Search results for 'scars' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jack Reynolds (2007). Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time (and the Ethics) of the Event. Deleuze Studies 2 (1):15.
    This essay examines Deleuze's account of time and the wound in The Logic of Sense and, to a lesser extent, in Difference and Repetition. As such, it will also explicate his understanding of the event, as well as the notoriously opaque ethics of counter-actualisation that are bound up with it, before raising certain problems that are associated with the transcendental and ethical priority that he accords to the event and what he calls the time of Aion. I will conclude by (...)
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  2.  6
    Min Soon Kim, William N. Rodney, Gregory P. Reece, Elisabeth K. Beahm, Melissa A. Crosby & Mia K. Markey (2011). Quantifying the Aesthetic Outcomes of Breast Cancer Treatment: Assessment of Surgical Scars From Clinical Photographs. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (6):1075-1082.
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  3. Jack Reynolds (2007). Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time and Ethics of the Event. Deleuze Studies 1 (2):144-166.
    This paper explores the idea that Deleuze’s oeuvre is best understood as a philosophy of the wound, synonymous with a philosophy of the event. Although this wound/scar typology may appear to be a metaphorical conceit, the motif of the wound recurs frequently and perhaps even symptomatically in many of Deleuze’s texts, particularly where he is attempting to delineate some of the most important differences (transcendental, temporal, and ethical) between himself and his phenomenological predecessors. I raise some some potential problems for (...)
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  4.  5
    Geoffrey H. Hartman (2002). Scars of the Spirit: The Struggle Against Inauthenticity. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In this fascinating collection of essays, noted critic Geoffrey Hartman raises the essential question of where we can find the real or authentic in today's world, and how this affects the way we understand our human predicament. Hartman explores such issues as the fantasy of total information and perfect communication encouraged by the internet, the biographical excesses of tell-all talk shows that serve to shore up a personal sense of unreality, the tendency to motivate violence in the name of some (...)
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  5. Tony T. Wells, W. Michael Vanderlind, Edward A. Selby & Christopher G. Beevers (2014). Childhood Abuse and Vulnerability to Depression: Cognitive Scars in Otherwise Healthy Young Adults. Cognition and Emotion 28 (5):821-833.
  6.  10
    Arthur W. Frank (2004). Emily's Scars: Surgical Shapings, Technoluxe, and Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 34 (2):18-29.
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    Yael Zaliasnik Schilkrut (2013). Theatricality and Scars in Memory Museums. Alpha (Osorno) 37:301-321.
    El artículo aborda los conceptos de multiculturalidad, interculturalidad y educación intercultural, como perspectivas teóricas que permiten explicar la dinámica intercultural de la acción educativa y como desafío epistemológico de los conocimientos indígenas en la escolarización. Para ello se realiza un análisis de los elementos teóricos que sustentan estos conceptos; se problematiza la dificultad epistemológica de la educación intercultural, considerando el contexto en que se lleva a cabo, y en consecuencia, se plantea que la dinámica de estos conceptos permite la posibilidad (...)
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    Christopher S. Schreiner (2005). Scars of the Spirit: The Struggle Against Inauthenticity (Review). Philosophy and Literature 29 (2):501-503.
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    Barbara E. Goff (1991). The Sign of the Fall: The Scars of Orestes and Odysseus. Classical Antiquity 10 (2):259.
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  10. Radcliffe G. Edmonds (2012). Whip Scars on the Naked Soul: Myth and Elenchos in Plato's Gorgias. In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill
  11. Janet Kuypers (forthcoming). Scars. Feminist Studies.
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  12. Mary Ann Wehler (forthcoming). Scars. Feminist Studies.
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  13.  4
    Min Soon Kim, William N. Rodney, Tara Cooper, Chris Kite, Gregory P. Reece & Mia K. Markey (2009). Towards Quantifying the Aesthetic Outcomes of Breast Cancer Treatment: Comparison of Clinical Photography and Colorimetry. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):20-31.
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  14. Susan Songsuk Hahn (1999). Authenticity and Impersonality in Adorno's Aesthetics. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1999 (117):60-78.
    The Impossibility of Poetry Adorno's aesthetic theory bears the profound scars of his personal experience of fascism. Even after Auschwitz, he feared that modern bourgeois society is a breeding ground for new forms of fascist terror. It was said that, after Auschwitz, one could no longer write poems. But Adorno insisted that postwar art is an indispensable means for telling the truth about how the social order was fundamentally changed by that catastrophe.1 Not to tell the truth is to (...)
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  15. Mark Ian Thomas Robson (2013). Divine Maximal Beauty: A Reply to Jon Robson. Religious Studies (2):1-17.
    In this article I reply to Jon Robson's objections to my argument that God does not contain any possible worlds. I had argued that ugly possible worlds clearly compromise God's beauty. Robson argues that I failed to show that possible worlds can be subject to aesthetic evaluation, and that even if they were it could be the case that ugliness might contribute to God's overall beauty. In reply I try to show that possible worlds are aesthetically evaluable by arguing that (...)
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  16.  1
    S. D. Edwards (2012). Safeguarding Children in Clinical Research. Nursing Ethics 19 (4):530-537.
    Current UK guidelines regarding clinical research on children permit research that is non-therapeutic from the perspective of that particular child. The guidelines permit research interventions that cause temporary pain, bruises or scars. It is argued here that such research conflicts with the Declaration of Helsinki according to which the interests of the research subject outweigh all other interests. Given this, in the context of clinical research, who is best placed to protect the child from this kind of exploitation? Is (...)
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    Jacques Caroux (1984). French Socialism and the Age of Torment. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1984 (59):162-166.
