Search results for 'public health' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jonny Anomaly (2012). Is Obesity a Public Health Problem? Public Health Ethics 5 (3):216-221.score: 270.0
    It is often claimed that there is an obesity epidemic in affluent countries, and that obesity is one of the most serious public health threats in the developed world. I will argue that obesity is not an 'epidemic' in any useful sense of the word, and that classifying it as a public health problem requires us to make fairly controversial moral and empirical assumptions. While evidence suggests that the prevalence of obesity is on the rise, and (...)
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  2. Jonny Anomaly (2011). Public Health and Public Goods. Public Health Ethics 4 (3):251-259.score: 270.0
    It has become increasingly difficult to distinguish public health from tangentially related fields like social work. I argue that we should reclaim the more traditional conception of public health as the provision of health-related public goods. The public goods account has the advantage of establishing a relatively clear and distinctive mission for public health. It also allows a consensus of people with different comprehensive moral and political commitments to endorse public (...)
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  3. Madison Powers, Ruth Faden & Yashar Saghai (2012). Liberty, Mill and the Framework of Public Health Ethics. Public Health Ethics 5 (1):6-15.score: 270.0
    In this article, we address the relevance of J.S. Mill’s political philosophy for a framework of public health ethics. In contrast to some readings of Mill, we reject the view that in the formulation of public policies liberties of all kinds enjoy an equal presumption in their favor. We argue that Mill also rejects this view and discuss the distinction that Mill makes between three kinds of liberty interests: interests that are immune from state interference; interests that (...)
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  4. Federica Russo (2012). Public Health Policy, Evidence, and Causation: Lessons From the Studies on Obesity. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):141-151.score: 246.0
    The paper addresses the question of how different types of evidence ought to inform public health policy. By analysing case studies on obesity, the paper draws lessons about the different roles that different types of evidence play in setting up public health policies. More specifically, it is argued that evidence of difference-making supports considerations about ‘what works for whom in what circumstances’, and that evidence of mechanisms provides information about the ‘causal pathways’ to intervene upon.
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  5. Peter West-Oram (2013). Freedom of Conscience and Health Care in the United States of America: The Conflict Between Public Health and Religious Liberty in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (3):237-247.score: 246.0
    The recent confirmation of the constitutionality of the Obama administration’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) by the US Supreme Court has brought to the fore long-standing debates over individual liberty and religious freedom. Advocates of personal liberty are often critical, particularly in the USA, of public health measures which they deem to be overly restrictive of personal choice. In addition to the alleged restrictions of individual freedom of choice when it comes to the question of whether (...)
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  6. David B. Resnik (forthcoming). Food and Beverage Policies and Public Health Ethics. Health Care Analysis:1-12.score: 246.0
    Government food and beverage policies can play an important role in promoting public health. Few people would question this assumption. Difficult questions can arise, however, when policymakers, public health officials, citizens, and businesses deliberate about food and beverage policies, because competing values may be at stake, such as public health, individual autonomy, personal responsibility, economic prosperity, and fairness. An ethically justified policy strikes a reasonable among competing values by meeting the following criteria: (1) the (...)
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  7. John E. Ataguba & Gavin Mooney (2011). A Communitarian Approach to Public Health. Health Care Analysis 19 (2):154-164.score: 246.0
    This paper argues that there is a need to move yet further than has already been suggested by some from the individual to the collective as a base for public health. A communitarian approach is one way to achieve this. This has the advantage of allowing not only the community’s voice to have a say in setting the values for public health but also more formally the development of a constitution on which public health (...)
