Search results for 'reparations' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  58
    Samuel C. Wheeler (1997). Reparations Reconstructed. American Philosophical Quarterly 34 (3):301-318.
    This essay argues that reparations for wrongs by one's ancestors can be justified. Differential benefits to those descended from victims of one's ancestors is discrimination which can be justified by one's right to be partial to one's ancestors, doing what they, with clearer thinking, would have done--namely compensating their victims. So, while there is no obligation to discriminate, one has a right to, in virtue of one's partiality towards one's ancestors.
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  2. Howard McGary (2003). Achieving Democratic Equality: Forgiveness, Reconciliation, and Reparations. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):93-113.
    This paper provides an account of reparations in general and then presents briefly one explanation of why many present day African Americans believe they are entitled to reparations from the U.S. Government.This explanation should not be seen as a final justification, but only as an indication why the demand for reparations for AfricanAmericans might be seen a plausible. Next, if it is reasonable to assume that reparations to African Americans are plausible, I then go onto explain (...)
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  3.  36
    Pablo De Greiff (ed.) (2006). The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press.
    Offering the most comprehensive book-length study to-date of reparation programs, this handbook contains an innovative blend of case-study analysis, thematic papers, and national legislation documents from leading scholars and practitioners. This landmark work will make a genuine contribution to the theory and practice of reparations.
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  4.  68
    Howard Mcgary (2010). Reconciliation and Reparations. Metaphilosophy 41 (4):546-562.
    Abstract: This article provides an account of the meaning of reparations and presents a brief explanation as to why African Americans believe they are entitled to reparations from the United States government. It then goes on to explain why reparations are necessary to address the distrust that is thought to exist between many African Americans and their government. Finally, it rejects the belief that reparations require reconciliation.
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  5.  59
    Margaret Urban Walker (2010). Truth Telling as Reparations. Metaphilosophy 41 (4):525-545.
    : International instruments now defend a "right to the truth " for victims of political repression and violence and include truth telling about human rights violations as a kind of reparation as well as a form of redress. While truth telling about violations is obviously a condition of redress or repair for violations, it may not be clear how truth telling itself is a kind of reparations. By showing that concerted truth telling can satisfy four features of suitable (...) vehicles, I defend the idea that politically implemented modes of truth telling to, for, and by those who are victims of gross violation and injustice may with good reason be counted as a kind of reparations. Understanding the doubly symbolic character of reparations, however, makes clearer why truth telling is unlikely to be sufficient reparation for serious wrongs and is likely to be sensitive to the larger context of reparative activity and its social, political, and historical background. (shrink)
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  6.  34
    Naomi Zack (2003). Reparations and the Rectification of Race. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):139-151.
    Positive law and problems with identifyingbeneficiaries confine reparations for U.S.slavery to the level of discourse. Within thediscourse, the broader topic of rectificationcan be addressed. The rectification of slaveryincludes restoring full humanity to our ideasof the slaves and their descendants and itrequires disabuse of the false biological ideaof race. This is not racial eliminativism,because biological race never existed, but moreimportantly because African American racialidentities and redress of present racism arebased on lifeworlds of race in contrast withwhich the biological idea has (...)
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  7.  5
    J. Angelo Corlett (2012). Reparations for U.S. War Crimes Against Iraq. Filozofija I Društvo 23 (4):193-217.
    Given the basic tenets of just war theory and those of United States law regard- ing compensatory justice, it is argued that the U.S. invasion of Iraq from 2003-present is morally unjust and that the U.S. owes substantial reparations to Iraq.
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  8.  16
    Ernesto Verdeja (2006). Reparations in Democratic Transitions. Res Publica 12 (2):115-136.
    This article proposes a normative theory of reparations for political violence from the standpoint of contemporary critical theory debates on recognition and redistribution. I argue that any satisfactory reparations theory should aspire to ‘status parity’, a term coined by Nancy Fraser, and should include symbolic and material components for both individuals and groups. The essay argues that reparations can promote a number of worthy goals, including the reaffirmation of moral respect and dignity of victims.
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  9.  12
    Roddy Brett & Lina Malagon (2013). Overcoming the Original Sin of the “Original Condition:” How Reparations May Contribute to Emancipatory Peacebuilding. Human Rights Review 14 (3):257-271.
    This short article explores the relationship between transitional justice mechanisms and peacebuilding by analysing the role that reparations may play in transforming or deepening conflict. Research seeks to identify potential components of an emancipatory approach to peacebuilding through the prioritisation of ‘transformative reparations’ processes, framing this proposal within the case study of collective reparations to the trade union movement in Colombia.
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  10.  9
    J. Allen & B. A. Hocking (2010). Unlocking the Alienation: A Comparative Role for Alien Torts Legislation in Post-Colonial Reparations Claims? Human Rights Review 11 (2):247-276.
    This article continues the themes developed in a previous paper looking at reparations for past wrongs in post-colonial Australia. It narrows the focus to examine the scope of the law of tort to provide reparations suffered as a result of colonisation and dispossession, with particular emphasis on the assimilation policies whose legacy is now known emphatically, although it ought not be exclusively, as the Stolen Generations. The search for more than just words is particularly topical in light of (...)
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  11.  3
    Joëlle Hecker (2015). Les temps et les modes des politiques réparatrices. Le cas des réparations ouest-allemandes à Israël et à la Claims Conference entre 1950 et 1980. Temporalités 21.
    Cet article se penche sur les rapports entre les politiques de réparation et la perception du temps après un crime de masse. Il cherche à démontrer que les mesures réparatrices prises parfois dans le but de rétablir la justice et le dialogue entre les groupes agissent sur la perception du temps. Elles sont dotées d’un pouvoir de reformulation qui vient modifier la mise en récit du passé, et donc sa perception. Elles contribuent notamment à faire le récit des responsabilités et (...)
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  12.  21
    Thom Brooks (2008). A Two-Tiered Reparations Theory: A Reply to Wenar. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):666-669.
    This paper argues that Leif Wenar's theory of reparations is not purely forward-looking and that backward-looking considerations play an important role: if there had never been a past injustice, then reparations for the future cannot be acceptable. Past injustice compose the first part of a two-tiered theory of reparations. We must first discover a past injustice has taken place: reparations are for the repair of previous damage. However, for Wenar, not all past injustices warrant reparations. (...)
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  13.  4
    Pamina Firchow & Roger Mac Ginty (2013). Reparations and Peacebuilding: Issues and Controversies. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 14 (3):231-239.
    This introduction to our special section of Human Rights Review on Reparations and Peacebuilding gives an overview of the challenges currently confronting both peacebuilding and reparations. The special section aims to explore the relationship between these two mechanisms and examines the role that reparations schemes can play in salving or exacerbating conflict.
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  14. Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.) (2007). Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press.
    Reparations is an idea whose time has come. From civilian victims of war in Iraq and South America to descendents of slaves in the US to citizens of colonized nations in Africa and south Asia to indigenous peoples around the world--these groups and their advocates are increasingly arguing for the importance of addressing historical injustices that have long been either ignored or denied. This volume contributes to these debates by focusing the attention of a group of highly distinguished international (...)
     
