Search results for 'regulatory evolution' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stavros Ioannidis (2013). Regulatory Evolution and Theoretical Arguments in Evolutionary Biology. Science and Education 22 (2):279-292.
    The cis-regulatory hypothesis is one of the most important claims of evolutionary developmental biology. In this paper I examine the theoretical argument for cis-regulatory evolution and its role within evolutionary theorizing. I show that, although the argument has some weaknesses, it acts as a useful example for the importance of current scientific debates for science education.
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  2.  17
    Ariel D. Chipman (2010). Parallel Evolution of Segmentation by Co‐Option of Ancestral Gene Regulatory Networks. Bioessays 32 (1):60-70.
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  3.  14
    Manfred D. Laubichler (2006). Does EvoDevo Equal Regulatory Evolution?: Endless Forms Most Beautiful: The New Science of Evo Devo and the Making of the Animal Kingdom Sean B. Carroll New York and London : Norton , 2005 (350 Pp; $25.95 Hbk; ISBN 0393060160); From DNA to Diversity: Molecular Genetics and the Evolution of Animal Design (2nd Ed.) Sean B. Carroll , Jennifer K. Grenier , Scott D. Weatherbee Malden, MA : Blackwell , 2004 (258 Pp; $49.95 Pbk; ISBN 1405119500). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 1 (1):102-103.
  4.  12
    Mika Skippari & Päivi Holmlund (2007). The Evolution of Non-Market Strategies in a Changing Regulatory Environment. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:412-415.
    In the earlier literature the importance of public policies and regulatory changes to firm performance and competitive position has been well established (e.g., Bonardi, 2004). However, little research has been done on the dynamics of this relationship. In this paper, we examine how and why regulatory changes can affect on the evolution of market and nonmarket strategies of a firm. We use a longitudinal case study on Finnish retail industry to illustrate the interactions between regulatory change, (...)
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  5.  18
    Guy Barry & John S. Mattick (2012). The Role of Regulatory RNA in Cognitive Evolution. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (10):497-503.
    The evolution of the human brain has resulted in the emergence of higher-order cognitive abilities, such as reasoning, planning and social awareness. Although there has been a concomitant increase in brain size and complexity, and component diversification, we argue that RNA regulation of epigenetic processes, RNA editing, and the controlled mobilization of transposable elements have provided the major substrates for cognitive advance. We also suggest that these expanded capacities and flexibilities have led to the collateral emergence of psychiatric fragilities (...)
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  6.  1
    Gareth M. Thomas & Takashi Hayashi (2013). Smarter Neuronal Signaling Complexes From Existing Components: How Regulatory Modifications Were Acquired During Animal Evolution. Bioessays 35 (11):929-939.
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  7. Nadege Philippe, Estelle Crozat, Richard E. Lenski & Dominique Schneider (2007). Evolution of Global Regulatory Networks During a Long‐Term Experiment with Escherichia Coli. Bioessays 29 (9):846-860.
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  8.  3
    Douglas R. Cavener (1992). Transgenic Animal Studies on the Evolution of Genetic Regulatory Circuitries. Bioessays 14 (4):237-244.
  9. Debra L. Silver (2016). Genomic Divergence and Brain Evolution: How Regulatory DNA Influences Development of the Cerebral Cortex. Bioessays 38 (2):162-171.
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  10. Adam S. Wilkins (2007). Putting Transcriptional Network Evolution at the Heart of Evolutionary Biology. The Regulatory Genome: Gene Regulatory Networks in Development and Evolution. (2006). Eric H. Davidson. Academic Press, San Diego. Xi + 289 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐12‐088563‐3. [REVIEW] Bioessays 29 (11):1175-1177.
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  11.  3
    Edward B. Chuong (2013). Retroviruses Facilitate the Rapid Evolution of the Mammalian Placenta. Bioessays 35 (10):853-861.