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  8. Shawn H. E. Harmon (2009). International Public Health Law: Not so Much WHO as Why, and Not Enough WHO and Why Not? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (3):245-255.score: 246.0
    To state the obvious, “health matters”, but health (or its equitable enjoyment) is neither simple nor easy. Public health in particular, which encompasses a broad collection of complex and multidisciplinary activities which are critical to the wellbeing and security of individuals, populations and nations, is a difficult milieu to master effectively. In fact, despite the vital importance of public health, there is a relative dearth of ethico-legal norms tailored for, and directed at, the (...) health sector, particularly at the international level. This is a state of affairs which is no longer tenable in the global environment. This article argues that public health promotion is a moral duty, and that international actors are key stakeholders upon whom this duty falls. In particular, the World Health Organization bears a heavy responsibility in this regard. The article claims that better health can and must be better promoted through a more robust interpretation of the WHO’s role, arguing that neither the WHO nor international law have yet played their necessary part in promoting health for all. (shrink)
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  9. Rick Mayes & Blair Armistead (2013). Chronic Disease, Prevention Policy, and the Future of Public Health and Primary Care. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):691-697.score: 246.0
    Globally, chronic disease and conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression and cancer are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Why, then, are public health efforts and programs aimed at preventing chronic disease so difficult to implement and maintain? Also, why is primary care—the key medical specialty for helping persons with chronic disease manage their illnesses—in decline? Public health suffers from its often being socially controversial, personally intrusive, irritating to many powerful corporate interests, and structurally (...)
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  10. David Badcott (2011). Professional Values in Community and Public Health Pharmacy. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):187-194.score: 246.0
    General practice (community) pharmacy as a healthcare profession is largely devoted to therapeutic treatment of individual patients whether in dispensing medically authorised prescriptions or by providing members of the public with over-the-counter advice and service for a variety of common ailments. Recently, community pharmacy has been identified as an untapped resource available to undertake important aspects of public health and in particular health promotion. In contrast to therapeutic treatment, public health primarily concerns the (...) of the entire population, rather than the health of individuals (Childress et al. in J Law Med Ethics 30:170–178, 2002). Thus, an important question for the profession is whether those moral and professional values that are appropriate to the therapeutic care of individual patients are relevant and adequate to support the additional public health role. (shrink)
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  11. Michèle St-Pierre, Daniel Reinharz & Jacques-Bernard Gauthier (2006). Organizing the Public Health-Clinical Health Interface: Theoretical Bases. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):97-106.score: 246.0
    This article addresses the issue of the interface between public health and clinical health within the context of the search for networking approaches geared to a more integrated delivery of health services. The articulation of an operative interface is complicated by the fact that the definition of networking modalities involves complex intra- and interdisciplinary and intra- and interorganizational systems across which a new transversal dynamics of intervention practices and exchanges between service structures must be established. A (...)
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  12. Per-Anders Tengland (2010). Health Promotion or Disease Prevention: A Real Difference for Public Health Practice? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (3):203-221.score: 246.0
    It appears that there are two distinct practices within public health, namely health promotion and disease prevention, leading to different goals. But does the distinction hold? Can we promote health without preventing disease, and vice versa? The aim of the paper is to answer these questions. First, the central concepts are defined and the logical relations between them are spelt out. A preliminary conclusion is that there is a logical difference between health and disease, which (...)
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  13. Robin Mackenzie (2011). The Neuroethics of Pleasure and Addiction in Public Health Strategies Moving Beyond Harm Reduction: Funding the Creation of Non-Addictive Drugs and Taxonomies of Pleasure. Neuroethics 4 (2):103-117.score: 240.0
    We are unlikely to stop seeking pleasure, as this would prejudice our health and well-being. Yet many psychoactive substances providing pleasure are outlawed as illicit recreational drugs, despite the fact that only some of them are addictive to some people. Efforts to redress their prohibition, or to reform legislation so that penalties are proportionate to harm have largely failed. Yet, if choices over seeking pleasure are ethical insofar as they avoid harm to oneself or others, public health (...)
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  14. Craig Blinderman (2009). Palliative Care, Public Health and Justice: Setting Priorities in Resource Poor Countries. Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):105-110.score: 240.0
    Many countries have not considered palliative care a public health problem. With limited resources, disease-oriented therapies and prevention measures take priority. In this paper, I intend to describe the moral framework for considering palliative care as a public health priority in resource-poor countries. A distributive theory of justice for health care should consider integrative palliative care as morally required as it contributes to improving normal functioning and preserving opportunities for the individual. For patients requiring terminal (...)
