Search results for 'resolute reading' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Koethe (2003). On the 'Resolute' Reading of the Tractatus. Philosophical Investigations 26 (3):187–204.score: 156.0
    It is customary to divide Wittgenstein’s work into two broad phases, the first culminating in the Tractatus, and the second comprising the writings that began upon his return to philosophy in 1929 and culminating in the Investigations. It is also commonly assumed that the Tractatus propounds various doctrines concerning language and representation, doctrines which are repudiated in the later work, and often criticized explicitly. One problem with this view of the Trac- tatus is Wittgenstein’s claim in 6.54 that its propositions (...)
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  2. Steen Brock (2011). A Resolute Reading of Cassirer's Anthropology. Synthese 179 (1):93 - 113.score: 152.0
    In the paper I try, resolutely, to associate the open ended encyclopedic character of Cassirer's philosophy with the core part of this philosophy concerning symbolic formation. In this way I try to supplement and strengthen the anthropology that Cassirer formulated in AN ESSAY ON MAN. Finally I discuss the historical character and value of this anthropology.
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  3. Tomas Dosek (2013). " Anything That Can Be Reached with a Ladder Does Not Interest Me." The Analysis and Criticism of the Resolute Reading of Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. Organon F 20 (2):222-250.score: 150.0
     
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  4. Genia Schönbaumsfeld (2010). A “Resolute” Later Wittgenstein? Metaphilosophy 41 (5):649-668.score: 120.0
    Abstract: “Resolute readings” initially started life as a radical new approach to Wittgenstein's early philosophy, but are now starting to take root as a way of interpreting the later writings as well—a trend exemplified by Stephen Mulhall's Wittgenstein's Private Language (2007) as well as by Phil Hutchinson's “What's the Point of Elucidation?” (2007) and Rom Harré's “Grammatical Therapy and the Third Wittgenstein” (2008). The present article shows that there are neither good philosophical nor compelling exegetical grounds for accepting a (...)
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  5. Ian Proops (2001). The New Wittgenstein: A Critique. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):375–404.score: 90.0
    An essay challenging Cora Diamond's influential approach to reading Wittgenstein's Tractatus. According to Diamond, the Tractatus contains no substantive philosophical theses, but is purely an exercise in the debunking of nonsense. I argue that a convincing case for this claim has not yet been made--either by Diamond herself, or by the numerous defenders of this so-called "resolute" reading. Having critically examined the arguments that have been offered in favor of the resolute reading, I go on (...)
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  6. Meredith Williams (2004). Nonsense and Cosmic Exile: The Austere Reading of the Tractatus. In Max Kölbel & Bernhard Weiss (eds.), Wittgenstein's Lasting Significance. Routledge.score: 90.0
     
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  7. Anton Alterman (2001). The New Wittgenstein (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (3):456-457.score: 66.0
    The essays in the book have two main emphases. Regarding the late Wittgenstein, they focus on the idea that skepticism about rule-following is undermined, indeed incoherent, in virtue of Wittgenstein's emphasis on context of utterance and "forms of life" (roughly the "community" view of his later work). In the early Wittgenstein they take a "resolute" position on nonsense, saying that he did not believe there was some ineffable or informative nonsense, but only pure and utter nonsense, including everything in (...)
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  8. James Conant (1989). Must We Show What We Cannot Mean? In R. Fleming & M. Payne (eds.), The Senses of Stanley Cavell. Bucknell. 242--83.score: 60.0
  9. Peter M. Sullivan (2002). On Trying to Be Resolute: A Response to Kremer on the Tractatus. European Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):43–78.score: 60.0
    A way of reading the Tractatus has been proposed which, according to its advocates, is importantly novel and essentially distinct from anything to be found in the work of such previously influential students of the book as Anscombe, Stenius, Hacker or Pears. The point of difference is differently described, but the currently most used description seems to be Goldfarb’s term ‘resolution’ – hence one speaks of ‘the (or a) resolute reading’. I’ll shortly ask what resolution is. (...)
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  10. Kevin Cahill (2004). Ethics and the Tractatus: A Resolute Failure. Philosophy 79 (1):33-55.score: 60.0
    The paper assumes for its starting point the basic correctness of the so-called “resolutereading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus, a reading first developed by Cora Diamond and James Conant. The main part of the paper concerns the consequences this interpretation will have for our understanding of Wittgenstein's well-known remark in a letter to a prospective publisher that the point or aim of his book was an ethical one. I first give a sketch of what, given the committments of (...)
