Search results for 'resolute reading' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  51
    John Koethe (2003). On the 'Resolute' Reading of the Tractatus. Philosophical Investigations 26 (3):187–204.
    It is customary to divide Wittgenstein’s work into two broad phases, the first culminating in the Tractatus, and the second comprising the writings that began upon his return to philosophy in 1929 and culminating in the Investigations. It is also commonly assumed that the Tractatus propounds various doctrines concerning language and representation, doctrines which are repudiated in the later work, and often criticized explicitly. One problem with this view of the Trac- tatus is Wittgenstein’s claim in 6.54 that its propositions (...)
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  2. Tomas Dosek (2013). " Anything That Can Be Reached with a Ladder Does Not Interest Me." The Analysis and Criticism of the Resolute Reading of Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 20 (2):222-250.
     
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  3.  33
    Steen Brock (2011). A Resolute Reading of Cassirer's Anthropology. Synthese 179 (1):93 - 113.
    In the paper I try, resolutely, to associate the open ended encyclopedic character of Cassirer's philosophy with the core part of this philosophy concerning symbolic formation. In this way I try to supplement and strengthen the anthropology that Cassirer formulated in AN ESSAY ON MAN. Finally I discuss the historical character and value of this anthropology.
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  4. Steen Brock (2011). A Resolute Reading of Cassirer’s Anthropology. Synthese 179 (1):93-113.
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  5. Genia Schönbaumsfeld (2010). A “Resolute” Later Wittgenstein? Metaphilosophy 41 (5):649-668.
    Abstract: “Resolute readings” initially started life as a radical new approach to Wittgenstein's early philosophy, but are now starting to take root as a way of interpreting the later writings as well—a trend exemplified by Stephen Mulhall's Wittgenstein's Private Language (2007) as well as by Phil Hutchinson's “What's the Point of Elucidation?” (2007) and Rom Harré's “Grammatical Therapy and the Third Wittgenstein” (2008). The present article shows that there are neither good philosophical nor compelling exegetical grounds for accepting a (...)
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  6. Ian Proops (2001). The New Wittgenstein: A Critique. European Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):375–404.
    An essay challenging Cora Diamond's influential approach to reading Wittgenstein's Tractatus. According to Diamond, the Tractatus contains no substantive philosophical theses, but is purely an exercise in the debunking of nonsense. I argue that a convincing case for this claim has not yet been made--either by Diamond herself, or by the numerous defenders of this so-called "resolute" reading. Having critically examined the arguments that have been offered in favor of the resolute reading, I go on (...)
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  7. Meredith Williams (2004). Nonsense and Cosmic Exile: The Austere Reading of the Tractatus. In Max Kölbel & Bernhard Weiss (eds.), Wittgenstein's Lasting Significance. Routledge
     
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  8.  65
    Anton Alterman (2001). The New Wittgenstein (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (3):456-457.
    The essays in the book have two main emphases. Regarding the late Wittgenstein, they focus on the idea that skepticism about rule-following is undermined, indeed incoherent, in virtue of Wittgenstein's emphasis on context of utterance and "forms of life" (roughly the "community" view of his later work). In the early Wittgenstein they take a "resolute" position on nonsense, saying that he did not believe there was some ineffable or informative nonsense, but only pure and utter nonsense, including everything in (...)
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  9. James Conant (1989). Must We Show What We Cannot Say? In R. Fleming & M. Payne (eds.), The Senses of Stanley Cavell. Bucknell 242--83.
  10.  93
    Peter M. Sullivan (2002). On Trying to Be Resolute: A Response to Kremer on the Tractatus. European Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):43–78.
    A way of reading the Tractatus has been proposed which, according to its advocates, is importantly novel and essentially distinct from anything to be found in the work of such previously influential students of the book as Anscombe, Stenius, Hacker or Pears. The point of difference is differently described, but the currently most used description seems to be Goldfarb’s term ‘resolution’ – hence one speaks of ‘the resolute reading’. I’ll shortly ask what resolution is. For now, it (...)
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  11.  5
    Konrad Werner (forthcoming). What is It Like to Be the Metaphysical Subject? An Essay on Early Wittgenstein, Our Epistemic Position, and Beyond. Philosophia:1-26.
    I argue that Ludwig Wittgenstein’s idea of the metaphysical subject sheds new light on subjective qualities of experience. In this article I draw first of all on the interpretations provided by Michael Kremer and James Conant. Subsequently, I conclude that “what is it like” means primarily “what is it like to see myself as the metaphysical subject”.
