Search results for 'scars' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jack Reynolds (2007). Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time (and the Ethics) of the Event. Deleuze Studies 2 (1):15.score: 21.0
    This essay examines Deleuze's account of time and the wound in The Logic of Sense and, to a lesser extent, in Difference and Repetition. As such, it will also explicate his understanding of the event, as well as the notoriously opaque ethics of counter-actualisation that are bound up with it, before raising certain problems that are associated with the transcendental and ethical priority that he accords to the event and what he calls the time of Aion. I will conclude by (...)
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  2. Min Soon Kim, William N. Rodney, Gregory P. Reece, Elisabeth K. Beahm, Melissa A. Crosby & Mia K. Markey (2011). Quantifying the Aesthetic Outcomes of Breast Cancer Treatment: Assessment of Surgical Scars From Clinical Photographs. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (6):1075-1082.score: 21.0
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  3. Jack Reynolds (2007). Wounds and Scars: Deleuze on the Time and Ethics of the Event. Deleuze Studies 1 (2):144-166.score: 16.0
    This paper explores the idea that Deleuze’s oeuvre is best understood as a philosophy of the wound, synonymous with a philosophy of the event. Although this wound/scar typology may appear to be a metaphorical conceit, the motif of the wound recurs frequently and perhaps even symptomatically in many of Deleuze’s texts, particularly where he is attempting to delineate some of the most important differences (transcendental, temporal, and ethical) between himself and his phenomenological predecessors. I raise some some potential problems for (...)
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  4. Christopher S. Schreiner (2005). Scars of the Spirit: The Struggle Against Inauthenticity (Review). Philosophy and Literature 29 (2):501-503.score: 15.0
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  5. Arthur W. Frank (2004). Emily's Scars: Surgical Shapings, Technoluxe, and Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 34 (2):18-29.score: 15.0
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  6. Geoffrey H. Hartman (2002). Scars of the Spirit: The Struggle Against Inauthenticity. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 15.0
    In this fascinating collection of essays, noted critic Geoffrey Hartman raises the essential question of where we can find the real or authentic in today's world, and how this affects the way we understand our human predicament. Hartman explores such issues as the fantasy of total information and perfect communication encouraged by the internet, the biographical excesses of tell-all talk shows that serve to shore up a personal sense of unreality, the tendency to motivate violence in the name of some (...)
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  7. Yael Zaliasnik Schilkrut (2013). Theatricality and Scars in Memory Museums. Alpha (Osorno) 37:301-321.score: 15.0
    El artículo aborda los conceptos de multiculturalidad, interculturalidad y educación intercultural, como perspectivas teóricas que permiten explicar la dinámica intercultural de la acción educativa y como desafío epistemológico de los conocimientos indígenas en la escolarización. Para ello se realiza un análisis de los elementos teóricos que sustentan estos conceptos; se problematiza la dificultad epistemológica de la educación intercultural, considerando el contexto en que se lleva a cabo, y en consecuencia, se plantea que la dinámica de estos conceptos permite la posibilidad (...)
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  8. Barbara E. Goff (1991). The Sign of the Fall: The Scars of Orestes and Odysseus. Classical Antiquity 10 (2):259.score: 15.0
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  9. Radcliffe G. Edmonds (2012). Whip Scars on the Naked Soul: Myth and Elenchos in Plato's Gorgias. In Catherine Collobert, Pierre Destrée & Francisco J. Gonzalez (eds.), Plato and Myth: Studies on the Use and Status of Platonic Myths. Brill.score: 15.0
     
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  10. Janet Kuypers (forthcoming). Scars. Feminist Studies.score: 15.0
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  11. Mary Ann Wehler (forthcoming). Scars. Feminist Studies.score: 15.0
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  12. Tony T. Wells, W. Michael Vanderlind, Edward A. Selby & Christopher G. Beevers (2014). Childhood Abuse and Vulnerability to Depression: Cognitive Scars in Otherwise Healthy Young Adults. Cognition and Emotion 28 (5):821-833.score: 15.0
  13. W. Lewis (2002). “You Keep Telling Me What has Been Lost, and I Keep Telling You Something Remains.” A Personal Response To: Scar Tissue by Michael Ignatieff. Medical Humanities 28 (2):105-106.score: 6.0
    Michael Ignatieff is well known as a journalist and broadcaster of a distinctly intellectual kind. He has written movingly on the trauma of modern warfare and Europe following the Cold War. His CV also boasts of studies on the Scottish Enlightenment and nineteenth century penal policy. Additionally, his Booker short listed novel Scar Tissue is one of the most interesting studies of medicine and the human consequences of disease of the last decade.
