Search results for 'right to trial by jury' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Thom Brooks (2004). The Right to Trial by Jury. Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (2):197–212.score: 2043.0
    This article offers a justification for the continued use of jury trials. I shall critically examine the ability of juries to render just verdicts, judicial impartiality, and judicial transparency. My contention is that the judicial system that best satisfies these values is most preferable. Of course, these three values are not the only factors relevant for consideration. Empirical evidence demonstrates that juries foster both democratic participation and public legitimation of legal decisions regarding the most serious cases. Nevertheless, juries are (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert A. Sedler, The Michigan Supreme Court Diminishes the Right to Trial by Jury in Civil Cases.score: 1560.0
    In this paper, I have analyzed the right to trial by jury in civil cases as reflected in decisions of the Michigan Supreme Court over approximately a 20 year period dealing with three areas affecting the right to trial by jury in civil cases: (1) entitlement to a jury trial; (2) summary disposition; and (3) directed verdicts. The study was constructed to cover cases over a substantial period of time, so that it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. John F. Quinn (1993). The Right to Trial by Jury. Social Philosophy Today 8:91-101.score: 1170.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Thom Brooks (2004). A Defence of Jury Nullification. Res Publica 10 (4):401-423.score: 1116.0
    In both Great Britain and the United States there has been a growing debate about the modern acceptability of jury nullification. Properly understood, juries do not have any constitutional right to ignore the law, but they do have the power to do so nevertheless. Juries that nullify may be motivated by a variety of concerns: too harsh sentences, improper government action, racism, etc. In this article, I shall attempt to defend jury nullification on a number of grounds. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Lijana Štarienė (2009). The Limits of the Use of Undercover Agents and the Right to a Fair Trial Under Article 6(1) of the European Convention on Human Rights. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 117 (3):263-284.score: 760.8
    Various special investigative methods are more often applied nowadays; their use is unavoidably induced by today’s reality in combating organised crime in the spheres such as corruption, prostitution, drug trafficking, trafficking in persons, money counterfeit and etc. Therefore, special secret investigative methods are more often used and they are very effective in gathering evidence for the purpose of detecting and investigating very well-organised or latent crimes. Both the Convention on the Protection on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms itself, i.e. its (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Mirko Bagaric (2010). The Right to an Impartial Hearing Trumps the Social Imperative of Bringing Accused to Trial Even 'Down Under'. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):321-339.score: 739.2
    Accused persons who are subjected to a saturation level of negative media coverage may be denied an impartial hearing, which is perhaps the most important aspect of the right to a fair hearing. Despite this, the courts have generally held that the social imperative of prosecuting accused trumps the interests of the accused. The justification for an impartial hearing stems from the repugnance of convicting the innocent. Viewed dispassionately, this imperative is not absolute, given that every legal system (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Peter Bachrach (1958). The Senate Debate on the Right to Jury Trial Versus the Right to Vote Controversy: A Case Study in Liberal Thought. Ethics 68 (3):210-216.score: 590.4
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Richard L. Lippke (2008). To Waive or Not to Waive: The Right to Trial and Plea Bargaining. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (2):181-199.score: 518.4
    Criminal defendants in many countries are faced with a dilemma: If they waive their right to trial and plead guilty, they typically receive charge or sentence reductions in exchange for having done so. If they exercise their right to trial and are found guilty, they often receive stiffer sanctions than if they had pled guilty. I characterize the former as ‘waiver rewards’ and the latter as ‘non-waiver penalties.’ After clarifying the two and considering the relation between (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Steven R. Smith (2012). Neuroscience, Ethics and Legal Responsibility: The Problem of the Insanity Defense. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):475-481.score: 492.0
    The insanity defense presents many difficult questions for the legal system. It attracts attention beyond its practical significance (it is seldom used successfully) because it goes to the heart of the concept of legal responsibility. “Not guilty by reason of insanity” generally requires that as a result of mental illness the defendant was unable to distinguish right from wrong at the time of the crime. The many difficult and complex questions presented by the insanity defense have led some in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Mark Tunick (1992). Hegel's Political Philosophy. Princeton University Press.score: 375.0
    Hegel claims that punishment is the criminal's right and makes the criminal free. In critically examining Hegel's justification of legal punishment, the author takes us to the core of Hegel's political philosophy, offering an account of what Hegel means by right and freedom. Drawing on recently published but still untranslated lecture notes of Hegel's philosophy of right, which illuminate Hegel's notoriously difficult texts, the author rejects the commonly taken position that Hegel uncritically accepts existing practices. Acknowledging that (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Hamish Stewart (2014). The Right to Be Presumed Innocent. Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (2):407-420.score: 363.2