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  11. Alessandra Zarcone, Sebastian Padó & Alessandro Lenci (2014). Logical Metonymy Resolution in a Words‐as‐Cues Framework: Evidence From Self‐Paced Reading and Probe Recognition. Cognitive Science 38 (5):973-996.score: 60.0
    Logical metonymy resolution (begin a book begin reading a book or begin writing a book) has traditionally been explained either through complex lexical entries (qualia structures) or through the integration of the implicit event via post-lexical access to world knowledge. We propose that recent work within the words-as-cues paradigm can provide a more dynamic model of logical metonymy, accounting for early and dynamic integration of complex event information depending on previous contextual cues (agent and patient). We first present a (...)
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  12. Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read (2006). An Elucidatory Interpretation of Wittgenstein's Tractatus: A Critique of Daniel D. Hutto's and Marie McGinn's Reading of Tractatus 6.54. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):1 – 29.score: 58.0
    Much has been written on the relative merits of different readings of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. The recent renewal of the debate has almost exclusively been concerned with variants of the ineffabilist (metaphysical) reading of TL-P - notable such readings have been advanced by Elizabeth Anscombe, P. M. S. Hacker and H. O. Mounce - and the recently advanced variants of therapeutic (resolute) readings - notable advocates of which are James Conant, Cora Diamond, Juliet Floyd and Michael Kremer. During (...)
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  13. David Roochnik (2010). Ronna Burger's Talmudic Reading of the Nicomachean Ethics. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):61-79.score: 54.0
    Ronna Burger’s Aristotle’s Dialogue with Socrates argues that the Nicomachean Ethics is a unified whole. Her reading runs against the tide of most contemporary scholarship. In particular, Book X.7–8, Aristotle’s valorization and near apotheosis of the “contemplative life,” has been taken to be a Platonic intrusion in a work otherwise characterized by a resolute “anthropocentrism,” as Nussbaum puts it. To account for such an apparent fracture commentators have attributed both chronological development and later editorship to the corpus. Burger, (...)
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  14. James Conant & Cora Diamond (2004). On Reading the Tractatus Resolutely: Reply to Meredith Williams and Peter Sullivan. In Max Kölbel & Bernhard Weiss (eds.), Wittgenstein's lasting significance. Routledge.score: 52.0
    Wittgenstein gives voice to an aspiration that is central to his later philosophy, well before he becomes later Wittgenstein, when he writes in §4.112 of the Tractatus that philosophy is not a matter of putting forward a doctrine or a theory, but consists rather in the practice of an activity – an activity he goes on to characterize as one of elucidation or clarification – an activity which he says does not result in philosophische Sätze, in propositions of philosophy, but (...)
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  15. Daniel Dahlstrom (2009). Temptation, Self-Possession, and Resoluteness: Heidegger's Reading of Confessions X and What Is the Good of Being and Time? Research in Phenomenology 39 (2):248-265.score: 44.0
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  16. Lutz P. Koepnick (1996). The Spectacle, the "Trauerspiel," and the Politics of Resolution: Benjamin Reading the Baroque Reading Weimar. Critical Inquiry 22 (2):268.score: 40.0
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  17. Giles Constable (2008). Toward a Resolution of the Franciscan Question: Manuscripts and the Reading of History. Franciscan Studies 66 (1):482-484.score: 40.0
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  18. Oskari Kuusela (2006). Nonsense and Clarification in the Tractatus-Resolute and Ineffability Readings and the Tractatus' Failure. Acta Philosophica Fennica 80:35.score: 40.0
     
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  19. Rupert J. Read & Matthew A. Lavery (eds.) (2011). Beyond the Tractatus Wars: The New Wittgenstein Debate. Routledge.score: 32.0
    Over fifteen years have passed since Cora Diamond and James Conant turned Wittgenstein scholarship upside down with the program of “resolutereading, and ten years since this reading was crystallized in the major collection The New Wittgenstein . This approach remains at the center of the debate about Wittgenstein and his philosophy, and this book draws together the latest thinking of the world’s leading Tractatarian scholars and promising newcomers. Showcasing one piece alternately from each “camp”, Beyond the (...)