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  14. Min Soon Kim, William N. Rodney, Tara Cooper, Chris Kite, Gregory P. Reece & Mia K. Markey (2009). Towards Quantifying the Aesthetic Outcomes of Breast Cancer Treatment: Comparison of Clinical Photography and Colorimetry. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):20-31.score: 6.0
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  15. Irene J. F. De Jong (1985). Eurykleia and Odysseus' Scar: Odyssey 19.393–466. Classical Quarterly 35 (02):517-.score: 5.0
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  16. D. Ben Desmidt (2006). Horn and Ivory, Bow and Scar: Odyssey 19.559–81. Classical Quarterly 56 (01):284-.score: 5.0
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  17. Stephanie Hartman (forthcoming). Reading the Scar in Breast Cancer Poetry. Feminist Studies.score: 5.0
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  18. Philip Paul Hallie (1966). The Scar of Montaigne. Middleton, Conn.,Wesleyan University Press.score: 5.0
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  19. R. Schäfer, U. Kuhl, M. Barth & H.-J. Stöckmann (2001). Spectra and Wavefunctions in a Ray-Splitting Sinai Microwave Billiard and Their Semiclassical Interpretation. Foundations of Physics 31 (3):475-487.score: 3.0
    Experimental results on spectra and wave functions of a ray-splitting microwave billiard are presented. The billiard is formed by a flat rectangular microwave cavity with a quarter-circle insert made of teflon in one of the corners. Using the Gutzwiller trace formula, the contribution of the periodic orbits of the billiard to the density of states are determined. The wave functions, many of them showing scars associated with periodic orbits, are interpreted in terms of the semiclassical Green function.
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  20. Barry Smith, Anand Kumar, Werner Ceusters & Cornelius Rosse (2005). On Carcinomas and Other Pathological Entities. Comparative and Functional Genomics 6 (7/8):379–387.score: 3.0
    Tumors, abscesses, cysts, scars, fractures are familiar types of what we shall call pathological continuant entities. The instances of such types exist always in or on anatomical structures, which thereby become transformed into pathological anatomical structures of corresponding types: a fractured tibia, a blistered thumb, a carcinomatous colon. In previous work on biomedical ontologies we showed how the provision of formal definitions for relations such as is_a, part_of and transformation_of can facilitate the integration of such ontologies in ways which (...)
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  21. James Harvey-Davitt (2014). Collision: “Non-Film”: A Dialogue Between Rancière and Panahi on Asceticism as a Political Aesthetic. Evental Aesthetics 2 (4).score: 3.0
    Iranian national cinema is showing the scars of artistic persecution. The aesthetic landscape of this national cinema has become one of stark confines – both in its thematic allowances and its aesthetic possibilities. However, these confinements, both physical and technological, have not merely been passively affected by ideological constraints but have also been active in affecting ideological discourse, answering back as it does within imposed limitations. What we are seeing in contemporary Iranian cinema, I believe, is a complex movement (...)
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  22. Mark Ian Thomas Robson (2013). Divine Maximal Beauty: A Reply to Jon Robson. Religious Studies:1-17.score: 3.0
    In this article I reply to Jon Robson's objections to my argument that God does not contain any possible worlds. I had argued that ugly possible worlds clearly compromise God's beauty. Robson argues that I failed to show that possible worlds can be subject to aesthetic evaluation, and that even if they were it could be the case that ugliness might contribute to God's overall beauty. In reply I try to show that possible worlds are aesthetically evaluable by arguing that (...)