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  12.  52
    Kevin Cahill (2004). Ethics and the Tractatus: A Resolute Failure. Philosophy 79 (1):33-55.
    The paper assumes for its starting point the basic correctness of the so-called “resolutereading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus, a reading first developed by Cora Diamond and James Conant. The main part of the paper concerns the consequences this interpretation will have for our understanding of Wittgenstein's well-known remark in a letter to a prospective publisher that the point or aim of his book was an ethical one. I first give a sketch of what, given the committments of (...)
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  13.  64
    Phil Hutchinson & Rupert Read (2006). An Elucidatory Interpretation of Wittgenstein's Tractatus: A Critique of Daniel D. Hutto's and Marie McGinn's Reading of Tractatus 6.54. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (1):1 – 29.
    Much has been written on the relative merits of different readings of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus. The recent renewal of the debate has almost exclusively been concerned with variants of the ineffabilist (metaphysical) reading of TL-P - notable such readings have been advanced by Elizabeth Anscombe, P. M. S. Hacker and H. O. Mounce - and the recently advanced variants of therapeutic (resolute) readings - notable advocates of which are James Conant, Cora Diamond, Juliet Floyd and Michael Kremer. During (...)
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  14.  20
    David Roochnik (2010). Ronna Burger's Talmudic Reading of the Nicomachean Ethics. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):61-79.
    Ronna Burger’s Aristotle’s Dialogue with Socrates argues that the Nicomachean Ethics is a unified whole. Her reading runs against the tide of most contemporary scholarship. In particular, Book X.7–8, Aristotle’s valorization and near apotheosis of the “contemplative life,” has been taken to be a Platonic intrusion in a work otherwise characterized by a resolute “anthropocentrism,” as Nussbaum puts it. To account for such an apparent fracture commentators have attributed both chronological development and later editorship to the corpus. Burger, (...)
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  15.  9
    Hanne Appelqvist (forthcoming). On Wittgenstein's Kantian Solution of the Problem of Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    ABSTRACTIn 1931 Wittgenstein wrote: ‘the limit of language manifests itself in the impossibility of describing the fact that corresponds to a sentence without simply repeating the sentence’. Here, Wittgenstein claims, ‘we are involved … with the Kantian solution of the problem of philosophy’. This paper shows how this remark fits with Wittgenstein's early account of the substance of the world, his account of logic, and ultimately his view of philosophy. By contrast to the currently influential resolute reading of (...)
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  16.  21
    Marie McGinn (2006/2009). Elucidating the Tractatus: Wittgenstein's Early Philosophy of Logic and Language. Oxford University Press.
    Discussion of Wittgenstein's Tractatus is currently dominated by two opposing interpretations of the work: a metaphysical or realist reading and the 'resolute' reading of Diamond and Conant. Marie McGinn's principal aim in this book is to develop an alternative interpretative line, which rejects the idea, central to the metaphysical reading, that Wittgenstein sets out to ground the logic of our language in features of an independently constituted reality, but which allows that he aims to provide positive (...)
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  17.  8
    Melvin Chen (2015). Is Ethics Nonsense?: The Imagination, and the Spirit Against the Limit. Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):172-187.
    The letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.In the exegetical tradition of Wittgenstein, there have existed three types of readings: the positivist reading, the ineffability reading, and the resolute reading. In this essay, I will be adhering to the resolute reading, whose roots may be traced to James Conant and Cora Diamond. However, the positivist reading of Wittgenstein having been historically prior and still in currency, it bears first examining the features of this (...)
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  18. Rupert Read (2012). A Wittgensteinian Way with Paradoxes. Lexington Books.
    A Wittgensteinian way with paradoxes tackles some of the classic philosophical paradoxes that have puzzled philosophers over the centuries and explores how they can be dissolved using the ‘therapeutic’ method of Wittgenstein, according to the ‘resolutereading of the latter’s work. The book shows how, by contrast, we should give more serious consideration to real, ‘lived paradoxes’, some of which can be harmful psychically, morally or politically, but others of which can be beneficial.
     
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  19. Leo K. C. Cheung (2008). The Disenchantment of Nonsense: Understanding Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Philosophical Investigations 31 (3):197–226.
    This paper aims to argue against the resolute reading, and offer a correct way of reading Wittgenstein'sTractatus. According to the resolute reading, nonsense can neither say nor show anything. The Tractatus does not advance any theory of meaning, nor does it adopt the notion of using signs in contravention of logical syntax. Its sentences, except a few constituting the frame, are all nonsensical. Its aim is merely to liberate nonsense utterers from nonsense. I argue that (...)
