Search results for 'review' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
  1. Discussion Review, Discussion Review.score: 210.0
    These two volumes, edited by Mario Bunge – one of the few avant-gardists in both physics and philo sophy – contain both stimulating and frustrating material. Some of the writers knowingly exert pressure on their readers (Clifford Truesdell); others flatter them by assuming that they know so much. The volumes are packed with material, and it takes a long time just to read them, let alone understand them. Had I known of anyone competent to understand these two volumes in all (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Susan Haack (2007). Peer Review and Publication: Lessons for Lawyers. Stetson Law Review 36 (3).score: 27.0
    Peer review and publication is one of the factors proposed in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc. as indicia of the reliability of scientific testimony. This Article traces the origins of the peer-review system, the process by which it became standard at scientific and medical journals, and the many roles it now plays. Additionally, the Author articulates the epistemological rationale for pre-publication peer-review and the inherent limitations of the system as a scientific quality-control mechanism. The Article explores (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Laura K. Landolt (2013). Externalizing Human Rights: From Commission to Council, the Universal Periodic Review and Egypt. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 14 (2):107-129.score: 27.0
    Critics of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights (CHR) and its successor, the Human Rights Council (HRC), focus on member state efforts to protect themselves and allies from external pressure for human rights implementation. Even though HRC members still shield rights abusers, the new Universal Periodic Review (UPR) subjects all states to regular scrutiny, and provides substantial new space for domestic NGOs to externalize domestic human rights demands. This paper offers an institutional account of the expansion of NGO (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Corey Brettschneider (2005). Balancing Procedures and Outcomes Within Democratic Theory: Corey Values and Judicial Review. Political Studies 53:423-451.score: 24.0
    Democratic theorists often distinguish between two views of democratic procedures. ‘Outcomes theorists’ emphasize the instrumental nature of these procedures and argue that they are only valuable because they tend to produce good outcomes. In contrast, ‘proceduralists’ emphasize the intrinsic value of democratic procedures, for instance, on the grounds that they are fair. In this paper. I argue that we should reject pure versions of these two theories in favor of an understanding of the democratic ideal that recognizes a commitment to (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Valia Allori (2010). Review of "Quantum Theory: A Philosopher's Overview" by S. Cannavo. [REVIEW] International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (3):330-333.score: 24.0
    Book Review of "Quantum Mechanics- a Philosopher's Overview," by Salvator Cannavo.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Seth Miller (2011). A Review of “Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension”. [REVIEW] World Futures 66 (7):525-529.score: 24.0
    This essay critically reviews Andy Clark’s new book Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension, in which he argues that there are circumstances in which the mind, properly considered, is found to supervene on not only the brain, but the body and the external environment as well. This review summarizes Clark’s major contributions to this viewpoint for the general reader, then raises a few critical points that help to contextualize Clark’s claims, aims, and methods, while highlighting the book’s (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Michael J. O'Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield (2005). A Review of the Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996-2003. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375 - 413.score: 24.0
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996-2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable - awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield (2005). A Review of the Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996–2003. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375 - 413.score: 24.0
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996–2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable – awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ronald N. Kostoff (1997). The Principles and Practices of Peer Review. Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (1):19-34.score: 24.0
    The principles and practices of research peer review are described. While the principles are fundamentally generic and apply to peer review across the full spectrum of performing institutions as well as to manuscript/proposal/program peer review, the focus of this paper is peer review of proposed and ongoing programs in federal agencies. The paper describes desireable characteristics and important intangible factors in successful peer review. Also presented is a heuristic protocol for the conduct of successful peer (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robert Frodeman & Adam Briggle (2012). The Dedisciplining of Peer Review. Minerva 50 (1):3-19.score: 24.0
    The demand for greater public accountability is changing the nature of ex ante peer review at public science agencies worldwide. Based on a four year research project, this essay examines these changes through an analysis of the process of grant proposal review at two US public science agencies, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Weaving historical and conceptual narratives with analytical accounts, we describe the ways in which these two agencies struggle with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Valia Allori (2009). Review of "The Kantian Legacy in Nineteenth-Century Science" by M. Friedman and A. Nordmann (Eds). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 478-479.score: 24.0