    The end of the hope for a magic-socialist solution to the French crisis leads into the age of torment. This is an unexpected effect of the French socialists' coming to power. The international crisis which the socialist alternative previously conjured away magically takes on its full scope. Previous political certainties — those of the “first” and those of the “second” Left — are swept up in this typhon and cast about in a new space in which they have lost their (...)
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  18.  32
    R. Schäfer, U. Kuhl, M. Barth & H.-J. Stöckmann (2001). Spectra and Wavefunctions in a Ray-Splitting Sinai Microwave Billiard and Their Semiclassical Interpretation. Foundations of Physics 31 (3):475-487.
    Experimental results on spectra and wave functions of a ray-splitting microwave billiard are presented. The billiard is formed by a flat rectangular microwave cavity with a quarter-circle insert made of teflon in one of the corners. Using the Gutzwiller trace formula, the contribution of the periodic orbits of the billiard to the density of states are determined. The wave functions, many of them showing scars associated with periodic orbits, are interpreted in terms of the semiclassical Green function.
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  19.  53
    Barry Smith, Anand Kumar, Werner Ceusters & Cornelius Rosse (2005). On Carcinomas and Other Pathological Entities. Comparative and Functional Genomics 6 (7/8):379–387.
    Tumors, abscesses, cysts, scars, fractures are familiar types of what we shall call pathological continuant entities. The instances of such types exist always in or on anatomical structures, which thereby become transformed into pathological anatomical structures of corresponding types: a fractured tibia, a blistered thumb, a carcinomatous colon. In previous work on biomedical ontologies we showed how the provision of formal definitions for relations such as is_a, part_of and transformation_of can facilitate the integration of such ontologies in ways which (...)
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  20.  13
    James Harvey-Davitt (2014). Collision: “Non-Film”: A Dialogue Between Rancière and Panahi on Asceticism as a Political Aesthetic. Evental Aesthetics 2 (4).
    Iranian national cinema is showing the scars of artistic persecution. The aesthetic landscape of this national cinema has become one of stark confines – both in its thematic allowances and its aesthetic possibilities. However, these confinements, both physical and technological, have not merely been passively affected by ideological constraints but have also been active in affecting ideological discourse, answering back as it does within imposed limitations. What we are seeing in contemporary Iranian cinema, I believe, is a complex movement (...)
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  21.  2
    Jenny Slatman (2016). Is It Possible to “Incorporate” a Scar? Revisiting a Basic Concept in Phenomenology. Human Studies 39 (3):347-363.
    Although scars never disappear completely, in time most people will basically get used to them. In this paper I explore what it means to habituate to scars against the background of the phenomenological concept of incorporation. In phenomenology the body as Leib or corps vécu functions as a transcendental condition for world disclosure. Because of this transcendental reasoning, phenomenology prioritizes a form of embodied subjectivity that is virtually dis-embodied. Endowing meaning to one’s world through getting engaged in actions (...)
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  22.  2
    Burlin Barr (2010). Shot and Counter-Shot: Presence, Obscurity, and the Breakdown of Discourse in Godard's Notre Musique. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 18 (2):65-86.
    " Notre Musique includes a lengthy sequence that involves a presentation by Godard on the relationship between text and image. The occasion of the lecture is a conference in Sarajevo titled European Literary Encounters, an annual event first organized in 2000. Godard gave his lecture in 2002 and the long middle-section of the film offers a "lightly fictionalized restaging" of his address and of other encounters surrounding the conference. The narrative setting of the majority of this film, then, is a (...)
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  23.  2
    J. D. P. Bolton (1967). Horace's Earliest Ode? Classical Quarterly 17 (02):451-.
    ‘Shameful are the scars inflicted by the sin of fraternal strife! What has ourunconscionable generation shunned, what abomination left undone? Ourgodless soldiery has held nothing sacred. I pray that Fortune may, on a new anvil, give our blunted swords another shape, to use against Massagetae andArabs!‘.
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  24.  1
    Stephen Asma (2005). The Gods Drink Whiskey: Stumbling Toward Enlightenment in the Land of the Tattered Buddha. Harper Collins.
    Asma, a professor of Buddhism at Columbia College in Chicago and the author of Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads (2001), recounts his intense and revelatory Cambodian adventures while teaching at Phnom Penh's Buddhist Institute. In an electrifying and frank mix of hair-raising anecdotes and expert analysis, he explicates the vast difference between text-based Buddhist teachings and daily life in a poor and politically volatile Buddhist society. Amid tales of massage parlors, marijuana-spiced pizza, and bloodshed, he cogently explains how Theravada Buddhism, (...)
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  25. Adrienne Harris, Susan Klebanoff & Margery Kalb (eds.) (2016). Ghosts in the Consulting Room: Echoes of Trauma in Psychoanalysis. Routledge.
    _Ghosts in the Consulting Room: Echoes of Trauma in Psychoanalysis_ is the first of two volumes that delves into the overwhelming, often unmetabolizable feelings related to mourning. The book uses clinical examples of people living in a state of liminality or ongoing melancholia. The authors reflect on the challenges of learning to move forward and embrace life over time, while acknowledging, witnessing and working through the emotional scars of the past. Bringing together a collection of clinical and theoretical papers, (...)
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  26. Nancy Stanlick (2010). Reconciling With Harm: An Alternative To Forgiveness And Revenge. Florida Philosophical Review 10 (1):88-111.
    With respect to wrongdoing and harm, most accounts of forgiveness focus on benefits of forgiving to the forgiver and others; some advocate vengeance against a wrongdoer; and others argue for reconciliation. However, forgiveness, revenge, and traditional reconciliation may be impossible, inappropriate, or morally undesirable in cases in which people suffer from wounds and scars not healed by time that can and do alter irrevocably one’s ability to make choices, take actions, or enjoy life fully. In these cases, a form (...)
     
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