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  15. Louise Cummings (2012). Scaring the Public: Fear Appeal Arguments in Public Health Reasoning. Informal Logic 32 (1):25-50.score: 240.0
    The study of threat and fear appeal arguments has given rise to a sizeable literature. Even within a public health context, much is now known about how these arguments work to gain the public’s compliance with health recommendations. Notwithstanding this level of interest in, and examination of, these arguments, there is one aspect of these arguments that still remains unexplored. That aspect concerns the heuristic function of these arguments within our thinking about public health (...)
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  16. Yashar Saghai (2012). The Ethics of Public Health Nudges. Dissertation, Georgetown Universityscore: 240.0
    There is growing interest in using non-coercive interventions to promote and protect public health, in particular "health nudges." Behavioral economist Richard Thaler and law scholar Cass Sunstein coined the term nudge to designate influences that steer individuals in a predetermined direction by activating their automatic cognitive processes, while preserving their freedom of choice. Proponents of nudges argue that public and private institutions are entitled to use health-promoting nudges because nudges do not close off any options. (...)
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  17. Sabina Gainotti, Nicola Moran, Carlo Petrini & Darren Shickle (2008). Ethical Models Underpinning Responses to Threats to Public Health: A Comparison of Approaches to Communicable Disease Control in Europe. Bioethics 22 (9):466-476.score: 240.0
    Increases in international travel and migratory flows have enabled infectious diseases to emerge and spread more rapidly than ever before. Hence, it is increasingly easy for local infectious diseases to become global infectious diseases (GIDs). National governments must be able to react quickly and effectively to GIDs, whether naturally occurring or intentionally instigated by bioterrorism. According to the World Health Organisation, global partnerships are necessary to gather the most up-to-date information and to mobilize resources to tackle GIDs when necessary. (...)
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  18. Søren Holm (2009). Should Persons Detained During Public Health Crises Receive Compensation? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):197-205.score: 240.0
    One of the ways in which public health officials control outbreaks of epidemic disease is by attempting to control the situations in which the infectious agent can spread. This may include isolation of infected persons, quarantine of persons who may be infected and detention of persons who are present in or have entered premises where infected persons are being treated. Most who have analysed such measures think that the restrictions in liberty they entail and the detriments in welfare (...)
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  19. Adam D. Moore (2010). Privacy, Public Health, and Controlling Medical Information. HEC Forum 22 (3):225-240.score: 240.0
    This paper argues that individuals do, in a sense, own or have exclusive claims to control their personal information and body parts. It begins by sketching several arguments that support presumptive claims to informational privacy, turning then to consider cases which illustrate when and how privacy may be overridden by public health concerns.
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  20. Doris Schroeder (2007). Public Health, Ethics, and Functional Foods. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (3):247-259.score: 240.0
    Functional foods aim to provide a positive impact on health and well-being beyond their nutritive content. As such, they are likely candidates to enhance the public health official’s tool kit. Or are they? Although a very small number of functional foods (e.g., phytosterol-enriched margarine) show such promise in improving individual health that Dutch health insurance companies reimburse their costs to consumers, one must not draw premature conclusions about functional foods as a group. A large number (...)
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  21. David Barling (2007). Food Supply Chain Governance and Public Health Externalities: Upstream Policy Interventions and the UK State. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (3):285-300.score: 240.0
    Contemporary food supply chains are generating externalities with high economic and social costs, notably in public health terms through the rise in diet-related non-communicable disease. The UK State is developing policy strategies to tackle these public health problems alongside intergovernmental responses. However, the governance of food supply chains is conducted by, and across, both private and public spheres and within a multilevel framework. The realities of contemporary food governance are that private interests are key drivers (...)
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  22. Andrew Courtwright (2013). Stigmatization and Public Health Ethics. Bioethics 27 (2):74-80.score: 240.0
    Encouraged by the success of smoking denormalization strategies as a tobacco-control measure, public health institutions are adopting a similar approach to other health behaviors. For example, a recent controversial ad campaign in New York explicitly aimed to denormalize HIV/AIDS amongst gay men. Authors such as Scott Burris have argued that efforts like this are tantamount to stigmatization and that such stigmatization is unethical because it is dehumanizing. Others have offered a limited endorsement of denormalization/stigmatization campaigns as being (...)
