Search results for 'resource competition' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Eckart Voland & R. I. M. Dunbar (1995). Resource Competition and Reproduction. Human Nature 6 (1):33-49.score: 180.0
    A family reconstitution study of the Krummhörn population (Ostfriesland, Germany, 1720–1874) reveals that infant mortality and children’s probabilities of marrying or emigrating unmarried are affected by the number of living same-sexed sibs in farmers’ families but not in the families of landless laborers. We interpret these results in terms of a “local resource competition” model in which resource-holding families are obliged to manipulate the reproductive future of their offspring. In contrast, families that lack resources have no need (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Christopher H. Eliot (2011). Competition Theory and Channeling Explanation. Philosophy and Theory in Biology 3 (20130604):1-16.score: 108.0
    The complexity and heterogeneity of causes influencing ecology’s domain challenge its capacity to generate a general theory without exceptions, raising the question of whether ecology is capable, even in principle, of achieving the sort of theoretical success enjoyed by physics. Weber has argued that competition theory built around the Competitive Exclusion Principle (especially Tilman’s resource-competition model) offers an example of ecology identifying a law-like causal regularity. However, I suggest that as Weber presents it, the CEP is not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. I. Walker (1984). The Volterra Competition Equations with Resource - Independent Growth Coefficients and Discussion on Their Biological and Biophysical Implications. Acta Biotheoretica 33 (4).score: 96.0
    Analysis of the biophysical conditions for a correct application of the Volterra Competition Equations with resource-independent coefficients reveals the following:The traditional, mathematical formalism with the two equations representing two straight lines at the condition of zero growth applies.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Martin L. Cody (1983). Resources and Communities Resource Competition and Community Structure David Tilman. Bioscience 33 (11):723-724.score: 90.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Geoff Kushnick (2010). Resource Competition and Reproduction in Karo Batak Villages. Human Nature 21 (1):62-81.score: 90.0
    When wealth is heritable, parents may manipulate family size to optimize the trade-off between more relatively poor offspring and fewer relatively rich ones, and channel less care into offspring that compete with siblings. These hypotheses were tested with quantitative ethnographic data collected among the Karo Batak—patrilineal agriculturalists from North Sumatra, Indonesia, among whom land is bequeathed equally to sons. It was predicted that landholding would moderate the relationship between reproductive rate and parental investment on one hand, and the number of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Val H. Smith (forthcoming). Resource Competition Between Host and Pathogen. Bioscience.score: 90.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Stacey L. Rucas, Michael Gurven, Hillard Kaplan & Jeffrey Winking (2010). The Social Strategy Game. Human Nature 21 (1):1-18.score: 90.0
    This paper examines social determinants of resource competition among Tsimane Amerindian women of Bolivia. We introduce a semi-anonymous experiment (the Social Strategy Game) designed to simulate resource competition among women. Information concerning dyadic social relationships and demographic data were collected to identify variables influencing resource competition intensity, as measured by the number of beads one woman took from another. Relationship variables are used to test how the affiliative or competitive aspects of dyads affect the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Beverly I. Strassmann & Wendy M. Garrard (2011). Alternatives to the Grandmother Hypothesis. Human Nature 22 (1-2):201-222.score: 90.0
    We conducted a meta-analysis of 17 studies that tested for an association between grandparental survival and grandchild survival in patrilineal populations. Using two different methodologies, we found that the survival of the maternal grandmother and grandfather, but not the paternal grandmother and grandfather, was associated with decreased grandoffspring mortality. These results are consistent with the findings of psychological studies in developed countries (Coall and Hertwig Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33:1-59, 2010). When tested against the predictions of five hypotheses (confidence of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Suzanne Boyden, Dan Binkley & José Luiz Stape (2008). Competition Among Eucalyptus Trees Depends on Genetic Variation and Resource Supply. In Carolyn Merchant (ed.), Ecology. Humanity Books. 2850-2859.score: 72.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. J. Michael Plavcan (2012). Sexual Size Dimorphism, Canine Dimorphism, and Male-Male Competition in Primates. Human Nature 23 (1):45-67.score: 60.0
    Sexual size dimorphism is generally associated with sexual selection via agonistic male competition in nonhuman primates. These primate models play an important role in understanding the origins and evolution of human behavior. Human size dimorphism is often hypothesized to be associated with high rates of male violence and polygyny. This raises the question of whether human dimorphism and patterns of male violence are inherited from a common ancestor with chimpanzees or are uniquely derived. Here I review patterns of, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. D. V. Meegan (2009). Zero-Sum Bias: Perceived Competition Despite Unlimited Resources. Frontiers in Psychology 1:191-191.score: 60.0
