Search results for 'reasons to live' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  43
    Kathy Behrendt (2011). Reasons to Live Versus Reasons Not to Die. Think 10 (28):67-76.
    ‘Any reason for living is an excellent reason for not dying’ (Steven Luper-Foy, 'Annihilation'). Some claims seem so clearly right that we don’t think to question them. Steven Luper-Foy’s remark is like that. It borders on the ‘trivially true’ (i.e. so obviously true as to be uninteresting). If I have a reason to live, surely I likewise have a reason not to die. It may then be surprising to learn that so many philosophers disagree with this claim—either directly or (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  88
    Instrumental Reasons, Instrumental Reasons.
    As Kant claimed in the Groundwork, and as the idea has been developed by Korsgaard 1997, Bratman 1987, and Broome 2002. This formulation is agnostic on whether reasons for ends derive from our desiring those ends, or from the relation of those ends to things of independent value. However, desire-based theorists may deny, against Hubin 1999, that their theory is a combination of a principle of instrumental transmission and the principle that reasons for ends are provided by desires. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  5
    Deryck Beyleveld (2013). Williams' False Dilemma: How to Give Categorically Binding Impartial Reasons to Real Agents. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (2):204-226.
    According to Bernard Williams, attempts to justify a categorically binding impartial principle fail because they can only establish categorically binding requirements on action by making them non-universalizable , and can only establish impartial requirements by rendering them inapplicable to real agents . But, an individual cannot be the particular agent the individual is without being an agent every bit as much as an individual cannot be an agent without being the particular agent that the individual is. On this basis, it (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. Kai F. Wehmeier (2012). How to Live Without Identity—And Why. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):761 - 777.
    Identity, we're told, is the binary relation that every object bears to itself, and to itself only. But how can a relation be binary if it never relates two objects? This puzzled Russell and led Wittgenstein to declare that identity is not a relation between objects. The now standard view is that Wittgenstein's position is untenable, and that worries regarding the relational status of identity are the result of confusion. I argue that the rejection of identity as a binary relation (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  5.  36
    Paul Teller (2011). Learning to Live with Voluntarism. Synthese 178 (1):49 - 66.
    This paper examines and finds wanting the arguments against van Fraassen's voluntarism, the view that the only constraint of rationality is consistency. Foundationalists claim that if we have no grounds or rationale for a belief or rule, rationality demands that we suspend it. But that begs the question by assuming that there have to be grounds or a rationale. Instead of asking, why should we hold a basic belief or rule, the question has to be: why should not we be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6. Chris Argyris (ed.) (2006). Reasons and Rationalizations: The Limits to Organizational Knowledge: The Limits to Organizational Knowledge. Oxford University Press Uk.
    What is the purpose of social science and management research? Do scholars/researchers have a responsibility to generate insights and knowledge that are of practical value and validity? We are told we live in turbulent and changing times, should this not provide an important opportunity for management researchers to provide understanding and guidance? Yet there is widespread concern about the efficacy of much research: These are some of the puzzles that Chris Argyris addresses in this short book. Argyris is one (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7. Jonathan Way (2013). Value and Reasons to Favour. Oxford Studies in Metaethics 8.
    This paper defends a 'fitting attitudes' view of value on which what it is for something to be good is for there to be reasons to favour that thing. The first section of the paper defends a 'linking principle' connecting reasons and value. The second and third sections argue that this principle is better explained by a fitting-attitudes view than by 'value-first' views on which reasons are explained in terms of value.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  8.  52
    Allan Gibbard (2003). Thinking How to Live. Harvard University Press.
    An original and elegant work of metaethics, this book brings a new clarity and rigor to the discussion of these tangled issues, and will significantly alter the ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   186 citations  
  9. John Stanton-Ife (2006). Resource Allocation and the Duty to Give Reasons. Health Care Analysis 14 (3):145-156.
    In a much cited phrase in the famous English ‘Child B’ case, Mr Justice Laws intimated that in life and death cases of scarce resources it is not sufficient for health care decision-makers to ‘toll the bell of tight resources’: they must also explain the system of priorities they are using. Although overturned in the Court of Appeal, the important question remains of the extent to which health-care decision-makers have a duty to give reasons for their decisions. In this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  27
    Sofia Jeppsson (forthcoming). Reasons, Determinism and the Ability to Do Otherwise. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    It has been argued that in a deterministic universe, no one has any reason to do anything. Since we ought to do what we have most reason to do, no one ought to do anything either. Firstly, it is argued that an agent cannot have reason to do anything unless she can do otherwise; secondly, that the relevant ‘can’ is incompatibilist. In this paper, I argue that even if the first step of the argument for reason incompatibilism succeeds, the second (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Neil Sinclair (2012). Promotionalism, Motivationalism and Reasons to Perform Physically Impossible Actions. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (5):647-659.
