Search results for 'request' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Veronique Bergeron (2007). The Ethics of Cesarean Section on Maternal Request: A Feminist Critique of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Position on Patient-Choice Surgery. Bioethics 21 (9):478–487.score: 21.0
  2. G. K. Kimsma (2010). Death by Request in The Netherlands: Facts, the Legal Context and Effects on Physicians, Patients and Families. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):355-361.score: 20.0
    In this article I intend to describe an issue of the Dutch euthanasia practice that is not common knowledge. After some general introductory descriptions, by way of formulating a frame of reference, I shall describe the effects of this practice on patients, physicians and families, followed by a more philosophical reflection on the significance of these effects for the assessment of the authenticity of a request and the nature of unbearable suffering, two key concepts in the procedure towards euthanasia (...)
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  3. Zenon Szablowinski (2011). Apology with and Without a Request for Forgiveness. Heythrop Journal 53 (5):731-741.score: 18.0
    The offender who desires to restore or maintain a relationship after a conflict apologises to his or her victim. Not only an individual but also a group can make apology. Groups do it through their representatives who are recognised as such by both sides. Sometimes offenders acknowledge wrongdoing and express regret for it. At other times while apologising, they may also ask for forgiveness. Does apology without a request for forgiveness mean the same as apology with such a (...)? Are there any cases where apology may be appropriate, but not a request for forgiveness? Do those who apologise without asking for forgiveness really not want to be forgiven? This article answers these questions by exploring the notion of apology and its relation to forgiveness. (shrink)
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  4. Lawrence J. Schneiderman (1995). When Families Request That 'Everything Possible' Be Done. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (2):145-163.score: 18.0
    The paper explores the ethical and psychological issues that arise when family members request that "everything possible" be done for a particular patient. The paper first illustrates this phenomenon by reviewing the well known case of Helga Wanglie. We proceed to argue that in Wanglie and similar cases family members may request futile treatments as a means of conveying that (1) the loss of the patient is tantamount to losing a part of themselves; (2) the patient should not (...)
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  5. M. K. Dees, M. J. Vernooij-Dassen, W. J. Dekkers, K. C. Vissers & C. van Weel (2011). 'Unbearable Suffering': A Qualitative Study on the Perspectives of Patients Who Request Assistance in Dying. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):727-734.score: 18.0
    Background One of the objectives of medicine is to relieve patients' suffering. As a consequence, it is important to understand patients' perspectives of suffering and their ability to cope. However, there is poor insight into what determines their suffering and their ability to bear it. Purpose To explore the constituent elements of suffering of patients who explicitly request euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (EAS) and to better understand unbearable suffering from the patients' perspective. Patients and methods A qualitative study using (...)
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  6. M. Sercu, P. Pype, T. Christiaens, M. Grypdonck, A. Derese & M. Deveugele (2012). Are General Practitioners Prepared to End Life on Request in a Country Where Euthanasia is Legalised? Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):274-280.score: 18.0
    Background In 2002, Belgium set a legal framework for euthanasia, whereby granting and performing euthanasia is entrusted entirely to physicians, and—as advised by Belgian Medical Deontology—in the context of a trusted patient–physician relationship. Euthanasia is, however, rarely practiced, so the average physician will not attain routine in this matter. Aim To explore how general practitioners in Flanders (Belgium) deal with euthanasia. This was performed via qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews with 52 general practitioners (GPs). Results Although GPs can understand a (...)
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  7. Eli Feen (2010). Leave Current System of Universal CPR and Patient Request of DNR Orders in Place. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):80-81.score: 18.0
    (2010). Leave Current System of Universal CPR and Patient Request of DNR Orders in Place. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 80-81.
