Search results for 'qualitative character' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  20
    Douglas B. Meehan (2002). Qualitative Character and Sensory Representation. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):630-641.
    Perceptual experience seems to involve distinct intentional and qualitative features. Inasmuch as one can visually perceive that there is a Coke can in front of one, perceptual experience must be intentional. But such experiences seem to differ from paradigmatic intentional states in having introspectible qualitative character. Peacocke argues that a perceptual experience’s qualitative character is determined by intrinsic, nonrepresentational properties. But and also argues that perceptual experiences have nonconceptual representational content in addition to conceptual content (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  2. Guillaume Frechette (2010). Intentionality and Qualitative Character of Experiences. Studia Phaenomenologica 10:91-117.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  23
    Tom McClelland (forthcoming). Can Self-Representationalism Explain Away the Apparent Irreducibility of Consciousness? Synthese:1-22.
    Kriegel’s self-representationalist theory of phenomenal consciousness pursues two projects. The first is to offer a positive account of how conscious experience arises from physical brain processes. The second is to explain why consciousness misleadingly appears to be irreducible to the physical i.e. to ‘demystify’ consciousness. This paper seeks to determine whether SR succeeds on the second project. Kriegel trades on a distinction between the subjective character and qualitative character of conscious states. Subjective character is the property (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  72
    Uriah Kriegel (2005). Naturalizing Subjective Character. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (1):23-57.
    . When I have a conscious experience of the sky, there is a bluish way it is like for me to have that experience. We may distinguish two aspects of this "bluish way it is like for me": the bluish aspect and the for-me aspect. Let us call the bluish aspect of the experience its qualitative character and the for-me aspect its subjective character . What is this elusive for-me-ness, or subjective character , of conscious experience? (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  5.  90
    Tom McClelland (forthcoming). The Problem of Consciousness: Easy, Hard or Tricky? Topoi:1-14.
    Phenomenal consciousness presents a distinctive explanatory problem. Some regard this problem as ‘hard’, which has troubling implications for the science and metaphysics of consciousness. Some regard it as ‘easy’, which ignores the special explanatory difficulties that consciousness offers. Others are unable to decide between these two uncomfortable positions. All three camps assume that the problem of consciousness is either easy or hard. I argue against this disjunction and suggest that the problem may be ‘tricky’—that is, partly easy and partly hard. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Mark Eli Kalderon (2011). The Multiply Qualitative. Mind 120 (478):239-262.
    Shoemaker argues that one could not hold both that the qualitative character of colour experience is inherited from the qualitative character of the experienced colour and that there are faultless forms of variation in colour perception. In this paper, I explain what is meant by inheritance and discuss in detail the problematic cases of perceptual variation. In so doing I argue that these claims are in fact consistent, and that the appearance to the contrary is due (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  7. Berit Brogaard (2012). Are Conscious States Conscious in Virtue of Representing Themselves? Philosophical Studies 159 (3):467-474.
    Are conscious states conscious in virtue of representing themselves? Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-8 DOI 10.1007/s11098-011-9762-x Authors Berit Brogaard, Department of Philosophy, University of Missouri, St. Louis, 599 Lucas Hall, One University Blvd., St. Louis, MO 63121-4400, USA Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  76
    Danielle Mason (2005). Demystifying Without Quining: Wittgenstein and Dennett on Qualitative States. South African Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):33-43.
    In his 1991 book ‘Consciousness Explained', Daniel Dennett presents his “Multiple Drafts” model of consciousness. Central to his theory is the rejection of the notion of ‘qualia'; of the existence of the purported ‘qualitative character' of conscious experience that many argue rules out the possibility of a purely materialist theory of mind. In eliminating qualia from his theory of consciousness, Dennett claims to be following in the footsteps of Wittgenstein, who also had much to say regarding the nature (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Mark Eli Kalderon, The Multiply Qualitative.
    What is the relation between colors and our experience of them? A na?ve thought is this?the phenomenal character of color experience is determined by the qualitative character of the perceived color. When Norm perceives a red tomato, the qualitative character of his color experience is determined by the qualitative character of the color manifest in his experience of the tomato. If however, colors are mind- independent qualities of material objects, as they seem, pre-philosophically (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Thomas Natsoulas (2006). The Case for Intrinsic Theory: XIII. The Role of the Qualitative in a Modal Account of Inner Awareness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 27 (3-4):319-350.