    In this paper I grant the Humean premise that some reasons for action are grounded in the desires of the agents whose reasons they are. I then consider the question of the relation between the reasons and the desires that ground them. According to promotionalism , a desire that p grounds a reason to φ insofar as A’s φing helps promote p . According to motivationalism a desire that p grounds a reason to φ insofar as it (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  12.  59
    Kurt Sylvan (2015). What Apparent Reasons Appear to Be. Philosophical Studies 172 (3):587-606.
    Many meta-ethicists have thought that rationality requires us to heed apparent normative reasons, not objective normative reasons. But what are apparent reasons? There are two kinds of standard answers. On de dicto views, R is an apparent reason for S to \ when it appears to S that R is an objective reason to \ . On de re views, R is an apparent reason for S to \ when R’s truth would constitute an objective reason for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  13.  13
    Marko Jurjako (2010). From Reasons to Norms. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):292-296.
    This is a review of Torbjorn Tannsjo's book: "From Reasons to Norms".
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  26
    John Kaler (2000). Reasons to Be Ethical: Self-Interest and Ethical Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):161 - 173.
    This paper examines the self-interested reasons that businesses can have for ethical behaviour. It distinguishes between economic and non-economic reasons and, among the latter, notes those connected with the self-esteem of managers. It offers a detailed typology of prudential reasons for ethical behaviour, laying particular stress on those to do with avoiding punishment by society for wrongdoing and, more particularly still, stresses the role of campaigning pressure groups within that particular category of reasons. It goes on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  15. James Morauta (2010). In Defence of State-Based Reasons to Intend. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 91 (2):208-228.
    A state-based reason for one to intend to perform an action F is a reason for one to intend to F which is not a reason for one to F. Are there any state-based reasons to intend? According to the Explanatory Argument, the answer is no, because state-based reasons do not satisfy a certain explanatory constraint. I argue that whether or not the constraint is correct, the Explanatory Argument is unsound, because state-based reasons do satisfy the constraint. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  3
    Maria Antonaccio (2012). A Philosophy to Live By: Engaging Iris Murdoch. OUP Usa.
    A Philosophy to Live By highlights Murdoch's distinctive conception of philosophy as a spiritual or existential practice and enlists the resources of her thought to explore a wide range of thinkers and debates at the intersections of moral philosophy, religion, art, and politics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  17. Clayton Littlejohn (2013). Are Epistemic Reasons Ever Reasons to Promote? Logos and Episteme 4 (3).
    In trying to distinguish the right kinds of reasons from the wrong, epistemologists often appeal to the connection to truth to explain why practical considerations cannot constitute reasons. The view they typically opt for is one on which only evidence can constitute a reason to believe. Talbot has shown that these approaches don’t exclude the possibility that there are non-evidential reasons for belief that can justify a belief without being evidence for that belief. He thinksthat there are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Matthew Chrisman (2005). Review of Alan Gibbard's Thinking How to Live. [REVIEW] Ethics 115 (2):406-412.
    I imagine that people will complain that the account of normative concepts defended in Gibbard’s new book makes the metaethical waters even muddier because it blurs the line between cognitivism and noncognitivism and between realism and antirealism. However, these labels are philosophic tools, and in the wake of Gibbard’s new book, one might rightly conclude that there are new and better philosophical tools emerging on the metaethical scene. The uptake of views about practical reasoning—as exhibited by planning—into debates about the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19.  93
    Christophe Malaterre (2010). On What It is to Fly Can Tell Us Something About What It is to Live. Origins of Life and Evolution of Biospheres 40 (2):169-177.
