Search results for 'referential use' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thomas D. Bontly (2005). Conversational Implicature and the Referential Use of Descriptions. Philosophical Studies 125 (1):1 - 25.score: 180.0
    This paper enters the continuing fray over the semantic significance of Donnellan’s referential/attributive distinction. Some holdthat the distinction is at bottom a pragmatic one: i.e., that the difference between the referential use and the attributive use arises at the level of speaker’s meaning rather the level of sentence-or utterance-meaning. This view has recently been challenged byMarga Reimer andMichael Devitt, both of whom argue that the fact that descriptions are regularly, that is standardly, usedto refer defeats the pragmatic approach. (...)
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  2. Michael Devitt, Meaning: Truth-Referential or Use?score: 144.0
    In Coming to Our Senses (1996), I argued for a certain truth-referential theory of meaning and against various other theories, both truth-referential and not.[1] In this paper I shall consider some subsequent developments. I shall start by summarizing my theory. I will then consider some of the latest from direct-reference theorists, particularly from Scott Soames. Finally, I will consider the use theory proposed by Paul Horwich.
     
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  3. Takashi Yagisawa (1985). The Referential and the Attributive: A Distinction in Use? Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):109-125.score: 120.0
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  4. Rose M. Scott & Cynthia Fisher (2012). 2.5-Year-Olds Use Cross-Situational Consistency to Learn Verbs Under Referential Uncertainty. Cognition 122 (2):163-180.score: 120.0
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  5. Anne Bezuidenhout & Mary Sue Sroda (1998). Children's Use of Contextual Cues to Resolve Referential Ambiguity: An Application of Relevance Theory. Pragmatics and Cognition 6 (1):265-299.score: 120.0
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  6. Melissa A. Koenig & Catharine H. Echols (2003). Infants' Understanding of False Labeling Events: The Referential Roles of Words and the Speakers Who Use Them. Cognition 87 (3):179-208.score: 120.0
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  7. Wojciech Rostworowski (forthcoming). Roundabout Semantic Significance of the 'Attributive/Referential' Distinction. Kriterion - Journal of Philosophy 27 (1):30-40.score: 120.0
    In this paper, I argue that contrary to the approach widely taken in the literature, it is possible to retain Russell's theory of definite descriptions and grant some semantic significance to the distinction between the attributive and the referential use. The core of the argumentation is based on recognition of the so-called "roundabout" way in which the use of a definite description may be significant to the semantic features of the sentence: it is a case where the use of (...)
     
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  8. Cynthia Fisher Rose M. Scott (2012). 2.5-Year-Olds Use Cross-Situational Consistency to Learn Verbs Under Referential Uncertainty. Cognition 122 (2):163.score: 120.0
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  9. M. Ichael R. Use (2004). I May Be Old Fashioned but… Reviewed by M ICHAEL R USE, 183 Dodd Hall, Department of Philosophy, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306‐1500, USA. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 61 (3).score: 120.0
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  10. Vincenzo Vergiani (forthcoming). Āgamārthānusāribhiḥ. Helārāja's Use of Quotations and Other Referential Devices in His Commentary on the Vākyapadīya. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-27.score: 120.0
    Examining the function and style of the references to grammatical literature found in a substantial section of Helārāja’s Prakīrṇaprakāśa on Bhartṛhari’s third book of the Vākyapadīya, the article argues that the likely ideological motive of this commentary was to establish its mūla work firmly within the Brahmanical canon and should therefore be seen in the context of the appropriation of Bhartṛhari’s ideas on the part of the roughly contemporary Pratyabhijñā philosophers of Kashmir. Incidentally, it also touches upon the making of (...)
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  11. Javier Vidal (2012). Anscombe, la expresión de autoconciencia y la regla de autorreferencia. Revista de Filosofia 68:133-154.score: 90.0
    “The First Person” is the paper where G. E. M. Anscombe supports the thesis that “I” is not a referring word. Mainly I deal with her argument against the indexical view of “I” from the scenario of the “A” user, who refers to himself as the person who is under the special observation of the “A” user. On the one hand, I put forward that a use of “A” might have a guaranteed reference in a semantic sense: a referential (...)
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  12. Neil Feit (2003). Russellianism and Referential Uses of Descriptions. Philosophical Studies 115 (2):99 - 122.score: 72.0
    A number of philosophers continue to argue, inthe spirit of Keith Donnellans classic paperReference and Definite Descriptions, thatthere is more to the semantics of definitedescriptions than Russells theory predicts. If their arguments are correct, then a completesemantic theory for sentences that containdefinite descriptions will have to provide morethan one set of truth conditions. A unitaryRussellian analysis of sentences of the form`the F is G would not suffice. In this paper,I examine a recent line of argument for thisanti-Russellian conclusion.Unlike earlier Donnellan-style (...)