    The presumption of innocence has often been understood as a doctrine that can be explained primarily by instrumental concerns relating to accurate fact-finding in the criminal trial and that has few if any implications outside the trial itself. In this paper, I argue, in contrast, that in a liberal legal order everyone has a right to be presumed innocent simply in virtue of being a person. Every person has a right not to be subjected to criminal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. A. Kolossa, T. Fingscheidt, K. Wessel & B. Kopp (2011). A Model-Based Approach to Trial-by-Trial P300 Amplitude Fluctuations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:359-359.score: 361.8
    It has long been recognized that the amplitude of the P300 component of event–related brain potentials is sensitive to the degree to which eliciting stimuli are surprising to the observers (Donchin, 1981). While Squires et al. (1976) showed and modeled dependencies of P300 amplitudes from observed stimuli on various time scales, Mars et al. (2008) proposed a computational model keeping track of stimulus probabilities on a long–term time scale. We suggest here a computational model which integrates prior information with short–term, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. M. Chahal (2010). Off-Trial Access to Experimental Cancer Agents for the Terminally Ill: Balancing the Needs of Individuals and Society. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (6):367-370.score: 340.8
    The development of cancer therapies is a long and arduous process. Because it can take several years for a cancer agent to pass clinical testing and be approved for use, terminal cancer patients rarely have the time to see these experimental therapies become widely available. For most terminal cancer patients the only opportunity they have to access an experimental drug that could potentially improve their prognosis is by joining a clinical trial. Unfortunately, several aspects of clinical trial methodology (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. R. D. Ogden, W. K. Hamilton & C. Whitcher (2010). Assisted Suicide by Oxygen Deprivation with Helium at a Swiss Right-to-Die Organisation. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (3):174-179.score: 338.4
    Background In Switzerland, right-to-die organisations assist their members with suicide by lethal drugs, usually barbiturates. One organisation, Dignitas, has experimented with oxygen deprivation as an alternative to sodium pentobarbital. Objective To analyse the process of assisted suicide by oxygen deprivation with helium and a common face mask and reservoir bag. Method This study examined four cases of assisted suicide by oxygen deprivation using helium delivered via a face mask. Videos of the deaths were provided by the Zurich police. Dignitas (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. S. Fischer, C. A. Huber, L. Imhof, R. Mahrer Imhof, M. Furter, S. J. Ziegler & G. Bosshard (2008). Suicide Assisted by Two Swiss Right-to-Die Organisations. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):810-814.score: 338.4
    Background: In Switzerland, non-medical right-to-die organisations such as Exit Deutsche Schweiz and Dignitas offer suicide assistance to members suffering from incurable diseases. Objectives: First, to determine whether differences exist between the members who received assistance in suicide from Exit Deutsche Schweiz and Dignitas. Second, to investigate whether the practices of Exit Deutsche Schweiz have changed since the 1990s. Methods: This study analysed all cases of assisted suicide facilitated by Exit Deutsche Schweiz (E) and Dignitas (D) between 2001 and 2004 (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Allen Wood (2011). Kant and the Right to Lie. Reviewed Essay: On a Supposed Right to Lie From Philanthropy, by Inmanuel Kant (1797). Eidos 15:96-117.score: 338.4
    Kant’s strict views on lying have been regularly cited as a reason for thinking there is something fundamentally wrong with Kantian ethics. Some of Kant’s statements here seem so excessive that most Kantians who have dealt with the topic have tried to distance themselves from them, usually claiming that they do not (or need not) follow from Kant’s own principles. In this chapter, I will do a little of that, partly by questioning whether the famous example of the “murderer at (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Regina Valutytė (2012). State Liability for the Infringement of the Obligation to Refer for a Preliminary Ruling under the European Convention on Human Rights. Jurisprudence 19 (1):7-20.score: 307.8
    The article deals with the question whether a state might be held liable for the infringement of the European Convention on Human Rights if its national court of last instance fails to implement the obligation to make a reference for a preliminary ruling to the Court of Justice of the European Union under the conditions laid down in Article 267 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and developed in the case-law of the Court. Relying on well-established (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Andreas Frewer (2010). Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.score: 306.0
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the health of human beings. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Noam Chomsky, His Right to Say It.score: 294.4
    In the fall of 1979, I was asked by Serge Thion, a libertarian socialist scholar with a record of opposition to all forms of totalitarianism, to sign a petition calling on authorities to insure Robert Faurisson's "safety and the free exercise of his legal rights." The petition said nothing about his "holocaust studies" (he denies the existence of gas chambers or of a systematic plan to massacre the Jews and questions the authenticity of the Anne Frank diary, among other (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Thérèse Murphy & Noel Whitty (2000). What is a Fair Trial? Rape Prosecutions, Disclosure and the Human Rights Act. Feminist Legal Studies 8 (2):143-167.score: 292.8