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  8. A. Lindblad, N. Juth, C. J. Furst & N. Lynoe (2010). When Enough is Enough; Terminating Life-Sustaining Treatment at the Patient's Request: A Survey of Attitudes Among Swedish Physicians and the General Public. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):284-289.score: 18.0
    Objectives To explore attitudes and reasoning among Swedish physicians and the general public regarding the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment at a competent patient's request. Design A vignette-based postal questionnaire including 1202 randomly selected individuals in the county of Stockholm and 1200 randomly selected Swedish physicians with various specialities. The vignettes described patients requesting withdrawal of their life-sustaining treatment: (1) a 77-year-old woman on dialysis; (2) a 36-year-old man on dialysis; (3) a 34-year-old ventilator-dependent tetraplegic man. Responders were asked to (...)
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  9. Hans-Martin Sass (1998). Genotyping in Clinical Trials: Towards a Principle of Informed Request. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (3):288 – 296.score: 18.0
    This paper reviews the usefulness of bioethical instruments such as the informed consent principle to handle ethical and political challenges of clinical trials in genotyping and DNA-banking and discusses an informed request model as well as other contractual relations between research institutions, patients, and their families.
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  10. Cameron Stewart, Carmelle Peisah & Brian Draper (2011). A Test for Mental Capacity to Request Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (1):34-39.score: 18.0
    The mental competence of people requesting aid-in-dying is a key issue for the how the law responds to cases of assisted suicide. A number of cases from around the common law world have highlighted the importance of competence in determining whether assistants should be prosecuted, and what they will be prosecuted for. Nevertheless, the law remains uncertain about how competence should be tested in these cases. This article proposes a test of competence that is based on the existing common law (...)
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  11. Tore Nilstun, Marwan Habiba, Goran Lingman, Rudolfo Saracci, Monica Da Fre & Marina Cuttini (2008). Cesarean Delivery on Maternal Request: Can the Ethical Problem Be Solved by the Principlist Approach? BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):11-.score: 18.0
    In this article, we use the principlist approach to identify, analyse and attempt to solve the ethical problem raised by a pregnant woman's request for cesarean delivery in absence of medical indications.We use two different types of premises: factual (facts about cesarean delivery and specifically attitudes of obstetricians as derived from the EUROBS European study) and value premises (principles of beneficence and non-maleficence, respect for autonomy and justice).Beneficence/non-maleficence entails physicians' responsibility to minimise harms and maximise benefits. Avoiding its inherent (...)
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  12. J. A. C. Rietjens, D. G. van Tol, M. Schermer & A. van Der Heide (2009). Judgement of Suffering in the Case of a Euthanasia Request in The Netherlands. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):502-507.score: 18.0
    Introduction: In The Netherlands, physicians have to be convinced that the patient suffers unbearably and hopelessly before granting a request for euthanasia. The extent to which general practitioners (GPs), consulted physicians and members of the euthanasia review committees judge this criterion similarly was evaluated. Methods: 300 GPs, 150 consultants and 27 members of review committees were sent a questionnaire with patient descriptions. Besides a “standard case” of a patient with physical suffering and limited life expectancy, the descriptions included cases (...)
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  13. Penney Lewis & Isra Black (2013). Adherence to the Request Criterion in Jurisdictions Where Assisted Dying Is Lawful? A Review of the Criteria and Evidence in the Netherlands, Belgium, Oregon, and Switzerland. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):885-898.score: 18.0
    Some form of assisted dying (voluntary euthanasia and/or assisted suicide) is lawful in the Netherlands, Belgium, Oregon, and Switzerland. In order to be lawful in these jurisdictions, a valid request must precede the provision of assistance to die. Non-adherence to the criteria for valid requests for assisted dying may be a trigger for civil and/or criminal liability, as well as disciplinary sanctions where the assistor is a medical professional. In this article, we review the criteria and evidence in respect (...)
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  14. Omid Mahian & Somchai Wongwises (forthcoming). Is It Ethical for Journals to Request Self-Citation? Science and Engineering Ethics:1-3.score: 18.0
    By following the recently published paper in Science titled “Coercive Citation in Academic Publishing”, in this paper, we aim to discuss the demand of some journals that request authors to cite recently published papers in that journal to increase the impact factor of that journal. It will be mentioned that some of these demands are not ethical and consequently will diminish the reputation of the journal.