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  23. Jayne Lucke & Brad Partridge (2013). Towards a Smart Population: A Public Health Framework for Cognitive Enhancement. Neuroethics 6 (2):419-427.score: 240.0
    This paper presents a novel view of the concept of cognitive enhancement by taking a population health perspective. We propose four main modifiable healthy lifestyle factors for optimal cognitive functioning across the population for which there is evidence of safety and efficacy. These include i) promoting adequate sleep, ii) increasing physical activity, iii) encouraging a healthy diet, including minimising consumption of stimulants, alcohol and other drugs including nicotine, iv) and promoting good mental health. We argue that it is (...)
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  24. Lenny R. Vartanian & Joshua M. Smyth (2013). Primum Non Nocere: Obesity Stigma and Public Health. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):49-57.score: 240.0
    Several recent anti-obesity campaigns appear to embrace stigmatization of obese individuals as a public health strategy. These approaches seem to be based on the fundamental assumptions that (1) obesity is largely under an individual’s control and (2) stigmatizing obese individuals will motivate them to change their behavior and will also result in successful behavior change. The empirical evidence does not support these assumptions: Although body weight is, to some degree, under individuals’ personal control, there are a range of (...)
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  25. Meena Krishnamurthy (2013). Political Solidarity, Justice and Public Health. Public Health Ethics 6 (2):129-141.score: 240.0
    n this paper, I argue that political solidarity is important to justice. At its core, political solidarity is a relational concept. To be in a relation of political solidarity, is to be in a relation of connection or unity with one’s fellow citizens. I argue that fellow citizens can be said to stand in such a relation when they have attitudes of collective identification, mutual respect, mutual trust, and mutual support and loyalty toward one another. I argue that political solidarity, (...)
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  26. Melanie Rock & Chris Degeling (2013). Public Health Ethics and a Status for Pets as Person-Things. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):485-495.score: 240.0
    Within the field of medical ethics, discussions related to public health have mainly concentrated on issues that are closely tied to research and practice involving technologies and professional services, including vaccination, screening, and insurance coverage. Broader determinants of population health have received less attention, although this situation is rapidly changing. Against this backdrop, our specific contribution to the literature on ethics and law vis-à-vis promoting population health is to open up the ubiquitous presence of pets within (...)
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  27. Cynthia Chappell & Nathan Carlin (2011). Public Health Ethics Education in a Competency-Based Curriculum: A Method of Programmatic Assessment. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (1):33-42.score: 240.0
    Public health ethics began to emerge in the 1990s as a development within bioethics. Public health ethics education has been implemented in schools of public health in recent years, and specific professionalism and ethics competencies were included in the Master of Public Health (MPH) competency set developed nationally and adapted by individual schools of public health around the country. The University of Texas School of Public Health approved the (...)
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  28. Ross Upshur (2013). What Does Public Health Ethics Tell (Or Not Tell) Us About Intervening in Non-Communicable Diseases? Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):19-28.score: 240.0
    Obesity has been described as pandemic and a public health crisis. It has been argued that concerted research efforts are needed to enhance our understanding and develop effective interventions for the complex and multiple dimensions of the health challenges posed by obesity. This would provide a secure evidence base in order to justify clinical interventions and public policy. This paper critically examines these claims through the examination of models of public health and public (...)
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  29. Sean A. Valles (2012). Heterogeneity of Risk Within Racial Groups, a Challenge for Public Health Programs. Preventive Medicine 55 (5):405-408.score: 240.0
    Targeting high-risk populations for public health interventions is a classic tool of public health promotion programs. This practice becomes thornier when racial groups are identified as the at-risk populations. I present the particular ethical and epistemic challenges that arise when there are low-risk subpopulations within racial groups that have been identified as high-risk for a particular health concern. I focus on two examples. The black immigrant population does not have the same hypertension risk as US-born (...)