    Book review of "The Kantian legacy in the Nineteenth -Century Science,'' M. Friedman, and A. Nordmann (eds.).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Maureen H. Fitzgerald (2005). Punctuated Equilibrium, Moral Panics and the Ethics Review Process. Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (4):315-338.score: 24.0
    A review of the literature and ethnographic data from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United States, and the United Kingdom on the research ethics review process suggest that moral panics can become triggers for punctuated equilibrium in the review process at both the macro and microlevel, albeit with significantly different levels of magnitude and impact. These data suggest that neither the development of the ethics review process nor the process itself proceeds gradually, but both are characterized (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Annabelle Lever (2007). Democracy and Judicial Review: Are They Really Incompatible? Public Law:280-298.score: 24.0
    This article shows that judicial review has a democratic justification even though judges may be no better at protecting rights than legislatures. That justification is procedural, not consequentialist: reflecting the ability of judicial review to express and protect citizen’s interests in political participation, political equality, political representation and political accountability. The point of judicial review is to symbolize and give expression to the authority of citizens over their governors, not to reflect the wisdom, trustworthiness or competence of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Fahri Karakas (2010). Spirituality and Performance in Organizations: A Literature Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):89 - 106.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this article is to review spirituality at work literature and to explore how spirituality improves employees' performances and organizational effectiveness. The article reviews about 140 articles on workplace spirituality to review their findings on how spirituality supports organizational performance. Three different perspectives are introduced on how spirituality benefits employees and supports organizational performance based on the extant literature: (a) Spirituality enhances employee well-being and quality of life; (b) Spirituality provides employees a sense of purpose and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Domenic V. Cicchetti (1997). Referees, Editors, and Publication Practices: Improving the Reliability and Usefulness of the Peer Review System. Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (1):51-62.score: 24.0
    The documented low levels of reliability of the peer review process present a serious challenge to editors who must often base their publication decisions on conflicting referee recommendations. The purpose of this article is to discuss this process and examine ways to produce a more reliable and useful peer review system.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Annabelle Lever (2009). Is Judicial Review Undemocratic? Perspectives on Politics 7 (4):897-915.score: 24.0
    This paper examines Jeremy Waldron’s ‘core case’ against judicial review. Waldron’s arguments, it shows, exaggerate the importance of voting to our judgements about the legitimacy and democratic credentials of a society and its government. Moreover, Waldron is insufficiently sensitive to the ways that judicial review can provide a legitimate avenue of political activity for those seeking to rectify historic injustice. While judicial review is not necessary for democratic government, the paper concludes that Waldron is wrong to believe (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. J. Angelo Corlett (2005). Ethical Issues in Journal Peer-Review. Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (4):355-366.score: 24.0
    In some recent articles, Dr. Leigh Turner [Doffing the Mask: Why Manuscript Reviewers Ought to Be Identifiable,” Journal of Academic Ethics, 1 (2003), pp. 41–48; “Promoting F.A.I.T.H. in Peer Review: Five Core Attributes in Effective Peer Review,” Journal of Academic Ethics, 1 (2003), pp. 181–188.] makes some rather critical observations regarding the processes of peer-review in academic journals. I shall note them in turn, note wherein I concur and wherein I disagree, and discuss some of Turner's suggestions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Jorn Sonderholm (2009). In Defence of Priority Review Vouchers. Bioethics 23 (7):413-420.score: 24.0
    Infectious and parasitic diseases cause enormous health problems in the developing world whereas they leave the developed one relatively unscathed. Research and development (R&D) of drugs for diseases that mainly affect people in developing countries is limited. The problem that relatively few drugs are available for diseases that cause an enormous burden of disease in the developing world is called the 'availability problem'. In recent years, the availability problem has received quite a bit of attention. A number of proposals have (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Gregor Betz (2008). Der Umgang mit Zukunftswissen in der Klimapolitikberatung. Eine Fallstudie zum Stern Review. Philosophia Naturalis 45 (1):95-129.score: 24.0
    The Stern Review on The Economics of Climate Change is a highly influential welfare analysis of climate policy measures which has been published in 2006. This paper identifies and systematically assesses the long-term socioeconomic and climatic predictions the Stern Review relies on, and reflects them philosophically. Being a cost-benefit analysis, the Stern Review has to predict the benefits of climate mitigation policies, i.e.the damaging consequences of climate change which might be avoided, as well as the costs of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jonathan Kimmelman (2011). Ethics, Ambiguity Aversion, and the Review of Complex Translational Clinical Trials. Bioethics 26 (5):242-250.score: 24.0