    The plurality of definitions of life is often perceived as an unsatisfying situation stemming from still incomplete knowledge about ‘what it is to live’ as well as from the existence of a variety of methods for reaching a definition. For many, such plurality is to be remedied and the search for a unique and fully satisfactory definition of life pursued. In this contribution on the contrary, it is argued that the existence of such a variety of definitions of life (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20.  27
    Morwenna Griffiths (2012). Is It Possible to Live a Philosophical, Educational Life in Education, Nowadays? Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):397-413.
    I consider if and how far it is possible to live an educational philosophical life, in the fast-changing, globalised world of Higher Education. I begin with Socrates’ account of a philosophical life in the Apology. I examine some tensions within different conceptions of what it is to do philosophy. I then go on to focus more closely on what it might be to live a philosophical, educational life in which educational processes and outcomes are influenced by philosophy, using (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  4
    Mirko D. Garasic & Andrea Lavazza (2016). Moral and Social Reasons to Acknowledge the Use of Cognitive Enhancers in Competitive-Selective Contexts. BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundAlthough some of the most radical hypothesis related to the practical implementations of human enhancement have yet to become even close to reality, the use of cognitive enhancers is a very tangible phenomenon occurring with increasing popularity in university campuses as well as in other contexts. It is now well documented that the use of cognitive enhancers is not only increasingly common in Western countries, but also gradually accepted as a normal procedure by the media as well. In fact, its (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Ted M. Preston & Scott Dixon (2007). Who Wants to Live Forever? Immortality, Authenticity, and Living Forever in the Present. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (2):99-117.
    Death is a bad thing by virtue of its ability to frustrate the subjectively valuable projects that shape our identities and render our lives meaningful. While the presumption that immortality would necessarily result in boredom worse than death proves unwarranted, if the constraint of mortality is a necessary element for virtues, relationships, and motivation to pursue our life-projects, then death might nevertheless be a necessary evil. Mortal or immortal, it’s clear that the value of one’s life depends on its subjectively (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  9
    William Isdale (2015). Are There Moral Reasons to Remember the First World War? Think 14 (41):89-97.
    2014 marked the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War. This paper considers whether there are moral reasons to remember wars. It is argued that the most convincing reason for remembering wars is that they provide valuable lessons about human nature. The First World War elucidates several aspects of human nature, including our tribalism, sheepishness, drive for honour and over-confidence. Taking heed of these lessons may help avert future conflict.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  57
    Jan Westerhoff (forthcoming). What It Means to Live in a Virtual World Generated by Our Brain. Erkenntnis:1-22.
    Recent discussions in cognitive science and the philosophy of mind have defended a theory according to which we live in a virtual world akin to a computer simulation, generated by our brain. It is argued that our brain creates a model world from a variety of stimuli; this model is perceived as if it was external and perception-independent, even though it is neither of the two. The view of the mind, brain, and world, entailed by this theory has some (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  20
    Peter Singer (1995). How Are We to Live?: Ethics in an Age of Self-Interest. Oxford University Press.
    B'Imagine that you could choose a book that everyone in the world would read. My choice would be this book.' Roger Crisp, Ethics -/- Many people have an uneasy feeling that they may be missing out on something basic that would give their lives a significance it currently lacks. But how should we live? What is there to stop us behaving selfishly? In a highly readable account which makes reference to a wide variety of sources and everyday issues, Peter (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  26. A. C. Grayling (2003). What is Good?: The Search for the Best Way to Live. Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
    In his major new book A.C. Grayling examines the different ways to live a good life, as proposed from classical antiquity to the recent present. Grayling focuses on the two very different conceptions of what a good life should be: one is a broadly secular view rooted in attitudes about human nature and the human condition; the other is a broadly transcendental view which locates the source of moral value outside the human realm. In the modern world - the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  3
    Ignaas Devisch & Kathleen Vandepute (2010). Sense, Existence and Justice, or, How to Live in a Secular World? Synthesis Philosophica 25 (1):149-160.
    It has been taken for granted that in western modernity we are dealing with a secularised world, an atheistic world where religion is no longer reigning the public sphere. In other words: a world where sense lies outside the world towards a world where sense is situated within it. If we follow the line of thought French philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy sets out in his books The Sense of the World and Dis-Enclosure, we have to think world not as what has (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. Gerald Gaus, What is Deontology?, Part Two: Reasons to Act Gerald F. Gaus.