    Theorists of consciousness differ in respect to whether they hold that all or some of our states of consciousness possess a qualitative character, and in respect to whether they hold that all or some of our states of consciousness possess a reflexive character. This article mainly discusses one such theory, wherein it is proposed that both the qualitative character and the reflexive character are intrinsic to each state of consciousness that possesses them and are (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  5
    Katherine Nelson (2015). Quantitative and Qualitative Research in Psychological Science. Biological Theory 10 (3):263-272.
    The field of psychology has emphasized quantitative laboratory research as a defining character of its role as a science, and has generally de-emphasized qualitative research and theorizing throughout its history. This article reviews some of the effects of this emphasis in two areas, intelligence testing, and learning and memory. On one side, quantitative measurement produced the widely used IQ test but shed little light on the construct of intelligence and its role in human cognition. On the other side, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  7
    Chi-Ming Lee (2009). The Planning, Implementation and Evaluation of a Character-Based School Culture Project in Taiwan. Journal of Moral Education 38 (2):165-184.
    This study focused on the planning, implementation and evaluation of a character-based school culture project in Taiwan. The project integrated the principles of justice, caring and developmental discipline and was influenced by several well-known American models of character education programmes. The CBSC project was conducted in a Taiwanese elementary school from August 2005 to July 2007. The methods included symposia, workshops, meetings, interviews, surveys, observations and experimentation. The findings were: the planning, implementation and evaluation of the CBSC project (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  59
    M. Aase, J. E. Nordrehaug & K. Malterud (2008). "If You Cannot Tolerate That Risk, You Should Never Become a Physician": A Qualitative Study About Existential Experiences Among Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):767-771.
    Background and objectives: Physicians are exposed to matters of existential character at work, but little is known about the personal impact of such issues. Methods: To explore how physicians experience and cope with existential aspects of their clinical work and how such experiences affect their professional identities, a qualitative study using individual semistructured interviews has analysed accounts of their experiences related to coping with such challenges. Analysis was by systematic text condensation. The purposeful sample comprised 10 physicians (including (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  3
    Aasim I. Padela, Hasan Shanawani, Jane Greenlaw, Hamada Hamid, Mehmet Aktas & Nancy Chin (2008). The Perceived Role of Islam in Immigrant Muslim Medical Practice Within the USA: An Exploratory Qualitative Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):365-369.
    Background: Islam and Muslims are underrepresented in the medical literature and the influence of physician’s cultural beliefs and religious values upon the clinical encounter has been understudied.Objective: To elicit the perceived influence of Islam upon the practice patterns of immigrant Muslim physicians in the USA.Design: Ten face-to-face, in-depth, semistructured interviews with Muslim physicians from various backgrounds and specialties trained outside the USA and practising within the the country. Data were analysed according to the conventions of qualitative research using a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  3
    A. I. Padela, H. Shanawani, J. Greenlaw, H. Hamid, M. Aktas & N. Chin (2008). The Perceived Role of Islam in Immigrant Muslim Medical Practice Within the USA: An Exploratory Qualitative Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):365-369.
    Background: Islam and Muslims are underrepresented in the medical literature and the influence of physician’s cultural beliefs and religious values upon the clinical encounter has been understudied. Objective: To elicit the perceived influence of Islam upon the practice patterns of immigrant Muslim physicians in the USA. Design: Ten face-to-face, in-depth, semistructured interviews with Muslim physicians from various backgrounds and specialties trained outside the USA and practising within the the country. Data were analysed according to the conventions of qualitative research (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  10
    Angus J. Dawson (2006). A Messy Business: Qualitative Research and Ethical Review. Clinical Ethics 1 (2):114-116.
    This paper argues that qualitative research is both useful and necessary, as it provides an essential means of gaining a richer understanding of patients' perceptions, social processes and meanings. In their paper in this edition of Clinical Ethics, Hallowell and Lawton raise many issues relating to the way that qualitative research is treated by RECs in the UK. In this paper I discuss just three key topics stimulated by their paper: the way that methodology relates to ethics, the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  18
    John C. Avise (1979). Considerations on the Evolution of Qualitative Multistate Traits. Acta Biotheoretica 28 (3):190-203.