     
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  20. Edmund Dain (2006). Contextualism and Nonsense in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):91-101.score: 30.0
    Central to a new, or 'resolute', reading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico- Philosophicus is the idea that Wittgenstein held there an 'austere' view of nonsense: the view, that is, that nonsense is only ever a matter of our failure to give words a meaning, and so that there are no logically distinct kinds of nonsense. Resolute readers tend not only to ascribe such a view to Wittgenstein, but also to subscribe to it themselves; and it is also a (...)
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  21. Leo K. C. Cheung (2008). The Disenchantment of Nonsense: Understanding Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Philosophical Investigations 31 (3):197–226.score: 30.0
    This paper aims to argue against the resolute reading, and offer a correct way of reading Wittgenstein'sTractatus. According to the resolute reading, nonsense can neither say nor show anything. The Tractatus does not advance any theory of meaning, nor does it adopt the notion of using signs in contravention of logical syntax. Its sentences, except a few constituting the frame, are all nonsensical. Its aim is merely to liberate nonsense utterers from nonsense. I argue that (...)
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  22. Oskari Kuusela, Tractatus' Failure.score: 30.0
    In this paper I discuss the role of the nonsensical ‘statements’ of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus and the aims of the book, a topic which has in recent years been the subject of, at times heated, controversy among Wittgenstein’s readers.1 In this debate the so-called ineffability interpretation argues that the role of nonsense in the Tractatus is to make us grasp ineffable truths which ‘strictly speaking’ cannot be said or thought2. By contrast, the interpretation known as the resolute reading emphasises (...)
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  23. Michael D. Ashfield (2013). Against the Minimalistic Reading of Epistemic Contextualism: A Reply to Wolfgang Freitag. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 28 (1):111-125.score: 30.0
    Several philosophers have argued that the factivity of knowledge poses a problem for epistemic contextualism (EC), which they have construed as a knowability problem. On a proposed minimalistic reading of EC’s commitments, Wolfgang Freitag argues that factivity yields no knowability problem for EC. I begin by explaining how factivity is thought to generate a contradiction out of paradigmatic contextualist cases on a certain reading of EC’s commitments. This reductio results in some kind of reflexivity problem for the contextualist (...)
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  24. Piergiorgio Donatelli (2013). Reshaping Ethics After Wittgenstein. Wittgenstein-Studien 4 (1).score: 30.0
    This article suggests a reading of the significance of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus for ethics, in the light of Cora Diamond’s resolute reading. The contrasts between sense and nonsense and between ethics and science are commented on and are connected to a further contrast between a specialized response to language and the world and an unspecialized response characteristic of the humanistic disciplines. The Tractatus is seen as a work which diagnoses the loss of such a fully human unspecialized sense (...)
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  25. Marie McGinn (2006/2009). Elucidating the Tractatus: Wittgenstein's Early Philosophy of Logic and Language. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Discussion of Wittgenstein's Tractatus is currently dominated by two opposing interpretations of the work: a metaphysical or realist reading and the 'resolute' reading of Diamond and Conant. Marie McGinn's principal aim in this book is to develop an alternative interpretative line, which rejects the idea, central to the metaphysical reading, that Wittgenstein sets out to ground the logic of our language in features of an independently constituted reality, but which allows that he aims to provide positive (...)
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  26. Robert Boyd, Primed for Reading.score: 30.0
    Reading is an amazing skill. As you read this review, meaning flows from the page (or for many readers, the screen) into your brain. This happens automatically—you can’t choose not to understand the written word any more than the spoken one. It’s also highly efficient. Most people can process text two or three times faster than speech. Of course, humans have many amazing skills. We also identify objects, decode speech, and understand complex social situations automatically and efficiently. However, the (...)
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  27. Cameron Hessell (2013). On the Unintelligibility of Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Philosophical Investigations 36 (2):113-154.score: 30.0
    Resolute” readings of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus maintain that the book is divided into two parts: an intelligible “frame” and an unintelligible “body.” This article questions the validity of the “frame/body distinction” and, by extension, the resolute reading itself. It first establishes the tenability of the resolute programme as entirely dependent upon such a frame/body distinction. It then explores three possible ways the claim that the Tractatus contains such a distinction might be grounded, arguing in each case (...)
