Search results for 'quantified modal logic' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrea Iacona (forthcoming). Ockhamism and Quantified Modal Logic. Logique Et Analyse.score: 720.0
    This paper outlines a formal account of tensed sentences that is consistent with Ockhamism, a view according to which future contingents are either true or false. The account outlined substantively differs from the attempts that have been made so far to provide a formal apparatus for such a view in terms of some expressly modified version of branching time semantics. The system on which it is based is the simplest quantified modal logic.
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  2. Bartosz Więckowski (2010). Associative Substitutional Semantics and Quantified Modal Logic. Studia Logica 94 (1):105 - 138.score: 672.0
    The paper presents an alternative substitutional semantics for first-order modal logic which, in contrast to traditional substitutional (or truth-value) semantics, allows for a fine-grained explanation of the semantical behavior of the terms from which atomic formulae are composed. In contrast to denotational semantics, which is inherently reference-guided, this semantics supports a non-referential conception of modal truth and does not give rise to the problems which pertain to the philosophical interpretation of objectual domains (concerning, e.g., possibilia or trans-world (...)
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  3. Geir Waagbø & G. Waagbø (1992). Quantified Modal Logic with Neighborhood Semantics. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 38 (1):491-499.score: 639.0
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  4. Yannis Stephanou (2002). Investigations Into Quantified Modal Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 43 (4):193-220.score: 633.0
    In this paper, I investigate a system of quantified modal logic, due in many respects to Bressan (see [2]), from several perspectives -- both semantic and proof-theoretic. As Anderson and Belnap note in [1]: "It seems to be generally conceded that formal systems are natural or substantial if they can be looked at from several points of view. We tend to think of systems as artificial or ad hoc if most of their formal properties arise from some (...)
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  5. Phillip Bricker (1989). Quantified Modal Logic and the Plural De Re. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 14 (1):372-394.score: 624.0
    Modal sentences of the form "every F might be G" and "some F must be G" have a threefold ambiguity. in addition to the familiar readings "de dicto" and "de re", there is a third reading on which they are examples of the "plural de re": they attribute a modal property to the F's plurally in a way that cannot in general be reduced to an attribution of modal properties to the individual F's. The plural "de re" (...)
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  6. James W. Garson (2005). Unifying Quantified Modal Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 34 (5/6):621 - 649.score: 549.0
    Quantified modal logic (QML) has reputation for complexity. Completeness results for the various systems appear piecemeal. Different tactics are used for different systems, and success of a given method seems sensitive to many factors, including the specific combination of choices made for the quantifiers, terms, identity, and the strength of the underlying propositional modal logic. The lack of a unified framework in which to view QMLs and their completeness properties puts pressure on those who develop, (...)
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  7. Thomas J. McKay (1975). Essentialism in Quantified Modal Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 4 (4):423 - 438.score: 549.0
    This paper mentions several different sorts of "essentialism," and examines various senses in which quantified modal logic is "committed to" the most troublesome kind of essentialism. It is argued that essentialism is neither provable, Nor entailed by any contingently true non-Modal sentence. But quantified modal logic is committed to the meaningfulness of essentialism. This sort of commitment may be made innocuous by requiring that essentialism simply be made logically false; some of the consequences (...)
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  8. John Woods (1973). Descriptions, Essences and Quantified Modal Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 2 (2):304 - 321.score: 549.0
    Could one give expression to a doctrine of essentialism without running afoul of semantical problems that are alleged to beggar systems of quantified modal logic? An affirmative answer is, I believe, called for at least in the case of individual essentialism. Individual essentialism is an ontological thesis concerning a kind of necessary connection between objects and their (essential) properties. It is not or anyhow not primarily a semantic thesis, a thesis about meanings, for example. And thus we (...)
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  9. Bernard Linsky & Edward N. Zalta (1994). In Defense of the Simplest Quantified Modal Logic. Philosophical Perspectives 8 (Logic and Language):431-458.score: 540.0
    The simplest quantified modal logic combines classical quantification theory with the propositional modal logic K. The models of simple QML relativize predication to possible worlds and treat the quantifier as ranging over a single fixed domain of objects. But this simple QML has features that are objectionable to actualists. By contrast, Kripke-models, with their varying domains and restricted quantifiers, seem to eliminate these features. But in fact, Kripke-models also have features to which actualists object. Though (...)
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  10. David Efird (2009). Divine Command Theory and the Semantics of Quantified Modal Logic. In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave Macmillan. 91.score: 540.0
    I offer a series of axiomatic formalizations of Divine Command Theory motivated by certain methodological considerations. Given these considerations, I present what I take to be the best axiomatization of Divine Command Theory, an axiomatization which requires a non-standardsemantics for quantified modal logic.