    Zero-sum bias describes intuitively judging a situation to be zero-sum (i.e., resources gained by one party are matched by corresponding losses to another party) when it is actually non-zero-sum. The experimental participants were students at a university where students’ grades are determined by how the quality of their work compares to a predetermined standard of quality rather than to the quality of the work produced by other students. This creates a non-zero-sum situation in which high grades are an unlimited (...). In three experiments, participants were shown the grade distribution after a majority of the students in a course had completed an assigned presentation, and asked to predict the grade of the next presenter. When many high grades had already been given, there was a corresponding increase in low grade predictions. This suggests a zero-sum bias, in which people perceive a competition for a limited resource despite unlimited resource availability. Interestingly, when many low grades had already been given, there was not a corresponding increase in high grade predictions. This suggests that a zero-sum heuristic is only applied in response to the allocation of desirable resources. A plausible explanation for the findings is that a zero-sum heuristic evolved as a cognitive adaptation to enable successful intra-group competition for limited resources. Implications for understanding inter-group interaction are also discussed. (shrink)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Diane M. Beck Paige E. Scalf, Ana Torralbo, Evelina Tapia (2013). Competition Explains Limited Attention and Perceptual Resources: Implications for Perceptual Load and Dilution Theories. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 60.0
    Both perceptual load theory and dilution theory purport to explain when and why task-irrelevant information, or so-called distractors are processed. Central to both explanations is the notion of limited resources, although the theories differ in the precise way in which those limitations affect distractor processing. We have recently proposed a neurally plausible explanation of limited resources in which neural competition among stimuli hinders their representation in the brain. This view of limited capacity can also explain distractor processing, whereby the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Yu-Chiang Hu & Chia-Ching Fatima Wang (2009). Collectivism, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Resource Advantages in Retailing. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):1 - 13.score: 54.0
    Is corporate social responsibility (CSR) linked to performance-related instrumentality or real moral concerns? Does CSR create resource advantages? Reasons for and results of CSR remain unclear. We choose a leading retail company in a Confucian, collectivist, and high power distance society and ask whether managers are naturally oriented toward societal actions. We study managerial perceptions regarding the importance and the performance of CSR in relation to other management factors. Drawing on Hunt’s (2000, A General Theory of Competition: Resources, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Judith Avrahami, Werner Güth & Yaakov Kareev (2005). Games of Competition in a Stochastic Environment. Theory and Decision 59 (4):255-294.score: 54.0
    The paper presents a set of games of competition between two or three players in which reward is jointly determined by a stochastic biased mechanism and players’ choices. More specifically, a resource can be found with unequal probabilities in one of two locations. The first agent is rewarded only if it finds the resource and avoids being found by the next agent in line; the latter is rewarded only if it finds the former. Five benchmarks, based on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Steven B. Most Lingling Wang, Briana L. Kennedy (2012). When Emotion Blinds: A Spatiotemporal Competition Account of Emotion-Induced Blindness. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 54.0
    Emotional visual scenes are such powerful attractors of attention that they can disrupt perception of other stimuli that appear soon afterwards, an effect known as emotion-induced blindness. What mechanisms underlie this impact of emotion on perception? Evidence suggests that emotion-induced blindness may be distinguishable from closely related phenomena such as the orienting of spatial attention to emotional stimuli or the central resource bottlenecks commonly associated with the attentional blink. Instead, we suggest that emotion-induced blindness reflects relatively early competition (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Thomas R. Alley (1982). Competition Theory, Evolution, and the Concept of an Ecological Niche. Acta Biotheoretica 31 (3).score: 42.0
    This article examines some of the main tenets of competition theory in light of the theory of evolution and the concept of an ecological niche. The principle of competitive exclusion and the related assumption that communities exist at competitive equilibrium - fundamental parts of many competition theories and models - may be violated if non-equilibrium conditions exist in natural communities or are incorporated into competition models. Furthermore, these two basic tenets of competition theory are not compatible (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Darryl Reed (2002). Resource Extraction Industries in Developing Countries. Journal of Business Ethics 39 (3):199 - 226.score: 42.0
