultural Critique of Certainty. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):227-235.score: 90.0
    This article argues that traditional models of diagnosis are incomplete in their reliance on a models of certainty that are no longer tenable in a postmodern world. Further, it argues that the current form of diagnosis, as applied to psychiatric and affective disorders, reduces patient agency and reinscribes the effects of biopower.
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  20. Isaac R. Galatzer-Levy & Robert M. Galatzer-Levy (2007). The Revolution in Psychiatric Diagnosis: Problems at the Foundations. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (2):161-180.score: 90.0
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  21. F. Callard (forthcoming). Psychiatric Diagnosis: The Indispensability of Ambivalence. Journal of Medical Ethics.score: 90.0
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  22. Randolph M. Nesse & Eric D. Jackson (2011). Evolutionary Foundations for Psychiatric Diagnosis: Making DSM-V Valid. In Pieter R. Adriaens & Andreas de Block (eds.), Maladapting Minds: Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Evolutionary Theory. Oxford University Press. 167--191.score: 90.0
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  23. William M. Landau (2009). A Footnote to the Revolution in Psychiatric Diagnosis. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (2):338-341.score: 90.0
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  24. Kenneth Mark Colby (1982). Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Double Taxonomic Swamp. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):596.score: 90.0
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  25. M. D. JosefParnas (2008). Comment: Psychiatric Diagnosis. In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry: Explanation, Phenomenology, and Nosology. Johns Hopkins University Press. 383.score: 90.0
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  26. Victor Kuperman & Joseph Zislin (2005). Semiotic Perspective of Psychiatric Diagnosis. Semiotica 2005 (155.1part4):1-13.score: 90.0
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  27. R. Uren (1992). Psychiatric-Diagnosis and the Market. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 35 (4):612-616.score: 90.0
     
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  28. Paolo Curci & Cesare Secchi (2005). Making Diagnoses in Psychiatric Clinical Practice: The Point of View of the Psychotherapeutic Attitude. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (1):63-68.score: 78.0
    Using a “psychotherapeutic attitude”, as a criterion and measure of the psychiatrist’s involvement in clinical relationship (with the “trial identification” according to Fliess), some phenomenological and epistemological considerations are offered about diagnostic assessments, as a synchronic and diachronic recognising process. Inspired by Gehlen’s notion of “exoneration” (i.e., the reducing and focusing of the perceptive experience as applied to the wealth of the perceptible), this paper examines how the mind of a skilled diagnostician might work. Three levels are explored: firstly, “the (...)
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  29. A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2009). Notes on a Few Issues in the Philosophy of Psychiatry. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):128.score: 72.0
    _The first part called the Preamble tackles: (a) the issues of silence and speech, and life and disease; (b) whether we need to know some or all of the truth, and how are exact science and philosophical reason related; (c) the phenomenon of Why, How, and What; (d) how are mind and brain related; (e) what is robust eclecticism, empirical/scientific enquiry, replicability/refutability, and the role of diagnosis and medical model in psychiatry; (f) bioethics and the four principles of beneficence, (...)
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  30. Joel P. Eigen (1989). A Mania for Diagnosis : Unravelling the Aims of Nineteenth-Century French Psychiatrists Jan Goldstein, Console and Classify, The French Psychiatric Profession in the Nineteenth Century, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988, 30.00, Xiii+414 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 2 (2):241-251.score: 72.0
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  31. Drozdstoj Stoyanov, Peter K. Machamer, Kenneth F. Schaffner & Rayito Rivera‐Hernández (2012). The Challenge of Psychiatric Nosology and Diagnosis. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):704-709.score: 72.0
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  32. Daniel K. Winstead (1993). Diagnosis, Health Beliefs, and Risk of HIV Infection in Psychiatric Patients. Hastings Center Report 23 (2).score: 72.0
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  33. Malcolm Parker (2010). Diagnosis, Power and Certainty: Response to Davis. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (3):291-297.score: 60.0
    Lennard Davis’s Biocultural Critique of the alleged certainty of diagnosis (Davis Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7:227−235, 2010) makes errors of fact concerning psychiatric diagnostic categories, misunderstands the role of power in the therapeutic relationship, and provides an unsubstantiated and vague alternative to the management of psychological distress via a conceptually outdated model of the relationships between physical and psychological disease and illness. This response demonstrates that diagnostic knowledge vouchsafes legitimate power to physicians, and via them relief to patients (...)
