Search results for 'reproductive ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter F. Omonzejele (2010). Global Principles, Local Obligations: Reproductive Ethics in Affluent Societies and Developing Countries. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):32-47.score: 66.0
    This essay is an intercultural dialogue in reproductive ethics. The paper, which argues from both developed and developing world perspectives, addresses the question of what should be done when confronted with the possibility of giving birth to a severely disabled child. The author argues that such a life should not be considered because of the economic circumstances in most developing countries. This is contrary to the view sometimes advanced in affluent societies that the prevention of such a birth (...)
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  2. Bertha Alvarez Manninen (2009). The Metaphysical Foundations of Reproductive Ethics. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):190-204.score: 60.0
    Many bioethicists working in reproductive ethics tacitly assume some theory of diachronic personal identity. For example, Peter Singer argues that there is no identity relation between a foetus and a future individual because the former shares no robust mental connections with the latter. Consequently, abortion prevents the existence of an individual; it does not destroy an already existing individual. Singer's argument implicitly appeals to the psychological account of personal identity, which, although endorsed by many philosophers such as Derek (...)
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  3. Edward Collins Vacek (1992). Catholic 'Natural Law' and Reproductive Ethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (3):329-346.score: 60.0
    Catholic natural law has had a long and evolving interest in bioethics. Thomas Aquinas left natural law a legacy of great flexibility in evaluating goods within a whole life. He also bequeathed to the Church the basis for an abolutism on sexual issues. Modern reproductive medicine and a deeper understanding of human freedom have reopened these issues. The Vatican has developed new, holistic arguments to proscribe reproductive interventions, but critics remain unconvinced that marital relationships and goods have been (...)
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  4. Marcello Di Paola & Gianfranco Pellegrino (2012). Temporary Reproductive Suspension: Population Ethics and Climate Change. Iride 25 (1):57-78.score: 60.0
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  5. S. Camporesi & L. Bortolotti (2008). Reproductive Cloning in Humans and Therapeutic Cloning in Primates: Is the Ethical Debate Catching Up with the Recent Scientific Advances? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):e15-e15.score: 57.0
    After years of failure, in November 2007 primate embryonic stem cells were derived by somatic cellular nuclear transfer, also known as therapeutic cloning. The first embryo transfer for human reproductive cloning purposes was also attempted in 2006, albeit with negative results. These two events force us to think carefully about the possibility of human cloning which is now much closer to becoming a reality. In this paper we tackle this issue from two sides, first summarising what scientists have achieved (...)
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  6. Hannelore Koerner (1989). Ethics in Reproductive Medicine in the German Democratic Republic. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (3):335-341.score: 51.0
    The paper discusses the practice of genetic counseling and elective abortion in the German Democratic Republic. Keywords: elective abortion, embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization, protection of human life, reproductive ethics, German Democratic Republic, bioethics CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
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  7. R. Narruhn & I. R. Schellenberg (2012). Caring Ethics and a Somali Reproductive Dilemma. Nursing Ethics 20 (4):0969733012453363.score: 51.0
    The use of traditional ethical methodologies is inadequate in addressing a constructed maternal–fetal rights conflict in a multicultural obstetrical setting. The use of caring ethics and relational approach is better suited to address multicultural conceptualizations of autonomy and moral distress. The way power differentials, authoritative knowledge, and informed consent are intertwined in this dilemma will be illuminated by contrasting traditional bioethics and a caring ethics approach. Cultural safety is suggested as a way to develop a relational ontology. Using (...)
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  8. S. Matthew Liao (2008). Selecting Children: The Ethics of Reproductive Genetic Engineering. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):973-991.score: 48.0
    Advances in reproductive genetic engineering have the potential to transform human lives. Not only do they promise to allow us to select children free of diseases, they can also enable us to select children with desirable traits. In this paper, I consider two clusters of arguments for the moral permissibility of reproductive genetic engineering, what I call the Perfectionist View and the Libertarian View; and two clusters of arguments against reproductive genetic engineering, what I call the Human (...)
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  9. Catherine Mills (2011). Futures of Reproduction: Bioethics and Biopolitics. Springer.score: 48.0
    Issues in reproductive ethics, such as the capacity of parents to ‘choose children’, present challenges to philosophical ideas of freedom, responsibility and harm. This book responds to these challenges by proposing a new framework for thinking about the ethics of reproduction that emphasizes the ways that social norms affect decisions about who is born. The book provides clear and thorough discussions of some of the dominant problems in reproductive ethics - human enhancement and the notion (...)