    Over the last one hundred and fifty years, the extraction and processing of non-renewable resources has provided the basis for the three industrial revolutions that have led to the modern economies of the developed world. In the process, the nature of resource extraction firms has also changed dramatically, from small-scale operations exploiting easily accessible deposits to large, vertically integrated, capital intensive transnational corporations characterized by oligopolistic competition. In the last ten to fifteen years, coinciding with processes of economic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. David C. Thomasma, Kenneth C. Micetich, John Brems & David van Thiel (1999). The Ethics of Competition in Liver Transplantation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (03):321-329.score: 42.0
    The behavior of people in the presence of scarce resources has long been a source of ethical concern and debate. Many of the responses, ranging from outright brutality and cheating on the one hand to altruism, nobility, and sacrifice on the other, were most recently demonstrated in the movie Titanic. It should come as no surprise, then, that rational efforts to allocate the very scarce life-saving resource of organs are sometimes circumvented by these natural human impulses and sheer human (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Yehoshua Liebermann (1985). Competition in Consumption as Viewed by Jewish Law. Journal of Business Ethics 4 (5):385 - 393.score: 42.0
    Competition is the most basic force traditionally regarded by Western economists as governing both society's resources allocation and income distribution. No wonder, then, that many legal systems have been concerned with various aspects of competitive activity, and formulated laws and rulings to keep market behavior within limits of ethical conduct. Jewish law has not been an exception. The focus of this paper is on competition in consumption. Its underlying assumption is that lawmakers' decisions approximate optimality in resource (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. I. Walker (1993). Competition and Information. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (3).score: 42.0
    Reconsideration of the logistic equation and of its expansion to the special and general Volterra competition equations in terms of mass/energy in phase-space, shows that information on the phase-spatial conditions of resource and consumers determines specific population parameters which, in turn, decide on coexistence and extinction.Thus, introduction ofInformation as a separate and independent biophysical parameter, in analogy, and in addition, to Force in Classical Physics, is necessary. This allows for quantification of informational effects on resource flows and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. I. Walker (1987). Compartmentalization and Niche Differentiation: Causal Patterns of Competition and Coexistence. Acta Biotheoretica 36 (4).score: 42.0
    The current major models of coexistence of species on the same resources are briefly summarized. It is then shown that analysis of supposedly competitive systems in terms of the physical four dimensions of phase-space is sufficient to understand the causes for coexistence and for competitive exclusion. Thus, the multiple dimensions of niche theory are reduced to factors which define the magnitudes of the phase-spatial system, in particular the boundaries of population spaces and of periods of activity. Excluding possible cooperative interaction (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Lars Witting (2000). Interference Competition Set Limits to the Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection. Acta Biotheoretica 48 (2).score: 42.0
    The relationship between Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection and the ecological environment of density regulation is examined. Using a linear model, it is shown that the theorem holds when density regulation is caused by exploitative competition and that the theorem fails with interference competition. In the latter case the theorem holds only at the limit of zero population density and/or at the limit where the competitively superior individuals cannot monopolise the resource. The results are discussed in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jasmine M. DeJesus, Marjorie Rhodes & Katherine D. Kinzler (2014). Evaluations Versus Expectations: Children's Divergent Beliefs About Resource Distribution. Cognitive Science 38 (1):178-193.score: 42.0
    Past research reveals a tension between children's preferences for egalitarianism and ingroup favoritism when distributing resources to others. Here we investigate how children's evaluations and expectations of others' behaviors compare. Four- to 10-year-old children viewed events where individuals from two different groups distributed resources to their own group, to the other group, or equally across groups. Groups were described within a context of intergroup competition over scarce resources. In the Evaluation condition, children were asked to evaluate which resource (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. David W. Lawson & Ruth Mace (2010). Optimizing Modern Family Size. Human Nature 21 (1):39-61.score: 42.0