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  15. Hannah Selinger (forthcoming). Maternal Request for Caesarean Section: An Ethical Consideration. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101558.score: 18.0
    Caesarean section (CS) is a method of delivering a baby through a surgical incision into the abdominal wall. Until recently in the UK, it was preserved as a procedure which was only carried out in certain circumstances. These included if the fetus lay in a breech position or was showing signs of distress leading to a requirement for rapid delivery. CS is perceived as a safe method of delivery due to the recommendation by the National Institute for Health and Care (...)
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  16. N. S. Jecker & L. J. Schneiderman (1995). When Families Request That 'Everything Possible' Be Done. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (2):145-163.score: 18.0
    The paper explores the ethical and psychological issues that arise when family members request that “everything possible” be done for a particular patient. The paper first illustrates this phenomenon by reviewing the well known case of Helga Wanglie. We proceed to argue that in Wanglie and similar cases family members may request futile treatments as a means of conveying that (1) the loss of the patient is tantamount to losing a part of themselves; (2) the patient should not (...)
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  17. Z. S. Manzari, E. Mohammadi, A. Heydari, H. R. A. Sharbaf, M. J. M. Azizi & E. Khaleghi (2012). Exploring Families' Experiences of an Organ Donation Request After Brain Death. Nursing Ethics 19 (5):654-665.score: 18.0
    This qualitative research study with a content analysis approach aimed to explore families’ experiences of an organ donation request after brain death. Data were collected through 38 unstructured and in-depth interviews with 14 consenting families and 12 who declined to donate organs. A purposeful sampling process began in October 2009 and ended in October 2010. Data analysis reached 10 categories and two major themes were listed as: 1) serenity in eternal freedom; and 2) resentful grief. The central themes were (...)
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  18. Sidney Strauss & Margalit Ziv (2001). Children Request Teaching When Asking for Names of Objects. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1118-1119.score: 16.0
    We propose that in addition to children's requests for word names being a reflection of an understanding of the referential nature of words, they may also be requests for adult's teaching. These possible requests for teaching among toddlers, along with other indications, suggest that teaching may be a natural cognition that may be related to the development of theory of mind.
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  19. Yuko Hattori, Masaki Tomonaga & Kazuo Fujita (2012). Chimpanzees (iPan Troglodytes/I) Show More Understanding of Human Attentional States When They Request Food in the Experimenters Hand Than on the Table. Interaction Studies 12 (3):418-429.score: 16.0
    Although chimpanzees have been reported to understand to some extent others' visual perception, previous studies using food requesting tasks are divided on whether or not chimpanzees understand the role of eye gaze. One plausible reason for this discrepancy may be the familiarity of the testing situation. Previous food requesting tasks with negative results used an unfamiliar situation that may be difficult for some chimpanzees to recognize as a requesting situation, whereas those with positive results used a familiar situation. The present (...)
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  20. K. A. Rasinski, J. D. Yoon, Y. G. Kalad & F. A. Curlin (2011). Obstetrician-Gynaecologists' Opinions About Conscientious Refusal of a Request for Abortion: Results From a National Vignette Experiment. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):711-714.score: 16.0
    Background and objectives Conscientious refusal of abortion has been discussed widely by medical ethicists but little information on practitioners' opinions exists. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) issued recommendations about conscientious refusal. We used a vignette experiment to examine obstetrician-gynecologists' (OB/GYN) support for the recommendations. Design A national survey of OB/GYN physicians contained a vignette experiment in which an OB/GYN doctor refused a requested elective abortion. The vignette varied two issues recently addressed by the ACOG ethics committee—whether the (...)
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  21. E. C. Winkler, W. Hiddemann & G. Marckmann (2012). Evaluating a Patient's Request for Life-Prolonging Treatment: An Ethical Framework. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):647-651.score: 16.0
    Contrary to the widespread concern about over-treatment at the end of life, today, patient preferences for palliative care at the end of life are frequently respected. However, ethically challenging situations in the current healthcare climate are, instead, situations in which a competent patient requests active treatment with the goal of life-prolongation while the physician suggests best supportive care only. The argument of futility has often been used to justify unilateral decisions made by physicians to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatment. However, (...)