    Simple models for the evolution of qualitative multistate traits are considered, in which the traits are permitted to evolve in time-dependent versus speciation-dependent fashion. Of particular interest are the means and variances of distances for these traits in evolutionary phylads characterized by different rates of speciation, when alternative characters are neutral with respect to fitness, and when the total number of observable characters is limited to small values. As attainable character states are increasingly restricted, mean distance (D) in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  4
    M. Aase, J. E. Nordrehaug & K. Malterud (2008). “If You Cannot Tolerate That Risk, You Should Never Become a Physician”: A Qualitative Study About Existential Experiences Among Physicians. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):767-771.
    Background and objectives: Physicians are exposed to matters of existential character at work, but little is known about the personal impact of such issues.Methods: To explore how physicians experience and cope with existential aspects of their clinical work and how such experiences affect their professional identities, a qualitative study using individual semistructured interviews has analysed accounts of their experiences related to coping with such challenges. Analysis was by systematic text condensation. The purposeful sample comprised 10 physicians , aged (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  4
    Christopher J. Schroll & Richard J. Kenney (1997). Public Virtue: A Focus for Editorializing About Political Character. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (1):36 – 50.
    This article argues that afirm and consistent editorial focus on a poilitician's public virtue would serve well as the essence of journalistic communication about piitical character. Public virtue is defined as the ethical character traits attributed to a politician by an editorialist, based on direct obsemation, of the politician's words and deeds, broadly construed. After presenting the theoretical foundation of this definition, via qualitative case-study methodology, this essay analyzes the editorial claims made in the Atlanta newspapers about (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Ali Dehghani, Leili Mosalanejad & Nahid Dehghan-Nayeri (2015). Factors Affecting Professional Ethics in Nursing Practice in Iran: A Qualitative Study. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-7.
    BackgroundProfessional ethics refers to the use of logical and consistent communication, knowledge, clinical skills, emotions and values in nursing practice. This study aimed to explore and describe factors that affect professional ethics in nursing practice in Iran.MethodsThis qualitative study was conducted using conventional content analysis approach. Thirty nurses with at least 5 years of experience participated in the study; they were selected using purposive sampling. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using thematic analysis.ResultsAfter encoding and classifying (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Madonna Murphy (2002). Character Education in America's Blue Ribbon Schools: Best Practices for Meeting the Challenge. R&L Education.
    Character Education in America's Blue Ribbon Schools is based upon descriptive, documentary, and qualitative research conducted on the award winning school applications in the United Stated Department of Education's Elementary School Recognition Program, i.e. the Blue Ribbon Schools. The purpose of the program is to focus national attention on schools that are doing an exceptional job with all of their students. Areas studied are developing a solid foundation of basic skills and knowledge of subject matter and fostering the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Stephen L. White (1986). Curse of the Qualia. Synthese 68 (August):333-68.
    In this paper I distinguish three alternatives to the functionalist account of qualitative states such as pain. The physicalist-functionalist holds that (1) there could be subjects functionally equivalent to us whose mental states differed in their qualitative character from ours, (2) there could be subjects functionally equivalent to us whose mental states lacked qualitative character altogether and (3) there could not be subjects like us in all objective respects whose qualitative states differed from ours. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  23. David M. Rosenthal (2004). Subjective Character and Reflexive Content. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (1):191-198.
    I. Zombies and the Knowledge Argument John Perry.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  5
    Benjamin D. Young (2014). Smelling Phenomenal. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Qualitative-consciousness arises at the sensory level of olfactory processing and pervades our experience of smells to the extent that qualitative character is maintained whenever we are aware of undergoing an olfactory experience. Building upon the distinction between Access and Phenomenal Consciousness the paper offers a nuanced distinction between Awareness and Qualitative-consciousness that is applicable to olfaction in a manner that is conceptual precise and empirically viable. Mounting empirical research is offered substantiating the applicability of the distinction (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  3
    Fernando Charro & Juan J. Colomina (2014). Points of View Beyond Models: Towards a Formal Approach to Points of View as Access to the World. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 19 (2):137-151.
    According to Vázquez and Liz (Found Sci 16(4): 383–391, 2011), Points of View (PoV) can be considered in two different ways. On the one hand, they can be explained following the model of propositional attitudes. This model assumes that the internal structure of a PoV is constituted by a subject, a set of contents, and a set of relations between the subject and those contents. On the other hand, we can analyze points of view taking as a model the notions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26. Galen Strawson (1994). Mental Reality. MIT Press.