    Modern industrialized populations lack the strong positive correlations between wealth and reproductive success that characterize most traditional societies. While modernization has brought about substantial increases in personal wealth, fertility in many developed countries has plummeted to the lowest levels in recorded human history. These phenomena contradict evolutionary and economic models of the family that assume increasing wealth reduces resource competition between offspring, favoring high fertility norms. Here, we review the hypothesis that cultural modernization may in fact establish unusually (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Dietrich Klusmann (2006). Sperm Competition and Female Procurement of Male Resources. Human Nature 17 (3):283-300.score: 40.0
    This study investigates changes in sexual motivation over the duration of a partnership in a population sample stratified by age. The results replicate and extend the findings of a previous study that was based on a sample of college students. In the samples of 30- and 45-year-olds, male sexual motivation remains constant regardless of the duration of the partnership. Female sexual motivation matches male sexual motivation in the first years of the partnership and then steadily decreases. In the sample of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Laxmikant Manroop (2014). Human Resource Systems and Competitive Advantage: An Ethical Climate Perspective. Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (3).score: 40.0
    Drawing on the theoretical insights from the resource-based view of the firm, this paper explores how human resource (HR) systems may contribute to competitive advantage by facilitating the development and maintenance of five types of ethical climates, and conversely, how HR systems may hinder competitive advantage by inhibiting the development and maintenance of these climate types. In so doing, this paper contributes to the literature by highlighting the resource worthiness of a firm's ethical climates and showing how (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Judith Avrahami & Yaakov Kareev (2009). Do the Weak Stand a Chance? Distribution of Resources in a Competitive Environment. Cognitive Science 33 (5):940-950.score: 40.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Mary C. Towner (2001). Linking Dispersal and Resources in Humans. Human Nature 12 (4):321-349.score: 34.0
    Competition for resources is one of the main evolutionary explanations for dispersal from the natal area. For humans this explanation has received little attention, despite the key role dispersal is thought to play in shaping social systems. I examine the link between dispersal and resources using historical data on people from the small farming town of Oakham, Massachusetts (1750–1850). I reconstruct individual life histories through a variety of records, identifying dispersers, their age at dispersal, and their destinations. I find (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. S. Prakash Sethi & Linda M. Sama (1998). Ethical Behavior as a Strategic Choice by Large Corporations: The Interactive Effect of Marketplace Competition, Industry Structure and Firm Resources. Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (1):85-104.score: 32.0
    Analysis of ethical conduct of business organizations has hitherto placed primary emphasis on the conduct of that corporation’smanagers because ethical conduct, like all conduct, must manifest itself through individual behavior. This paper argues that in the realworld corporate actions are influenced, to a considerable extent, by external market-based conditions. Therefore, a more comprehensive explanation of ethical business conduct must incorporate both corporate, i.e., internal considerations, and competitive, industry structure-based, i.e., external considerations. A framework is presented that provides a systematic analysis (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. S. Heim, N. Wirth & A. Keil (2010). Competition for Cognitive Resources During Rapid Serial Processing: Changes Across Childhood. Frontiers in Psychology 2:9-9.score: 32.0
    The ability to direct cognitive resources to target objects despite distraction by competing information plays an important role for the development of mental aptitudes and skills. We examined developmental changes of this ability in a cross-sectional design, using the “attentional blink” (AB) paradigm. The AB is a pronounced impairment of T2 report, which occurs when a first (T1) and second target (T2) embedded in a rapid stimulus sequence are separated by at least one distractor and occur within 500 ms of (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Manuel Castelo Branco & Lúcia Lima Rodrigues (2006). Corporate Social Responsibility and Resource-Based Perspectives. Journal of Business Ethics 69 (2):111 - 132.score: 30.0
    Firms engage in corporate social responsibility (CSR) because they consider that some kind of competitive advantage accrues to them. We contend that resource-based perspectives (RBP) are useful to understand why firms engage in CSR activities and disclosure. From a resource-based perspective CSR is seen as providing internal or external benefits, or both. Investments in socially responsible activities may have internal benefits by helping a firm to develop new resources and capabilities which are related namely to know-how and corporate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Robert C. Padgett & Jose I. Galan (2010). The Effect of R&D Intensity on Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 93 (3):407 - 418.score: 30.0
    This study examines the impact that research and development (R&D) intensity has on corporate social responsibility (CSR). We base our research on the resource-based view (RBV) theory, which contributes to our analysis of R&D intensity and CSR because this perspective explicitly recognizes the importance of intangible resources. Both R&D and CSR activities can create assets that provide firms with competitive advantage. Furthermore, the employment of such activities can improve the welfare of the community and satisfy stakeholder expectations, which might (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Alain Verbeke & Vincent Tung (2013). The Future of Stakeholder Management Theory: A Temporal Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (3):529-543.score: 30.0