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  10. Guido Van Steendam, András Dinnyés, Jacques Mallet, Rolando Meloni, Carlos Romeo Casabona, Jorge Guerra González, Josef Kuře, Eörs Szathmáry, Jan Vorstenbosch, Péter Molnár, David Edbrooke, Judit Sándor, Ferenc Oberfrank, Ron Cole-Turner, István Hargittai, Beate Littig, Miltos Ladikas, Emilio Mordini, Hans E. Roosendaal, Maurizio Salvi, Balázs Gulyás & Diana Malpede (2006). Summary: The Budapest Meeting 2005 Intensified Networking on Ethics of Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):415-420.score: 48.0
    This paper reports on the meeting of the Sounding Board of the EU Reprogenetics Project that was held in Budapest, Hungary, 6–9 November 2005. The Reprogenetics Project runs from 2004 until 2007 and has a brief to study the ethical aspects of human reproductive cloning and germline gene therapy. Discussions during The Budapest Meeting are reported in depth in this paper as well as the initiatives to involve the participating groups and others in ongoing collaborations with the goal of (...)
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  11. Daniel Sperling (2010). Commanding the “Be Fruitful and Multiply” Directive: Reproductive Ethics, Law, and Policy in Israel. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (03):363-371.score: 48.0
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  12. G. K. D. Crozier & Dominique Martin (2012). How to Address the Ethics of Reproductive Travel to Developing Countries: A Comparison of National Self-Sufficiency and Regulated Market Approaches. Developing World Bioethics 12 (1):45-54.score: 48.0
    One of the areas of concern raised by cross-border reproductive travel regards the treatment of women who are solicited to provide their ova or surrogacy services to foreign consumers. This is particularly troublesome in the context of developing countries where endemic poverty and low standards for both medical care and informed consent may place these women at risk of exploitation and harm. We explore two contrasting proposals for policy development regarding the industry, both of which seek to promote ethical (...)
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  13. Judit Sándor & Violeta Beširević (eds.) (2009). Perfect Copy?: Law and Ethics of Reproductive Medicine. Cenger for Ethics and Law in Biomedicine.score: 48.0
     
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  14. Rebecca J. Cook, Bernard M. Dickens & Mahmoud F. Fathalla (2003). Reproductive Health and Human Rights: Integrating Medicine, Ethics, and Law. Clarendon Press.score: 48.0
    The concept of reproductive health promises to play a crucial role in improving women's health and rights around the world. It was internationally endorsed by a United Nations conference in 1994, but remains controversial because of the challenge it presents to conservative agencies: it challenges policies of suppressing public discussion on human sexuality and regulating its private expressions. Reproductive Health and Human Rights is designed to equip healthcare providers and administrators to integrate ethical, legal, and human rights principles (...)
     
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  15. Carson Strong (2002). Overview: A Framework for Reproductive Ethics. In Donna L. Dickenson (ed.), Ethical Issues in Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Cambridge University Press. 17--36.score: 46.0
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  16. Jennifer A. Parks (2010). Care Ethics and the Global Practice of Commercial Surrogacy. Bioethics 24 (7):333-340.score: 45.0
    This essay will focus on the moral issues relating to surrogacy in the global context, and will critique the liberal arguments that have been offered in support of it. Liberal arguments hold sway concerning reproductive arrangements made between commissioning couples from wealthy nations and the surrogates from socioeconomically weak backgrounds that they hire to do their reproductive labor. My argument in this paper is motivated by a concern for controlling harms by putting the practice of globalized commercial surrogacy (...)
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  17. Bernard G. Prusak (2010). What Are Parents For?: Reproductive Ethics After the Nonidentity Problem. Hastings Center Report 40 (2):37-47.score: 45.0
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  18. Ruby Catsanos, Wendy Rogers & Mianna Lotz (2013). The Ethics of Uterus Transplantation. Bioethics 27 (2):65-73.score: 45.0
    Human uterus transplantation (UTx) is currently under investigation as a treatment for uterine infertility. Without a uterus transplant, the options available to women with uterine infertility are adoption or surrogacy; only the latter has the potential for a genetically related child. UTx will offer recipients the chance of having their own pregnancy. This procedure occurs at the intersection of two ethically contentious areas: assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and organ transplantation. In relation to organ transplantation, UTx lies with composite tissue (...)