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  28. Lorenz Sichelschmidt & Udo Gƞnther (1990). Interpreting Anaphoric Relations During Reading: Inspection Time Evidence. Journal of Semantics 7 (4):321-345.score: 30.0
    On-line mechanisms in the processing of anaphora were investigated in two reading experiments. Short German texts were presented incrementally for self-paced reading, and inspection times were recorded for every single word. Each text contained a critical two-clause sentence with an elliptical gap and a personal pronoun. In the first experiment, varying the surface structure of the antecedent clause affected inspection times for the anaphor clause as a whole. In the second experiment, varying the semantic structure of the antecedent (...)
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  29. Thomas J. Brommage, Three Wittgensteins: Interpreting the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus.score: 30.0
    There are historically three main trends in understanding Wittgenstein's Tractatus. The first is the interpretation offered by the Vienna Circle. They read Wittgenstein as arguing that neither metaphysical nor normative propositions have any cognitive meaning, and thus are to be considered nonsense. This interpretation understands Wittgenstein as setting the limits of sense, and prescribing that nothing of substantive philosophical importance lies beyond that line. The second way of reading the Tractatus, which has became popular since the 1950s, is the (...)
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  30. Cameron Buckner (2014). The Semantic Problem(s) with Research on Animal Mind‐Reading. Mind and Language 29 (5):566-589.score: 24.0
    Philosophers and cognitive scientists have worried that research on animal mind-reading faces a ‘logical problem’: the difficulty of experimentally determining whether animals represent mental states (e.g. seeing) or merely the observable evidence (e.g. line-of-gaze) for those mental states. The most impressive attempt to confront this problem has been mounted recently by Robert Lurz. However, Lurz' approach faces its own logical problem, revealing this challenge to be a special case of the more general problem of distal content. Moreover, participants in (...)
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  31. Nikolay Milkov, The Method of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus: Towards a New Interpretation.score: 24.0
    This paper introduces a novel interpretation of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, a work widely held to be one of the most intricate in the philosophical canon. What’s original to this interpretation is that it reads the Tractatus as advancing a new logical symbolism that enables one to “recognize the formal properties [the logic] of propositions by mere inspection of propositions themselves” (6.122). When viewed in this way, we discover that the Tractatus is a vehicle for elucidating our language. Unlike a mere physical (...)
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  32. Moritz Baumstark (2010). Hume's Reading of the Classics at Ninewells, 1749–51. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):63-77.score: 24.0
    This article provides a re-evaluation of David Hume's intensive reading of the classics at an important moment of his literary and intellectual career. It sets out to reconstruct the extent and depth of this reading as well as the uses – scholarly, philosophical and polemical – to which Hume put the information he had gathered in the course of it. The article contends that Hume read the classics against the grain to collect data on a wide range of (...)
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  33. Nikolay Milkov (2003). The Method of the Tractatus. Contributions of the Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society 11:139-41.score: 24.0
    A few years ago, a group of American philosophers, Cora Diamond and James Conant among them, suggested a resolute, or radical reading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus. These two authors claim that the Tractatus has a body, and a frame. Wittgenstein minded the frame seriously, whereas all the remaining propositions of the Tractatus, which belong to its body, are written tongue in cheek. To the frame of the work belong the Preface, 3.32, 3.326, 4.003, 4.111, 4.112 and 6.53, 6.54. In (...)
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  34. Ed Dain & James Conant (2011). Throwing the Baby Out. In Beyond the Tractatus Wars.score: 24.0
    If, as the title of this book suggests, the state of Tractatus commentary has at times recently resembled something close to a state of war, then it has most of all resembled a war of attrition. Against this background, Roger White's "Throwing the Baby Out with the Ladder" makes for refreshing reading. To be sure, White repeats some of the familiar misconceptions of what resolute readers do or must claim that have marred the debate over the adequacies or (...)
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  35. Frederic Gilbert, Lawrence Burns & Timothy Krahn (2011). The Inheritance, Power and Predicaments of the “Brain-Reading” Metaphor. Medicine Studies 2 (4):229-244.score: 24.0
    Purpose With the increasing sophistication of neuroimaging technologies in medicine, new language is being sought to make sense of the findings. The aim of this paper is to explore whether the brain-reading metaphor used to convey current medical or neurobiological findings imports unintended significations that do not necessarily reflect the genuine findings made by physicians and neuroscientists. Methods First, the paper surveys the ambiguities of the readability metaphor, drawing from the history of science and medicine, paying special attention to (...)