     
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  11. Veikko Rantala (1982). Quantified Modal Logic: Non-Normal Worlds and Propositional Attitudes. Studia Logica 41 (1):41 - 65.score: 492.0
    One way to obtain a comprehensive semantics for various systems of modal logic is to use a general notion of non-normal world. In the present article, a general notion of modal system is considered together with a semantic framework provided by such a general notion of non-normal world. Methodologically, the main purpose of this paper is to provide a logical framework for the study of various modalities, notably prepositional attitudes. Some specific systems are studied together with semantics (...)
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  12. Anil Gupta (1980). The Logic of Common Nouns: An Investigation in Quantified Modal Logic. Yale University Press.score: 490.0
     
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  13. Christopher Menzel (1993). Singular Propositions and Modal Logic. Philosophical Topics 21 (2):113-148.score: 480.0
    According to many actualists, propositions, singular propositions in particular, are structurally complex, that is, roughly, (i) they have, in some sense, an internal structure that corresponds rather directly to the syntactic structure of the sentences that express them, and (ii) the metaphysical components, or constituents, of that structure are the semantic values — the meanings — of the corresponding syntactic components of those sentences. Given that reference is "direct", i.e., that the meaning of a name is its denotation, an apparent (...)
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  14. Thomas Jager (1982). An Actualistic Semantics for Quantified Modal Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 23 (3):335-349.score: 459.0
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  15. Kit Fine (1979). Failures of the Interpolation Lemma in Quantified Modal Logic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 44 (2):201-206.score: 459.0
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  16. C. Smoryński (1987). Quantified Modal Logic and Self-Reference. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 28 (3):356-370.score: 459.0
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  17. Philip Kremer (forthcoming). Quantified Modal Logic on the Rational Line. The Review of Symbolic Logic:1-16.score: 459.0
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  18. Saul A. Kripke (1983). Review: Kit Fine, Failures of the Interpolation Lemma in Quantified Modal Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 48 (2):486-488.score: 459.0
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  19. Carlos Areces, Patrick Blackburn & Maarten Marx (2003). Repairing the Interpolation Theorem in Quantified Modal Logic. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 124 (1-3):287-299.score: 459.0
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  20. Giovanna Corsi (1988). Quantified Modal Logic With Rigid Terms. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 34 (3):251-259.score: 459.0
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  21. Frank Vlach (1983). Review: Anil Gupta, The Logic of Common Nouns. An Investigation in Quantified Modal Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 48 (2):500-501.score: 459.0
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  22. David K. Lewis (1968). Counterpart Theory and Quantified Modal Logic. Journal of Philosophy 65 (5):113-126.score: 450.0
  23. Terence Parsons (1969). Essentialism and Quantified Modal Logic. Philosophical Review 78 (1):35-52.score: 450.0
  24. David Lewis (1993). Counterpart Theory, Quantified Modal Logic, and Extra Argument Places. Analysis 53 (2):69-71.score: 450.0
  25. Nicholas Rescher & Zane Parks (1973). Possible Individuals, Trans-World Identity, and Quantified Modal Logic. Noûs 7 (4):330-350.score: 450.0
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  26. Kai Yee Wong, Rigid Designation, Existence and Semantics for Quantified Modal Logic.score: 450.0
    In an English article (‘On Expressions’) Professor Shen Youding writes, ‘the meaning of a name is not the object which is mentioned by means of it’ (Shen 1992: 11). This remark touches on a big issue that has divided contemporary philosophers of language. On the one side is the Millian (after J.S. Mill), who maintains that the semantic value of a name is the object which it designates, denotes, or refers to (as I use them here, these three terms are (...)
     
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  27. Terence Parsons (1967). Grades of Essentialism in Quantified Modal Logic. Noûs 1 (2):181-191.score: 450.0
  28. Paul Gochet Et Eric Gillet (1999). Quantified Modal Logic, Dynamic Semantics and S 5. Dialectica 53 (3-4):243–251.score: 450.0
  29. Zane Parks (1976). Investigations Into Quantified Modal Logic-I. Studia Logica 35 (2):109 - 125.score: 450.0
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  30. Alessandro Torza (2007). An Interpretive Independence-Friendly Quantified Modal Logic. In Michal Pelis (ed.), The LOGICA Yearbook 2007. Filosofia. Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.score: 450.0
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  31. W. Stephen Croddy (1988). Quine Against Essentialism and Quantified Modal Logic. Logique Et Analyse 31 (123-124):317-328.score: 450.0
     
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  32. Paul Gochet & Eric Gillet (1999). Quantified Modal Logic, Dynamic Semantics and S 5. Dialectica 53 (3‐4):243-251.score: 450.0
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  33. M. Perrick & H. de Swart (1993). Quantified Modal Logic, Reference and Essentialism. Logique Et Analyse 143 (143-144):219-231.score: 450.0
     
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  34. Tushar K. Sarkar (1981). Some Proposed Cures for the Maladies of Quantified Modal Logic: A Critical Survey. In Krishna Roy (ed.), Mind, Language, and Necessity. Macmillan India.score: 450.0
     
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  35. David Basin, Seán Matthews & Luca Viganò (1998). Labelled Modal Logics: Quantifiers. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 7 (3):237-263.score: 448.0
    In previous work we gave an approach, based on labelled natural deduction, for formalizing proof systems for a large class of propositional modal logics that includes K, D, T, B, S4, S4.2, KD45, and S5. Here we extend this approach to quantified modal logics, providing formalizations for logics with varying, increasing, decreasing, or constant domains. The result is modular with respect to both properties of the accessibility relation in the Kripke frame and the way domains of individuals (...)