    We propose adding a temporal dimension to stakeholder management theory, and assess the implications thereof for firm-level competitive advantage. We argue that a firm’s competitive advantage fundamentally depends on its capacity for stakeholder management related, transformational adaptation over time. Our new temporal stakeholder management approach builds upon insights from both the resource-based view (RBV) in strategic management and institutional theory. Stakeholder agendas and their relative salience to the firm evolve over time, a phenomenon well understood in the literature, and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Richard J. Davidson, Mental Training Affects Distribution of Limited Brain Resources.score: 30.0
    The information processing capacity of the human mind is limited, as is evidenced by the so-called ‘‘attentional-blink’’ deficit: When two targets (T1 and T2) embedded in a rapid stream of events are presented in close temporal proximity, the second target is often not seen. This deficit is believed to result from competition between the two targets for limited attentional resources. Here we show, using performance in an attentional-blink task and scalp-recorded brain potentials, that meditation, or mental training, affects the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Mark V. Flinn (1987). Resources, Reproduction, and Mate Competition in Human Populations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):305.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Cam Caldwell, Do X. Truong, Pham T. Link & Anh Tuan (2011). Strategic Human Resource Management as Ethical Stewardship. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):171 - 182.score: 30.0
    The research about strategic human resource management (SHRM) has suggested that human resource professionals (HRPs) have the opportunity to play a greater role in contributing to organizational success if they are effective in developing systems and policies aligned with the organization's values, goals, and mission. We suggest that HRPs need to raise the standard of their performance and that the competitive demands of the modern economic environment create implicit ethical duties that HRPs owe to their organizations. We define (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Anne Campbell, Steven Muncer & Josie Odber (1998). Primacy of Organising Effects of Testosterone. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):365-365.score: 30.0
    A test of a biosocial model is reported in which we found no impact of circulating testosterone on either status-seeking or aggression. The fact that sex differences in competitiveness and aggression appear in childhood strongly suggests that the major impact of testosterone is organisational. Whereas dominance and resources are linked among males, female aggression may be a function of pure resource competition, with no element of status-seeking.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Sylvia Maxfield (2006). Implication of Incomplete Markets for Corporate Social Responsibility and Competitive Strategy. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:133-138.score: 30.0
    This paper explores the theory and illustrates the managerial implications of complete and incomplete markets for corporate strategy and corporate socialresponsibility. Market imperfections including externalities, asymmetric information or compromised competition motivate corporate social responsibility. At the same time, traditional approaches to corporate strategy based on industry analysis may imply exploiting or sustaining market imperfections. Assuming markets are complete complicates finding a theoretical basis for happily uniting CSR and above average profits. Assuming markets are incomplete undermines traditional industry analysis or (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Robert J. Quinlan (2009). Predicting Cross-Cultural Patterns in Sex-Biased Parental Investment and Attachment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):40-41.score: 30.0
    If parenting behavior influences attachment, then parental investment (PI) theory can predict sex differences and distributions of attachment styles across cultures. Trivers-Willard, local resource competition, and local resource enhancement models make distinct predictions for sex-biased parental responsiveness relevant to attachment. Parental investment and attachment probably vary across cultures in relation to for status, wealth, and well-being.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Eva Sanchez, Pierre Auger & Rafael Bravo de la Parra (1997). Influence of Individual Aggressiveness on the Dynamics of Competitive Populations. Acta Biotheoretica 45 (3-4).score: 30.0
    Two populations are subdivided into two categories of individuals (hawks and doves). Individuals fight to have access to a resource which is necessary for their survival. Conflicts occur between individuals belonging to the same population and to different populations. We investigate the long term effects of the conflicts on the stability of the community. The modelis a set of ODE's with four variables corresponding to hawk and dove individuals of the two populations. Two time scales are considered. A fast (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Hindi Attar Catherine (2011). Competition for Processing Resources Between Emotional Stimuli and Foreground Task in the Human Brain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 30.0