    Clinical trials of novel agents often present several layers of ethical challenge. Because time and resources for ethical and safety review are limited, how investigators, IRBs, and regulators allocate attention to a trial's various safety dimensions itself represents a critical ethical question. In what follows, I use the example of a Parkinson's disease gene transfer trial to show how risks involving unknown probabilities or outcomes (ambiguity), might sometimes draw attention away from risks that involve known probabilities or outcomes. This (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. J. Scott Armstrong (1997). Peer Review for Journals: Evidence on Quality Control, Fairness, and Innovation. Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (1):63-84.score: 24.0
    This paper reviews the published empirical evidence concerning journal peer review consisting of 68 papers, all but three published since 1975. Peer review improves quality, but its use to screen papers has met with limited success. Current procedures to assure quality and fairness seem to discourage scientific advancement, especially important innovations, because findings that conflict with current beliefs are often judged to have defects. Editors can use procedures to encourage the publication of papers with innovative findings such as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jana L. Craft (2013). A Review of the Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 2004–2011. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):221-259.score: 24.0
    This review summarizes the research on ethical decision-making from 2004 to 2011. Eighty-four articles were published during this period, resulting in 357 findings. Individual findings are categorized by their application to individual variables, organizational variables, or the concept of moral intensity as developed by Jones (Acad Manag Rev 16(2):366–395, 1991). Rest’s (Moral development: advances in research and theory, Praeger, New York, 1986) four-step model for ethical decision-making is used to summarize findings by dependent variable—awareness, intent, judgment, and behavior. A (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Wendy Baldwin & Belinda Seto (1997). Peer Review: Selecting the Best Science. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (1):11-17.score: 24.0
    The major challenge facing today’s biomedical researchers is the increasing competition for available funds. The competitive review process, through which the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awards grants, is built upon review by a committee of expert scientists. The NIH is firmly committed to ensuring that its peer review system is fair and objective.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Susan A. Tilley (2008). A Troubled Dance: Doing the Work of Research Ethics Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (2):91-104.score: 24.0
    The fast growing interest in the work of university ethics review boards is evident in the proliferation of research and literature in the area. This article focuses on a Research Ethics Board (REB) in the Canadian context. In-depth, open-ended interviews with REB members and findings from a qualitative study designed to examine the ethics review of school-based research are used to illustrate points raised in the paper. The author’s experiences as academic researcher, advisor to student researchers and a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Walter A. Carnielli (2004). Book Review: Yves Nievergelt, Foundations of Logic and Mathematics: Applications to Computer Science and Cryptography, Birkäuser Verlag, Boston, 2002, €90, Pp. 480, ISBN 0-8176-4249-8, Hardcover. Dimensions (in Inches): 1.00 × 9.96 × 7.36. [REVIEW] Studia Logica 78 (3):479-481.score: 24.0
    Book review r A. (2004). "Book review: Yves nievergelt, foundations of ...
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Nicholas McClaren (2013). The Personal Selling and Sales Management Ethics Research: Managerial Implications and Research Directions From a Comprehensive Review of the Empirical Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):101-125.score: 24.0
    Research into ethics in personal selling and sales management has increased substantially over the preceding decade by investigating complex dimensions of ethical decision-making in greater depth and with more analytical sophistication. This review of the recent conceptual and empirical literature provides insight into the extent and the direction of this knowledge, recommends managerial action, and discusses areas for future exploration. Future direction is also provided through research propositions. The type of sales practitioner investigated, the main variables examined, and the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Douglas P. Peters & Stephen J. Ceci (1982). Peer-Review Practices of Psychological Journals: The Fate of Published Articles, Submitted Again. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (2):187-195.score: 24.0
    A growing interest in and concern about the adequacy and fairness of modern peer-review practices in publication and funding are apparent across a wide range of scientific disciplines. Although questions about reliability, accountability, reviewer bias, and competence have been raised, there has been very little direct research on these variables.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Raymond Spier (2002). Peer Review and Innovation. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (1):99-108.score: 24.0