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  23. Burlin Barr (2010). Shot and Counter-Shot: Presence, Obscurity, and the Breakdown of Discourse in Godard's Notre Musique. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 18 (2):65-86.score: 3.0
    " Notre Musique includes a lengthy sequence that involves a presentation by Godard on the relationship between text and image. The occasion of the lecture is a conference in Sarajevo titled European Literary Encounters, an annual event first organized in 2000. Godard gave his lecture in 2002 and the long middle-section of the film offers a "lightly fictionalized restaging" of his address and of other encounters surrounding the conference. The narrative setting of the majority of this film, then, is a (...)
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  24. Susan Hahn (1999). Authenticity and Impersonality in Adorno's Aesthetics. Telos 1999 (117):60-78.score: 3.0
    The Impossibility of Poetry Adorno's aesthetic theory bears the profound scars of his personal experience of fascism. Even after Auschwitz, he feared that modern bourgeois society is a breeding ground for new forms of fascist terror. It was said that, after Auschwitz, one could no longer write poems. But Adorno insisted that postwar art is an indispensable means for telling the truth about how the social order was fundamentally changed by that catastrophe.1 Not to tell the truth is to (...)
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  25. Jacques Caroux (1984). French Socialism and the Age of Torment. Telos 1984 (59):162-166.score: 3.0
    The end of the hope for a magic-socialist solution to the French crisis leads into the age of torment. This is an unexpected effect of the French socialists' coming to power. The international crisis which the socialist alternative previously conjured away magically takes on its full scope. Previous political certainties — those of the “first” and those of the “second” Left — are swept up in this typhon and cast about in a new space in which they have lost their (...)
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  26. S. D. Edwards (2012). Safeguarding Children in Clinical Research. Nursing Ethics 19 (4):530-537.score: 3.0
    Current UK guidelines regarding clinical research on children permit research that is non-therapeutic from the perspective of that particular child. The guidelines permit research interventions that cause temporary pain, bruises or scars. It is argued here that such research conflicts with the Declaration of Helsinki according to which the interests of the research subject outweigh all other interests. Given this, in the context of clinical research, who is best placed to protect the child from this kind of exploitation? Is (...)
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  27. Alisa Bokulich (2008). Can Classical Structures Explain Quantum Phenomena? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (2):217-235.score: 1.0
    In semiclassical mechanics one finds explanations of quantum phenomena that appeal to classical structures. These explanations are prima facie problematic insofar as the classical structures they appeal to do not exist. Here I defend the view that fictional structures can be genuinely explanatory by introducing a model-based account of scientific explanation. Applying this framework to the semiclassical phenomenon of wavefunction scarring, I argue that not only can the fictional classical trajectories explain certain aspects of this quantum phenomenon, but also that (...)
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  28. Robert S. Kawashima (2004). Verbal Medium and Narrative Art in Homer and the Bible. Philosophy and Literature 28 (1):103-117.score: 1.0
    : Erich Auerbach's famous comparative study of Homer and the Bible, "Odysseus' Scar," argues that their contrastive styles derive from the different possibilities available to oral tradition and literature. In support of this thesis, I invoke two theories of verbal art: Walter Benjamin's description of the storyteller's craft, and Victor Shklovsky's definition of art as "defamiliarization." Through a comparative analysis of the use of type-scenes in Homer and in biblical narrative, I demonstrate how Homer is a traditional storyteller, practicing an (...)
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  29. Kurt Vanhoutte (2013). Luddite Interventions: On the Poetics of Catastrophe and the Art of Criticism. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 18 (1):149-153.score: 1.0
    As an art theoretician, and as a father, I focus on the social and political consequences of Vanderbeeken’s postmodernist negative theology. I express doubts about the relevance of a poetics of catastrophe that conflates any possible alternative to the alleged technocracy under the sign of the simulacrum. To my opinion, the discourse about the virtual and the real are in a deadlock. Following the lead of American novelist Thomas Pynchon, I rephrase these critical doubts in Luddite terms: should we imagine (...)
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  30. Iuliana Conovici (2013). Re-Weaving Memory: Representations of the Interwar and Communist Periods in the Romanian Orthodox Church After 1989. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (35):109-131.score: 1.0
    After the fall of Communism, the Romanian Orthodox Church was forced to face its recent past, scarred by its collaboration – harshly criticized in the early 1990s – with the Ceauşescu regime. The Church’s turn to its memory of the interwar period in order to legitimize the (re)casting of Orthodoxy as a public religion was also problematic. Based mainly, but not solely on the analysis of public discourses originating with the Orthodox Church hierarchy and clergy, this paper will address the (...)