  12.  13
    Lyudmila Trut, Irina Oskina & Anastasiya Kharlamova (2009). Animal Evolution During Domestication: The Domesticated Fox as a Model. Bioessays 31 (3):349-360.
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  13.  10
    Scott Barolo (2012). Shadow Enhancers: Frequently Asked Questions About Distributed Cis‐Regulatory Information and Enhancer Redundancy. Bioessays 34 (2):135-141.
  14.  8
    Antónia Monteiro (2012). Gene Regulatory Networks Reused to Build Novel Traits. Bioessays 34 (3):181-186.
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  15.  2
    James J. McKenna (1990). Evolution and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Human Nature 1 (2):145-177.
    This paper and its subsequent parts (Part II and Part III) build on an earlier publication (McKenna 1986). They suggest that important clinical data on the relationship between infantile constitutional deficits and microenvironmental factors relevant to SIDS can be acquired by examining the physiological regulatory effects (well documented among nonhuman primates) that parents assert on their infants when they sleep together.I attempt to show why access to parental sensory cues (movement, touch, smell, sound) that induce arousals in infants while (...)
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  16.  16
    Ryan J. Taft, Michael Pheasant & John S. Mattick (2007). The Relationship Between Non‐Protein‐Coding DNA and Eukaryotic Complexity. Bioessays 29 (3):288-299.
    There are two intriguing paradoxes in molecular biology-the inconsistent relationship between organismal complexity and (1) cellular DNA content and (2) the number of protein-coding genes-referred to as the C-value and G-value paradoxes, respectively. The C-value paradox may be largely explained by varying ploidy. The G-value paradox is more problematic, as the extent of protein coding sequence remains relatively static over a wide range of developmental complexity. We show by analysis of sequenced genomes that the relative amount of non-protein-coding sequence increases (...)
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  17.  52
    Matt J. Rossano (2011). Cognitive Control: Social Evolution and Emotional Regulation. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):238-241.
    This commentary argues that theories of cognitive control risk being incomplete unless they incorporate social/emotional factors. Social factors very likely played a critical role in the evolution of human cognitive control abilities, and emotional states are the primary regulatory mechanisms of cognitive control.
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  18.  16
    Brett Calcott (2014). The Creation and Reuse of Information in Gene Regulatory Networks. Philosophy of Science 81 (5):879-890.
    Recent work on the evolution of signaling systems provides a novel way of thinking about genetic information, where information is passed between genes in a regulatory network. I use examples from evolutionary developmental biology to show how information can be created in these networks and how it can be reused to produce rapid phenotypic change.
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  19.  6
    A. Quispel (1968). Pre-Biological Evolution. Acta Biotheoretica 18 (1-4):291-315.
    Some theoretical examples of possibilities for natural selection in a prebiotic organic medium at the molecular level are given. These examples, presented in the form of simple kinetic models, are based on the idea that the occurrence of autocatalysis and self-duplication broke through the limitations imposed by contacts by chance with rare but essential molecules in the surrounding medium. It is shown that many regulatory mechanisms and the development of organization are logical consequences of this selection process. Symbiogenetic associations (...)
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  20.  17
    J. Aracena & J. Demongeot (2004). Mathematical Methods for Inferring Regulatory Networks Interactions: Application to Genetic Regulation. Acta Biotheoretica 52 (4):391-400.
    This paper deals with the problem of reconstruction of the intergenic interaction graph from the raw data of genetic co-expression coming with new technologies of bio-arrays (DMA-arrays, protein-arrays, etc.). These new imaging devices in general only give information about the asymptotical part (fixed configurations of co-expression or limit cycles of such configurations) of the dynamical evolution of the regulatory networks (genetic and/or proteic) underlying the functioning of living systems. Extracting the casual structure and interaction coefficients of a gene (...)
