Search results for 'reproduction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Melissa Seymour Fahmy (2013). On Procreative Responsibility in Assisted and Collaborative Reproduction. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):55-70.score: 24.0
    Abstract It is common practice to regard participants in assisted and collaborative reproduction (gamete donors, embryologists, fertility doctors, etc.) as simply providing a desired biological product or medical service. These agents are not procreators in the ordinary sense, nor do they stand in any kind of meaningful parental relation to the resulting offspring. This paper challenges the common view by defending a principle of procreative responsibility and then demonstrating that this standard applies as much to those who provide reproductive (...)
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  2. Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta & Annemiek Richters (2008). Embodied Subjects and Fragmented Objects: Women's Bodies, Assisted Reproduction Technologies and the Right to Self-Determination. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):239-249.score: 24.0
    This article focuses on the transformation of the female reproductive body with the use of assisted reproduction technologies under neo-liberal economic globalisation, wherein the ideology of trade without borders is central, as well as under liberal feminist ideals, wherein the right to self-determination is central. Two aspects of the body in western medicine—the fragmented body and the commodified body, and the integral relation between these two—are highlighted. This is done in order to analyse the implications of local and global (...)
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  3. Daniela Cutas & Lisa Bortolotti (2010). Natural Versus Assisted Reproduction. In Search of Fairness. Studies in Ethics, Law and Technology 4 (1).score: 24.0
    Whilst the choice of becoming a parent in the natural way is unregulated all over Europe (and proposals of regulation raise vehement objections), most European countries have (either legal or professional) regulations imposing criteria that people must satisfy if they wish to gain access to assisted reproduction and parenting. These criteria may include relationship status, age, sexual orientation, financial stability, health, and willingness to attend parenting classes. The existence of regulations in this area is largely accepted, and the objections (...)
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  4. Anne Donchin (2011). In Whose Interest? Policy and Politics in Assisted Reproduction. Bioethics 25 (2):92-101.score: 24.0
    This paper interprets the British legislative process that initiated the first comprehensive national regulation of embryo research and fertility services and examines subsequent efforts to restrain the assisted reproduction industry. After describing and evaluating British regulatory measures, I consider successive failures to control the assisted reproduction industry in the US. I discuss disparities between UK and US regulatory initiatives and their bearing on regulation in other countries. Then I turn to the political and social structures in which the (...)
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  5. Evelyn Fox Keller (1987). Reproduction and the Central Project of Evolutionary Theory. Biology and Philosophy 2 (4):383-396.score: 24.0
    In much of the discourse of evolutionary theory, reproduction is treated as an autonomous function of the individual organism — even in discussions of sexually reproducing organisms. In this paper, I examine some of the functions and consequences of such manifestly peculiar language. In particular, I suggest that it provides crucial support for the central project of evolutionary theory — namely that of locating causal efficacy in intrinsic properties of the individual organism. Furthermore, I argue that the language of (...)
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  6. Hongxing Chen (2010). Reproduction, Familiarity, Love, and Humaneness: How Did Confucius Reveal “Humaneness”? [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):506-522.score: 24.0
    This article draws out the subtle connections among the various sorts of categories— sheng 生 (reproduction), qin 亲 (familiarity), ai 爱 (love), and ren 仁 (humaneness) —focusing on the following: Confucius found the original significance of reproduction to be sympathy between males and females, and upon further study he found it extended to the.affinity of blood relations, namely familiarity. From familiarity he came to understand love that one generates and has for people and things beyond one’s blood relations, (...)
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  7. Anne Donchin (2009). Toward a Gender-Sensitive Assisted Reproduction Policy. Bioethics 23 (1):28-38.score: 24.0
    The recent case of the UK woman who lost her legal struggle to be impregnated with her own frozen embryos, raises critical issues about the meaning of reproductive autonomy and the scope of regulatory practices. I revisit this case within the context of contemporary debate about the moral and legal dimensions of assisted reproduction. I argue that the gender neutral context that frames discussion of regulatory practices is unjust unless it gives appropriate consideration to the different positions women and (...)