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  36. Erik D. Reichle, Keith Rayner & Alexander Pollatsek (2003). The E-Z Reader Model of Eye-Movement Control in Reading: Comparisons to Other Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):445-476.score: 24.0
    The E-Z Reader model (Reichle et al. 1998; 1999) provides a theoretical framework for understanding how word identification, visual processing, attention, and oculomotor control jointly determine when and where the eyes move during reading. In this article, we first review what is known about eye movements during reading. Then we provide an updated version of the model (E-Z Reader 7) and describe how it accounts for basic findings about eye movement control in reading. We then review several (...)
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  37. Joanne Arciuli & Ian C. Simpson (2012). Statistical Learning Is Related to Reading Ability in Children and Adults. Cognitive Science 36 (2):286-304.score: 24.0
    There is little empirical evidence showing a direct link between a capacity for statistical learning (SL) and proficiency with natural language. Moreover, discussion of the role of SL in language acquisition has seldom focused on literacy development. Our study addressed these issues by investigating the relationship between SL and reading ability in typically developing children and healthy adults. We tested SL using visually presented stimuli within a triplet learning paradigm and examined reading ability by administering the Wide Range (...)
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  38. Yanping Liu, Erik D. Reichle & Ding‐Guo Gao (2013). Using Reinforcement Learning to Examine Dynamic Attention Allocation During Reading. Cognitive Science 37 (8):1507-1540.score: 24.0
    A fundamental question in reading research concerns whether attention is allocated strictly serially, supporting lexical processing of one word at a time, or in parallel, supporting concurrent lexical processing of two or more words (Reichle, Liversedge, Pollatsek, & Rayner, 2009). The origins of this debate are reviewed. We then report three simulations to address this question using artificial reading agents (Liu & Reichle, 2010; Reichle & Laurent, 2006) that learn to dynamically allocate attention to 1–4 words to “read” (...)
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  39. Janet I. Vousden, Michelle R. Ellefson, Jonathan Solity & Nick Chater (2011). Simplifying Reading: Applying the Simplicity Principle to Reading. Cognitive Science 35 (1):34-78.score: 24.0
    Debates concerning the types of representations that aid reading acquisition have often been influenced by the relationship between measures of early phonological awareness (the ability to process speech sounds) and later reading ability. Here, a complementary approach is explored, analyzing how the functional utility of different representational units, such as whole words, bodies (letters representing the vowel and final consonants of a syllable), and graphemes (letters representing a phoneme) may change as the number of words that can be (...)
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  40. [deleted]Fabio Richlan (2012). Developmental Dyslexia: Dysfunction of a Left Hemisphere Reading Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    This mini-review summarizes and integrates findings from recent meta-analyses and original neuroimaging studies on functional brain abnormalities in dyslexic readers. Surprisingly, there is little empirical support for the standard neuroanatomical model of developmental dyslexia, which localizes the primary phonological decoding deficit in left temporo-parietal regions. Rather, recent evidence points to a dysfunction of a left hemisphere reading network, which includes occipito-temporal, inferior frontal, and inferior parietal regions.
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  41. [deleted]Ulrike Altmann, Isabel C. Bohrn, Oliver Lubrich, Winfried Menninghaus & Arthur M. Jacobs (2012). The Power of Emotional Valence—From Cognitive to Affective Processes in Reading. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    The comprehension of stories requires the reader to imagine the cognitive and affective states of the characters. The content of many stories is unpleasant, as they often deal with conflict, disturbance or crisis. Nevertheless, unpleasant stories can be liked and enjoyed. In this fMRI study, we used a parametric approach to examine (1) the capacity of increasing negative valence of story contents to activate the mentalizing network (cognitive and affective theory of mind, ToM), and (2) the neural substrate of liking (...)
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  42. Philip S. Gerrans (2013). Imitation, Mind Reading, and Social Learning. Biological Theory 8 (1):20-27.score: 24.0
    Imitation has been understood in different ways: as a cognitive adaptation subtended by genetically specified cognitive mechanisms; as an aspect of domain general human cognition. The second option has been advanced by Cecilia Heyes who treats imitation as an instance of associative learning. Her argument is part of a deflationary treatment of the “mirror neuron” phenomenon. I agree with Heyes about mirror neurons but argue that Kim Sterelny has provided the tools to provide a better account of the nature and (...)