    Part One of this essay considered familiar ways of characterizing deontology, which focus on the notions of the good and the right. Here we will take up alternative approaches, which stress the type of reasons for actions that are generated by deontological theories. Although some of these alternative conceptualizations of deontology also employ a distinction between the good and the right, all mark the basic contrast between deontology and teleology in terms of reasons to act.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  22
    Zsuzsa Baross (2008). Lessons to Live (1): Posthumous Fragments, for Jacques Derrida. Derrida Today 1 (2):247-265.
    Written as a last, long posthumous letter to Jacques Derrida, the essay turns to the philosopher's last and, for the living, most important lesson – on ‘learning to live.’ In particular, it addresses – as constitutive of his unique ‘heterodidactics’ – two discrete communications on the subject. The first, in Spectres de Marx (1993), declares the lesson to be at once impossible and necessary, that is, ‘ethics itself’; in the second, the last interview ‘Je suis en guerre contre moi-même’ (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  58
    Philip Pettit (2006). Review: On Thinking How to Live: A Cognitivist View. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (460):1083-1106.
    Allan Gibbard’s strategy in his new book is to begin by describing a psychology of thinking and planning that certain agents might instantiate, then to argue that this psychology involves an ‘expressivism’ about thought that bears on what to do, and, finally, to try to show that ascribing that same psychology to human beings would explain the way we deploy various concepts in practical and normative deliberation. The idea is to construct an imaginary normative psychology, purportedly conforming to expressivist specifications, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  3
    Yrrah H. Stol, Eva C. A. Asscher & Maartje H. N. Schermer (forthcoming). Reasons to Participate or Not to Participate in Cardiovascular Health Checks: A Review of the Literature. [REVIEW] Public Health Ethics:phv030.
    Cardiovascular health checks test risk factors for cardiovascular disease. They are offered to improve health: in case of an increased risk, participants receive lifestyle advice and medication. With this review, we investigate what is known about the reasons why people do or do not test for CVD risk factors. To what extent do these reasons relate to health monitoring and/or improvement? And do reasons differ in different contexts in which health checks are offered? We conducted a literature (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  41
    Philip Pettit (2006). On Thinking How to Live: A Cognitivist View. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (460):1083 - 1105.
    Allan Gibbard’s strategy in his new book is to begin by describing a psychology of thinking and planning that certain agents might instantiate, then to argue that this psychology involves an ‘expressivism’ about thought that bears on what to do, and, finally, to try to show that ascribing that same psychology to human beings would explain the way we deploy various concepts in practical and normative deliberation. The idea is to construct an imaginary normative psychology, purportedly conforming to expressivist specifications, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  4
    Claudemir Inacio dos Santos & Policarpo Junior (2015). Learning to live together in peace and harmony: um olhar comprometido com a formação humana // Learning to live together in peace and harmony: a look committed to human formation. Conjectura: Filosofia E Educação 20 (2):94-111.
    Viver de forma autônoma, em paz e em harmonia ainda é um estorvo para os seres humanos. O documento Learning to live together in peace and harmony, publicação conjunta da UNESCO-APNIEVE, retrata essa dificuldade e expressa os desafios políticos, econômicos, sociais, étnicos e culturais que os habitantes da região Ásia-Pacífico enfrentam para aprender a viver de maneira autônoma, pacífica e harmoniosa. O documento defende que o caminho para esse processo é mudar o modelo vigente, voltado para criar uma força (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  12
    Elizabeth Wijaya (2012). To Learn to Live with Spectral Justice: Derrida–Levinas. Derrida Today 5 (2):232-247.
    Early on in Specters of Marx, the first sentence in Exordium reads: ‘Someone, you or me, comes forward and says: I would like to learn to live finally’. In the last paragraph of the last chapter, Derrida gives the injunction: ‘If he loves justice at least, the “scholar” of the future, the “intellectual” of tomorrow should learn it and from the ghost’. The ghost is the gift Derrida leaves us, yet, what can ghosts teach us about justice and how (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  7
    T. K. Chan & G. L. Tipoe (2014). The Best Interests of Persistently Vegetative Patients: To Die Rather That to Live? Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (3):202-204.