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  22. Marc Aguert & Virginie Laval (2013). Request Complexity is No More a Problem When the Requests Are Ironic. Pragmatics and Cognition 21 (2):329-339.score: 16.0
    Although the topic has been extensively studied, many issues about understanding of indirect requests in children are still unsolved. Our contribution is to distinguish genuine and ironic hints, focusing on the latter. We examined the understanding of ironic hints and ironic imperatives in 5- to 9-year-old children and in adults, in various situational contexts (neutral or ironic). The main result of this study was that ironic hints were more difficult to understand than ironic imperatives only when the context was neutral. (...)
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  23. Mahesh Ananth (2010). The Scientific Study of Consciousness: Searle’s Radical Request. Psyche 16 (2):59-89.score: 15.0
    John Searle offers what he thinks to be a reasonable scientific approach to the understanding of consciousness. I argue that Searle is demanding nothing less than a Kuhnian-type revolution with respect to how scientists should study consciousness given his rejection of the subject-object distinction and affirmation of mental causation. As part of my analysis, I reveal that Searle embraces a version of emergentism that is in tension, not only with his own account, but also with some of the theoretical tenets (...)
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  24. Susan R. Martyn, Richard Wright & Leo Clark (1988). Required Request for Organ Donation: Moral, Clinical, and Legal Problems. Hastings Center Report 18 (2):27-34.score: 15.0
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  25. Neera K. Badhwar, (Not for Citations. Published Copy Available on Request.).score: 15.0
    1.1 Are commercial societies unfriendly to friendship? Many critics of commercial societies, from both the left and the right, have thought so. They claim that the free-market system of property rights, freedom of contract, and other liberty rights – the “negative” right of individuals to peacefully pursue their own ends – is impersonal and dehumanizing, or even inherently divisive and adversarial. Yet (their complaint goes) the psychology and morality of markets and liberty rights pervade far too many relationships in a (...)
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  26. Peter Milne (2012). Indicative Conditionals, Conditional Probabilities, and the “Defective Truth-Table”: A Request for More Experiments. Thinking and Reasoning 18 (2):196 - 224.score: 15.0
    While there is now considerable experimental evidence that, on the one hand, participants assign to the indicative conditional as probability the conditional probability of consequent given antecedent and, on the other, they assign to the indicative conditional the ?defective truth-table? in which a conditional with false antecedent is deemed neither true nor false, these findings do not in themselves establish which multi-premise inferences involving conditionals participants endorse. A natural extension of the truth-table semantics pronounces as valid numerous inference patterns that (...)
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  27. Thomas F. Morris (2014). Why Socrates Does Not Request Exile in the Apology. Heythrop Journal 55 (1):73-85.score: 15.0
  28. Alan Rolle (2011). Why Doesn't Aristotle Accept My Facebook Friendship Request? Philosophy Now 82:35-35.score: 15.0
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  29. Chris Gastmans & Yvonne Denier (2010). What If Patients with Dementia Use Decision Aids to Make an Advance Euthanasia Request? American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):25 – 26.score: 15.0
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  30. J. K. M. Gevers (1987). Legal Developments Concerning Active Euthanasia on Request in the Netherlands. Bioethics 1 (2):156–162.score: 15.0
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  31. Ruth Jonathan & Nigel Blake (1988). Philosophy in Schools: A Request for Clarification. Journal of Philosophy of Education 22 (2):221–227.score: 15.0
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  32. A. Slowther (2008). Clinical Ethics Committee Case 3: Should Parents Be Able to Request Non-Therapeutic Treatment for Their Severely Disabled Child? Clinical Ethics 3 (3):109-112.score: 15.0
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  33. A. J. Newson (2011). Clinical Ethics Committee Case 16: A Request From an Accident and Emergency Department - Should We Give Our Patient a Blood Transfusion? Clinical Ethics 6 (4):154-158.score: 15.0