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  36. R. Jones (2013). Robert Goldblatt. Quantifiers, Propositions and Identity: Admissible Semantics for Quantified Modal and Substructural Logics. Lecture Notes in Logic; 38. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Isbn 978-1-107-01052-9. Pp. XIII + 282. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 21 (1):123-127.score: 435.0
  37. Christopher Menzel (1991). The True Modal Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 20 (4):331 - 374.score: 399.0
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  38. Tim Fernando (1999). A Modal Logic for Non-Deterministic Discourse Processing. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 8 (4):445-468.score: 390.0
    A modal logic for translating a sequence of English sentences to a sequence of logical forms is presented, characterized by Kripke models with points formed from input/output sequences, and valuations determined by entailment relations. Previous approaches based (to one degree or another) on Quantified Dynamic Logic are embeddable within it. Applications to presupposition and ambiguity are described, and decision procedures and axiomatizations supplied.
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  39. Giovanna Corsi (2002). A Unified Completeness Theorem for Quantified Modal Logics. Journal of Symbolic Logic 67 (4):1483-1510.score: 389.0
    A general strategy for proving completeness theorems for quantified modal logics is provided. Starting from free quantified modal logic K, with or without identity, extensions obtained either by adding the principle of universal instantiation or the converse of the Barcan formula or the Barcan formula are considered and proved complete in a uniform way. Completeness theorems are also shown for systems with the extended Barcan rule as well as for some quantified extensions of the (...)
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  40. Wiebe Van Der Hoek & Maarten De Rijke (1993). Generalized Quantifiers and Modal Logic. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 2 (1):19-58.score: 388.3
    We study several modal languages in which some (sets of) generalized quantifiers can be represented; the main language we consider is suitable for defining any first order definable quantifier, but we also consider a sublanguage thereof, as well as a language for dealing with the modal counterparts of some higher order quantifiers. These languages are studied both from a modal logic perspective and from a quantifier perspective. Thus the issues addressed include normal forms, expressive power, completeness (...)
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  41. Wiebe Hoek & Maarten Rijke (1993). Generalized Quantifiers and Modal Logic. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 2 (1):19-58.score: 388.3
    We study several modal languages in which some (sets of) generalized quantifiers can be represented; the main language we consider is suitable for defining any first order definable quantifier, but we also consider a sublanguage thereof, as well as a language for dealing with the modal counterparts of some higher order quantifiers. These languages are studied both from a modal logic perspective and from a quantifier perspective. Thus the issues addressed include normal forms, expressive power, completeness (...)
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  42. Walter Dean (2014). Montague's Paradox, Informal Provability, and Explicit Modal Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 55 (2):157-196.score: 354.0
    The goal of this paper is to explore the significance of Montague’s paradox—that is, any arithmetical theory $T\supseteq Q$ over a language containing a predicate $P(x)$ satisfying (T) $P(\ensuremath {\ulcorner \varphi \urcorner })\rightarrow \varphi $ and (Nec) $T\vdash \varphi \,\therefore\,T\vdash P(\ensuremath {\ulcorner \varphi \urcorner })$ is inconsistent—as a limitative result pertaining to the notions of formal, informal, and constructive provability, in their respective historical contexts. To this end, the paradox is reconstructed in a quantified extension $\mathcal {QLP}$ (the (...) logic of proofs) of Artemov’s logic of proofs ($\mathcal {LP}$). $\mathcal {QLP}$ contains both explicit modalities $t:\varphi $ (“$t$ is a proof of $\varphi $”) and also proof quantifiers $(\exists x)x:\varphi $ (“there exists a proof of $\varphi $”). In this system, the basis for the rule NEC is decomposed into a number of distinct principles governing how various modes of reasoning about proofs and provability can be internalized within the system itself. A conceptually motivated resolution to the paradox is proposed in the form of an argument for rejecting the unrestricted rule NEC on the basis of its subsumption of an intuitively invalid principle pertaining to the interaction of proof quantifiers and the proof-theorem relation expressed by explicit modalities. (shrink)
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  43. Robert Goldblatt (2011). Quantifiers, Propositions, and Identity: Admissible Semantics for Quantified Modal and Substructural Logics. Cambridge University Press.score: 343.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction and overview; 1. Logics with actualist quantifiers; 2. The Barcan formulas; 3. The existence predicate; 4. Propositional functions and predicate substitution; 5. Identity; 6. Cover semantics for relevant logic; References; Index.