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  13. Wojciech Rostworowski (forthcoming). Definite Descriptions and the Argument From Inference. Philosophia:1-11.score: 66.0
    This article discusses the “Argument from Inference” raised against the view that definite descriptions are semantically referring expressions. According to this argument, the indicated view is inadequate since it evaluates some invalid inferences with definite descriptions as “valid” and vice versa. I argue that the Argument from Inference is basically wrong. Firstly, it is crucially based on the assumption that a proponent of the view that definite descriptions are referring expressions conceives them as directly referring terms, i.e., the terms which (...)
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  14. Janet Dean Fodor & Ivan A. Sag (1982). Referential and Quantificational Indefinites. Linguistics and Philosophy 5 (3):355 - 398.score: 60.0
    The formal semantics that we have proposed for definite and indefinite descriptions analyzes them both as variable-binding operators and as referring terms. It is the referential analysis which makes it possible to account for the facts outlined in Section 2, e.g. for the purely ‘instrumental’ role of the descriptive content; for the appearance of unusually wide scope readings relative to other quantifiers, higher predicates, and island boundaries; for the fact that the island-escaping readings are always equivalent to maximally wide (...)
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  15. Rod Bertolet (1981). Referential Uses and Speaker Meaning. Philosophical Quarterly 31 (124):253-259.score: 60.0
  16. Charles Sayward (1993). Definite Descriptions, Negation and Necessitation. Russell 13:36-47.score: 60.0
    The principal question asked in this paper is: in the case of attributive usage, is the definite description to be analyzed as Russell said or is it to be treated as a referring expression, functioning semantically as a proper name? It answers by defending the former alternative.
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  17. James Andow (2014). Intuitions, Disagreement and Referential Pluralism. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (2):223-239.score: 54.0
    Mallon, Machery, Nichols and Stich (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79: 332–356, 2009) argue that the use of intuitions in the philosophy of reference is problematic as recent studies show intuitions about reference vary both within and between cultures. I use some ideas from the recent literature on disagreement and truth relativism to shed light on the debate concerning the appropriate reaction to these studies. Mallon et al. argue that variation is problematic because if one tries to use intuitions which vary (...)
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  18. Christian Nimtz (2005). Reassessing Referential Indeterminacy. Erkenntnis 62 (1):1 - 28.score: 54.0
    Quine and Davidson employ proxy functions to demonstrate that the use of language (behaviouristically conceived) is compatible with indefinitely many radically different reference relations. They also believe that the use of language (behaviouristically conceived) is all that determines reference. From this they infer that reference is indeterminate, i.e. that there are no facts of the matter as to what singular terms designate and what predicates apply to. Yet referential indeterminacy yields rather dire consequences. One thus does wonder whether one (...)
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  19. Kumiko Fukumura & Roger P. G. van Gompel (2012). Producing Pronouns and Definite Noun Phrases: Do Speakers Use the Addressee's Discourse Model? Cognitive Science 36 (7):1289-1311.score: 54.0
    We report two experiments that investigated the widely held assumption that speakers use the addressee’s discourse model when choosing referring expressions (e.g., Ariel, 1990; Chafe, 1994; Givón, 1983; Prince, 1985), by manipulating whether the addressee could hear the immediately preceding linguistic context. Experiment 1 showed that speakers increased pronoun use (and decreased noun phrase use) when the referent was mentioned in the immediately preceding sentence compared to when it was not, even though the addressee did not hear the preceding sentence, (...)
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  20. A. Morin, Self-Awareness and the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus: Inner Speech Use During Self-Related Processing.score: 54.0
    To test the hypothesis of a participation of inner speech in self-referential activity we reviewed 59 studies measuring brain activity during processing of self-information in the following self-domains: agency, self-recognition, emotions, personality traits, autobiographical memory, preference judgments, and REST. The left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) has been shown to sustain inner speech use. We calculated the percentage of studies reporting LIFG activity for each self-dimension. 55.9% of all studies reviewed identified LIFG (and presumably inner speech) activity during self-awareness tasks. (...)
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  21. Henri Lauener (1994). How to Use Proper Names. Grazer Philosophische Studien 49:101-119.score: 54.0
    According to relativized transcendentalism, the meaning of expressions, consisting in their intension and extension, is provided by a set of (syntactical, semantical and pragmatical) rules which prescribe their correct use in a context. We interpret a linguistic system by fixing a domain (of the values of the variables) and by assigning exactly one object to each individual constant and n-tuples of objects to predicates. The theory says that proper names have a purely referential role and that their meaning is (...)