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  19. Timothy F. Murphy (2010). The Ethics of Helping Transgender Men and Women Have Children. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (1):46-60.score: 45.0
    A transgender man legally married to a woman has given birth to two children, raising questions about the ethics of assisted reproductive treatments (ARTs) for people with cross-sex identities. Psychiatry treats cross-sex identities as a disorder, but key medical organizations and the law in some jurisdictions have taken steps to protect people with these identities from discrimination in health care, housing, and employment. In fact, many people with cross-sex identities bypass psychiatric treatment altogether in order to pursue lives (...)
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  20. Arthur Schafer (1985). Reproductive Ethics Michael Bayles Philosophy of Medicine Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1984. Pp. 144. $9.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 24 (04):731-.score: 45.0
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  21. Alvin Chew (2010). The Moment One Begins to Have Parental Obligations and How This Matters to Reproductive Ethics. Asian Bioethics Review 2 (1):82-86.score: 45.0
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  22. G. R. Dunstan (1984). A Secular Moralist's Manual. Reproductive Ethics. By MICHAEL D. BAYLES. Prentice-Hall, 1984, Pp. 41. Paperback, �9.45. [REVIEW] Bioessays 1 (4):189-190.score: 45.0
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  23. John McMillan (2007). The Return of the Inseminator: Eutelegenesis in Past and Contemporary Reproductive Ethics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (2):393-410.score: 45.0
  24. Francis Myrna Kamm (1985). Sheila McLean and Gerry Maher, Medicine, Morals, and the Law; Michael Bayles, Reproductive Ethics; Douglas N. Walton, Ethics of Withdrawal of Life-Support Systems Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 5 (4):168-173.score: 45.0
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  25. T. Murray (2003). Reproductive Ethics-Reply. Hastings Center Report 33 (1):5-5.score: 45.0
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  26. Stephen Napier (2013). Reproductive Ethics: Adaequatio and Dialogical Virtues. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 1 (S1).score: 45.0
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  27. J. L. Nelson (2000). Reproductive Ethics and the Family. New Zealand Bioethics Journal 1 (1):4-10.score: 45.0
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  28. Christine Overall (1986). Reproductive Ethics: Feminist and Non Feminist Approaches. Canadian Journal of Women and the Law 1 (2):271-278.score: 45.0
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  29. David T. Ozar (1991). Reproductive Ethics and Frameworks for Ethics Education. Teaching Philosophy 14 (3):305-311.score: 45.0
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  30. John A. Robertson (2002). Reproductive Ethics. Hastings Center Report 33 (1):4-5.score: 45.0
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  31. Joseph F. Fletcher (1974). The Ethics of Genetic Control: Ending Reproductive Roulette. Garden City, N.Y.,Anchor Press.score: 44.0
  32. Penelope Deutscher (2010). Reproductive Politics, Biopolitics and Auto-Immunity: From Foucault to Esposito. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):217-226.score: 42.0
    The contingent cultural, epistemological and ontological status of biology is highlighted by changes in attitudes towards reproductive politics in the history of feminist movements. Consider, for example, the American, British, and numerous European instances of feminist sympathy for eugenics at the turn of the century. This amounted to a specific formation of the role, in late nineteenth and early twentieth century feminisms, of concepts of biological risk and defence, which were transformed into the justificatory language of rights claims. In (...)
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  33. Janet Malek (2006). Identity, Harm, and the Ethics of Reproductive Technology. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (1):83 – 95.score: 42.0
    The controversial question of whether a future child can be harmed by the use of reproductive technology turns on the way that the future child's identity is understood. As a result, analysis of the ethical and legal obligations to the children of reproductive technology that are based upon the possibility of such harm depends upon the conception of identity that is used. This paper reviews the contributions of two recent books, David DeGrazia's Human Identity and Bioethics (2005) and (...)
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  34. Daniel M. Goldstein (2003). Reproductive Technologies of the Self: Michel Foucault and Meta-Narrative-Ethics. Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (3-4):229-240.score: 42.0
  35. Anton van Niekerk & Liezl van Zyl (1995). The Ethics of Surrogacy: Women's Reproductive Labour. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (6):345-349.score: 42.0
    The aim of this article is to establish whether there is anything intrinsically immoral about surrogacy arrangements from the perspective of the surrogate mother herself. Specific attention is paid to the claim that surrogacy is similar to prostitution in that it reduces women's reproductive labour to a form of alienated and/or dehumanized labour.