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  8. Marco Fabbri, Nicola Cellini, Monica Martoni, Lorenzo Tonetti & Vincenzo Natale (2013). The Mechanisms of Space‐Time Association: Comparing Motor and Perceptual Contributions in Time Reproduction. Cognitive Science 37 (7):1228-1250.score: 24.0
    The spatial-temporal association indicates that time is represented spatially along a left-to-right line. It is unclear whether the spatial-temporal association is mainly related to a perceptual or a motor component. In addition, the spatial-temporal association is not consistently found using a time reproduction task. Our rationale for this finding is that, classically, a non-lateralized button for performing the task has been used. Using two lateralized response buttons, the aim of the study was to find a spatial-temporal association in a (...)
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  9. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2004). A Woman's Choice? On Women, Assisted Reproduction and Social Coercion. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (1):81 - 90.score: 24.0
    This paper critically discusses an argument that is sometimes pressed into service in the ethical debate about the use of assisted reproduction. The argument runs roughly as follows: we should prevent women from using assisted reproduction techniques, because women who want to use the technology have been socially coerced into desiring children - and indeed have thereby been harmed by the patriarchal society in which they live. I call this the argument from coercion. Having clarified this argument, I (...)
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  10. Stephen Gill & Isabella Bakker (2006). New Constitutionalism and the Social Reproduction of Caring Institutions. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (1):35-57.score: 24.0
    This essay analyzes neo-liberal economic agreements and legal and political frameworks or what has been called the “new constitutionalism,” a governance framework that empowers market forces to reshape economic and social development worldwide. The article highlights some consequences of new constitutionalism for caring institutions specifically, and for what feminists call social reproduction more generally: the biological reproduction of the species; the reproduction of labor power; and the reproduction of social institutions and processes associated with the creation (...)
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  11. Mairi Levitt (2004). Assisted Reproduction: Managing an Unruly Technology. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 12 (1):41-49.score: 24.0
    Technology is “unruly” because it operates in a social context where it is shaped by institutions, organisations and individuals in ways not envisaged when it was first developed. In the UK assisted reproductive technology has developed from strictly circumscribed beginnings as a treatment for infertility within the NHS, to a service which is more often offered by commercial clinics and purchased by clients who are not necessarily infertile. The article considers the process by which assisted reproductive technology has been created (...)
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  12. Vida Panitch (2013). Assisted Reproduction and Distributive Justice. Bioethics 28 (8).score: 24.0
    The Canadian province of Quebec recently amended its Health Insurance Act to cover the costs of In Vitro Fertilization (IVF). The province of Ontario recently de-insured IVF. Both provinces cited cost-effectiveness as their grounds, but the question as to whether a public health insurance system ought to cover IVF raises the deeper question of how we should understand reproduction at the social level, and whether its costs should be a matter of individual or collective responsibility. In this article I (...)
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  13. Carmel Shalev (2012). An Ethic of Care and Responsibility: Reflections on Third-Party Reproduction. Medicine Studies 3 (3):147-156.score: 24.0
    The rapid development of assisted reproduction technologies for the treatment of infertility appears to empower women through expanding their individual choice, but it is also creating new forms of suffering for them and their collaborators, especially in the context of transnational third-party reproduction. This paper explores the possibility of framing the ethical discourse around third-party reproduction by bringing attention to concerns of altruistic empathy for women who collaborate in the reproductive process, in addition to those of individualistic (...)
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  14. Jacqueline A. Laing (2006). Artificial Reproduction, Blood Relatedness, and Human Identity. The Monist 89 (4):548-566.score: 24.0
    The article discusses questions on the significance of blood relatedness in the context of identity arguments about artificial reproduction (AR). Kinship, origins, and biological connections are significant to human beings. The author explains that family relationships bear on the identity of human beings. Moreover, she emphasizes that once these principles are neglected, it is possible to create people in ways that threaten significant human bonds and alienate people who are naturally related spelling loss, confusion and grief for them.
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  15. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2004). A Woman's Choice? – On Women, Assisted Reproduction and Social Coercion. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (1):81-90.score: 24.0
    This paper critically discusses an argument that is sometimes pressed into service in the ethical debate about the use of assisted reproduction. The argument runs roughly as follows: we should prevent women from using assisted reproduction techniques, because women who want to use the technology have been socially coerced into desiring children - and indeed have thereby been harmed by the patriarchal society in which they live. I call this the argument from coercion. Having clarified this argument, I (...)