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  20. Edmund Dain (2006). Contextualism and Nonsense in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. South African Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):91-101.
    Central to a new, or 'resolute', reading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico- Philosophicus is the idea that Wittgenstein held there an 'austere' view of nonsense: the view, that is, that nonsense is only ever a matter of our failure to give words a meaning, and so that there are no logically distinct kinds of nonsense. Resolute readers tend not only to ascribe such a view to Wittgenstein, but also to subscribe to it themselves; and it is also a (...)
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  21. Oskari Kuusela, Tractatus' Failure.
    In this paper I discuss the role of the nonsensical ‘statements’ of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus and the aims of the book, a topic which has in recent years been the subject of, at times heated, controversy among Wittgenstein’s readers.1 In this debate the so-called ineffability interpretation argues that the role of nonsense in the Tractatus is to make us grasp ineffable truths which ‘strictly speaking’ cannot be said or thought2. By contrast, the interpretation known as the resolute reading emphasises (...)
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  22.  29
    Lynette Reid (1998). Wittgenstein's Ladder: The Tractatus and Nonsense. Philosophical Investigations 21 (2):97–151.
    I discuss some reservations about the exegetical power of the claim that the Tractatus is “anti-metaphysical.” The “resolutereading has the virtue of fidelity to important and neglected features of the work, both its anti-metaphysical moves and its account of the nature of the activity of philosophy and its status. However, its proponents underestimate the barriers to maintaining a consistent fidelity to these features of the text. The image of a ladder suggests a mere instrumental means to arrive (...)
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  23. Marie McGinn (2006). Elucidating the Tractatus: Wittgenstein's Early Philosophy of Logic and Language. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Discussion of Wittgenstein's Tractatus is currently dominated by two opposing interpretations of the work: a metaphysical or realist reading and the 'resolute' reading of Diamond and Conant. Marie McGinn's principal aim in this book is to develop an alternative interpretative line, which rejects the idea, central to the metaphysical reading, that Wittgenstein sets out to ground the logic of our language in features of an independently constituted reality, but which allows that he aims to provide positive (...)
     
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  24.  35
    Piergiorgio Donatelli (2013). Reshaping Ethics After Wittgenstein. Wittgenstein-Studien 4 (1).
    This article suggests a reading of the significance of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus for ethics, in the light of Cora Diamond’s resolute reading. The contrasts between sense and nonsense and between ethics and science are commented on and are connected to a further contrast between a specialized response to language and the world and an unspecialized response characteristic of the humanistic disciplines. The Tractatus is seen as a work which diagnoses the loss of such a fully human unspecialized sense (...)
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  25.  16
    Cameron Hessell (2013). On the Unintelligibility of Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Philosophical Investigations 36 (2):113-154.
    Resolute” readings of Wittgenstein's Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus maintain that the book is divided into two parts: an intelligible “frame” and an unintelligible “body.” This article questions the validity of the “frame/body distinction” and, by extension, the resolute reading itself. It first establishes the tenability of the resolute programme as entirely dependent upon such a frame/body distinction. It then explores three possible ways the claim that the Tractatus contains such a distinction might be grounded, arguing in each case (...)
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  26.  4
    Thomas J. Brommage, Three Wittgensteins: Interpreting the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus.
    There are historically three main trends in understanding Wittgenstein's Tractatus. The first is the interpretation offered by the Vienna Circle. They read Wittgenstein as arguing that neither metaphysical nor normative propositions have any cognitive meaning, and thus are to be considered nonsense. This interpretation understands Wittgenstein as setting the limits of sense, and prescribing that nothing of substantive philosophical importance lies beyond that line. The second way of reading the Tractatus, which has became popular since the 1950s, is the (...)
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  27.  2
    Rupert Read (2007). The Enchantment of Words. [REVIEW] Philosophy 82 (4):657-661.
    This book is a piece of philosophical work of extremely high intellectual quality. Its purpose is to defend in detail a ‘resolutereading of the Tractatus. It succeeds in this aim. It thus accomplishes something that has not yet been accomplished even by Conant or Diamond. It is therefore a major contribution to ‘Wittgenstein studies’, to contemporary philosophy and to the philosophical history of recent philosophy.
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  28. Andy Hamilton (2014). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Wittgenstein and on Certainty. Routledge.