    Two important aspects of the relationship between peer review and innovation includes the acceptance of articles for publication in journals and the assessment of applications for grants for the funding of research work. While there are well-known examples of the rejection by journals of first choice of many papers that have radically changed the way we think about the world outside ourselves, such papers do get published eventually, however tortuous the process required. With grant applications the situation differs in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Wendy Lipworth, Ian Kerridge, Stacy Carter & Miles Little (2011). Should Biomedical Publishing Be “Opened Up”? Toward a Values-Based Peer-Review Process. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (3):267-280.score: 24.0
    Peer review of manuscripts for biomedical journals has become a subject of intense ethical debate. One of the most contentious issues is whether or not peer review should be anonymous. This study aimed to generate a rich, empirically-grounded understanding of the values held by journal editors and peer reviewers with a view to informing journal policy. Qualitative methods were used to carry out an inductive analysis of biomedical reviewers’ and editors’ values. Data was derived from in-depth, open-ended interviews (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Carole J. Lee, Cassidy R. Sugimoto, Guo Zhang & Blaise Cronin (2013). Bias in Peer Review. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 64 (1):2-17.score: 24.0
    Research on bias in peer review examines scholarly communication and funding processes to assess the epistemic and social legitimacy of the mechanisms by which knowledge communities vet and self-regulate their work. Despite vocal concerns, a closer look at the empirical and methodological limitations of research on bias raises questions about the existence and extent of many hypothesized forms of bias. In addition, the notion of bias is predicated on an implicit ideal that, once articulated, raises questions about the normative (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. David B. Resnik, Christina Gutierrez-Ford & Shyamal Peddada (2008). Perceptions of Ethical Problems with Scientific Journal Peer Review: An Exploratory Study. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3):305-310.score: 24.0
    This article reports the results of an anonymous survey of researchers at a government research institution concerning their perceptions about ethical problems with journal peer review. Incompetent review was the most common ethical problem reported by the respondents, with 61.8% (SE = 3.3%) claiming to have experienced this at some point during peer review. Bias (50.5%, SE = 3.4%) was the next most common problem. About 22.7% (SE = 2.8%) of respondents said that a reviewer had required (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Anton Oleinik (2013). Conflict(s) of Interest in Peer Review: Its Origins and Possible Solutions. Science and Engineering Ethics (1):1-21.score: 24.0
    Scientific communication takes place at two registers: first, interactions with colleagues in close proximity—members of a network, school of thought or circle; second, depersonalised transactions among a potentially unlimited number of scholars can be involved (e.g., author and readers). The interference between the two registers in the process of peer review produces a drift toward conflict of interest. Three particular cases of peer review are differentiated: journal submissions, grant applications and applications for tenure. The current conflict of interest (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Leigh Turner (2003). Promoting F.A.I.T.H. In Peer Review: Five Core Attributes of Effective Peer Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (2):181-188.score: 24.0
    Peer review is an important component of scholarly research. Long a black box whose practical mechanisms were unknown to researchers and readers, peer review is increasingly facing demands for accountability and improvement. Numerous studies address empirical aspects of the peer review process. Much less consideration is typically given to normative dimensions of peer review. This paper considers what authors, editors, reviewers, and readers ought to expect from the peer review process. Integrity in the review (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Ashok K. Vijh (1996). Reflections on Peer Review Practices in Committees Selecting Laureates for Prestigious Awards and Prizes: Some Relevant and Irrelevant Criteria. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (4):389-394.score: 24.0
    An important function in all scholarly and academic activities is the participation in the peer review system. One aspect of this peer review evaluation is service on committees judging candidates for important awards, prizes and fellowships. Some reflective observations on this process are made in which a number of factors determining the final choice are identified. It is pointed out that the decisions of such committees are based not only on relevant and objective criteria but are also influenced (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Joe Cain (1999). Why Be My Colleague's Keeper? Moral Justifications for Peer Review. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (4):531-540.score: 24.0
    Justifying ethical practices is no easy task. This paper considers moral justifications for peer review so as to persuade even the sceptical individualist. Two avenues provide a foundation for that justification: self-interest (the right behaviour is that which maximally serves one’s own interests) and social contract theory (the right behaviour is that which best meets obligations set in binding social contracts). A wider notion of “interest” permits the self-interest approach to justify not only submitting one’s own work to peer (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. George Hargraves (2000). The Review of Vocational Qualifications, 1985 to 1986: An Analysis of Its Role in the Development of Competence-Based Vocational Qualifications in England and Wales. [REVIEW] British Journal of Educational Studies 48 (3):285 - 308.score: 24.0