    This article engages with the vogue for predicting the effects of the Human Rights Act 1998 by focusing on the rape prosecution and trial. The specific interest is feminist scrutiny of the right to a fair trial, particularly the concept of ‘fairness’, in light of the increasing use of disclosure rules (in Canada and England) to gain access to medical and counseling records. Transcending the two contemporary narratives of ‘victims’/women’s rights and defendants’ rights in the criminal justice (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Elizabeth Ashford (2007). The Duties Imposed by the Human Right to Basic Necessities. In Thomas Pogge (ed.), Freedom From Poverty as a Human Right: Who Owes What to the Very Poor? Co-Published with Unesco. Oup Oxford.score: 289.8
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Sherman J. Clark (2014). The Juror, the Citizen, and the Human Being: The Presumption of Innocence and the Burden of Judgment. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (2):421-429.score: 288.0
    In this essay, I suggest that the criminal trial is not only about the guilt or innocence of the defendant, but also about the character and growth of the jurors and the communities they represent. In earlier work, I have considered the potential impact of law and politics on the character of citizens, and thus on the capacity of citizens to thrive—to live full and rich human lives. Regarding the jury, I have argued that aspects of criminal (...) procedure work to fix in jurors a sense of agency in and responsibility for verdicts of conviction. Here, I draw on those ideas with respect to the presumption of innocence. I suggest that the presumption of innocence works not primarily as legal rule, but rather as a moral framing device—a sort of moral discomfort device—encouraging jurors to feel and bear the weight of what they do. I offer an account of character development in which virtues are conceived of not merely as modes of conduct developed through habituation and practice, but also as capacities and ways of being developed in part through understanding and experience. The criminal trial, framed by the presumption of innocence, can be an experience through which jurors and their communities, by learning what it means and feels like to carry a certain sort of moral weight, may engender a certain set of moral strengths—strengths valuable to them not just as jurors, but also as citizens, and as human beings. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jeffrey Glick (2010). Justification and the Right to Believe. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (240):532-544.score: 282.6
    Some philosophers have attempted to utilize the conceptual tools of ethics in order to understand epistemology. One instantiation of this understands justification in terms of having a certain kind of epistemic right, namely, a right to believe. In variations of this theme, some hold that justification involves having the authority to believe, or being entitled to believe. But by examining the putative analogies between different versions of rights and justification, I demonstrate that justification should not be understood as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Kieran Oberman (2011). Immigration, Global Poverty and the Right to Stay. Political Studies 59 (2):253-268.score: 282.6
    This article questions the use of immigration as a tool to counter global poverty. It argues that poor people have a human right to stay in their home state, which entitles them to receive development assistance without the necessity of migrating abroad. The article thus rejects a popular view in the philosophical literature on immigration which holds that rich states are free to choose between assisting poor people in their home states and admitting them as immigrants when fulfilling duties (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Mark B. Brown & David H. Guston (2009). Science, Democracy, and the Right to Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):351-366.score: 282.6
    Debates over the politicization of science have led some to claim that scientists have or should have a “right to research.” This article examines the political meaning and implications of the right to research with respect to different historical conceptions of rights. The more common “liberal” view sees rights as protections against social and political interference. The “republican” view, in contrast, conceives rights as claims to civic membership. Building on the republican view of rights, this article conceives the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Sune Lægaard (2010). What is the Right to Exclude Immigrants? Res Publica 16 (3):245-262.score: 282.6
    It is normally taken for granted that states have a right to control immigration into their territory. When immigration is raised as a normative issue two questions become salient, one about what the right to exclude is, and one about whether and how it might be justified. This paper considers the first question. The paper starts by noting that standard debates about immigration have not addressed what the right to exclude is. Standard debates about immigration furthermore tend (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jason T. Eberl, Eleanor K. Kinney & Matthew J. Williams (2011). Foundation for a Natural Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.score: 282.6
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the value of specific policies designed (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Efrat Ram-Tiktin (2012). The Right to Health Care as a Right to Basic Human Functional Capabilities. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):337 - 351.score: 282.6