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  16. Ekaterina Balabanova & Frida Simonstein (2010). Assisted Reproduction: A Comparative Review of IVF Policies in Two Pro-Natalist Countries. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (2):188-202.score: 24.0
    Policies on reproduction have become an increasingly important tool for governments seeking to meet the so-called demographic ‘challenge’ created by the combination of low fertility and lengthening life expectancies. However, the tension between the state and the market in health care is present in all countries around the world due to the scare resources available and the understandable importance of the health issues. The field of assisted reproduction, as part of the health care system, is affected by this (...)
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  17. Roger Pierson & Raymond Stephanson (2010). Imagining Reproduction in Science and History. Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):1-9.score: 24.0
    Reproduction is at the core of many aspects of human existence. It is intrinsic in our biology and in the broad social constructs in which we all reside. The introduction to this special issue is designed to reflect on some of the differences between the humanities/arts and the sciences on the subject of Reproduction now and in the past. The intellectual/cultural distance between humanists and reproductive biologists is vast, yet communication between the Two Cultures has much to offer (...)
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  18. Valdimar Tr Hafstein (2007). Spectacular Reproduction. Journal of Medical Humanities 28 (1):3-17.score: 24.0
    Ron Harris captured the popular imagination in October 1999 with a website where he auctioned off the ova of fashion models to the highest bidder. This article treats the controversy surrounding Harris’ site within a dual frame of critical theory’s approach to reproduction and a folkloristic approach to discourse. The website fuses traditional narrative motifs and structures with the logic of advertising, seventies television, family-values rhetoric, and the fertility industry. I argue that the great attraction of ronsangels.com is that (...)
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  19. Patrick Hanafin (2006). Gender, Citizenship and Human Reproduction in Contemporary Italy. Feminist Legal Studies 14 (3):329-352.score: 24.0
    This article examines how the recently introduced law on assisted reproduction in Italy, which gives symbolic legal recognition to the embryo, came about, and how a referendum, which would have repealed large sections of it, failed. The occupation of the legal space by the embryo is the outcome of a crusade by a well-organised alliance of theo-conservatives. These groups see in reproductive medicine an uncontrolled interference with their notion of the natural order of things. Such a worldview requires a (...)
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  20. Ruth Fletcher (2010). Reproduction and Scale: A Response to Skeggs and Wilson. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 18 (1):77-84.score: 24.0
    This paper draws on the concepts of reproduction and scale to suggest that Skeggs and Wilson, in their contributions to this issue of Feminist Legal Studies, both identify a future-oriented reworking of historically accumulated value. The spectacular emotional labour of British reality television and the parody of mechanistic labour in Bangkok’s sex shows may be seen as instances in the affective search for future security in transnational markets. Capitalist subjectivities are still being produced through these gendered and sexual activities, (...)
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  21. Allison Muri (2010). Imagining Reproduction: The Politics of Reproduction, Technology and the Woman Machine. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):53-67.score: 24.0
    Scholars widely assume that the term generation, is preferable to reproduction in the context of early modern history, based on the premise that reproduction to mean procreation was not in use until the end of the eighteenth century. This shift in usage presumably corresponds to the rise of mechanistic philosophy; feminist scholarship, particularly that deriving from the hostile critique fashionable in the 1980s has claimed reproduction is associated with medical practitioners’ perceptions of women as baby-producing machines. However, (...)
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  22. Anne Pollock (2003). Complicating Power in High-Tech Reproduction: Narratives of Anonymous Paid Egg Donors. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (3-4):241-263.score: 22.0
    This paper is informed by my own participant observation and uses my own ethnography which included conducting in-depth interviews with anonymous paid egg donors and observing a listserv for women considering, pursuing, or having completed egg donation, to illustrate the way that power operates at this particular site of the reproductive center in postmodernity. After outlining who the consumers and providers of eggs are, I will use Foucault's concepts of biopower, disciplinary power, and normativity to describe how anonymous paid egg (...)
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  23. Lisa Guenther (2006). The Gift of the Other: Levinas and the Politics of Reproduction. SUNY Press.score: 22.0
    The Gift of the Other brings together a philosophical analysis of time, embodiment, and ethical responsibility with a feminist critique of the way women’s reproductive capacity has been theorized and represented in Western culture. Author Lisa Guenther develops the ethical and temporal implications of understanding birth as the gift of the Other, a gift which makes existence possible, and already orients this existence toward a radical responsibility for Others. Through an engagement with the work of Levinas, Beauvoir, Arendt, Irigaray, and (...)
