Search results for 'recidivism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Zachary Hoskins (2014). Review: Recidivist Punishments: The Philosopher's View - Claudio Tamburrini and Jesper Ryberg (Eds.). [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (4):531-534.score: 21.0
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  2. Claudio Marcello Tamburrini, Jesper Ryberg & J. Angelo Corlett (eds.) (2011). Recidivist Punishments: The Philosopher's View. Lexington Books.score: 21.0
     
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  3. George P. Fletcher (1982). The Recidivist Premium. Criminal Justice Ethics 1 (2):54-59.score: 15.0
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  4. Kirk Torgensen, D. Chris Buttars, Seth W. Norman & Stephanie Bailey (2004). How Drug Courts Reduce Substance Abuse Recidivism. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (s4):69-72.score: 15.0
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  5. Peter Asp, Christopher Bennett, Peter Cave, J. Angelo Corlett, Richard Dagger, Michael Davis, Anthony Ellis, Thomas S. Petersen, Julian V. Roberts & Torbjörn Tännsjö (2011). Recidivist Punishments: The Philosopher's View. Lexington Books.score: 15.0
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  6. Vernon L. Quinsey (1996). Improving Decision Accuracy Where Base Rates Matter: The Prediction of Violent Recidivism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (1):37.score: 15.0
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  7. David F. Weiman (2007). Barriers to Prisoners' Reentry Into the Labor Market and the Social Costs of Recidivism. Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (2):575-611.score: 15.0
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  8. Audrey L. Anton (2006). Breaking the Habit. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):58-66.score: 6.0
  9. Susan Dimock (2013). Criminalizing Dangerousness: How to Preventively Detain Dangerous Offenders. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-24.score: 6.0
    I defend a form of preventive detention through the creation of an offence of ‘being a persistent violent dangerous offender’ (PVDO). This differs from alternative proposals and actual habitual offender laws that impose extra periods of incarceration on offenders after they have completed the sentence for their most recent crime(s) or as a result of a certain number of prior convictions (as in three strikes laws). I, instead, would make ‘being a persistent violent dangerous offender’ an offence itself. Persons to (...)
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  10. Ana Novosad & Raimundas Moisejevas (2012). Novelties of Method of Setting Fines Imposed for Infringements of the Lithuanian Law on Competition. Jurisprudence 19 (2):625-642.score: 6.0
    Imposition of sanctions for violations of competition law rules is an important instrument of the European Union (EU) and Lithuanian competition enforcement authorities and is an inevitable part of the EU and Lithuanian competition law policy. The fining policy of the Lithuanian Competition Council for breaches of the Lithuanian and EU competition rules has recently been changed by the new 2012 Government resolution and has been aligned with the 2006 Commission Guidelines on the method of setting fines. The new Lithuanian (...)
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  11. Michael Davis (1985). Just Deserts for Recidivists. Criminal Justice Ethics 4 (2):29-50.score: 5.0
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  12. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2003). Return of the Mental Image: Are There Really Pictures in the Brain? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):113-118.score: 3.0
    In the past decade there has been renewed interest in the study of mental imagery. Emboldened by new findings from neuroscience, many people have revived the idea that mental imagery involves a special format of thought, one that is pictorial in nature. But the evidence and the arguments that exposed deep conceptual and empirical problems in the picture theory over the past 300 years have not gone away. I argue that the new evidence from neural imaging and clinical neuropsychology does (...)
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  13. Richard L. Lippke (2011). Why Sex (Offending) Is Different. Criminal Justice Ethics 30 (2):151-172.score: 3.0
    The central premise is that a significant amount of sex offending stems from unusual or inappropriate sexual preferences that appear in early adolescence, are relatively stable, and immutable. In those ways, they are like more ordinary sexual preferences, generating sexual impulses that are insistent. Individuals are strongly tempted to act on them, alternatives to satisfying them are unfulfilling, and complete long-term control of such impulses is unlikely. Yet, since individuals with sexual preferences for inappropriate objects or activities are neither morally (...)
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  14. Matthew Gabriel, Cherisse Boland & Cydne Holt (2010). Beyond the Cold Hit: Measuring the Impact of the National DNA Data Bank on Public Safety at the City and County Level. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):396-411.score: 3.0
    Over the past decade, the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) has increased solvability of violent crimes by linking evidence DNA profiles to known offenders. At present, an in-depth analysis of the United States National DNA Data Bank effort has not assessed the success of this national public safety endeavor. Critics of this effort often focus on laboratory and police investigators unable to provide timely investigative support as a root cause(s) of CODIS' failure to increase public safety. By studying a group (...)