    A just social arrangement must guarantee a right to health care for all. This right should be understood as a positive right to basic human functional capabilities. The present article aims to delineate the right to health care as part of an account of distributive justice in health care in terms of the sufficiency of basic human functional capabilities. According to the proposed account, every individual currently living beneath the sufficiency threshold or in jeopardy of falling (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Carol J. Gill (2004). Depression in the Context of Disability and the “Right to Die”. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (3):171-198.score: 282.6
    Arguments in favor of legalized assisted suicide often center on issues of personal privacy and freedom of choice over one's body. Many disability advocates assert, however, that autonomy arguments neglect the complex sociopolitical determinants of despair for people with disabilities. Specifically, they argue that social approval of suicide for individuals with irreversible conditions is discriminatory and that relaxing restrictions on assisted suicide would jeopardize, not advance, the freedom of persons with disabilities to direct the lives they choose. This paper examines (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Muireann Quigley (2010). A Right to Reproduce? Bioethics 24 (8):403-411.score: 282.6
    How should we conceive of a right to reproduce? And, morally speaking, what might be said to justify such a right? These are just two questions of interest that are raised by the technologies of assisted reproduction. This paper analyses the possible legitimate grounds for a right to reproduce within the two main theories of rights; interest theory and choice theory.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Ashley M. Fox & Benjamin Mason Meier (2009). Health as Freedom: Addressing Social Determinants of Global Health Inequities Through the Human Right to Development. Bioethics 23 (2):112-122.score: 282.6
    In spite of vast global improvements in living standards, health, and well-being, the persistence of absolute poverty and its attendant maladies remains an unsettling fact of life for billions around the world and constitutes the primary cause for the failure of developing states to improve the health of their peoples. While economic development in developing countries is necessary to provide for underlying determinants of health – most prominently, poverty reduction and the building of comprehensive primary health systems – inequalities in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Paulius Čelkis & Eglė Venckienė (2011). Concept of the Right to Health Care. Jurisprudence 18 (1):269-286.score: 282.6
    On the grounds of the fundamental value of the human rights, which is the human dignity, this article describes a basis of the right to health care in terms of quality, discloses its concept, reviews the spheres of health system in which this right is exercised: health care and public health. The right to health care is stressed as one of the fundamental rights, without which the person will not able to enjoy other rights: economic, political and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jonas Juškevičius & Janina Balsienė (2010). On Human Rights in Healthcare: Some Remarks on Limits of the Right to Healthcare. Jurisprudence 122 (4):95-110.score: 282.6
    Notwithstanding the expectations related to the ‘invasion’ of human rights into the field of healthcare, the complexity of this field raises some problematic questions about the applicability of such a legal instrument. The present paper analyses the possible limits to the content of the core right to healthcare. These limits are discussed through the examination of two normative pillars of health law: the right to individual self-determination (or the principle of individual autonomy) and the right to healthcare (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Graham Riches (1999). Advancing the Human Right to Food in Canada: Social Policy and the Politics of Hunger, Welfare, and Food Security. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 16 (2):203-211.score: 282.6
    This article argues that hunger in Canada, while being an outcome of unemployment, low incomes, and inadequate welfare, springs also from the failure to recognize and implement the human right to food. Food security has, however, largely been ignored by progressive social policy analysis. Barriers standing in the way of achieving food security include the increasing commodification of welfare and the corporatization of food, the depoliticization of hunger by governments and the voluntary sector, and, most particularly, the neglect by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Indrė Pukanasytė (2009). Some Aspects Related to the Interpretation of the Right to Free Elections in the Case-Law of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 115 (1):155-182.score: 282.6
    The paper focuses on the general principles established in the caselaw of the European Court of Human Rights while applying and interpreting the Article 3 of the First Protocol of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms which provides: „The High Contracting Parties undertake to hold free elections at reasonable intervals by secret ballot, under conditions which will ensure the free expression of the opinion of the people in the choice of the legislature.“ Article 3 of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ralph P. Hall, Barbara Van Koppen & Emily Van Houweling (forthcoming). The Human Right to Water: The Importance of Domestic and Productive Water Rights. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-20.score: 282.6
    The United Nations (UN) Universal Declaration of Human Rights engenders important state commitments to respect, fulfill, and protect a broad range of socio-economic rights. In 2010, a milestone was reached when the UN General Assembly recognized the human right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation. However, water plays an important role in realizing other human rights such as the right to food and livelihoods, and in realizing the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Justina Balčiūnaitė & Lijana Štarienė (2010). Right to Privacy V. European Commission's Expanded Power of Inspection According to Regulation 1/2003. Jurisprudence 121 (3):115-132.score: 282.6