    Introduction -- A default position -- Experience -- The character of experience -- Understanding-experience -- A note about dispositional mental states -- Purely experiential content -- An account of four seconds of thought -- Questions -- The mental and the nonmental -- The mental and the publicly observable -- The mental and the behavioral -- Neobehaviorism and reductionism -- Naturalism in the philosophy of mind -- Conclusion: The three questions -- Agnostic materialism, part 1 -- Monism -- The linguistic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   94 citations  
  27.  36
    Frank Arntzenius & Cian Dorr (forthcoming). Self-Locating Priors and Cosmological Measures. In Khalil Chamcham, John Barrow, Simon Saunders & Joe Silk (eds.), The Philosophy of Cosmology. Cambridge University Press
    We develop a Bayesian framework for thinking about the way evidence about the here and now can bear on hypotheses about the qualitative character of the world as a whole, including hypotheses according to which the total population of the world is infinite. We show how this framework makes sense of the practice cosmologists have recently adopted in their reasoning about such hypotheses.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. John M. Doris (2002). Lack of Character: Personality and Moral Behavior. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a provocative contribution to contemporary ethical theory challenging foundational conceptions of character that date back to Aristotle. John Doris draws on behavioral science, especially social psychology, to argue that we misattribute the causes of behavior to personality traits and other fixed aspects of character rather than to the situational context. More often than not it is the situation not the nature of the personality that really counts. The author elaborates the philosophical consequences of this research (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   180 citations  
  29. Katalin Balog (2009). Phenomenal Concepts. In Brian McLaughlin, Ansgar Beckermann & Sven Walter (eds.), Oxford Handbook in the Philosophy of Mind. Oxford University Press 292--312.
    This article is about the special, subjective concepts we apply to experience, called “phenomenal concepts”. They are of special interest in a number of ways. First, they refer to phenomenal experiences, and the qualitative character of those experiences whose metaphysical status is hotly debated. Conscious experience strike many philosophers as philosophically problematic and difficult to accommodate within a physicalistic metaphysics. Second, PCs are widely thought to be special and unique among concepts. The sense that there is something special (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  30.  15
    Kati Balog (2009). Phenomenal Concepts. In Brian McLaughlin, Ansgar Beckermann & Sven Walter (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mind. OUP Oxford
    This article is about the special, subjective concepts we apply to experience, called “phenomenal concepts”. They are of special interest in a number of ways. First, they refer to phenomenal experiences, and the qualitative character of those experiences whose metaphysical status is hotly debated. Conscious experience strike many philosophers as philosophically problematic and difficult to accommodate within a physicalistic metaphysics. Second, PCs are widely thought to be special and unique among concepts. The sense that there is something special (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  31. David M. Rosenthal (2002). How Many Kinds of Consciousness? Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):653-665.
    Ned BlockÕs influential distinction between phenomenal and access consciousness has become a staple of current discussions of consciousness. It is not often noted, however, that his distinction tacitly embodies unargued theoretical assumptions that favor some theoretical treatments at the expense of others. This is equally so for his less widely discussed distinction between phenomenal consciousness and what he calls reflexive consciousness. I argue that the distinction between phenomenal and access consciousness, as Block draws it, is untenable. Though mental states that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  32.  72
    Murat Aydede (2014). How to Unify Theories of Sensory Pleasure: An Adverbialist Proposal. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (1):119-133.
    A lot of qualitatively very different sensations can be pleasant or unpleasant. The Felt-Quality Views that conceive of sensory affect as having an introspectively available common phenomenology or qualitative character face the “heterogeneity problem” of specifying what that qualitative common phenomenology is. In contrast, according to the Attitudinal Views, what is common to all pleasant or unpleasant sensations is that they are all “wanted” or “unwanted” in a certain sort of way. The commonality is explained not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33. Uriah Kriegel (2002). Phenomenal Content. Erkenntnis 57 (2):175-198.
    This paper defends a version of Sheomaker-style representationalism about qualitative character.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  34. Hilan Bensusan & Eros de Carvalho (2011). Qualia Qua Qualitons: Mental Qualities as Abstract Particulars. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 26 (2):155-163.