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  22. Laurie Schick (2014). Some People: From Referential Vagueness to Social-Moral Socialization in Middle School Dance Classes. Pragmatics and Society 5 (2):243-270.score: 54.0
    This paper integrates methods associated with language socialization and pragmatics to examine how participants in one middle school dance program use the indefinitely referential language of ‘some people’ as a robust resource for socializing embodied competencies related to dance, linguistic competencies related to the ability to use ‘some people’ in indexically and pragmatically complex ways, cognitive competencies related to error-correction and problem-solving, and social-moral competencies related to responsibility-taking. A key argument is that the referential vagueness inherent in ‘some’ (...)
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  23. Scott Soames (2009). Philosophical Essays: Natural Language: What It Means and How We Use It. Princeton University Press.score: 54.0
    The origins of these essays -- Introduction -- Presupposition -- A projection problem for speaker presupposition -- Language and linguistic competence -- Linguistics and psychology -- Semantics and psychology -- Semantics and semantic competence -- The necessity argument -- Truth, meaning, and understanding -- Truth and meaning in perspective -- Semantics and pragmatics -- Naming and asserting -- The gap between meaning and assertion : why what we literally say often differs from what our words literally mean -- Drawing the (...)
     
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  24. Kent Bach (2007). Referentially Used Descriptions: A Reply to Devitt. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 3 (2):33-48.score: 50.0
  25. Marius Usher (2001). A Statistical Referential Theory of Content: Using Information Theory to Account for Misrepresentation. Mind and Language 16 (3):331-334.score: 50.0
  26. F. Kawczynski (2007). On Attributive and Referential Uses of Definite Descriptions. Filozofia Nauki 15 (4 (60)):15-35.score: 50.0
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  27. Andrzej Indrzejczak (2011). Possible Worlds in Use. Studia Logica 99 (1-3):229-248.score: 48.0
    The paper is a brief survey of the most important semantic constructions founded on the concept of possible world. It is impossible to capture in one short paper the whole variety of the problems connected with manifold applications of possible worlds. Hence, after a brief explanation of some philosophical matters I take a look at possible worlds from rather technical standpoint of logic and focus on the applications in formal semantics. In particular, I would like to focus on the fruitful (...)
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  28. Robert Van Rooy (2001). Exhaustivity in Dynamic Semantics; Referential and Descriptive Pronouns. Linguistics and Philosophy 24 (5):621-657.score: 42.0
    In this paper I argue that anaphoric pronouns should always be interpreted exhaustively. I propose that pronouns are either used referentially and refer to the speaker's referents of their antecedent indefinites, or descriptively and go proxy for the description recoverable from its antecedent clause. I show how this view can be implemented within a dynamic semantics, and how it can account for various examples that seemed to be problematic for the view that for all unbound pronouns there always should be (...)
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  29. Robert Van Rooy (2001). Exhaustivity in Dynamic Semantics; Referential and Descriptive Pronouns. Linguistics and Philosophy 24 (5):621 - 657.score: 42.0
    In this paper I argue that anaphoric pronouns should always be interpreted exhaustively. I propose that pronouns are either used referentially and refer to the speaker's referents of their antecedent indefinites, or descriptively and go proxy for the description recoverable from its antecedent clause. I show how this view can be implemented within a dynamic semantics, and how it can account for various examples that seemed to be problematic for the view that for all unbound pronouns there always should be (...)
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  30. W. Stephen Croddy (1984). Using Descriptions Referentially. Philosophical Inquiry 6 (2):111-118.score: 40.0
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  31. Stefan Wintein (2012). Assertoric Semantics and the Computational Power of Self-Referential Truth. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (2):317-345.score: 38.0
    There is no consensus as to whether a Liar sentence is meaningful or not. Still, a widespread conviction with respect to Liar sentences (and other ungrounded sentences) is that, whether or not they are meaningful, they are useless . The philosophical contribution of this paper is to put this conviction into question. Using the framework of assertoric semantics , which is a semantic valuation method for languages of self-referential truth that has been developed by the author, we show that (...)
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  32. George Voutsadakis (2013). Categorical Abstract Algebraic Logic: Referential Algebraic Semantics. Studia Logica 101 (4):849-899.score: 38.0
    Wójcicki has provided a characterization of selfextensional logics as those that can be endowed with a complete local referential semantics. His result was extended by Jansana and Palmigiano, who developed a duality between the category of reduced congruential atlases and that of reduced referential algebras over a fixed similarity type. This duality restricts to one between reduced atlas models and reduced referential algebra models of selfextensional logics. In this paper referential algebraic systems and congruential atlas systems (...)