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  24. Daniela Cutas (2008). On a Romanian Attempt to Legislate on Medically Assisted Human Reproduction. Bioethics 22 (1):56–63.score: 21.0
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  25. David Robert Cole (2010). The Reproduction of Philosophical Bodies in Education with Language. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (8):816-829.score: 21.0
    This paper articulates a feminist poststructural philosophy of education by combining the work of Luce Irigaray and Michel Foucault. This acts as an underpinning for a philosophy of desire (McWilliam, 1999) in education, or as a minor philosophy of education where multiple movements of bodies are enacted through theoretical methodologies and research. These methods include qualitative analysis and critical discourse analysis; where the conjunction Irigaray-Foucault is a paradigm for dealing with educational phenomena. It is also a rigorous materialism (Braidotti, 2005) (...)
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  26. Lucy Green (2005). Musical Meaning and Social Reproduction: A Case for Retrieving Autonomy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (1):77–92.score: 21.0
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  27. L. Michelle Baker (2008). Before Reproduction: The Distortion of Generation. Philosophia 36 (3):299-312.score: 21.0
    Jean Baudrillard has posited a theory of ‘the precession of simulacra’, arguing that it is no longer possible to tell the difference between an image and the meaning it purports to represent because technology allows the image to precede its meaning. Christa Wolf, while researching Cassandra: A Novel and Four Essays (1984), traveled to Greece and discovered the ways in which language in the rational, Western model of civilization has been distorted. Both Baudrillard and Wolf are disturbed by the ways (...)
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  28. Isabel Karpin (2012). Perfecting Pregnancy: Law, Disability, and the Future of Reproduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Disability; 2. Risk; 3. Terminations; 4. De-selections; 5. Interpretations; 6. Futures.
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  29. Signe Mezinska & Ilze Mileiko (2013). Risk Communication in Assisted Reproduction in Latvia: From Private Experience to Ethical Issues. Studia Philosophica Estonica 6 (2):79-96.score: 21.0
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  30. Coleman T. Merryman & Sandra S. Merryman (1973). Reproduction of Horizontal and Vertical Lines in a Within-Subjects Design. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (1):43.score: 21.0
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  31. Miroslav Popper (2012). Context Underlying Decision-Making on Parenthood and Reproduction. Human Affairs 22 (2):214-226.score: 21.0
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  32. Beatrice Ioan & Vasile Astarastoae (2013). Ethical and Legal Aspects in Medically Assisted Human Reproduction in Romania. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 14 (2):4 - 13.score: 21.0
    Up to the present, there have not been any specific norms regarding medically assisted human reproduction in Romanian legislation. Due to this situation the general legislation regarding medical assistance (law no. 95/2006, regarding the Reform in Health Care System), the Penal and Civil law and the provisions of the Code of Deontology of the Romanian College of Physicians are applied to the field of medically assisted human reproduction. By analysing the ethical and legal conflicts regarding medically assisted human (...)
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  33. Nilly Adam, Angelina D. Castro & Donald L. Clark (1974). Production, Estimation, and Reproduction of Time Intervals During Inhalation of a General Anesthetic in Man. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (4):609.score: 21.0
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  34. J. J. Gibson (1929). The Reproduction of Visually Perceived Forms. Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (1):1.score: 21.0
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  35. Chen Hongxing (2010). Reproduction, Familiarity, Love, and Humaneness: How Did Confucius Reveal “Humaneness”? Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):506-522.score: 21.0
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  36. Thierry Lodé (2011). Sex is Not a Solution for Reproduction: The Libertine Bubble Theory. Bioessays 33 (6):419-422.score: 21.0
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  37. A. H. Maslow (1934). The Effect of Varying External Conditions on Learning, Retention, and Reproduction. Journal of Experimental Psychology 17 (1):36.score: 21.0
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  38. Heidi Mertes & Guido Pennings (2010). Ethical Aspects of the Use of Stem Cell Derived Gametes for Reproduction. Health Care Analysis 18 (3):267-278.score: 21.0
    A lot of interest has been generated by the possibility of deriving gametes from embryonic stem cells and bone marrow stem cells. These stem cell derived gametes may become useful for research and for the treatment of infertility. In this article we consider prospectively the ethical issues that will arise if stem cell derived gametes are used in the clinic, making a distinction between concerns that only apply to embryonic stem cell derived gametes and concerns that are also relevant for (...)