    Ludwig Wittgenstein is arguably the most important philosopher of the twentieth-century. In _On Certainty_ he discusses central issues in epistemology concerning the nature of knowledge and scepticism. _The Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Wittgenstein and On Certainty_ introduces and assesses: Wittgenstein's life and the background to his later philosophy the central ideas and text of _On Certainty_, including its links with the arguments of G.E. Moore and its discussion of some fundamental issues in the theory of knowledge Wittgenstein's continuing importance and (...)
     
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  29. Rupert J. Read & Matthew A. Lavery (eds.) (2011). Beyond the Tractatus Wars: The New Wittgenstein Debate. Routledge.
    Over fifteen years have passed since Cora Diamond and James Conant turned Wittgenstein scholarship upside down with the program of “resolutereading, and ten years since this reading was crystallized in the major collection The New Wittgenstein . This approach remains at the center of the debate about Wittgenstein and his philosophy, and this book draws together the latest thinking of the world’s leading Tractatarian scholars and promising newcomers. Showcasing one piece alternately from each “camp”, Beyond the (...)
     
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  30. Rupert Read & Matthew A. Lavery (eds.) (2012). Beyond the Tractatus Wars: The New Wittgenstein Debate. Routledge.
    Over fifteen years have passed since Cora Diamond and James Conant turned Wittgenstein scholarship upside down with the program of “resolutereading, and ten years since this reading was crystallized in the major collection _The New Wittgenstein_. This approach remains at the center of the debate about Wittgenstein and his philosophy, and this book draws together the latest thinking of the world’s leading Tractatarian scholars and promising newcomers. Showcasing one piece alternately from each “camp”, _Beyond the Tractatus (...)
     
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  31. Cameron Buckner (2014). The Semantic Problem(s) with Research on Animal Mind‐Reading. Mind and Language 29 (5):566-589.
    Philosophers and cognitive scientists have worried that research on animal mind-reading faces a ‘logical problem’: the difficulty of experimentally determining whether animals represent mental states (e.g. seeing) or merely the observable evidence (e.g. line-of-gaze) for those mental states. The most impressive attempt to confront this problem has been mounted recently by Robert Lurz. However, Lurz' approach faces its own logical problem, revealing this challenge to be a special case of the more general problem of distal content. Moreover, participants in (...)
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  32.  43
    Erik D. Reichle, Keith Rayner & Alexander Pollatsek (2003). The E-Z Reader Model of Eye-Movement Control in Reading: Comparisons to Other Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):445-476.
    The E-Z Reader model (Reichle et al. 1998; 1999) provides a theoretical framework for understanding how word identification, visual processing, attention, and oculomotor control jointly determine when and where the eyes move during reading. In this article, we first review what is known about eye movements during reading. Then we provide an updated version of the model (E-Z Reader 7) and describe how it accounts for basic findings about eye movement control in reading. We then review several (...)
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  33.  20
    Philip S. Gerrans (2013). Imitation, Mind Reading, and Social Learning. Biological Theory 8 (1):20-27.
    Imitation has been understood in different ways: as a cognitive adaptation subtended by genetically specified cognitive mechanisms; as an aspect of domain general human cognition. The second option has been advanced by Cecilia Heyes who treats imitation as an instance of associative learning. Her argument is part of a deflationary treatment of the “mirror neuron” phenomenon. I agree with Heyes about mirror neurons but argue that Kim Sterelny has provided the tools to provide a better account of the nature and (...)
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  34. Nikolay Milkov, The Method of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus: Towards a New Interpretation.
    This paper introduces a novel interpretation of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, a work widely held to be one of the most intricate in the philosophical canon. What’s original to this interpretation is that it reads the Tractatus as advancing a new logical symbolism that enables one to “recognize the formal properties [the logic] of propositions by mere inspection of propositions themselves” (6.122). When viewed in this way, we discover that the Tractatus is a vehicle for elucidating our language. Unlike a mere physical (...)
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  35.  23
    Joanne Arciuli & Ian C. Simpson (2012). Statistical Learning Is Related to Reading Ability in Children and Adults. Cognitive Science 36 (2):286-304.
    There is little empirical evidence showing a direct link between a capacity for statistical learning (SL) and proficiency with natural language. Moreover, discussion of the role of SL in language acquisition has seldom focused on literacy development. Our study addressed these issues by investigating the relationship between SL and reading ability in typically developing children and healthy adults. We tested SL using visually presented stimuli within a triplet learning paradigm and examined reading ability by administering the Wide Range (...)