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  30. Alena Buyx (2010). Können, sollen, müssen? Public Health-Politik und libertärer Paternalismus. Ethik in der Medizin 22 (3):221-234.score: 240.0
    Die epidemiologische Morbiditätsverschiebung der vergangenen Jahrzehnte hat verhaltensassoziierte Erkrankungen in das Zentrum der Public Health-Arbeit rücken lassen. Sowohl die Prävention Lebensstil-bedingter Erkrankungen als auch die Behandlung ihrer Folgen gehören angesichts steigender Morbiditäts- und Mortalitätszahlen zu den größten Herausforderungen für moderne Gesundheitssysteme. Eine Beeinflussung von Gesundheitsverhalten sowie dessen Berücksichtigung in der Mittelverteilung – prominent verhandelt in der medizinethischen Debatte um gesundheitliche Eigenverantwortung – sind jedoch kontrovers. Bisher konnte dafür noch kein allgemein akzeptiertes theoretisches Modell entwickelt werden. Im vorliegenden Beitrag (...)
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  31. Y. Farmer, Bouthillier MÈ, M. Dion-Labrie, C. Durand & H. Doucet (2010). Public Participation in National Preparedness and Response Plans for Pandemic Influenza: Towards an Ethical Contribution to Public Health Policies. Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 1 (1):9.score: 240.0
    Faced with the threat of pandemic influenza, several countries have made the decision to put a number of measures in place which have been incorporated into national plans. In view of the magnitude of the powers and responsibilities that States assume in the event of a pandemic, a review of the various national preparedness and response plans for pandemic influenza brought to light a series of extremely important ethical concerns. Nevertheless, in spite of the recent emergence of literature focusing specifically (...)
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  32. Barbara Seed, Tim Lang, Martin Caraher & Aleck Ostry (2013). Integrating Food Security Into Public Health and Provincial Government Departments in British Columbia, Canada. Agriculture and Human Values 30 (3):457-470.score: 240.0
    Food security policy, programs, and infrastructure have been incorporated into Public Health and other areas of the Provincial Government in British Columbia, including the adoption of food security as a Public Health Core Program. A policy analysis of the integration into Public Health is completed by merging findings from 48 key informant interviews conducted with government, civil society, and food supply chain representatives involved in the initiatives along with relevant documents and participant/direct observations. The (...)
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  33. German Velasquez (2014). The Right to Health and Medicines: The Case of Recent Multilateral Negotiations on Public Health, Innovation and Intellectual Property. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2):67-74.score: 240.0
    The negotiations of the intergovernmental group known as the ‘IGWG’, undertaken by the Member States of the WHO, were the result of a deadlock in the World Health Assembly held in 2006 where the Member States of the WHO were unable to reach an agreement on what to do with the 60 recommendations in the report on ‘Public Health, Innovation and Intellectual Property Rights submitted to the Assembly in the same year by a group of experts designated (...)
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  34. Oliver Rauprich (2010). Public Health als Beitrag zur sozialen Gerechtigkeit. Ethik in der Medizin 22 (3):263-273.score: 240.0
    Soziale Faktoren haben einen starken Einfluss auf die Gesundheit und Lebenserwartung. Auch in Wohlfahrtsstaaten bestehen signifikante gesundheitliche Ungleichheiten zwischen besser und schlechter gestellten Bevölkerungsgruppen. Sie werden zunehmend als ein Problem der sozialen Gerechtigkeit wahrgenommen. Public Health dient dem Abbau gesundheitlicher Ungleichheiten und somit der Förderung der sozialen Gerechtigkeit. Obwohl Public Health-Maßnahmen effizienter zur Förderung und Angleichung der Bevölkerungsgesundheit beitragen können als viele medizinische Versorgungen, erhalten sie einen geringeren gesundheitspolitischen Stellenwert. Diese Prioritätensetzung zu Gunsten der Medizin kann (...)
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  35. Peter Schröder-Bäck, Peter Duncan, William Sherlaw, Caroline Brall & Katarzyna Czabanowska (2014). Teaching Seven Principles for Public Health Ethics: Towards a Curriculum for a Short Course on Ethics in Public Health Programmes. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):73.score: 240.0
    Teaching ethics in public health programmes is not routine everywhere – at least not in most schools of public health in the European region. Yet empirical evidence shows that schools of public health are more and more interested in the integration of ethics in their curricula, since public health professionals often have to face difficult ethical decisions.