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  15. Peter Slezak (1991). Bloor's Bluff: Behaviourism and the Strong Programme. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (3):241 – 256.score: 3.0
    Abstract The accumulated case studies in the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge have been taken to establish the Strong Programme's thesis that beliefs have social causes in contradistinction to psychological ones. This externalism is essentially a commitment to the stimulus control of behaviour which was the principal tenet of orthodox Skinnerian Behaviorism. Offered as ?straight forward scientific hypotheses? these claims of social determination are asserted to be ?beyond dispute?. However, the causes of beliefs and especially their contents has also been the (...)
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  16. Deborah Mower (2009). Teaching Ethics Via Sympathy. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):51-60.score: 3.0
    Given the specific educational, psychological, and sociological factors of juvenile inmates, I developed a course to teach such students moral concepts and reasoning without high level theorizing. I combined Hume’s account of sympathy with current philosophical and psychological research to develop the students’ natural sympathy as an aid in developing emotional, contextual, and moral literacy. In this paper, I explain (1) how the course developed the students’ natural sympathy, (2) how sympathy can provide a simple and familiar process of moral (...)
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  17. Peter H. Barnett (1975). Justification and the Intelligibility of Behavior. Journal of Value Inquiry 9 (1):24-33.score: 3.0
    In trying to make sense out of our behavior, we reach a point at which we stop talking about what we did and start talking about what we wish we had done, about what we mean to do next. But we think we are still talking about our motives and intentions in what we did. How do we know when we cross the line between finding out what actually happened and ascribing to a situation what we think ought to have (...)
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  18. Walter Glannon (2014). Intervening in the Psychopath's Brain. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (1):43-57.score: 3.0
    Psychopathy is a disorder involving personality and behavioral features associated with a high rate of violent aggression and recidivism. This paper explores potential psychopharmacological therapies to modulate dysfunctional neural pathways in psychopaths and reduce the incidence of their harmful behavior, as well as the ethical and legal implications of offering these therapies as an alternative to incarceration. It also considers whether forced psychopharmacological intervention in adults and children with psychopathic traits manifesting in violent behavior can be justified. More generally, (...)
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  19. Kathleen Gill (2007). Moral Functions of Public Apologies. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:105-110.score: 3.0
    Under certain circumstances the act of apologizing has moral import. It requires a commitment to truth, adherence to moral standards, and a willingness to acknowledge and regret one's own moral failures. In this paper I examine the moral import of apologizing within the U.S. legal system and as a response to historical acts of injustice. In both of these contexts apologies are expressed in a public forum, which adds an interesting dynamic to their moral significance. Within the legal system the (...)
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  20. Lise Aagaard (2014). Chemical Castration of Danish Sex Offenders. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):117-118.score: 3.0
    Surgical castration of sex offenders has been used in several countries to prevent sexual recidivism and is still practiced in several states in the United States. In Europe, it has remained in limited use in Germany and in the Czech Republic (Douglas et al. 2013). Since the 1960s, most jurisdictions have replaced irreversible surgical castration of sex offenders with reversible chemical castration with anti-androgen drugs. In Denmark, use of surgical castration was stopped in 1970, and since the late 1980s, (...)
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  21. Brenda M. Baker (1997). Improving Our Practice of Sentencing. Utilitas 9 (01):99-.score: 3.0
    Restorative justice should have greater weight as a criterion in criminal justice sentencing practice. It permits a realistic recognition of the kinds of harm and damage caused by offences, and encourages individualized non-custodial sentencing options as ways of addressing these harms. Non-custodial sentences have proven more effective than incarceration in securing social reconciliation and preventing recidivism, and they avoid the serious social and personal costs of imprisonment. This paper argues in support of restorative justice as a guiding idea in (...)
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  22. Dan R. Dalton & Idalene F. Kesner (1988). On the Dynamics of Corporate Size and Illegal Activity: An Empirical Assessment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 7 (11):861 - 870.score: 3.0
    This research, relying on companies continuously listed on the Fortune 500 over a five-year period (n=384), provides an empirical assessment of two hypotheses. Based on 334 violations over the period the results indicate: (1) gross differences in illegal activity based on corporate size, and (2) similar differences in corporate recidivism also based on size. Discussion includes a number of size related dynamics which may account in part for such results.
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  23. Leslie C. Levin (2012). Misbehaving Lawyers: Cross-Country Comparisons. Legal Ethics 15 (2):357-377.score: 3.0
    Lawyer misbehaviour occurs in every country and regulators often struggle to address it effectively. This article looks at six case studies of disciplined lawyers in Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. It notes the similarities in the cases and to disciplined lawyers previously described in case studies in the United States. In particular, these case studies involved male lawyers predominantly working in solo or small firms who were insufficiently exposed to positive professional values early in practice. (...)