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  33. Gennady G. Knyazev (2013). EEG Correlates of Self-Referential Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 38.0
    Self-referential processing has been principally investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, understanding of the brain functioning is not possible without careful comparison of the evidence coming from different methodological domains. This paper aims to review electroencephalographic (EEG) studies of self-referential processing and to evaluate how they correspond, complement, or contradict the existing fMRI evidence. There are potentially two approaches to the study of EEG correlates of self-referential processing. Firstly, because simultaneous registration of EEG and fMRI (...)
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  34. D. W. Mertz (1999). The Logic of Instance Ontology. Journal of Philosophical Logic 28 (1):81-111.score: 36.0
    An ontology's theory of ontic predication has implications for the concomitant predicate logic. Remarkable in its analytic power for both ontology and logic is the here developed Particularized Predicate Logic (PPL), the logic inherent in the realist version of the doctrine of unit or individuated predicates. PPL, as axiomatized and proven consistent below, is a three-sorted impredicative intensional logic with identity, having variables ranging over individuals x, intensions R, and instances of intensions $R_{i}$ . The power of PPL is illustrated (...)
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  35. Tudor M. Baetu (2011). The Referential Convergence of Gene Concepts Based on Classical and Molecular Analyses. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (4):411-427.score: 36.0
    Kenneth Waters and Marcel Weber argue that the joint use of distinct gene concepts and the transfer of knowledge between classical and molecular analyses in contemporary scientific practice is possible because classical and molecular concepts of the gene refer to overlapping chromosomal segments and the DNA sequences associated with these segments. However, while pointing in the direction of coreference, both authors also agree that there is a considerable divergence between the actual sequences that count as genes in classical genetics and (...)
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  36. Victoria N. Alexander (2013). Creativity: Self-Referential Mistaking, Not Negating. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (2):253-272.score: 36.0
    In C. S. Peirce, as well as in the work of many biosemioticians, the semiotic object is sometimes described as a physical “object” with material properties and sometimes described as an “ideal object” or mental representation. I argue that to the extent that we can avoid these types of characterizations we will have a more scientific definition of sign use and will be able to better integrate the various fields that interact with biosemiotics. In an effort to end Cartesian dualism (...)
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  37. Peter Wright (1990). Using Constraints and Reference in Task–Oriented Dialogue. Journal of Semantics 7 (1):65-79.score: 34.0
    This paper presents an analysis of linguistic data that stems from a task-oriented dialogue. We demonstrate that certain referring expressions used in this setting are potentially ambiguous and indeterminate but do not lead to referential errors such as under– or over–population of the discourse representation. Three studies are reported which show that it is the skilled use of non-linguistic constraints, present in the task which facilitates successful reference. When these non-linguistic constraints are removed, skilled speakers are able to make (...)
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  38. A. Bezuidenhout (1997). Pragmatics, Semantic Undetermination and the Referential/Attributive Distinction. Mind 106 (423):375-409.score: 32.0
    It has long ben recognised that there are referential uses of definite descriptions. It is not as widely recognised that there are atttributives uses of idexicals and other such paradigmatically singular terms. I offer an account of the referential/attributive distinction which is intended to give a unified treatment of both sorts of cases. I argue that the best way to account for the referential/attributive distinction is to treat is as semantically underdetermined which sort of propositions is expressed (...)
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  39. Carlo Penco, Truth, Charity and Assertion.score: 30.0
    In this paper [submitted in 2008] I discuss the relation between truth and assertion, starting from Linsky's example [her husband is kind to her], used in the debate on definite description by Keith Donnellan and Saul Kripke. To treat the problem of the referential use of definite descriptions we need not only to take into account the contest of utterance, but also the context of reception, or the cognitive context. If the cognitive context is given the right relevance we (...)
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  40. Genoveva Marti (2008). Direct Reference and Definite Descriptions. Dialectica 62 (1):43–57.score: 30.0
    According to Donnellan the characteristic mark of a referential use of a definite description is the fact that it can be used to pick out an individual that does not satisfy the attributes in the description. Friends and foes of the referential/attributive distinction have equally dismissed that point as obviously wrong or as a sign that Donnellan’s distinction lacks semantic import. I will argue that, on a strict semantic conception of what it is for an expression to be (...)
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  41. Howard K. Wettstein (1981). Demonstrative Reference and Definite Descriptions. Philosophical Studies 40 (2):241--57.score: 30.0
    A distinction is developed between two uses of definite descriptions, the "attributive" and the "referential." the distinction exists even in the same sentence. several criteria are given for making the distinction. it is suggested that both russell's and strawson's theories fail to deal with this distinction, although some of the things russell says about genuine proper names can be said about the referential use of definite descriptions. it is argued that the presupposition or implication that something fits the (...)