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  34. Tim Thornton (2008). Should Comprehensive Diagnosis Include Idiographic Understanding? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):293-302.score: 60.0
    The World Psychiatric Association has emphasised the importance of idiographic understanding as a distinct component of comprehensive assessment but in introductions to the idea it is often assimilated to the notion of narrative judgement. This paper aims to distinguish between supposed idiographic and narrative judgement. Taking the former to mean a kind of individualised judgement, I argue that it has no place in psychiatry in part because it threatens psychiatric validity. Narrative judgement, by contrast, is a genuinely distinct (...)
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  35. Jann E. Schlimme (2009). Paranoid Atmospheres: Psychiatric Knowledge and Delusional Realities. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 4 (1):1-12.score: 48.0
    In this paper I investigate the topic of paranoid atmospheres. This subject is especially of interest with respect to persons who are deluded, and also, I will demonstrate, sheds light upon the psychiatrist's "gaze" and knowledge of delusions. In my argument I will follow a path initially outlined by Karl Jaspers (1883-1969): modern psychiatric diagnosis of delusions is a diagnosis of form and not content. Jaspers' emphasis on the form of delusions enables psychiatrists to be self-critical about (...)
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  36. Nick Haslam (2010). Symptom Networks and Psychiatric Categories. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (2-3):158-159.score: 48.0
    The network approach to psychiatric phenomena has the potential to clarify and enhance psychiatric diagnosis and classification. However, its generally well-justified anti-essentialism views psychiatric disorders as invariably fuzzy and arbitrary, and overlooks the likelihood that the domain includes some latent categories. Network models misrepresent these categories, and fail to recognize that some comorbidity may represent valid co-occurrence of discrete conditions.
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  37. J. K. Trivedi & D. Goel (2006). What Psychiatry Means to Us. Mens Sana Monographs 4 (1):166.score: 48.0
    Psychiatry has come up as one of the most dynamic branches of medicine in recent years. There are a lot of controversies regarding concepts, nosology, definitions and treatments in psychiatry, all of which are presently under a strict scanner. Differences are so many that even the meaning of psychiatry varies amongst individual psychiatrists. For us, it is an art to practice psychiatry and give the patient what he needs. Still, it should be practiced with great caution and utmost sincerity towards (...)
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  38. Shadia Kawa & James Giordano (2012). A Brief Historicity of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Issues and Implications for the Future of Psychiatric Canon and Practice. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):2-.score: 42.0
    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) of the American Psychiatric Association, currently in its fourth edition and considered the reference for the characterization and diagnosis of mental disorders, has undergone various developments since its inception in the mid-twentieth century. With the fifth edition of the DSM presently in field trials for release in 2013, there is renewed discussion and debate over the extent of its relative successes - and shortcomings - at iteratively incorporating scientific evidence on the often (...)
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  39. Lisa Bortolotti & Heather Widdows (2011). The Right Not to Know: The Case of Psychiatric Disorders. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (11):673-676.score: 42.0
    This paper will consider the right not to know in the context of psychiatric disorders. It will outline the arguments for and against acquiring knowledge about the results of genetic testing for conditions such as breast cancer and Huntington’s disease, and examine whether similar considerations apply to disclosing to clients the results of genetic testing for psychiatric disorders such as depression and Alzheimer’s disease. The right not to know will also be examined in the context of the (...) of psychiatric disorders that are associated with stigma or for which there is no effective treatment. (shrink)
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  40. Ruth Macklin (1983). Philosophical Conceptions of Rationality and Psychiatric Notions of Competency. Synthese 57 (2):205 - 224.score: 42.0
    Psychiatrists are frequently called upon to make assessments of the rationality or irrationality of persons for a variety of medical-legal purposes. A key category is that of evaluations of a patient's capacity to grant informed consent for a medical procedure. A diagnosis of mental illness is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for a finding of incompetence. The notion of competency to grant consent, which is a mixed psychiatric-legal concept, shares some features with philosophical conceptions of rationality, (...)
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  41. K. W. M. Fulford (2011). Neuroscience and Values: A Case Study Illustrating Developments in Policy, Training and Research in the UK and Internationally. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):79.score: 42.0
    In the current climate of dramatic advances in the neurosciences, it has been widely assumed that the diagnosis of mental disorder is a matter exclusively for value-free science. Starting from a detailed case history, this paper describes how, to the contrary, values come into the diagnosis of mental disorders, directly through the criteria at the heart of psychiatry's most scientifically grounded classification, the American Psychiatric Association's DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual). Various possible interpretations of the prominence of (...)