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  36. Signe Mezinska & Ilze Mileiko (2013). Risk Communication in Assisted Reproduction in Latvia: From Private Experience to Ethical Issues. Studia Philosophica Estonica 6 (2):79-96.score: 42.0
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  37. Barbara Hewson (2001). Reproductive Autonomy and the Ethics of Abortion. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (suppl 2):10-14.score: 42.0
    Abortion is one of the most controversial issues in today's world. People tend to turn to the law when trying to decide what is the best possible solution to an unwanted pregnancy. Here the author's views on abortion are discussed from a lawyer's and a woman's point of view. By taking into consideration the rights of the fetus an “antagonistic relationship” between the woman and her unborn child may occur. Therefore, women should have more autonomy in the issue. The article (...)
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  38. Matthias Kettner & Dieter Schäfer (1998). Identifying Moral Perplexity in Reproductive Medicine: A Discourse Ethics Rationale. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 4 (1):8.score: 42.0
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  39. Julien S. Murphy (1998). Ethics in Reproductive and Perinatal Medicine: A New Framework, by Carson Strong. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997. 247 Pp. The Perfect Baby: A Pragmatic Approach to Genetics, by Glenn McGee. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 1997. 166 Pp. New Ways of Making Babies: The Case of Egg Donation, by Cynthia B. Cohen, Ed. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1996. 332 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):226-229.score: 40.0
    The major dilemma for bioethics is choosing an appropriate method of ethical analysis, one that when applied to individual cases can illuminate if not resolve vexing ethical issues for providers and their patients. Two of these books offer direction in this regard. The framework Carson Strong adopts and makes a compelling case for in EthicsinReproductiveandPerinatalMedicine:ANewFramework is one of modified casuistry. Casuistry, imported to bioethics by Jonsen and Toulmin, is a practical, case-based method of ethical decisionmaking. It relies on comparison between (...)
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  40. Stellan Welin (2004). Reproductive Ectogenesis: The Third Era of Human Reproduction and Some Moral Consequences. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (4):615-626.score: 39.0
    In a well known story Derek Parfit describes a disconnection between two entities that normally (in real life) travel together through space and time, namely your personal identity consisting of both mind and body. Realising the possibility of separation, even if it might never happen in real life, new questions arise that cast doubt on old solutions. In human reproduction, in real life, at present the fetus spends approximately nine months inside the pregnant woman. But, we might envisage other possibilities. (...)
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  41. Kristin Zeiler (2004). Reproductive Autonomous Choice – A Cherished Illusion? Reproductive Autonomy Examined in the Context of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):175-183.score: 39.0
    Enhancement of autonomous choice may be considered as an important reason for facilitating the use of genetic tests such as preimplantation genetic diagnosis. The principle of respect for autonomy is a crucial component not only of Western liberal traditions but also of Western bioethics. This is especially so in bioethical discussions and analyses of clinical encounters within medicine. On the basis of an analysis of qualitative research interviews performed with British, Italian and Swedish geneticists and gynaecologists on ethical aspects of (...)
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  42. D. Elsner (2006). Just Another Reproductive Technology? The Ethics of Human Reproductive Cloning as an Experimental Medical Procedure. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (10):596-600.score: 39.0
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  43. Florencia Luna (2004). Reproductive Health and Research Ethics: Hot Issues in Argentina. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (03):267-274.score: 39.0
  44. D. B. Resnik (1998). The Commodification of Human Reproductive Materials. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (6):388-393.score: 39.0
    This essay develops a framework for thinking about the moral basis for the commodification of human reproductive materials. It argues that selling and buying gametes and genes is morally acceptable although there should not be a market for zygotes, embryos, or genomes. Also a market in gametes and genes should be regulated in order to address concerns about the adverse social consequences of commodification.
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  45. M. Charlesworth (1998). Ethics in Reproductive and Perinatal Medicine: A New Framework. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (4):284-284.score: 39.0
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  46. Julien S. Murphy (1998). Ethics in Reproductive and Perinatal Medicine: A New Framework, by Carson Strong. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1997. 247 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (2):226-229.score: 39.0
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  47. Janie B. Butts (forthcoming). Reproductive Issues and Nursing Ethics. Nursing Ethics: Across the Curriculum and Into Practice.score: 39.0
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  48. Kathryn Lilla Cox (2013). The Infertility Treadmill: Feminist Ethics, Personal Choice, and the Use of Reproductive Technologies by Karey Harwood. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 33 (2):209-210.score: 39.0
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  49. D. Micah Hester (2002). Reproductive Technologies as Instruments of Meaningful Parenting: Ethics in the Age of ARTs. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (04):401-410.score: 39.0
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