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  21.  13
    L. Hammen (1986). On Some Aspects of Parallel Evolution in Chelicerata. Acta Biotheoretica 35 (1-2).
    A study is made of some aspects of parallel evolution in Chelicerata. Definitions are given of parallel evolution, convergence, homology and analogy. It is pointed out that the concept of parallel evolution (parallelism) is initially formed in an empirical way, and that a judgment must be based on formal criteria. Particular attention is paid to the rôle of gene regulation in parallel evolution, to the special case of convergence as a result of heterologous regulatory mechanisms, (...)
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  22.  8
    A. K. Sharma (1986). Evolution of Cell and Chromosome Structure in Eukaryote. Acta Biotheoretica 35 (1-2):69-76.
    The analysis of the data so far available indicates that eukaryotic chromosome with splicing characteristics appeared quite early in evolution possibly parallel and not sequential to the prokaryotic system. The endosymbiotic origin of the eukaryotic cell involved a primitive undifferentiated unicellular eukaryote and a photosynthetic or non-photosynthetic microbe. Certain regulatory genes of extra-cellular organelles were transferred later through molecular hybridization to the nucleus. The evolution of multicellularity and sexual reproduction led to the origin of innumerable eukaryotic forms (...)
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  23.  5
    Christopher G. Knight & John W. Pinney (2009). Making the Right Connections: Biological Networks in the Light of Evolution. Bioessays 31 (10):1080-1090.
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  24. Carl Schlichting & Massimo Pigliucci (1993). Control of Phenotypic Plasticity Via Regulatory Genes. American Naturalist 142 (2):366-370.
    A response to Via about the existence (or not) and role of plasticity genes in evolution.
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  25.  30
    Patrick Bateson (1989). Does Evolutionary Biology Contribute to Ethics? Biology and Philosophy 4 (3):287-301.
    Human propensities that are the products of Darwinian evolution may combine to generate a form of social behavior that is not itself a direct result of such pressure. This possibility may provide a satisfying explanation for the origin of socially transmitted rules such as the incest taboo. Similarly, the regulatory processes of development that generated adaptations to the environment in the circumstances in which they evolved can produce surprising and sometimes maladaptive consequences for the individual in modern conditions. (...)
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  26.  5
    Ulrike Griebel, Irene M. Pepperberg & D. Kimbrough Oller (2016). Developmental Plasticity and Language: A Comparative Perspective. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):435-445.
    The growing field of evo-devo is increasingly demonstrating the complexity of steps involved in genetic, intracellular regulatory, and extracellular environmental control of the development of phenotypes. A key result of such work is an account for the remarkable plasticity of organismal form in many species based on relatively minor changes in regulation of highly conserved genes and genetic processes. Accounting for behavioral plasticity is of similar potential interest but has received far less attention. Of particular interest is plasticity in (...)
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  27.  1
    Jonathan Kembery (2016). The Evolution of the Lawyer’s Lawyer. Legal Ethics 19 (1):112-121.
    ABSTRACTThis paper gives a personal perspective on the growth of in-house legal teams within law firms. It suggests why these departments have emerged as a response to greater legal and regulatory challenges, changes in the profession and a quest for professionalism and cost effectiveness. The paper examines the work of a substantial team and the parallels and differences between a role in that organisation and other forms of legal practice. Finally, it considers the future for these in-house teams in (...)
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  28. William Dembski, Does Evolution Even Have a Mechanism?
    Evolutionary biology teaches that all biological complexity is the result of material mechanisms. These include principally the Darwinian mechanism of natural selection and random variation, but also include other mechanisms (symbiosis, gene transfer, genetic drift, the action of regulatory genes in development, self-organizational processes, etc.). These mechanisms are just that: mindless material mechanisms that do what they do irrespective of intelligence. To be sure, mechanisms can be programmed by an intelligence. But any such intelligent programming of evolutionary mechanisms is (...)
     
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  29.  5
    Mark Q. Martindale & Patricia N. Lee (2013). The Development of Form: Causes and Consequences of Developmental Reprogramming Associated with Rapid Body Plan Evolution in the Bilaterian Radiation. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 8 (3):253-264.