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  36. Angus Dawson & Marcel Verweij (eds.) (2009). Ethics, Prevention, and Public Health. OUP Oxford.score: 240.0
    Public health is an important and fast-developing area of ethical discussion. In this volume a range of issues in public health ethics are explored using the resources of moral theory, political philosophy, philosophy of science, applied ethics, law, and economics. The twelve original papers presented consider numerous ethical issues arise within public health ethics. To what extent can the public good or the public interest justify state interventions that impose limits upon the (...)
     
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  37. Linda Neuhauser, Dawn Richardson, Sonja Mackenzie & Meredith Minkler (2007). Advancing Transdisciplinary and Translational Research Practice: Issues and Models of Doctoral Education in Public Health. Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M19.score: 240.0
    Finding solutions to complex health problems, such as obesity, violence, and climate change, will require radical changes in cross-disciplinary education, research, and practice. The fundamental determinants of health include many interrelated factors such as poverty, culture, education, environment, and government policies. However, traditional public health training has tended to focus more narrowly on diseases and risk factors, and has not adequately leveraged the rich contributions of sociology, anthropology, economics, geography, communication, political science, and other disciplines. Further, (...)
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  38. Donald J. Willison, Nancy Ondrusek, Angus Dawson, Claudia Emerson, Lorraine E. Ferris, Raphael Saginur, Heather Sampson & Ross Upshur (2014). What Makes Public Health Studies Ethical? Dissolving the Boundary Between Research and Practice. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):61.score: 240.0
    The generation of evidence is integral to the work of public health and health service providers. Traditionally, ethics has been addressed differently in research projects, compared with other forms of evidence generation, such as quality improvement, program evaluation, and surveillance, with review of non-research activities falling outside the purview of the research ethics board. However, the boundaries between research and these other evaluative activities are not distinct. Efforts to delineate a boundary – whether on grounds of primary (...)
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  39. Louise Cummings (2014). Informal Fallacies as Cognitive Heuristics in Public Health Reasoning. Informal Logic 34 (1):1-37.score: 234.0
    The public must make assessments of a range of health-related issues. However, these assessments require scientific know-ledge which is often lacking or ineffectively utilized by the public. Lay people must use whatever cognitive resources are at their disposal to come to judgement on these issues. It will be contended that a group of arguments—so-called informal fallacies—are a valuable cognitive resource in this regard. These arguments serve as cognitive heuristics which facilitate reasoning when knowledge is limited or beyond (...)
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  40. Lubomira Radoilska (2009). Public Health Ethics and Liberalism. Public Health Ethics 2 (2):135-145.score: 222.0
    This paper defends a distinctly liberal approach to public health ethics and replies to possible objections. In particular, I look at a set of recent proposals aiming to revise and expand liberalism in light of public health's rationale and epidemiological findings. I argue that they fail to provide a sociologically informed version of liberalism. Instead, they rest on an implicit normative premise about the value of health, which I show to be invalid. I then make (...)
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  41. George J. Annas (2010). Worst Case Bioethics: Death, Disaster, and Public Health. Oxford University Press.score: 216.0
    American healthcare -- Bioterror and bioart -- State of emergency -- Licensed to torture -- Hunger strikes -- War -- Cancer -- Drug dealing -- Toxic tinkering -- Abortion -- Culture of death -- Patient safety -- Global health -- Statue of security -- Pandemic fear -- Bioidentifiers -- Genetic genocide.
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  42. Lawrence O. Gostin (2001). Health Information: Reconciling Personal Privacy with the Public Good of Human Health. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 9 (3):321-335.score: 216.0
    The success of the health care system depends on the accuracy, correctness and trustworthiness of the information, and the privacy rights of individuals to control the disclosure of personal information. A national policy on health informational privacy should be guided by ethical principles that respect individual autonomy while recognizing the important collective interests in the use of health information. At present there are no adequate laws or constitutional principles to help guide a rational privacy policy. The laws (...)
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  43. Darren Shickle (2000). €œOn a Supposed Right to Lie [to the Public] From Benevolent Motives” Communicating Health Risks to the Public. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (3):241-249.score: 216.0
    There are three main categories of rationale for withholding information or telling lies: if overwhelming harm can only be averted through deceit; complete triviality such that it is irrelevant whether the truth is told; a duty to protect the interests of others. Public health authorities are frequently having to form judgements about the public interest, whether to release information or issue warnings. In June 1992, routine surveillance detected patulin levels (a known carcinogen) in samples of apple juice (...)