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  36.  6
    David Newheiser (2013). Eschatology and the Areopagite: Interpreting the Dionysian Hierarchies in Terms of Time. In Markus Vinzent (ed.), Studia Patristica LXVIII. Peeters
    There is a tension in the Dionysian corpus between the resolute negativity of the Mystical Theology and Divine Names, on the one hand, and the affirmative confidence of the hierarchical treatises. Where the former works insist that God is entirely beyond created symbols, the latter speaks of "mediation" of the divine (CH XIII.4) and "a correlation between visible signs and invisible reality" (CH XV.5). Whereas the debate surrounding the Corpus tends to exaggerate one of these poles at the expense (...)
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  37.  21
    Janet I. Vousden, Michelle R. Ellefson, Jonathan Solity & Nick Chater (2011). Simplifying Reading: Applying the Simplicity Principle to Reading. Cognitive Science 35 (1):34-78.
    Debates concerning the types of representations that aid reading acquisition have often been influenced by the relationship between measures of early phonological awareness (the ability to process speech sounds) and later reading ability. Here, a complementary approach is explored, analyzing how the functional utility of different representational units, such as whole words, bodies (letters representing the vowel and final consonants of a syllable), and graphemes (letters representing a phoneme) may change as the number of words that can be (...)
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  38. Moritz Baumstark (2010). Hume's Reading of the Classics at Ninewells, 1749–51. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):63-77.
    This article provides a re-evaluation of David Hume's intensive reading of the classics at an important moment of his literary and intellectual career. It sets out to reconstruct the extent and depth of this reading as well as the uses – scholarly, philosophical and polemical – to which Hume put the information he had gathered in the course of it. The article contends that Hume read the classics against the grain to collect data on a wide range of (...)
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  39.  33
    Jillian H. Fecteau, Alan Kingstone & James T. Enns (2004). Hemisphere Differences in Conscious and Unconscious Word Reading. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):550-64.
    Hemisphere differences in word reading were examined using explicit and implicit processing measures. In an inclusion task, which indexes both conscious and unconscious word reading processes, participants were briefly presented with a word in either the right or the left visual field and were asked to use this word to complete a three-letter word stem. In an exclusion task, which estimates unconscious word reading, participants completed the word stem with any word other than the prime word. Experiment (...)
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  40.  6
    Ernesto Priani & Ana María Guzman Olmos (2015). From Fragment to Hypertext: Adding Layers of Reading. Humanist Studies and the Digital Age 4 (1):108-115.
    In this paper we will suggest that a hypertextual representation of the text allows us to show different temporal layers of reading and lets us add new ones. We use the notion “layers of reading” as a metaphor to explain how, historically, each reading of a text creates a new layer, an independent “stratum of meaning” -to use a geological term-, that is superimposed to a previous reading. We think the digital edition and the digital (...) could create a philosophical methodology, based on the awareness of the historical construction of each layer of reading. (shrink)
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  41.  6
    Massimo Lollini & Pierpaolo Spagnolo (2015). Re-Reading Petrarca in the Digital Era. Humanist Studies and the Digital Age 4 (1):60-97.
    As part of the seminar Re-reading Petrarch in the Digital Age –taught at the University of Oregon in Winter 2014– a digital close reading of Francesco Petrarca’s Rerum Vulgarium Fragmenta led to a series of parallel and entwined activities and projects. Deeply integrated with the Oregon Petrarch Open Book Project, the course was oriented towards the encoding of Petrarca’s masterpiece based on the implementation of a network of different themes. The various occurrences and data obtained from the encoding (...)
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  42.  65
    David W. Concepción (2004). Reading Philosophy with Background Knowledge and Metacognition. Teaching Philosophy 27 (4):351-368.
    This paper argues that explicit reading instruction should be part of lower level undergraduate philosophy courses. Specifically, the paper makes the claim that it is necessary to provide the student with both the relevant background knowledge about a philosophical work and certain metacognitive skills that enrich the reading process and their ability to organize the content of a philosophical text with other aspects of knowledge. A “How to Read Philosophy” handout and student reactions to the handout are provided.
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  43.  39
    Yanping Liu, Erik D. Reichle & Ding‐Guo Gao (2013). Using Reinforcement Learning to Examine Dynamic Attention Allocation During Reading. Cognitive Science 37 (8):1507-1540.