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  15. Robert K. Fullinwider (2000). THE CASE FOR REPARATIONS. Report From the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy 20 (2):1-8.
  16. Barbara Rose Johnston & Susan Slyomovics (eds.) (2009). Waging War, Making Peace: Reparations and Human Rights. Left Coast Press.
     
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  17.  3
    Stanislav Sretenovic (2009). Les réparations des vaincus, les dettes des vainqueurs: le cas de la France et du Royaume des Serbes, Croates et Slovènes/Yougoslavie. Filozofija I Društvo 20 (1):223-243.
    S'appuyant sur l'analyse historique des relations entre la France et le Royaume des Serbes, Croates et Slovènes/Yougoslavie après la Première Guerre mondiale, l'auteur traite de l'application des décisions du traité de Versailles en matière économique et financière, et montre comment elle pesa sur les relations, non seulement entre les Alliés et leurs anciens ennemis, mais aussi entre les Alliés eux-mêmes. Il conclut que la mise en place d'un ordre juste dépendait de tout un ensemble de solutions concrètes que les faiblesses (...)
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  18.  6
    Ernesto Verdeja (2006). A Normative Theory of Reparations in Transitional Democracies. Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):449–468.
  19. Bernard R. Boxill (2003). A Lockean Argument for Black Reparations. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):63-91.
    This is a defense of black reparations using the theory of reparations set out in John Locke''s The Second Treatise of Government. I develop two main arguments, what I call the ``inheritance argument'''' and the ``counterfactual argument,''''both of which have been thought to fail. In no case do I appeal to the false ideas that present day United States citizens are guilty of slavery or must pay reparation simply because the U.S. Government was once complicit in the crime.
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  20. Leif Wenar (2006). Reparations for the Future. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):396–405.
    All of these claims for reparations have mobilized popular support, and all share a degree of intuitive plausibility. The challenge to the theorist is to judge whether and which of such demands are grounded in sound principles of political normativity, so as to be able to select out the valid claims and to measure how the urgency of these claims compares with other demands on the public agenda. The most basic question for those considering the justifications of reparations (...)
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  21.  67
    Kok-Chor Tan (2007). Colonialism, Reparations, and Global Justice. In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press 280--306.
  22.  99
    Derrick Darby (2010). Reparations and Racial Inequality. Philosophy Compass 5 (1):55-66.
    A recent development in philosophical scholarship on reparations for black chattel slavery and Jim Crow segregation is reliance upon social science in normative arguments for reparations. Although there are certainly positive things to be said in favor of an empirically informed normative argument for black reparations, given the depth of empirical disagreement about the causes of persistent racial inequalities, and the ethos of 'post-racial' America, the strongest normative argument for reparations may be one that goes through (...)
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  23.  44
    Lawrie Balfour (2005). Reparations After Identity Politics. Political Theory 33 (6):786 - 811.
    The end of the twentieth century witnessed a resurgence of demands for reparations for slavery and segregation in the United States. At the same time, a chorus of prominent political theorists warned against the threat "identity politics" poses for democratic politics. This essay considers whether it is possible to construct an argument for reparations that responds to these concerns, particularly as they are articulated by Wendy Brown. To do so, I explore how Brown's analysis of the dangers of (...)
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  24.  53
    Jonathan Kaplan & Andrew Valls (2007). Housing Discrimination As a Basis for Black Reparations. Public Affairs Quarterly 21 (3):255-274.
    The renewed interest in the issue of black reparations, both in the public sphere and among scholars, is a welcome development because the racial injustices of the past continue to shape American society by disadvantaging African Americans in a variety of ways. Attention to the past and how it has shaped present-day inequality seems essential both to understanding our predicament and to justifying policies that would address and undermine racial inequality. Given this, any argument for policies designed to pursue (...)
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  25.  49
    Thomas McCarthy (2004). Coming to Terms with Our Past, Part II: On the Morality and Politics of Reparations for Slavery. Political Theory 32 (6):750-772.