    Organismal form arises by the coordinated movement, arrangement, and activity of cells. In metazoans, most morphogenetic programs that establish the recognizable body plan of any given species are initiated during the developmental period, although in many species growth continues throughout life. By comparing the cellular and molecular development of the bilaterians (bilaterally symmetrical animals) to the development of their closest outgroup, the cnidarians, it appears that morphogenesis and the cell fate specification associated with germ layer formation during the process of (...)
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  30.  1
    C. A. Hooker (1988). From Logical Formalism to Control Structure: The Evolution of Methodological Understanding. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:211 - 221.
    The thesis of this paper is that scientific method is to be thought of as a complex many-leveled regulatory hierarchy of principles, interacting with theory also viewed as a complex many-leveled hierarchy. This conception of method is illustrated in particular through one episode in the contemporary development of plasma physics, and related to others. It provides for method-theory interaction and for the development of method itself as science develops.
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  31.  2
    Farah Huzair (2008). Innovative Potential in Hungarian Agricultural Biotechnology and the Evolution of Networks. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (2).
    The ban on commercial GMO cultivation in Hungary suggests a scenario in which scientific progress may decline and innovative potential may thus deteriorate. There is the added difficulty of greatly reduced funding and the loss of expertise that accompany fiscal austerity measures. However, initial findings from recent fieldwork suggest that science and innovative potential have not been 'stopped in their tracks.' This paper demonstrates how innovative potential may be generated and captured. It identifies the key actors in the Hungarian system; (...)
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  32. Henri Bergson (2007). Creative Evolution. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Henri Bergson (1859-1941) is one of the truly great philosophers of the modernist period, and there is currently a major renaissance of interest in his unduly neglected texts and ideas amongst philosophers, literary theorists, and social theorists. Creative Evolution (1907) is the text that made Bergson world-famous in his own lifetime; in it Bergson responds to the challenge presented to our habits of thought by modern evolutionary theory, and attempts to show that the theory of knowledge must have its (...)
     
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  33. Massimo Pigliucci (2005). Evolution of Phenotypic Plasticity: Where Are We Going Now? Trends in Ecology and Evolution 20 (9):481-486.
    The study of phenotypic plasticity has progressed significantly over the past few decades. We have moved from variation for plasticity being considered as a nuisance in evolutionary studies to it being the primary target of investigations that use an array of methods, including quantitative and molecular genetics, as well as of several approaches that model the evolution of plastic responses. Here, I consider some of the major aspects of research on phenotypic plasticity, assessing where progress has been made and (...)
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  34. Thomas Suddendorf & Michael C. Corballis (2007). The Evolution of Foresight: What is Mental Time Travel, and is It Unique to Humans? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):299-313.
    In a dynamic world, mechanisms allowing prediction of future situations can provide a selective advantage. We suggest that memory systems differ in the degree of flexibility they offer for anticipatory behavior and put forward a corresponding taxonomy of prospection. The adaptive advantage of any memory system can only lie in what it contributes for future survival. The most flexible is episodic memory, which we suggest is part of a more general faculty of mental time travel that allows us not only (...)
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  35.  18
    Christine Clavien & Chloë FitzGerald (forthcoming). The Evolution of Moral Intuitions and Their Feeling of Rightness. In Joyce R. (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Evolution and Philosophy.
    Despite the widespread use of the notion of moral intuition, its psychological features remain a matter of debate and it is unclear why the capacity to experience moral intuitions evolved in humans. We first survey standard accounts of moral intuition, pointing out their interesting and problematic aspects. Drawing lessons from this analysis, we propose a novel account of moral intuitions which captures their phenomenological, mechanistic, and evolutionary features. Moral intuitions are composed of two elements: an evaluative mental state and a (...)
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  36.  82
    Nicholas Maxwell (2001). Evolution of Sentience, Consciousness and Language Viewed From a Darwinian and Purposive Perspective. In From The Human World in the Physical Universe: Consciousness, Free Will and Evolution, ch. 7. Rowman and Littlefield 162-201.