    Adults without the capacity to make their own medical decisions have their rights protected under the Mental Capacity Act in the UK. The underlying principle of the court's decisions is the best interests test, and the evaluation of best interests is a welfare appraisal. Although the House of Lords in the well-known case of Bland held that the decision to withhold treatment for patients in a persistent vegetative state should not be based on their best interests, judges in recent cases (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  7
    Lesley McLean (2009). How Ought We To Live With Nonhuman Animals? Peter Singer's Answer: Animal Liberation Part I. Between the Species 13 (9):3.
    In this paper and the next I discuss Peter Singer’s approach to answering the question of how one ought to live with nonhuman animals. In the first paper I situate Singer’s work within the larger historical context of moral concern for animals, looking at previous public consensus on the issue, its breakdown and its re-emergence with Singer in the 1970s. In the second paper, I take a closer look at Singer’s highly influential book, Animal Liberation , and argue that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  6
    Chuck Ward & Steven Gimbel (2010). Retroductive Analogy: How to and How Not to Make Claims of Good Reasons to Believe in Evolutionary and Anti-Evolutionary Hypotheses. [REVIEW] Argumentation 24 (1):71-84.
    This paper describes an argumentative fallacy we call ‘Retroductive Analogy.’ It occurs when the ability of a favored hypothesis to explain some phenomena, together with the fact that hypotheses of a similar sort are well supported, is taken to be sufficient evidence to accept the hypothesis. This fallacy derives from the retroductive or abductive form of reasoning described by Charles Sanders Peirce. According to Peirce’s account, retroduction can provide good reasons to pursue a hypothesis but does not, by itself, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  17
    B. K. Putt (2011). Learning to Live Up to Death -- Finally: Ricoeur and Derrida on the Textuality of Immortality. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (2):239-247.
    In the ninth fragment of his posthumous work Living Up to Death , Paul Ricoeur reflects on Jacques Derrida’s final interview given to the French newspaper Le Monde just months prior to his death. Although he confesses to a genuine distanciation from Derrida regarding salient aspects of their individual memento mori , he does so within the context of significant concessions of agreement. I argue in this article that their differing positions de facto agree at a critical structural level with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  14
    Derick Wilson (2011). Unveiling the Past—Preparing the Conditions for Human Beings to Live in the Midst of One Another Again? A Response From Living in Northern Ireland. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (4):333-335.
    Unveiling the Past—Preparing the Conditions for Human Beings to Live in the Midst of One Another Again? A Response From Living in Northern Ireland Content Type Journal Article Category Symposium Pages 333-335 DOI 10.1007/s11673-011-9334-y Authors Derick Wilson, University of Ulster, School of Education, Coleraine, Co. Londonderry, BT52 1SA UK Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529 Journal Volume Volume 8 Journal Issue Volume 8, Number 4.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  13
    Norvin Richards (2010). Lives No One Should Have To Live. Social Theory and Practice 36 (3):463-477.
    Prospective parents centainly ought to avoid creating a child whose life would be so terrible that no one should have to live it. However, those who sought to avoid it would risk making a serious moral error, if their reasoning did follow a certain pattern.The error would be failure to respect autonomy, which includes a claim to judge for oneself whether one's life is worth living. I explain how this applies to a decision about whether someone is to exist (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  5
    Gernot Kamecke (2009). What is It to Live?: Critical Considerations with Regard to Badiou and Bergson Concerning Life Theory and its Language. Filozofski Vestnik.
    This essay raises a philosophical question concerning the language of Life Theory. It aims to prove the assumption that in contrast to Life Science, which today is connected to neuroscience and biotechnology, a theory that comprehends “life itself” must exceed the computerized mathematics of modern materialistic positivism. For this purpose, the conceptual possibility of such a theory is analysed from the perspective of 20th century philosophy of life. Beginning with Henri Bergson, who developed an immanent concept of life“from within itself” (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  2
    Jean-Francois Bonnefon (2007). Reasons to Act and the Mental Representation of Consequentialist Aberrations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):453-454.
    If imagination is guided by the same principles as rational thoughts, then we ought not to stop at the way people make inferences to get insights about the workings of imagination; we ought to consider as well the way they make rational choices. This broader approach accounts for the puzzling effect of reasons to act on the mutability of actions.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  7
    Lisa Coulthard (2004). Visible Violence in Kiki Smith's Life Wants to Live. Journal of Medical Humanities 25 (1):21-32.