    There has recently been a surge of interest, theoretical and political, in reparations for slavery. This essay takes up several moral-political issues from that intensifying debate: how to conceptualize and justify collective compensation and collective responsibility, and how to establish a plausible connection between past racial injustices and present racial inequalities. It concludes with some brief remarks on one aspect of the very complicated politics of reparations: the possible effects of hearings and trials on the public memory and (...)
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  26. Ariel Colonomos & Andrea Armstrong (2006). German Reparations to the Jews After World War II: A Turning Point in the History of Reparations. In Pablo De Greiff (ed.), The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press 390--419.
  27.  26
    Jeremy J. Sarkin & Carly Fowler (2008). Reparations for Historical Human Rights Violations: The International and Historical Dimensions of the Alien Torts Claims Act Genocide Case of the Herero of Namibia. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 9 (3):331-360.
    Between 1904 and 1908, German colonialists in German South West Africa (GSWA, known today as Namibia) committed genocide and other international crimes against two indigenous groups, the Herero and the Nama. From the late 1990s, the Herero have sought reparations from the German government and several German corporations for what occurred more than a hundred years ago. This article examines and contextualizes the issues concerning reparations for historical human rights claims. It describes and analyzes the events in GSWA (...)
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  28.  15
    Rebecca Tsosie (2007). Acknowledging the Past to Heal the Future: The Role of Reparations for Native Nations. In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press 47--68.
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  29.  17
    Wilton D. Alston & Walter E. Block (2008). Reparations, Once Again. Human Rights Review 9 (3):379-392.
    Reparations whether to blacks for slavery, or to Indians for land theft, or to settle any number of other conflicts, has an interesting political background. Analysts on the left, who are usually no friend of private property rights, nevertheless rely on this doctrine to support their case for reparations. Those on the right, in contrast, who supposedly defend the institution of property rights, jettison them when it comes to reparations. It is only libertarians, such as the present (...)
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  30.  12
    William Bradford (2005). Beyond Reparations: Justice as Indigenism. Human Rights Review 6 (3):5-79.
    For the peoples who have inhabited, since time immemorial, the lands within the external borders of the U.S., remediation of genocide, land theft, and ethnocide is a pressing issue. However, monetary reparations would frustrate the reacquisition of the American Indian capacity to self-determine on ancestral lands. Because the injustice at the core of U.S. history is neither broadly acknowledged nor deeply understood, Part I provides historical foundation and sketches the factual predicate to the American Indian claim for redress. Part (...)
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  31.  27
    Stephen Kershnar (2001). The Case Against Reparations. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 8 (1):41-46.
    George Schedler raises interesting issues with regard to the amount of reparations owed for slavery, the parties who are owed reparations, and the standard for these reparations. His arguments, however, do not hold up upon analysis. His analysis of the case for the descendants of slaves being owed compensation seriously overestimates the case for such reparations. He does not identify the grounds for such compensation, i.e., either stolen inheritance or the descendants’ trustee-like control over the slave’s (...)
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  32. Elisabeth Lira (2006). The Reparations Policy for Human Rights Violations in Chile. In Pablo De Greiff (ed.), The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press
     
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  33.  11
    Ronald Olufemi Badru (2010). Reparations for Africa. Cultura 7 (2):67-80.
    The paper adopts philosophical research methodologies of conceptual clarification, critical analysis, and extensive argumentation. It attempts to jointly employ African metaphysical and epistemological grounds to address the problem of finding appropriate justification for reparations for Africa on the issue of past slavery and slave trade. The paper states that the crux of the problem is how to formulate a coherent theoretical framework, which provides a strong connection between the direct victims of slavery and slave trade and their descendants in (...)
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  34. Alexander Segovia (2006). Financing Reparations Programs: Reflections From International Experience. In Pablo De Greiff (ed.), The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press 669--670.
     