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  42. Christopher S. Hill (2006). Harman on Self Referential Thoughts. Philosophical Issues 16 (1):346-357.score: 30.0
    I will be concerned in these pages with the views that Gilbert Harman puts forward in his immensely stimulating paper Self-Reflexive Thoughts.<sup>1</sup> Harman maintains that self referential thoughts are possible, and also that they are useful. I applaud both of these claims. An example of a self referential thought is the thought that every thought, including this present one, has a logical structure. I feel sure that this thought exists, for I have entertained it on a number of (...)
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  43. Meir Dan-Cohen (2001). The Value of Ownership. Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (4):404–434.score: 30.0
    To understand private property, it is generally assumed, we must recognize the contribution objects make to human life. On the prevailing view, ownership is valuable only insofar as its subject matter is of value. In the order of valuation, objects come first, owning them comes second. But despite its air of obviousness, the assumption does not suit our ordinary concept of ownership. Ownership can be valuable quite apart from the value of the owned object, and it can be the source (...)
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  44. Martine Nida-Rümelin (1993). Probability and Direct Reference. Erkenntnis 39 (1):51-78.score: 30.0
    I discuss three puzzles of probability theory which seem connected with problems of direct reference and rigid designation. The resolution of at least one of them requires referential use of definite descriptions in probability statements. I argue that contrary to common opinion all these puzzles are in a way still unsolved: They seem to exemplify cases in which a change of probabilities is rationally required, even though any specific change presupposes unjustified assumptions.
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  45. Joseph Margolis & Evan Fales (1976). Donnellan on Definite Descriptions. Philosophia 6 (2):289-302.score: 30.0
    Donnellan's distinction between the referential and attributive uses of definite descriptions is shown not to cover exhaustive and exclusive alternatives but to fix the termini of a continuum of cases. in fact, donnellan's distinction rests on a mixed classification: the referential use, concerned with intended referents regardless of what speakers may say about them; the attributive use, concerned with definite descriptions used in using sentences, that something or other may satisfy. given this feature of his account, it is (...)
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  46. Hector-Neri Castañeda (1985). Objects, Existence, and Reference A Prolegomenon to Guise Theory. Grazer Philosophische Studien 25:3-59.score: 30.0
    This is an investigation into the fundamental connections between the referential use of language and our rich human experience. All types of experience — perceptual, practical, scientific, literary, esthetic, ludic, ... — are tightly unified into one total experience by the structure of reference to real or possible items. Singular reference is essential for locating ourselves in our own corner of the world. General reference, by means of quantifiers, is our main tool in ascertaining the accessible patterns of the (...)
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  47. Thomas E. Patton (1997). Explaining Referential/Attributive. Mind 106 (422):245-261.score: 30.0
    Kaplan, Stalnaker and Wettstein all urge a two-stage theory of language whereon the propositions expressed by sentences are generated prior to being evaluated. A new ambiguity for sentences emerges, propositional rather syntactic or semantic. Kaplan and Wettstein then propose to explain Donnellan's referential/attributive ambiguity as simply being two-stage propositional ambiguity. This is tacitly seen as further confirmation for two-stage theory. Modal ambiguities are prime motivators for two-stage theory which distinguishes local from exotic evaluation to explain them. But if sentences (...)
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  48. Patrick Baert (1998). Foucault's History of the Present as Self-Referential Knowledge Acquisition. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (6):111-126.score: 30.0
    Underlying this article is the conviction that social scientists typically take on board a too restrictive concept of knowledge acquisition. The paper propounds a new concept of knowledge acquisition, one which is self-referential (i.e. which affects one's presuppositions) and which draws upon the unfamiliar to reveal and undercut the familiar. The aim of this paper is twofold. First, it is to show that this concept of knowledge acqui sition is already anticipated by Foucault, that it is a major concern (...)
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  49. William K. Blackburn (1988). Wettstein on Definite Descriptions. Philosophical Studies 53 (2):263 - 278.score: 30.0
    I critically examine an argument, due to howard wettstein, purporting to show that sentences containing definite descriptions are semantically ambiguous between referential and attributive readings. Wettstein argues that many sentences containing nonidentifying descriptions--descriptions that apply to more than one object--cannot be given a Russellian analysis, and that the descriptions in these sentences should be understood as directly referential terms. But because Wettstein does not justify treating referential uses of nonidentifying descriptions differently than attributive uses of nonidentifying descriptions, (...)
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