    A fundamental question in reading research concerns whether attention is allocated strictly serially, supporting lexical processing of one word at a time, or in parallel, supporting concurrent lexical processing of two or more words (Reichle, Liversedge, Pollatsek, & Rayner, 2009). The origins of this debate are reviewed. We then report three simulations to address this question using artificial reading agents (Liu & Reichle, 2010; Reichle & Laurent, 2006) that learn to dynamically allocate attention to 1–4 words to “read” (...)
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  44.  66
    Nikolay Milkov (2003). The Method of the Tractatus. Contributions of the Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society 11:139-41.
    A few years ago, a group of American philosophers, Cora Diamond and James Conant among them, suggested a resolute, or radical reading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus. These two authors claim that the Tractatus has a body, and a frame. Wittgenstein minded the frame seriously, whereas all the remaining propositions of the Tractatus, which belong to its body, are written tongue in cheek. To the frame of the work belong the Preface, 3.32, 3.326, 4.003, 4.111, 4.112 and 6.53, 6.54. In (...)
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  45.  1
    Kenji Ikeda, Taiji Ueno, Yuichi Ito, Shinji Kitagami & Jun Kawaguchi (2016). An Extension of a Parallel‐Distributed Processing Framework of Reading Aloud in Japanese: Human Nonword Reading Accuracy Does Not Require a Sequential Mechanism. Cognitive Science 40 (4):n/a-n/a.
    Humans can pronounce a nonword. Some researchers have interpreted this behavior as requiring a sequential mechanism by which a grapheme-phoneme correspondence rule is applied to each grapheme in turn. However, several parallel-distributed processing models in English have simulated human nonword reading accuracy without a sequential mechanism. Interestingly, the Japanese psycholinguistic literature went partly in the same direction, but it has since concluded that a sequential parsing mechanism is required to reproduce human nonword reading accuracy. In this study, by (...)
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  46.  28
    Conrad Perry, Johannes C. Ziegler & Marco Zorzi (2013). A Computational and Empirical Investigation of Graphemes in Reading. Cognitive Science 37 (5):800-828.
    It is often assumed that graphemes are a crucial level of orthographic representation above letters. Current connectionist models of reading, however, do not address how the mapping from letters to graphemes is learned. One major challenge for computational modeling is therefore developing a model that learns this mapping and can assign the graphemes to linguistically meaningful categories such as the onset, vowel, and coda of a syllable. Here, we present a model that learns to do this in English for (...)
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  47.  44
    Ed Dain & James Conant (2011). Throwing the Baby Out. In Beyond the Tractatus Wars.
    If, as the title of this book suggests, the state of Tractatus commentary has at times recently resembled something close to a state of war, then it has most of all resembled a war of attrition. Against this background, Roger White's "Throwing the Baby Out with the Ladder" makes for refreshing reading. To be sure, White repeats some of the familiar misconceptions of what resolute readers do or must claim that have marred the debate over the adequacies or (...)
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  48.  7
    Heather Sheridan & Erik D. Reichle (2016). An Analysis of the Time Course of Lexical Processing During Reading. Cognitive Science 40 (3):522-553.
    Reingold, Reichle, Glaholt, and Sheridan reported a gaze-contingent eye-movement experiment in which survival-curve analyses were used to examine the effects of word frequency, the availability of parafoveal preview, and initial fixation location on the time course of lexical processing. The key results of these analyses suggest that lexical processing begins very rapidly and is supported by substantial parafoveal processing. Because it is not immediately obvious that these results are congruent with the theoretical assumption that words are processed and identified in (...)
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  49.  23
    Mattias Nilsson & Joakim Nivre (2013). Proportional Hazards Modeling of Saccadic Response Times During Reading. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):541-563.
    In this article we use proportional hazards models to examine how low-level processes affect the probability of making a saccade over time, through the period of fixation, during reading. We apply the Cox proportional hazards model to investigate how launch distance (relative to word beginning), fixation location (relative to word center), and word frequency affect the hazard of a saccadic response. This model requires that covariates have a constant impact on the hazard over time, the assumption of proportional hazards. (...)
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    Benjamin Swets & Christopher A. Kurby (2016). Eye Movements Reveal the Influence of Event Structure on Reading Behavior. Cognitive Science 40 (2):466-480.
    When we read narrative texts such as novels and newspaper articles, we segment information presented in such texts into discrete events, with distinct boundaries between those events. But do our eyes reflect this event structure while reading? This study examines whether eye movements during the reading of discourse reveal how readers respond online to event structure. Participants read narrative passages as we monitored their eye movements. Several measures revealed that event structure predicted eye movements. In two experiments, we (...)
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