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  35.  6
    Naomi Zack (2003). Reparations and the Rectification of Race. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):139 - 151.
    Positive law and problems with identifying beneficiaries confine reparations for U.S. slavery to the level of discourse. Within the discourse, the broader topic of rectification can be addressed. The rectification of slavery includes restoring full humanity to our ideas of the slaves and their descendants and it requires disabuse of the false biological idea of race. This is not racial eliminativism, because biological race never existed, but more importantly because African American racial identities and redress of present racism are (...)
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  36. Brandon Hamber (2007). Reparations as Symbol: Narratives of Resistance, Reticence and Possibility in South Africa. In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press
     
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  37.  25
    Chris Buck (2004). Sartre, Fanon, and the Case for Slavery Reparations. Sartre Studies International 10 (2):123-138.
    In this article I argue that Fanon articulates a more complex relationship between his notion of radical freedom and slavery reparations that allows for the possibility of demanding the latter without sacrificing the former. While at times Fanon seems to posit a simple dilemma according to which one must choose between freedom and reparations, he also describes a vicious cycle in which the taking of material reparations appears to be a precondition for freedom, yet the claim for (...)
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  38. Catherine Lu (2007). Justice and Reparations in World Politics. In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press
  39. Andrew Valls (2007). Reconsidering the Case for Black Reparations. In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. OUP Oxford
  40. Richard Falk (2006). Reparations, International Law and Global Justice: A New Frontier. In Pablo De Greiff (ed.), The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press 478--503.
  41. M. Brinton Lykes & Marcie Mersky (2006). Reparations and Mental Health: Psychosocial Interventions Towards Healing, Human Agency, and Rethreading Social Realities. In Pablo De Greiff (ed.), The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press 589.
     
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  42. Jaime E. Malamud-Goti, Lucas Sebastián Grosman & P. De Greiff (2006). Reparations and Civil Litigation: Compensation for Human Rights Violations in Transitional Democracies. In Pablo De Greiff (ed.), The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press
     
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  43. Pablo De Greiff (2006). Justice and Reparations. In The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press
  44.  5
    Barbara Ann Hocking, Scott Guy & Jason Grant Allen (2010). Three Sorries and You're In? Does the Prime Minister's Statement in the Australian Federal Parliament Presage Federal Constitutional Recognition and Reparations? Human Rights Review 11 (1):105-134.
    Then newly elected Labor Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, made a historic statement of “Sorry” for past injustices to Australian Indigenous peoples at the opening of the 2008 federal parliament. In the long-standing absence of a constitutional ‘foundational principle’ to shape positive federal initiatives in this context, there has been speculation that the emphatic Sorry Statement may presage formal constitutional recognition. The debate is long overdue in a nation that only overturned the legal fiction of terra nullius and recognised native title (...)
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  45.  2
    George Schedler (1998). Racist Symbols & Reparations: Philosophical Reflections on Vestiges of the American Civil War. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this book, George Schedler offers moral and legal perspectives on two legacies of the Civil War: the adoption of the Confederate flag by Southern states and the question of African American reparations. Schedler's analysis of reparations focuses on the principle that whatever the enslaved would have earned and enjoyed had they not been enslaved should determine compensation.
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  46.  1
    Kathleen Dill (2009). Reparations and the Illusive Meaning of Justice in Guatemala. In Barbara Rose Johnston & Susan Slyomovics (eds.), Waging War, Making Peace: Reparations and Human Rights. Left Coast Press 183.
  47. A. Segovia (2006). Financing Reparations Programs: Reflections From International Experience a DE GREIFF, P. In Pablo De Greiff (ed.), The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press
     
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  48.  2
    Alison Dundes Renteln (2009). Reparations and Human Rights: Why the Anthropological Approach Matters. In Barbara Rose Johnston & Susan Slyomovics (eds.), Waging War, Making Peace: Reparations and Human Rights. Left Coast Press
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  49. Carolyn Benson (2007). Further Trouble for Unsettled Waters: Attention to Gender in the Debate on Black Reparations. In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press 130.
  50. Christopher J. Colvin (2006). Overview of the Reparations Program in South Africa. In Pablo De Greiff (ed.), The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press 176--215.
     
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