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  34. J. H. Muirhead (1933). Request to Readers. Mind 42 (166):271-a-271.score: 15.0
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  35. Bernard Heilicser (1999). Should a Bioethics Consultant Assume the Care of a Patient When the Attending Physician Refuses to Honor the Request of the Patient's Surrogate, Who Recommends That Life-Sustaining Treatment Be Withdrawn? HEC Forum 11 (3):277-278.score: 15.0
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  36. Loane Skene, Jeremy Sugarman, Nancy E. Kass, Nadine Taub & Marion Danis (1994). Request From a Middle Eastern Bride. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (03):422-.score: 15.0
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  37. Ruchika Mishra (2014). The Case: A Son's Request to Forgo Treatment. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):108-109.score: 15.0
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  38. Carson Strong (2007). Case Commentary: Parental Request for Life-Prolonging Interventions. HEC Forum 19 (4):377-380.score: 15.0
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  39. Ruth Landau & Steve Yentis (2010). Maternal–Fetal Conflicts: Cesarean Delivery on Maternal Request. In G. A. van Norman, S. Jackson, S. H. Rosenbaum & S. K. Palmer (eds.), Clinical Ethics in Anesthesiology. Cambridge University Press. 49.score: 15.0
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  40. Justine Pila, Response to the Australian Government Advisory Council on Intellectual Property's Request for Written Comments on Patentable Subject Matter†.score: 15.0
    1. Any statutory definition of inherent patentability or other threshold exclusion from patentability should have a clear normative basis. In the case of inherent patentability, that basis should relate to the patent system’s aim of encouraging and rewarding inventive activity for the benefit of society.
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  41. A. J. Wootton (1981). The Management of Grantings and Rejections by Parents in Request Sequences. Semiotica 37 (1-2).score: 15.0
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  42. Julian Baggini (2011). Move Over Mill and Bentham: The Complete Works and Selected Correspondence of Henry Sidgwick (CD-ROM), Ed. Bart Schultz, Prices on Request. The Philosophers' Magazine 3:52.score: 15.0
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  43. Joseph L. Barbiero (1990). Request for Help. The Chesterton Review 16 (2):115-115.score: 15.0
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  44. Donald Brunnquell (2007). Case Report: Parental Request for Life-Prolonging Interventions. HEC Forum 19 (4):375-376.score: 15.0
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  45. C. Gannon (2005). A Request for Hospice Admission From Hospital to Withdraw Ventilation. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):383-384.score: 15.0
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  46. René Osvaldo Geres (2013). “Que Digan Lo Que Saben y Cómo Es Que Lo Saben…” Un Pedido de Información Sobre Un Martirio En Las Fronteras Del Gran Chaco (1639-1640)“Let Them Say What They Know and How They Know It…” A Request for Information on a Martyrdom in the Frontier of the Gran Chaco (1639-1640). [REVIEW] Corpus.score: 15.0
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  47. R. Higgs (1983). Case Conference. Cutting the Thread and Pulling the Wool--A Request for Euthanasia in General Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (1):45-49.score: 15.0
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  48. E. G. Howe (2011). A Different Approach to Patients and Loved Ones Who Request "Futile" Treatments. Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (4):291-298.score: 15.0
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  49. Steven Leuthner (1999). Should a Bioethics Consultant Assume the Care of a Patient When the Attending Physician Refuses to Honor the Request of the Patient's Surrogate, Who Recommends That Life-Sustaining Treatment Be Withdrawn? HEC Forum 11 (3):279-280.score: 15.0
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  50. J. Alegria, W. Badecker, M. Bar-Hillel, D. Bekerian, E. Bisiach, P. Bloom, K. Bock, G. Boolos, V. Bruce & B. Byrne (1990). Each Year@ Ogn&~ N is Obliged to Request the Help of a Certain Number of Guest Reviewers Who Assist in the Assessment of Manuscripts. Without Their Cooperation the Journal Would Not Be Able to Maintain its High Standards. We Are Happy to Be Able to Thank the Following People for Their Help in Refereeing Manuscripts During 1989. Cognition 35:101.score: 15.0
     
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