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  39. Frida Simonstein (2006). Artificial Reproduction Technologies (RTs) – All the Way to the Artificial Womb? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (3):359-365.score: 21.0
    In this paper, I argue that the development of an artificial womb is already well on its way. By putting together pieces of information arising from new scientific advances in different areas, (neo-natal care, gynecology, embryology, the human genome project and computer science), I delineate a distinctive picture, which clearly suggests that the artificial womb may become a reality sooner than we may think. Currently, there is a huge gap between the first stages of gestation (using in vitro fertilization) and (...)
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  40. John L. Wipf & Wilse B. Webb (1962). Supplemetnary Report: Proactive Inhibition as a Function of the Method of Reproduction. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (4):421.score: 21.0
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  41. Gerald J. Laabs (1973). Retention Characteristics of Different Reproduction Cues in Motor Short-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):168.score: 21.0
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  42. H. E. Peixotto (1942). Intraserial Inhibition as Measured by Reproduction. Journal of Experimental Psychology 31 (1):17.score: 21.0
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  43. Marco Romito (2012). Growing Up in Le Vallette. A Research on Social Inequalities Reproduction. Polis 26 (2):227-254.score: 21.0
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  44. W. F. Thomas & P. T. Young (1942). A Study of Organic Set: Immediate Reproduction, by Different Muscle Groups, of Patterns Presented by Successive Visual Flashes. Journal of Experimental Psychology 30 (5):347.score: 21.0
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  45. Catherine Mills (2011). Futures of Reproduction: Bioethics and Biopolitics. Springer.score: 20.0
    Issues in reproductive ethics, such as the capacity of parents to ‘choose children’, present challenges to philosophical ideas of freedom, responsibility and harm. This book responds to these challenges by proposing a new framework for thinking about the ethics of reproduction that emphasizes the ways that social norms affect decisions about who is born. The book provides clear and thorough discussions of some of the dominant problems in reproductive ethics - human enhancement and the notion of the normal, reproductive (...)
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  46. Stellan Welin (2004). Reproductive Ectogenesis: The Third Era of Human Reproduction and Some Moral Consequences. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):615-626.score: 20.0
    In a well known story Derek Parfit describes a disconnection between two entities that normally (in real life) travel together through space and time, namely your personal identity consisting of both mind and body. Realising the possibility of separation, even if it might never happen in real life, new questions arise that cast doubt on old solutions. In human reproduction, in real life, at present the fetus spends approximately nine months inside the pregnant woman. But, we might envisage other (...)
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  47. Nicola L. Bulled & Richard Sosis (2010). Examining the Relationship Between Life Expectancy, Reproduction, and Educational Attainment. Human Nature 21 (3):269-289.score: 20.0
    Life history theory aims to explain the relationship between life events, recognizing that the fertility and growth schedules of organisms are dependent on environmental conditions and an organism’s ability to extract resources from its environment. Using models from life history theory, we predict life expectancy to be positively correlated with educational investments and negatively correlated with adolescent reproduction and total fertility rates. Analyses of UN data from 193 countries support these predictions and demonstrate that, although variation is evident across (...)
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  48. Helen E. Fisher (1998). Lust, Attraction, and Attachment in Mammalian Reproduction. Human Nature 9 (1):23-52.score: 20.0
    This paper proposes that mammals exhibit three primary emotion categories for mating and reproduction: (1) the sex drive, or lust, characterized by the craving for sexual gratification; (2) attraction, characterized by increased energy and focused attention on one or more potential mates, accompanied in humans by feelings of exhilaration, “intrusive thinking” about a mate, and the craving for emotional union with this mate or potential mate; and (3) attachment, characterized by the maintenance of close social contact in mammals, accompanied (...)
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  49. Shelley Day Sclater (ed.) (2009). Regulating Autonomy: Sex, Reproduction and Family. Hart.score: 20.0
    Intimacies and domestic lives -- Reproduction.
     
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  50. Jacqueline A. Laing (2005). Artificial Reproduction, the 'Welfare Principle', and the Common Good. Medical Law Review 13:328-356.score: 18.0
    This article challenges the view most recently expounded by Emily Jackson that ‘decisional privacy’ ought to be respected in the realm of artificial reproduction (AR). On this view, it is considered an unjust infringement of individual liberty for the state to interfere with individual or group freedom artificially to produce a child. It is our contention that a proper evaluation of AR and of the relevance of welfare will be sensitive not only to the rights of ‘commissioning parties’ to (...)
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