    In this paper we advocate the thesis that qualia are tropes (or qualitons), and not (universal) properties. The main advantage of the thesis is that we can accept both the Wittgensteinian and Sellarsian assault on the given and the claim that only subjective and private states can do justice to the qualitative character of experience. We hint that if we take qualia to be tropes, we dissolve the problem of inverted qualia. We develop an account of sensory concept (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  5
    Gary Hatfield (2009). On Perceptual Constancy. In Perception and Cognition: Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology. Clarendon Press 178-211.
    This chapter reconsiders the notion of perceptual constancy from the ground up. It distinguishes the phenomenology of perceptual constancy and stability from a functional characterization of perception as aiming at full constancy. Drawing on this distinction, we can attend to the phenomenology of constancy itself, and ask to what extent human perceivers attain constancy, as usually defined. Within this phenomenology, I distinguish phenomenal presentations of spatial features and color properties from categorizations, conceptualizations, and judgments that underlie verbal (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  36. Galen Strawson (1999). Realistic Materialist Monism. In S. Hameroff, A. Kaszniak & D. Chalmers (eds.), Towards a Science of Consciousness III.
    Short version of 'Real materialism', given at Tucson III Conference, 1998. (1) physicalism is true (2) the qualitative character of experience is real, as most naively understood ... so (3) the qualitative character of experience (considered specifically as such) is wholly physical. ‘How can consciousness possibly be physical, given what we know about the physical?’ To ask this question is already to have gone wrong. We have no good reason (as Priestley and Russell and others observe) (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  37. Amy Kind (2007). Restrictions on Representationalism. Philosophical Studies 134 (3):405-427.
    According to representationalism, the qualitative character of our phenomenal mental states supervenes on the intentional content of such states. Strong representationalism makes a further claim: the qualitative character of our phenomenal mental states _consists in_ the intentional content of such states. Although strong representationalism has greatly increased in popularity over the last decade, I find the view deeply implausible. In what follows, I will attempt to argue against strong representationalism by a two-step argument. First, I suggest (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  38.  38
    Timothy Schroeder & Ben Caplan (2007). On the Content of Experience. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):590–611.
    The intentionalist about consciousness holds that the qualitative character of experience.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  39.  41
    Anthony Peressini (2013). Consciousness as Integrated Information: A Provisional Philosophical Critique. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (1-2):180-206.
    Giulio Tononi (2008) has offered his integrated information theory of consciousness (IITC) as a “provisional manifesto.” I critically examine how the approach fares. I point out some (relatively) internal concerns with the theory and then more broadly philosophical ones; finally I assess the prospects for IITC as a fundamental theory of consciousness. I argue that the IITC’s scientific promise does carry over to a significant extent to broader philosophical theorizing about qualia and consciousness, though not as directly as Tononi suggests, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  47
    Tom McClelland (2013). The Neo-Russellian Ignorance Hypothesis: A Hybrid Account of Phenomenal Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (3-4):125 - 151.
    We have reason to believe that phenomenal properties are nothing over and above certain physical properties. However, doubt is cast on this by the apparent epistemic gap that arises for attempts to account for phenomenal properties in physical terms. I argue that the epistemic gap should be divided into two more fundamental conceptual gaps. The first of these pertains to the distinctive subjectivity of phenomenal states, and the second pertains to the intrinsicality of phenomenal qualities. Stoljars ignorance hypothesis (IH) attempts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  80
    Galen Strawson (1989). Red and 'Red'. Synthese 78 (February):193-232.
    THIS PAPER ARGUES FOR THE CLAIM THAT ALTHOUGH COLOUR WORDS LIKE 'RED' ARE, ESSENTIALLY, 'PHENOMENAL-QUALITY' WORDS—I.E., WORDS FOR PROPERTIES WHOSE WHOLE AND ESSENTIAL NATURE CAN BE AND IS FULLY REVEALED IN SENSORY EXPERIENCE, GIVEN ONLY THE QUALITATIVE CHARACTER THAT THAT EXPERIENCE HAS—STILL 'RED' CANNOT BE SUPPOSED TO BE A WORD THAT PICKS OUT OR DENOTES ANY PARTICULAR PHENOMENAL QUALITY. THE ARGUMENT RESTS ESSENTIALLY ON THE SUPPOSITION, OFTEN DISCUSSED UNDER THE HEADING OF THE 'COLOR-SPECTRUM INVERSION ARGUMENT', THAT TWO PEOPLE (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  42.  13
    Donovan Wishon (2012). Perceptual Aquaintance and Informational Content. In Miguens & Preyer (eds.), Consciousness and Subjectivity. Ontos Verlag 47--89.