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  44. James W. Garson (2006). Modal Logic for Philosophers. Cambridge University Press.score: 340.0
    Designed for use by philosophy students, this book provides an accessible, yet technically sound treatment of modal logic and its philosophical applications. Every effort has been made to simplify the presentation by using diagrams in place of more complex mathematical apparatus. These and other innovations provide philosophers with easy access to a rich variety of topics in modal logic, including a full coverage of quantified modal logic, non-rigid designators, definite descriptions, and the de-re (...)
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  45. Hanoch Ben-Yami (2014). The Quantified Argument Calculus. Review of Symbolic Logic 7 (1):120-146.score: 321.0
    I develop a formal logic in which quantified arguments occur in argument positions of predicates. This logic also incorporates negative predication, anaphora and converse relation terms, namely, additional syntactic features of natural language. In these and additional respects, it represents the logic of natural language more adequately than does any version of Frege’s Predicate Calculus. I first introduce the system’s main ideas and familiarize it by means of translations of natural language sentences. I then develop a (...)
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  46. Balder ten Cate (2006). Expressivity of Second Order Propositional Modal Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 35 (2):209-223.score: 313.3
    We consider second-order propositional modal logic (SOPML), an extension of the basic modal language with propositional quantifiers introduced by Kit Fine in 1970. We determine the precise expressive power of SOPML by giving analogues of the Van Benthem–Rosen theorem and the Goldblatt Thomason theorem. Furthermore, we show that the basic modal language is the bisimulation invariant fragment of SOPML, and we characterize the bounded fragment of first-order logic as being the intersection of first-order logic (...)
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  47. H. Kushida & M. Okada (2003). A Proof-Theoretic Study of the Correspondence of Classical Logic and Modal Logic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 68 (4):1403-1414.score: 306.0
    It is well known that the modal logic S5 can be embedded in the classical predicate logic by interpreting the modal operator in terms of a quantifier. Wajsberg [10] proved this fact in a syntactic way. Mints [7] extended this result to the quantified version of S5; using a purely proof-theoretic method he showed that the quantified S5 corresponds to the classical predicate logic with one-sorted variable. In this paper we extend Mints' result (...)
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  48. Manuel Perez Otero (1996). Verdad Necesaria Versus Teorema de Lógica Modal (Necessary Truth Versus Theorem of Modal Logic). Theoria 11 (1):185-201.score: 300.0
    En este artículo discuto el supuesto compromiso de la lógica modal cuantificada con el esencialismo. Entre otros argumentos, Quine, el más emblemático de los críticos de la modalidad, ha objetado a la lógica modal cuantificada que ésta se compromete con una doctrina filosófica usualmente considerada sospechosa, el esencialismo: la concepción que distingue, de entre los atributos de una cosa, aquellos que le son esenciales de otros poseidos sólo contingentemente. Examino en qué medida Quine puede tener razón sobre ese (...)
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  49. Timothy Williamson (2013). Modal Logic as Metaphysics. Oup Oxford.score: 300.0
    Timothy Williamson gives an original and provocative treatment of deep metaphysical questions about existence, contingency, and change, using the latest resources of quantified modal logic. Contrary to the widespread assumption that logic and metaphysics are disjoint, he argues that modal logic provides a structural core for metaphysics.
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  50. Manuel Perez Otero (1996). Verdad necesaria versus teorema de lógica modal (Necessary Truth versus Theorem of Modal Logic). Theoria 11 (1):185-201.score: 300.0
    En este artículo discuto el supuesto compromiso de la lógica modal cuantificada con el esencialismo. Entre otros argumentos, Quine, el más emblemático de los críticos de la modalidad, ha objetado a la lógica modal cuantificada que ésta se compromete con una doctrina filosófica usualmente considerada sospechosa, el esencialismo: la concepción que distingue, de entre los atributos de una cosa, aquellos que le son esenciales de otros poseidos sólo contingentemente. Examino en qué medida Quine puede tener razón sobre ese (...)
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