    A significant historical role in the development of competence-based vocational qualifications in England and Wales is customarily ascribed to the 1985 to 1986 Review of Vocational Qualifications (RVQ), the body which invented the National Vocational Qualification (NVQ). This paper analyses the RVQ's internal debates. The paper demonstrates that the RVQ proposed only the general principles of a structure and an administration for a reformed vocational qualifications system. The RVQ did not address in detail either the definition of occupational competence (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Arthur Stamps Iii (1997). Using a Dialectical Scientific Brief in Peer Review. Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (1):85-98.score: 24.0
    This paper presents a framework that editors, peer reviewers, and authors can use to identify and resolve efficiently disputes that arise during peer review in scientific journals. The framework is called a scientific dialectical brief. In this framework, differences among authors and reviewers are formatted into specific assertions and the support each party provides for its position. A literature review suggests that scientists use five main types of support; empirical data, reasoning, speculation, feelings, and status. It is suggested (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Denise Linda Parris & Jon Welty Peachey (2013). A Systematic Literature Review of Servant Leadership Theory in Organizational Contexts. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):377-393.score: 24.0
    A new research area linked to ethics, virtues, and morality is servant leadership. Scholars are currently seeking publication outlets as critics debate whether this new leadership theory is significantly distinct, viable, and valuable for organizational success. The aim of this study was to identify empirical studies that explored servant leadership theory by engaging a sample population in order to assess and synthesize the mechanisms, outcomes, and impacts of servant leadership. Thus, we sought to provide an evidence-informed answer to how does (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Dr Malcolm Atkinson (2001). 'Peer Review' Culture. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (2):193-204.score: 24.0
    A relatively high incidence of unsatisfactory review decisions is widely recognised and acknowledged as ‘the peer review problem’. Factors contributing to this problem are identified and examined. Specific examples of unreasonable rejection are considered. It is concluded that weaknesses of the ‘peer review’ system are significant and that they are well known or readily recognisable but that necessary counter-measures are not always enforced. Careful management is necessary to discount hollow opinion or error in review comment. (...) and referee functions should be quite separate. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Eric J. Ettema, Louise D. Derksen & Evert Leeuwen (2010). Existential Loneliness and End-of-Life Care: A Systematic Review. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (2):141-169.score: 24.0
    Patients with a life-threatening illness can be confronted with various types of loneliness, one of which is existential loneliness (EL). Since the experience of EL is extremely disruptive, the issue of EL is relevant for the practice of end-of-life care. Still, the literature on EL has generated little discussion and empirical substantiation and has never been systematically reviewed. In order to systematically review the literature, we (1) identified the existential loneliness literature; (2) established an organising framework for the (...); (3) conducted a conceptual analysis of existential loneliness; and (4) discussed its relevance for end-of-life care. We found that the EL concept is profoundly unclear. Distinguishing between three dimensions of EL—as a condition, as an experience, and as a process of inner growth—leads to some conceptual clarification. Analysis of these dimensions on the basis of their respective key notions—everpresent, feeling, defence; death, awareness, difficult communication; and inner growth, giving meaning, authenticity—further clarifies the concept. Although none of the key notions are unambiguous, they may function as a starting point for the development of care strategies on EL at the end of life. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Mihaela Mihai (2010). Public Negative Emotions and the Judicial Review of Transitional Justice Bills: Lessons From Three Contexts. Papeles Del Centro de Estudios Sobre la Identidad Colectiva 60:1-29.score: 24.0
    This article seeks to examine the ways in which courts of constitutional review have tried to deal with public sentiments within societies emerging from large-scale oppression and conflict. A comparative analysis of judicial review decisions from post-communist Hungary, post-apartheid South Africa and post-dictatorial Argentina is meant to show-case how judges have, more or less successfully, recognised and pedagogically engaged social negative feelings of resentment and indignation towards former victimisers and beneficiaries of violence. Thus, the article hopes to pave (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. [deleted]Aikaterini Fotopoulou Charlotte Krahé, Anne Springer, John A. Weinman (2013). The Social Modulation of Pain: Others as Predictive Signals of Salience – a Systematic Review. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Several studies in cognitive neuroscience have investigated the cognitive and affective modulation of pain. By contrast, fewer studies have focused on the social modulation of pain, despite a plethora of relevant clinical findings. Here we present the first review of experimental studies addressing how interpersonal factors, such as the presence, behaviour and spatial proximity of an observer, modulate pain. Based on a systematic literature search we identified twenty-six studies on experimentally-induced pain that manipulated different interpersonal variables and measured behavioural, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Lesya Y. Ganushchak, Ingrid K. Christoffels & Niels O. Schiller (2011). The Use of Electroencephalography in Language Production Research: A Review. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    Speech production long avoided electrophysiological experiments due to the suspicion that potential artifacts caused by muscle activity of overt speech may lead to a bad signal-to-noise ratio in the measurements. Therefore, researchers have sought to assess speech production by using indirect speech production tasks, such as tacit or implicit naming, delayed naming, or metalinguistic tasks, such as phoneme monitoring. Covert speech may, however, involve different processes than overt speech production. Recently, overt speech has been investigated using EEG. As the number (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Mohammad M. Khajah, Robert V. Lindsey & Michael C. Mozer (2014). Maximizing Students' Retention Via Spaced Review: Practical Guidance From Computational Models of Memory. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):157-169.score: 24.0