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  24. Eleanor O.’Higgins & Patrick E. Murphy (2007). When Does Business Ethics Pay - And When Doesn't It? Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:76-82.score: 3.0
    This paper examines moral misconduct and recidivism at the corporate level. We analyze the factors that facilitate moral transgressions and why some companies appear to be serial offenders. We propose that negative learning is a core process that encourages repeat misconduct. We offer a framework of negative learning, grounded in a case example. The framework also suggests circumstances that reverse the vicious selfreinforcing cycle of negative learning, so companies learn to adopt a more ethical stance when faced with moral (...)
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  25. Marinus H. Van IJzendoorn (1995). The Role of Attachment in the Development and Prevention of Sociopathy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):576-577.score: 3.0
    Mealey's sociobiological model of sociopathy could profit from attachment theory, in particular, the theory and research on the basis of the Adult Attachment Interview (Main & Goldwyn 1985–1993). Findings of an adult attachment study in a forensic psychiatric setting are summarized. Three attachment-oriented strategies for families, schools, and forensic settings are proposed to help reduce or prevent secondary sociopathy and criminal recidivism.
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  26. Ian C. Copeland (1999). Normalisation: An Analysis of Aspects of Special Educational Needs. Educational Studies 25 (1):99-111.score: 3.0
    An exploration of the governmental policy, prison works, and its attendant recidivism provides the general opening. The 1944 Education Act is then taken as furnishing the medical model of personal handicap and deficiency which informed special education at an early stage. The Warnock Report's attempt to shift considerations to educational grounds is examined with a particular focus upon the ensuing definition of special needs and its legacy in legislation following the 1981 Act to the present. Foucault's concept of normalisation (...)
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  27. Simona Mesoniene (2009). The Problem of Efficient Resocialization: Legal Regulations and Social Demands. Jurisprudence 118 (4):235-246.score: 3.0
    The predominant trends in the European prison system are population growth and overcrowding of correctional facilities. Recently, the level of criminal offences in Lithuania has been gradually increasing. Current statistics on repeated criminal offences and forecasts of recidivating crime are also pessimistic. The large number of convicts, the negative impact of isolation, the absence of a progressive correction system, the inadequacy of existing correctional measures, and the largely formal activity of penal institutions exacerbate the problems of ineffective resocialization of convicts (...)
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  28. Eleanor O'Higgins & Patrick E. Murphy (2007). When Does Business Ethics Pay-And When Doesn't It? Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:76-82.score: 3.0
    This paper examines moral misconduct and recidivism at the corporate level. We analyze the factors that facilitate moral transgressions and why some companies appear to be serial offenders. We propose that negative learning is a core process that encourages repeat misconduct. We offer a framework of negative learning, grounded in a case example. The framework also suggests circumstances that reverse the vicious selfreinforcing cycle of negative learning, so companies learn to adopt a more ethical stance when faced with moral (...)
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  29. Nick Smith, Rehabilitation.score: 3.0
    @FP= Although rehabilitation is often considered a type of punishment for criminal offenders, its objectives are therapeutic rather than punitive. While some theories of punishment claim that criminals deserve to suffer for their crimes, the rehabilitative ideal views criminal behavior more like a disease that should be treated with scientific methods available to cure the offender. Many convicts suffer from mental and physical illness, drug addiction, and limited opportunities for economic success and these problems increase the likelihood that they will (...)
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  30. Jeremy Watkins (forthcoming). Unilateral Forgiveness and the Task of Reconciliation. Res Publica:1-24.score: 3.0
    Although forgiveness is often taken to bear a close connection to the value of reconciliation, there is a good deal of scepticism about its role in situations where there is no consensus on the moral complexion of the past and no admission of guilt on the part of the perpetrator. This scepticism is typically rooted in the claims that forgiveness without perpetrator acknowledgement (1) aggravates the risk of recidivism; (2) yields a substandard and morally compromised form of political accommodation; (...)
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  31. Judith W. Decew (1987). Defending the “Private” in Constitutional Privacy. Journal of Value Inquiry 21 (3):171-184.score: 1.0
    Suppose we agree to reject the view that privacy has narrow scope and consequently is irrelevant to the constitutional privacy cases. We then have (at least) these two options: (1) We might further emphasize and draw out similarities between tort and constitutional privacy claims in order to develop a notion of privacy fundamental to informational and Fourth Amendment privacy concerns as well as the constitutional cases. We can cite examples indicating this is a promising position. Consider consenting homosexuality conducted in (...)
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  32. Ekow N. Yankah (2013). Republican Responsibility in Criminal Law. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-19.score: 1.0
    Retributivism so dominates criminal theory that lawyers, legal scholars and law students assert with complete confidence that criminal law is justified only in light of violations of another person’s rights. Yet the core tenet of retributivism views criminal law fundamentally through the lens of individual actors, rendering both offender and victim unrecognizably denuded from their social and civic context. Doing so means that retributivism is unable to explain even our most basic criminal law practices, such as why we punish recidivists (...)
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