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  44. Jan Deckers (2013). Obesity, Public Health, and the Consumption of Animal Products. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):29-38.score: 216.0
    Partly in response to rising rates of obesity, many governments have published healthy eating advice. Focusing on health advice related to the consumption of animal products (APs), I argue that the individualistic paradigm that prevails must be replaced by a radically new approach that emphasizes the duty of all human beings to restrict their negative “Global Health Impacts” (GHIs). If they take human rights seriously, many governments from nations with relatively large negative GHIs—including the Australian example provided here—must (...)
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  45. Scott Mann (2010). Bioethics in Perspective: Corporate Power, Public Health and Political Economy. Cambridge University Press.score: 216.0
    This book addresses corporate power, global inequality and sustainability in shaping health outcomes.
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  46. J. -F. Menard (2010). A 'Nudge' for Public Health Ethics: Libertarian Paternalism as a Framework for Ethical Analysis of Public Health Interventions? Public Health Ethics 3 (3):229-238.score: 210.0
    Is it possible to interfere with individual decision-making while preserving freedom of choice? The purpose of this article is to assess whether ‘libertarian paternalism’, a set of political and ethical principles derived from the observations of behavioural sciences, can form the basis of a viable framework for the ethical analysis of public health interventions. First, the article situates libertarian libertarianism within the broader context of the law and economics movement. The main tenets of the approach are then presented (...)
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  47. Thomas R. V. Nys (2008). Paternalism in Public Health Care. Public Health Ethics 1 (1):64-72.score: 210.0
    University of Utrecht, Department of Philosophy, Heidelberglaan 6, 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands. Tel.: +31 (0)30 253 28 74, Email: Thomas.Nys{at}phil.uu.nl ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract Measures in public health care (PHC) seem vulnerable to charges of paternalism: their aim is to protect, restore, or promote people's health, but the public character of these measures seems to leave insufficient room for respect for individual autonomy. This paper wants to explore (...)
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  48. Thomas Nys (2009). Public Health Paternalism: Continuing the Dialogue. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):294-298.score: 210.0
    According to Stephen Holland, the challenges I mention in my original paper can be met, so that, in a way, the problem of paternalism in public health care—which I intended to put into perspective by drawing out some possible justifications for it—returns in all its might and glory. But of course, as Holland observes, I never suggested that my challenges could never be met. I only wanted to point out that for each and every particular public (...) policy that should come to our attention we should reflect upon these challenges and see whether they could provide reasons for justification. I believe that the discussion is often stalled because these measures—in the absence of individual consent and in their aim to benefit the public's ‘best interests’—seem to be paternalist by default. In my paper, I wanted to call this assumption into question, but never intended to prove that there is no such thing as unjustified paternalism in public health care. Nevertheless, Holland's criticism is very insightful and he has done a lot to clarify my position. However, he also puts me on the spot by urging me to argue to what extent I can meet his rebuttal, and I am very grateful for that opportunity. (shrink)
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  49. Françoise Baylis, Nuala P. Kenny & Susan Sherwin (2008). A Relational Account of Public Health Ethics. Public Health Ethics 1 (3):196-209.score: 210.0
    oise Baylis, 1234 Le Marchant Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 3P7. Tel.: (902)-494–2873; Fax: (902)-494-2924; Email: francoise.baylis{at}dal.ca ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract Recently, there has been a growing interest in public health and public health ethics. Much of this interest has been tied to efforts to draw up national and international plans to deal with a global pandemic. It is common for these plans to state the importance of (...)
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  50. Stephen Holland (2009). Public Health Paternalism—a Response to Nys. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):285-293.score: 210.0
    Evaluating public health measures is one of the central tasks in public health ethics. Some public health measures incur the charge that they are paternalistic in an objectionable way. In a recent intriguing contribution to this journal, Thomas Nys responds to this complaint by setting out three challenges to be met if the charge is to be made good. The first challenge is that putatively objectionable public health measures in fact preserve autonomy; (...)
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