    In this article I give a Darwinian account of how sentience, consciousness and language may have evolved. It is argued that sentience and consciousness emerge as brains control purposive actions in new ways. A key feature of this account is that Darwinian theory is interpreted so as to do justice to the purposive character of living things. According to this interpretation, as evolution proceeds, purposive actions play an increasingly important role in the mechanisms of evolution until, with (...) by cultural means, Darwinian evolution takes on a Lamarckian character. According to this view, as evolution proceeds, the mechanisms of Darwinian evolution themselves evolve. (shrink)
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  37. Max Velmans (2007). The Co-Evolution of Matter and Consciousness. Velmans, Prof Max (2007) the Co-Evolution of Matter and Consciousness. [Journal (Paginated)] 44 (2):273-282.
    Theories about the evolution of consciousness relate in an intimate way to theories about the distribution of consciousness, which range from the view that only human beings are conscious to the view that all matter is in some sense conscious. Broadly speaking, such theories can be classified into discontinuity theories and continuity theories. Discontinuity theories propose that consciousness emerged only when material forms reached a given stage of evolution, but propose different criteria for the stage at which this (...)
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  38. Pouwel Slurink (1993). Ecological Dominance and the Final Sprint in Hominid Evolution. Human Evolution.
    In contrast to many other models of human evolution the "balance of power" theory of Alexander has a clear answer to the question why a runaway selection process for unique social and moral capacities occurred in our ancestry only and not in other species: "ecological dominance" is hypothesized to have diminished the effects of "extrinsic" forces of natural selection such that within-species, intergroup competition increased (Alexander, 1989). Alexander seems to be wrong, however, in his claim that already the common (...)
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  39.  7
    Gary Hatfield (2013). Introduction: The Evolution of Mind, Brain, and Culture. In Gary Hatfield & Holly Pittman (eds.), Evolution of Mind, Brain, and Culture. University of Pennsylvania Press 1-44.
    This introductory chapter surveys some basic findings on primate evolution and the evolution of mind; examines socially transmitted traditions in relation to the concept of culture; recounts the sources of evidence regarding the evolution of mind and culture; charts the history of evolutionary approaches to mind and behavior since Darwin; reviews several prominent theoretical syntheses concerning the evolution of the human mind and behavior; and, along the way, introduces the specific questions examined in the individual chapters.
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  40.  19
    Merlin Donald (1993). Précis of Origins of the Modern Mind: Three Stages in the Evolution of Culture and Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):737-748.
    This bold and brilliant book asks the ultimate question of the life sciences: How did the human mind acquire its incomparable power? In seeking the answer, Merlin Donald traces the evolution of human culture and cognition from primitive apes to the era of artificial intelligence, and presents an original theory of how the human mind evolved from its presymbolic form. In the emergence of modern human culture, Donald proposes, there were three radical transitions. During the first, our bipedal but (...)
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  41.  74
    Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman (2000). Niche Construction, Biological Evolution, and Cultural Change. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):131-146.
    We propose a conceptual model that maps the causal pathways relating biological evolution to cultural change. It builds on conventional evolutionary theory by placing emphasis on the capacity of organisms to modify sources of natural selection in their environment (niche construction) and by broadening the evolutionary dynamic to incorporate ontogenetic and cultural processes. In this model, phenotypes have a much more active role in evolution than generally conceived. This sheds light on hominid evolution, on the evolution (...)
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  42.  59
    Samir Okasha (2006). Evolution and the Levels of Selection. Oxford University Press.
    Does natural selection act primarily on individual organisms, on groups, on genes, or on whole species? The question of levels of selection - on which biologists and philosophers have long disagreed - is central to evolutionary theory and to the philosophy of biology. Samir Okasha's comprehensive analysis gives a clear account of the philosophical issues at stake in the current debate.
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  43.  22
    Stephen Davies (2012). The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution. OUP Oxford.