    Recent theoretical analyses of domestic violence have posited the complicity of medical communities in erasing and obfuscating the cause of injuries. Although medical cultures have engaged in progressive initiatives to address and treat domestic violence, these medical and clinical models can render domestic violence invisible by framing the battered woman as evidentiary object. By analyzing this invisibility of domestic violence through the concept of public secrecy, in this article I consider Kiki Smith's 1982 installation piece Life Wants to Live. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  1
    Jelle L. Epker, Yorick J. De Groot & Erwin J. O. Kompanje (2013). Obtaining Consent for Organ Donation From a Competent ICU Patient Who Does Not Want to Live Anymore and Who is Dependent on Life-Sustaining Treatment; Ethically Feasible? Clinical Ethics 8 (1):29-33.
    We anticipate a further decline of patients who eventually will become brain dead. The intensive care unit (ICU) is considered a last resort for patients with severe and multiple organ dysfunction. Patients with primary central nervous system failure constitute the largest group of patients in which life-sustaining treatment is withdrawn. Almost all these patients are unconscious at the moment physicians decide to withhold and withdraw life-sustaining measures. Sometimes, however competent ICU patients state that they do not want to live (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Sam Black & Evan Tiffany (eds.) (2010). Reasons to Be Moral Revisted: Canadian Journal of Philosophy Supplementary Volume 33. University of Calgary Press.
    H.A. Prichard argued that the “why should I be moral?” question is the central subject matter of moral theory. Prichard famously claimed to have proved that all efforts to answer that question are doomed. Many contributors to this volume of contemporary papers attempt to reconstruct Prichard’s argument. They claim either explicitly or implicitly that Prichard was mistaken, and philosophy can contribute to meaningful engagement with the ‘why be moral?’ question. A theme to emerge from these papers is that arguments like (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Kate Briggs (ed.) (2012). How to Live Together: Novelistic Simulations of Some Everyday Spaces. Cup.
    In _The Preparation of the Novel_, a collection of lectures delivered at a defining moment in Roland Barthes's career, the critic spoke of his struggle to discover a different way of writing and a new approach to life. _The Neutral_ preceded this work, containing Barthes's challenge to the classic oppositions of Western thought and his effort to establish new pathways of meaning. _How to Live Together_ predates both of these achievements, a series of lectures exploring solitude and the degree (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Stephen R. L. Clark (2015). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality is a subject which has long been explored and imagined by science fiction writers. In his intriguing new study, Stephen R.L.Clark argues that the genre of science fiction writing allows investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He reveals how fantasy accounts of issues such as resurrection, disembodied survival, reincarnation and devices or drugs for preserving life can be used as an important resource for philosophical inquiry and examines how a society of immortals might (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Stephen R. L. Clark & Stephen Clark (2008). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality is a subject which has long been explored and imagined by science fiction writers. In his intriguing new study, Stephen R.L.Clark argues that the genre of science fiction writing allows investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He reveals how fantasy accounts of issues such as resurrection, disembodied survival, reincarnation and devices or drugs for preserving life can be used as an important resource for philosophical inquiry and examines how a society of immortals might (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  13
    Alexandra D. Twyman & Nora S. Newcombe (2010). Five Reasons to Doubt the Existence of a Geometric Module. Cognitive Science 34 (7):1315-1356.
    It is frequently claimed that the human mind is organized in a modular fashion, a hypothesis linked historically, though not inevitably, to the claim that many aspects of the human mind are innately specified. A specific instance of this line of thought is the proposal of an innately specified geometric module for human reorientation. From a massive modularity position, the reorientation module would be one of a large number that organized the mind. From the core knowledge position, the reorientation module (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  50. Pekka Väyrynen (2011). A Wrong Turn to Reasons? In Michael Brady (ed.), New Waves in Metaethics. Palgrave Macmillan
    This paper argues that the recent metaethical turn to reasons as the fundamental units of normativity offers no special advantage in explaining a variety of other normative and evaluative phenomena, unless perhaps a form of reductionism about reasons is adopted which is rejected by many of those who advocate turning to reasons.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000