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  43. Conrad Perry, Johannes C. Ziegler & Marco Zorzi (2013). A Computational and Empirical Investigation of Graphemes in Reading. Cognitive Science 37 (5):800-828.score: 24.0
    It is often assumed that graphemes are a crucial level of orthographic representation above letters. Current connectionist models of reading, however, do not address how the mapping from letters to graphemes is learned. One major challenge for computational modeling is therefore developing a model that learns this mapping and can assign the graphemes to linguistically meaningful categories such as the onset, vowel, and coda of a syllable. Here, we present a model that learns to do this in English for (...)
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  44. Toshiki Murase (forthcoming). Japanese Mothers' Utterances About Agents and Actions During Joint Picture-Book Reading. Frontiers in Psychology.score: 24.0
    This study investigated maternal utterances during joint picture-book reading from the perspective of scaffolding. Unlike previous studies focusing on labeling, this study examined the utterances made about agents and actions while participants viewed pictures of scenes. Our first goal was to investigate whether mothers increased the frequency with which they requested information about agents and actions in their discrete utterances. The second goal was to investigate maternal responses to children’s utterances about agents and actions, focusing especially on whether mothers (...)
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  45. Mattias Nilsson & Joakim Nivre (2013). Proportional Hazards Modeling of Saccadic Response Times During Reading. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):541-563.score: 24.0
    In this article we use proportional hazards models to examine how low-level processes affect the probability of making a saccade over time, through the period of fixation, during reading. We apply the Cox proportional hazards model to investigate how launch distance (relative to word beginning), fixation location (relative to word center), and word frequency affect the hazard of a saccadic response. This model requires that covariates have a constant impact on the hazard over time, the assumption of proportional hazards. (...)
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  46. [deleted]William W. Graves Olga Boukrina (2013). Neural Networks Underlying Contributions From Semantics in Reading Aloud. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Reading is an essential part of modern society, yet much is still unknown about the physiological underpinnings of its information processing components. Two influential cognitive models of reading, the connectionist and dual-route cascaded models, offer very different accounts, yet evidence for one or the other remains equivocal. These models differ in several ways, including the role of semantics (word meaning) in mapping spelling to sound. We used a new effective connectivity algorithm, IMaGES, to provide a network-level perspective on (...)
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  47. V. N. Durand, I. M. Loe, J. D. Yeatman & H. M. Feldman (2012). Effects of Early Language, Speech, and Cognition on Later Reading: A Mediation Analysis. Frontiers in Psychology 4:586-586.score: 24.0
    This longitudinal secondary analysis examined which early language and speech abilities are associated with school-aged reading skills, and whether these associations are mediated by cognitive ability. We analyzed vocabulary, syntax, speech sound maturity, and cognition in a sample of healthy children at age 3 years (N=241) in relation to single word reading (decoding), comprehension, and oral reading fluency in the same children at age 9 to 11 years. All predictor variables and the mediator variable were associated with (...)
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  48. Rosa Angela Fabio, Ilaria Castelli, Antonella Marchetti & Alessandro Antonietti (2013). Training Communication Abilities in Rett Syndrome Through Reading and Writing. Frontiers in Psychology 4:911.score: 24.0
    The goal of this clinical case study is to investigate the possibility of training communication abilities in people with Rett syndrome (RS). Usually, girls with RS never exceed the sensorimotor stage of development, but the inter-individual variability typical of RS may lead us to doubt the irrevocability of that developmental limit, especially for those girls who are engaged in cognitive rehabilitation. The case study reported here concerns a 21 year old girl with RS who was engaged in cognitive rehabilitation training (...)
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  49. [deleted]Marion Oberhuber, ‘Ōiwi Parker Jones, Thomas M. H. Hope, Susan Prejawa, Mohamed L. Seghier, David W. Green & Cathy J. Price (2013). Functionally Distinct Contributions of the Anterior and Posterior Putamen During Sublexical and Lexical Reading. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Previous studies have investigated orthographic-to-phonological mapping during reading by comparing brain activation for (1) reading words to object naming, or (2) reading pseudowords (e.g. “phume”) to words (e.g. “plume”). Here we combined both approaches to provide new insights into the underlying neural mechanisms. In fMRI data from 25 healthy adult readers, we first identified activation that was greater for reading words and pseudowords relative to picture and color naming. The most significant effect was observed in the (...)
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