    Regulation No 17: First Regulation implementing Articles 85 and 86 of the Treaty set out that in carrying out the duties assigned to it by Article 89 and by provisions adopted under Article 87 of the Treaty, the officials authorized by the EU Commission were empowered inter alia to enter any premises, land and means of transport of undertakings. Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2003 of 16 December 2002 on the implementation of the rules on competition laid down in Articles 81 (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Birutė Pranevičienė & Aurelija Pūraitė (2010). Right to Education in International Legal Documents. Jurisprudence 121 (3):133-156.score: 282.6
    The importance of the right to education reaches far beyond education itself. The right to education is recognized, promoted and protected at all levels— from local to global. The concept of each human right constitutes a dual perception—human rights are personified and there are particular duty-bearers, most often the states, which have certain obligations to preserve and protect those rights. This article summarizes governmental obligations, foreseen in international and regional legal human rights’ instruments, corresponding to the (...) to education in its entirety. The conceptual framework for the content and scope of the right to education is established by different human rights institutions and judicial bodies and implicates the concept of quantitative and qualitative measures, expressed by four guidelines—availability, accessibility, acceptability, adaptability. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Regina Valutytė (2012). Legal Consequences for the Infringement of the Obligation to Make a Reference for a Preliminary Ruling Under Constitutional Law. Jurisprudence 19 (3):1171-1186.score: 280.8
    The article deals with the question whether a state might be held liable for the infringement of constitutional law if its national court of last instance violates the obligation to make a reference for a preliminary ruling to the Court of Justice of the European Union under the conditions laid down in Article 267 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and developed in the case-law of the Court. Relying on the well-established practice of the European Court (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Claudia Wiesemann (2011). Is There a Right Not to Know One's Sex? The Ethics of 'Gender Verification' in Women's Sports Competitions. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):216-220.score: 261.0
    The paper discusses the current medical practice of "gender verification" in sports from an ethical point of view. It takes the recent public discussion about 800-meter runner Caster Semenya as a starting point. At the World Championships in Athletics 2009 in Berlin, Germany, Semenya was challenged by competitors as being a so called "sex impostor". A medical examination to verify her sex ensued. The author analyses whether athletes like Semenya could claim a right not to know that is generally (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Peter Milward (2013). Thomas More's Trial by Jury. Edited by Henry Ansgar Kelly , Louis W. Karlin & Gerard B. Wegemer . Pp. Xix, 240, Woodbridge, Suffolk, The Boydell Press, 2011, £55.00. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 54 (3):484-484.score: 259.2
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Amy L. Peikoff (forthcoming). Book Note on Natural Rights and the Right to Choose by Hadley Arkes. Ethics.score: 259.2
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Hugo Adam Bedau (1977). The Right to Die by Firing Squad. Hastings Center Report 7 (1):5-7.score: 259.2
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. P. Baelz (1977). The Right to Strike by the Caring Professions. Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (3):150-150.score: 259.2
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Lord Devlin (1986). Trial by Jury for Fraud. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 6 (3):311-321.score: 259.2
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Maurice R. Holloway (1965). "Conscience and Its Right to Freedom," by Eric D'Arcy. The Modern Schoolman 42 (3):325-326.score: 259.2
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. C. L. Kellenberg (1957). The Right to Life by A. Delafield Smith. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1955. Pp. XI, 204. $3.50. American Journal of Jurisprudence 2 (1):153-156.score: 259.2
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. S. Margel (2000). Mendacium-Est-Fabula'or the Right to Lie by Avowing Innocence-JJ Rousseau, From The'4th Promenade'to the Epigraph of the'Confessions. Archives de Philosophie 63 (1):5-29.score: 259.2
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. U. Schueklenk (1997). Neugeborene Und Das Recht Auf Leben [Newborns and the Right to Life] by Norbert Hoerster. Bioethics-Oxford- 11:170-171.score: 259.2
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Naira Roland Matevosyan (2013). Legal Causes and Council in Reproductive Health. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (2):509-529.score: 258.2
    To study Judicial determinants of the ordered obstetrical and fertility interventions. Nature, corresponding laws, decisions upon the 37 expounded holdings at the Probate, Trial, District, Appellate, and Supreme Courts are studied in 92 published materials identified through the ACOG, RCOG, SOCG portals, and Legal Scholarship Repository. Hearings are held in the US (83.8 %), Canada (10.8 %) and U.K (5.4 %). Of all the hearings reviewed, 27 % concern mentally impaired, 37.8 %-maternal incompetence, and 21.6 % cases are of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000