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  42. James L. Mathis (1992). Psychiatric Diagnoses: A Continuing Controversy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (2):253-261.score: 42.0
    Psychiatric Medicine has been accused justly of making its diagnoses on the patient's report of symptoms and the physician's subjective observations of the patient. The main problem has been the lack of reliable data compounded by the stigma of a mental diagnosis. More recently, third-party pressures have become an added threat to objectivity. New knowledge of brain function, especially neurotransmitters, and more specific and effective medication have made the need for accurate diagnoses more acute. Psychiatry has responded by (...)
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  43. Serife Tekin (2010). Mad Narratives: Exploring Self-Constitutions Through the Diagnostic Looking Glass. Dissertation, York Universityscore: 36.0
    In “Mad Narratives: Self-Constitutions Through the Diagnostic Looking Glass,” by using narrative approaches to the self, I explore how the diagnosis of mental disorder shapes personal identities and influences flourishing. My particular focus is the diagnosis grounded on the criteria provided by the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). I develop two connected accounts pertaining to the self and mental disorder. I use the memoirs and personal stories written by the subjects with a DSM diagnosis as (...)
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  44. Liang Su, Jingjing Huang, Weimin Yang, Huafang Li, Yifeng Shen & Yifeng Xu (2012). Ethics, Patient Rights and Staff Attitudes in Shanghai's Psychiatric Hospitals. BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):8-.score: 36.0
    Adherence to ethical principles in clinical research and practice is becoming topical issue in China, where the prevalence of mental illness is rising, but treatment facilities remain underdeveloped. This paper reports on a study aiming to understand the ethical knowledge and attitudes of Chinese mental health professionals in relation to the process of diagnosis and treatment, informed consent, and privacy protection in clinical trials.
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  45. Enric J. Novella (2010). Mental Health Care in the Aftermath of Deinstitutionalization: A Retrospective and Prospective View. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (3):222-238.score: 36.0
    This paper offers a panoramic assessment of the significant changes experienced by psychiatric care in Western Europe and North America in the course of the last decades of deinstitutionalization and reform. Drawing on different comparative studies and an own review of relevant data and reports, the main transformations in the mental health field are analyzed around seven major topics: the expanding scope of psychiatry; the decline and metamorphosis of the asylum; the introduction of alternative and diversified forms of care; (...)
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  46. Lisa Diedrich (2010). Being the Shadow: Witnessing Schizophrenia. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (2):91-109.score: 36.0
    This essay discusses Susan Smiley’s documentary film, Out of the Shadow (2004), and Tina Kotulski’s memoir, Saving Millie: A Daughter’s Story of Surviving Her Mother’s Schizophrenia, as filmic and narrative treatments of their mother’s schizophrenia. Mildred Smiley, and her diagnosis of and treatment for schizophrenia, is at the center of both her daughters’ treatments of mental illness, and in these texts, all three become witnesses to the multiple experiences of mental illness and the multiple events of psychiatric power. (...)
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  47. Derek Bolton (2008). What is Mental Disorder?: An Essay in Philosophy, Science, and Values. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    The effects of mental disorder are apparent and pervasive, in suffering, loss of freedom and life opportunities, negative impacts on education, work satisfaction and productivity, complications in law, institutions of healthcare, and more. With a new edition of the 'bible' of psychiatric diagnosis - the DSM - under developmental, it is timely to take a step back and re-evalutate exactly how we diagnose and define mental disorder. This new book by Derek Bolton tackles the problems involved in the (...)
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  48. Lukas van Oudenhove & Stefaan E. Cuypers (2010). The Philosophical "Mind-Body Problem" and Its Relevance for the Relationship Between Psychiatry and the Neurosciences. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (4):545-557.score: 30.0
    Psychiatry is a discipline on the border between the biomedical sciences on the one hand and the humanities and social sciences (most notably psychology and anthropology) on the other. This unique position undoubtedly contributes to the attractiveness of psychiatry as a medical specialism for many young doctors, but it also causes significant problems. Unlike other medical disciplines, in which the definitions of diseases are based on objective, measurable pathophysiological underpinnings, psychiatric diagnosis and classification has been based on descriptions (...)
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  49. Ejgil Jespersen, Anika A. Jordbru & Egil Martinsen (2008). Conversion Gait Disorder—Meeting Patients in Behaviour, Reuniting Body and Mind. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):185-199.score: 30.0
    The Hospital for Rehabilitation, Stavern, in Norway has treated patients with physical symptoms with no organic cause, so called conversion disorder patients, for over a decade. For four years research on the treatment has been carried out. Patients with conversion disorder seem not to fit in traditional somatic hospitals because their patienthood depends upon psychiatric diagnosis. Ironically, they appear not to belong in psychiatric hospitals because of their physical symptoms. The treatment offered these patients at hospitals for (...)
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