    Stephen Davies presents a fascinating exploration of the idea that art, and our aesthetic sensibilities more generally, should be understood as an element in human evolution. He asks: Do animals have aesthetics? Do our aesthetic preferences have prehistoric roots? Is art universal? What is the biological role of aesthetic and artistic behaviour?
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  44. Jason Scott Robert (2004). Embryology, Epigenesis, and Evolution Taking Development Seriously. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Historically, philosophers of biology have tended to sidestep the problem of development by focusing primarily on evolutionary biology and, more recently, on molecular biology and genetics. Quite often too, development has been misunderstood as simply, or even primarily, a matter of gene activation and regulation. Nowadays a growing number of philosophers of science are focusing their analyses on the complexities of development, and in Embryology, Epigenesis and Evolution Jason Scott Robert explores the nature of development against current trends in (...)
     
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  45.  56
    Alex Mesoudi, Andrew Whiten & Kevin N. Laland (2006). Towards a Unified Science of Cultural Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):329-347.
    We suggest that human culture exhibits key Darwinian evolutionary properties, and argue that the structure of a science of cultural evolution should share fundamental features with the structure of the science of biological evolution. This latter claim is tested by outlining the methods and approaches employed by the principal subdisciplines of evolutionary biology and assessing whether there is an existing or potential corresponding approach to the study of cultural evolution. Existing approaches within anthropology and archaeology demonstrate a (...)
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  46. R. W. Byrne & Andrew Whiten (1988). Machiavellian Intelligence: Social Expertise and the Evolution of Intellect in Monkeys, Apes, and Humans. Oxford University Press.
    This book presents an alternative to conventional ideas about the evolution of the human intellect.
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  47.  7
    Antonine Nicoglou (2015). The Evolution of Phenotypic Plasticity: Genealogy of a Debate in Genetics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 50:67-76.
    The paper describes the context and the origin of a particular debate that concerns the evolution of phenotypic plasticity. In 1965, British biologist A. D. Bradshaw proposed a widely cited model intended to explain the evolution of norms of reaction, based on his studies of plant populations. Bradshaw’s model went beyond the notion of the “adaptive norm of reaction” discussed before him by Dobzhansky and Schmalhausen by suggesting that “plasticity” the ability of a phenotype to be modified by (...)
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  48.  21
    Georg Kell (2005). The Global Compact Selected Experiences and Reflections. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):69 - 79.
    In this paper, the Executive Head of the Global Compact shares some of his own reflections on the evolution of the Global Compact initiative – United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan’s voluntary corporate citizenship initiative in the area of human rights, labor, the environment and anti-corruption. Two main themes are addressed. The first considers the Global Compact’s institutional context, examining how such an initiative is even possible in the historically hierarchical and traditionally business-unfriendly UN. The second concerns the voluntary nature (...)
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  49.  10
    Richard Dawkins (2004). The Ancestor's Tale: A Pilgrimage to the Dawn of Evolution. Houghton Mifflin.
    The renowned biologist and thinker Richard Dawkins presents his most expansive work yet: a comprehensive look at evolution, ranging from the latest developments in the field to his own provocative views. Loosely based on the form of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Dawkins's Tale takes us modern humans back through four billion years of life on our planet. As the pilgrimage progresses, we join with other organisms at the forty "rendezvous points" where we find a common ancestor. The band of pilgrims (...)
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  50. Peter B. Todd (2013). Teilhard and Other Modern Thinkers on Evolution, Mind, and Matter. Teilhard Studies (66):1-22.
    In his The Phenomenon of Man, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin develops concepts of consciousness, the noosphere, and psychosocial evolution. This paper explores Teilhard’s evolutionary concepts as resonant with thinking in psychology and physics. It explores contributions from archetypal depth psychology, quantum physics, and neuroscience to elucidate relationships between mind and matter. Teilhard’s work can be seen as advancing this psychological lineage or psychogenesis. That is, the evolutionary emergence of matter in increasing complexity from sub-atomic particles to the human brain (...)
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