  42. Lee Cronk (1991). Preferential Parental Investment in Daughters Over Sons. Human Nature 2 (4):387-417.score: 30.0
    Female-biased parental investment is unusual but not unknown in human societies. Relevant explanatory models include Fisher’s principle, the Trivers-Willard model, local mate and resource competition and enhancement, and economic rational actor models. Possible evidence of female-biased parental investment includes sex ratios, mortality rates, parents’ stated preferences for offspring of one sex, and direct and indirect measurements of actual parental behavior. Possible examples of female-biased parental investment include the Mukogodo of Kenya, the Ifalukese of Micronesia, the Cheyenne of North (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Gordon Liu & Wai-Wai Ko (2011). Social Alliance and Employee Voluntary Activities: A Resource-Based Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):251-268.score: 30.0
    The corporate social responsibility literature devotes relatively little attention to the strategic role played by employee voluntary activities (EVAs) in social alliances. Using the resource-based perspective of the organization to frame the data collection and the analyses, this article investigates: (1) the role of EVAs in the development of corporate and non-profit organizations (NPOs) competitive assets and (2) the management approaches to how both parties can develop their own resources by combining them with the shared resources with the purpose (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Rui F. Oliveira, Gonçalo A. Oliveira, Sara Uceda, Tania F. De Oliveira, Alexandre Fernandes & Teresa Garcia-Marques (2013). Threat Perception and Familiarity Moderate the Androgen Response to Competition in Women. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 30.0
    Social interactions elicit androgen responses whose function has been posited to be the adjustment of androgen dependent behaviors to social context. The activation of this androgen response is known to be mediated and moderated by psychological factors. In this study we tested the hypothesis that the testosterone (T) changes after a competition are not simply related to its outcome, but rather to the way the subject evaluates the event. In particular we tested two evaluative dimensions of a social interaction: (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Steven L. Franconeri, George A. Alvarez & Patrick Cavanagh (2013). Flexible Cognitive Resources: Competitive Content Maps for Attention and Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):134-141.score: 30.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Gerald E. Fryxell & Cathy A. Enz (1990). Value Similarity About Human Resources, Competitiveness and Social Responsibility: A Study of Organizational and Suborganizational Differences. International Journal of Value-Based Management 3 (2):137-157.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Rose M. (2008). Biased Competition for Processing Resources Between a Foreground Task and Emotional Background Pictures. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 30.0
  48. Monique Borgerhoff Mulder (1998). Brothers and Sisters. Human Nature 9 (2):119-161.score: 30.0
    Data from the Kipsigis of Kenya are used to test two models for how parents invest in offspring, the Trivers-Willard and local resource competition/enhancement hypotheses. Investment is measured as age-specific survival, educational success, marital arrangements, and some components of property inheritance, permitting an evaluation of how biases persist or alter over the period of dependence. Changes through time in such biases are also examined. Despite stronger effects of wealth on the reproductive success of men than women, the survival (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Diego Fernandez-Duque (2002). Cause and Effect Theories of Attention: The Role of Conceptual Metaphors. Review of General Psychology 6 (2):153-165.score: 24.0
    Scientific concepts are defined by metaphors. These metaphors determine what atten- tion is and what count as adequate explanations of the phenomenon. The authors analyze these metaphors within 3 types of attention theories: (a) --cause-- theories, in which attention is presumed to modulate information processing (e.g., attention as a spotlight; attention as a limited resource); (b) --effect-- theories, in which attention is considered to be a by-product of information processing (e.g., the competition meta- phor); and (c) hybrid theories (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. María Dolores López-Gamero, Enrique Claver-Cortés & José Francisco Molina-Azorín (2008). Complementary Resources and Capabilities for an Ethical and Environmental Management: A Qual/Quan Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):701 - 732.score: 24.0
    Managers’ commitment to contribute to sustainable development holds the key to their long-term business success and may be a source of competitive advantage. The managerial perception of business ethics is influenced by the level of moral development and personal characteristics of managers. These perceptions are also shaped by forces existing in the environment of the firm, including available resources, societal expectations, sector, and regulations. The resource-based perspective can thus contribute to the analysis of ethical issues offering important insights on (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000