    Many currently working on a Russellian notion of perceptual acquaintance and its role in perceptual experience (including Campbell 2002a, 2002b, and 2009 and Tye 2009) treat naïve realism and indirect realism as an exhaustive disjunction of possible views. In this paper, I propose a form of direct realism according to which one is directly aware of external objects and their features without perceiving a mind-dependent intermediary and without making any inference. Nevertheless, it also maintains that the qualitative character (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Uriah Kriegel (2007). Consciousness: Phenomenal Consciousness, Access Consciousness, and Scientific Practice. In Paul R. Thagard (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophy of Psychology and Cognitive Science. Elsevier
    Key Terms: Phenomenal consciousness, access consciousness, qualitative character, subjective character, intransitive self-consciousness, disposition, categorical basis, subliminal perception, blindsight.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Jonathan Waskan (2011). A Vehicular Theory of Corporeal Qualia (a Gift to Computationalists). Philosophical Studies 152 (1):103 - 125.
    I have argued elsewhere that non-sentential representations that are the close kin of scale models can be, and often are, realized by computational processes. I will attempt here to weaken any resistance to this claim that happens to issue from those who favor an across-the-board computational theory of cognitive activity. I will argue that embracing the idea that certain computers harbor nonsentential models gives proponents of the computational theory of cognition the means to resolve the conspicuous disconnect between the sentential (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Richard Brown (2007). The Mark of the Mental. Southwest Philosophy Review 23 (1):117-124.
    The idea that there is something that it is like to have a thought is gaining acceptance in the philosophical community and has been argued for recently by several philosophers. Now, within this camp there is a debate about which component of the, say, the belief, is qualitative? Is the qualitative component part of the content of the belief, or part of the mental attitude that we take towards the content? Some argue that the qualitative character (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  85
    Eric Marcus (2006). Intentionalism and the Imaginability of the Inverted Spectrum. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (224):321-339.
    There has been much written in recent years about whether a pair of subjects could have visual experiences that represented the colors of objects in their environment in precisely the same way, despite differing significantly in what it was like to undergo them, differing that is, in their qualitative character. The possibility of spectrum inversion has been so much debated1 in large part because of the threat that it would pose to the more general doctrine of Intentionalism, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47.  26
    Robert Clowes (2007). A Self-Regulation Model of Inner Speech and its Role in the Organisation of Human Conscious Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (7):59-71.
    This paper argues for the importance of inner speech in a proper understanding of the structure of human conscious experience. It reviews one recent attempt to build a model of inner speech based on a grammaticization model (Steels, 2003) and compares it with a self-regulation model here proposed. This latter model is located within the broader literature on the role of language in cognition and the inner voice in consciousness. I argue that this role is not limited (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48.  71
    Austen Clark (1985). Spectrum Inversion and the Color Solid. Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):431-43.
    The possibility that what looks red to me may look green to you has traditionally been known as "spectrum inversion." This possibility is thought to create difficulties for any attempt to define mental states in terms of behavioral dispositions or functional roles. If spectrum inversion is possible, then it seems that two perceptual states may have identical functional antecedents and effects yet differ in their qualitative content. In that case the qualitative character of the states could not (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  49. Katalin Balog (2008). Review of Torin Alter, Sven Walter , Phenomenal Concepts and Phenomenal Knowledge: New Essays on Consciousness and Physicalism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).
    The book under review is a collection of thirteen essays on the nature phenomenal concepts and the ways in which phenomenal concepts figure in debates over physicalism. Phenomenal concepts are of special interest in a number of ways. First, they refer to phenomenal experiences, and the qualitative character of those experiences whose metaphysical status is hotly debated. There are recent arguments, originating in Descartes’ famous conceivability argument, that purport to show that phenomenal experience is irreducibly non-physical. Second, phenomenal (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Dimitria Electra Gatzia (2008). Martian Colours. Philosophical Writings 37.
    Developmental synesthesia typically involves either the stimulation of one sensory modality which gives rise to an experience in a different modality (when a sound, for example, evokes a colour) or the stimulation of a single sensory modality giving rise to different qualitative aspects of experience (when the sight of a number, for example, evokes a colour). These occurrences seem to support Grice’s (1989) argument that sense modalities cannot be individuated without reference to the introspective-character of experience. This, however, (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000