    During each school semester, students face an onslaught of material to be learned. Students work hard to achieve initial mastery of the material, but when they move on, the newly learned facts, concepts, and skills degrade in memory. Although both students and educators appreciate that review can help stabilize learning, time constraints result in a trade-off between acquiring new knowledge and preserving old knowledge. To use time efficiently, when should review take place? Experimental studies have shown benefits to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Caroline Privault, Jacki O'Neill, Victor Ciriza & Jean-Michel Renders (2010). A New Tangible User Interface for Machine Learning Document Review. Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (4):459-479.score: 24.0
    This paper describes a tool for assisting lawyers and paralegal teams during document review in eDiscovery. The tool combines a machine learning technology (CategoriX) and advanced multi-touch interface capable of not only addressing the usual cost, time and accuracy issues in document review, but also of facilitating the work of the review teams by capitalizing on the intelligence of the reviewers and enabling collaborative work.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Yuliya A. Vishneuskaya (2012). Analysis and Critical Review of the Development of Bioethics in Belarus. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):365-371.score: 24.0
    The main trends of the bioethics development in Belarus have been analyzed on the basis of the materials collected by the Ethics Documentation Center (ISEU, Minsk, Belarus). A critical review of the most important publications in the field since 2000 suggests that development of bioethics in Belarus has occurred in two parallel directions distantly connected to each other: a theoretical direction and a practical one. Despite there are objective and subjective reasons for introducing bioethics in Belarus as an institutionally-organized (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Professor Robert H. Fletcher & Professor Suzanne W. Fletcher (1997). Evidence for the Effectiveness of Peer Review. Science and Engineering Ethics 3 (1):35-50.score: 24.0
    Scientific editors’ policies, including peer review, are based mainly on tradition and belief. Do they actually achieve their desired effects, the selection of the best manuscripts and improvement of those published? Editorial decisions have important consequences—to investigators, the scientific community, and all who might benefit from correct information or be harmed by misleading research results. These decisions should be judged not just by intentions of reviewers and editors but also by the actual consequences of their actions. A small but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Carole J. Lee (2012). A Kuhnian Critique of Psychometric Research on Peer Review. Philosophy of Science 79 (5):859-870.score: 24.0
    Psychometrically oriented researchers construe low inter-rater reliability measures for expert peer reviewers as damning for the practice of peer review. I argue that this perspective overlooks different forms of normatively appropriate disagreement among reviewers. Of special interest are Kuhnian questions about the extent to which variance in reviewer ratings can be accounted for by normatively appropriate disagreements about how to interpret and apply evaluative criteria within disciplines during times of normal science. Until these empirical-cum-philosophical analyses are done, it will (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. David Pontille & Didier Torny (forthcoming). From Manuscript Evaluation to Article Valuation: The Changing Technologies of Journal Peer Review. Human Studies:1-23.score: 24.0
    Born in the 17th century, journal peer review is an extremely diverse technology, constantly torn between two often incompatible goals: the validation of manuscripts conceived as a collective industrial-like reproducible process performed to assert scientific statements, and the dissemination of articles considered as a means to spur scientific discussion, raising controversies, and civically challenging a state of knowledge. Such a situation is particularly conducive to clarifying the processes of valuation and evaluation in journal peer review. In this article, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Jesper Rasmussen, Vibeke Langer & Hugo Fjelsted Alrøe (2006). Bias in Peer Review of Organic Farming Grant Applications. Agriculture and Human Values 23 (2):181-188.score: 24.0
    Peer reviews of 84 organic farming grant applications from Sweden were analyzed to determine whether the reviewers’ affiliation to one of two types of agriculture (i.e., organic and conventional) influenced their reviews. Fifteen reviewers were divided into three groups: (1) scientists with experience in organic farming research; (2) scientists with no experience in organic farming research; and (3) users of organic farming research. The two groups of scientists assessed the societal relevance and scientific quality of the grant applications based on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 999