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  31. Marcelo Dascal, Discommunication and Pseudo-Morality.score: 1.0
    Terrorism is not an abstract subject matter – at least not for me. As I set out to write the n-th draft of this lecture (it was never so difficult for me to write a lecture!), the news of the November 21st suicide attack in a bus in the Kiryath Menachem neighborhood in western Jerusalem break through the selfimposed walls of my peace of mind. The bus exploded at 7:28 a.m. There is no doubt about the target: children, young girls (...)
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  32. Richard Scholar (ed.) (2006). Divided Cities: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 2003. OUP Oxford.score: 1.0
    Cities, at their best, are cradles of diversity, opportunity, and citizenship. Why, then, do so many cities today seem scarred by divisions separating the powerful and privileged from the victims of deprivation and injustice? What is it like to live on the wrong side of the divide in Paris, London, New York, Sao Paolo, and other cities all over the world? -/- In this book, based on the internationally renowned Oxford Amnesty Lectures, eight leading urban thinkers argue about why divisions (...)
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  33. Scott Zeman (2009). By Grace of Broken Skin. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):289-313.score: 1.0
    I address the question of the origins and historical meaning of art. Analyzing suggestions from Marx, Derrida, Winnicott, and Todorov, I claim that art doesn’t simply represent conscious, historical events but is also the continuing presentation of the prehistorical break-up of our “original” human family. Indeed, perpetuating yet distancing this archaic scene of community and violence in tension, art performs this mediation not just in history but also as history, as a secretive historiography of splitting and meaning-making. To this end, (...)
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  34. Donald F. Henze (1973). Hume, Treatise, III, I, 1. Philosophy 48 (185):277 - 283.score: 1.0
    The reappearance of Professor Alasdair MacIntyre's far-ranging and provocative article, ‘Hume on “is” and “ought”’, is the proximate cause of this short excursion to an old, well-scarred, and still fascinating battleground. Re-reading MacIntyre's brilliant offensive thrust led me to review the counter-attacks and diversionary movements that followed its first appearance. They in turn sent me back, inevitably and ultimately, to look again at the cause of this philosophic skirmishing: Section 1 of Part i of Book III of Hume's Treatise of (...)
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  35. Mariusz M. Czarniecki & Maciej Bańkowski (2013). Transitional Humanity (Poetical-Metaphilosophical Sketches). Dialogue and Universalism 19 (11/12):107-123.score: 1.0
    The author’s firm belief is that transitional humanity is not yet humanity proper but pre-humanity. He is especially intrigued by the essence and purpose of today’s contradiction between humanity’s immense advancement in micro-electronics, digital technology and social lore and its shocking moral shortcomings, best visible in its stagnant unchangeability—especially regarding the passionate quest for ever-better weaponry. Will our transience turn out to be nothing more but a phase on the road to human perfection, or will it petrify into an “inborn” (...)
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  36. Wendy Rogers, Katrina Hutchison, Zoë C. Skea & Marion K. Campbell (2014). Strengthening the Ethical Assessment of Placebo-Controlled Surgical Trials: Three Proposals. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):78.score: 1.0
    Placebo-controlled surgical trials can provide important information about the efficacy of surgical interventions. However, they are ethically contentious as placebo surgery entails the risk of harms to recipients, such as pain, scarring or anaesthetic misadventure. This has led to claims that placebo-controlled surgical trials are inherently unethical. On the other hand, without placebo-controlled surgical trials, it may be impossible to know whether an apparent benefit from surgery is due to the intervention itself or to the placebo effect.
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  37. Ana Carrasco Conde (2008). Las Heridas del Espíritu. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 16:293-299.score: 1.0
    It is untrue that, as Hegel said in 1807 in the Phänomenologie, «the wounds of the spirit heal and leave no scar behind; what is done is not indelible, but is reassumed by the spirit» (GW 9, 360) since the ground of reality, that reality which, as indicated by Kant, seems to be submerged in evil (Ak. VI), refuses to be tamed by concepts. Disappearance without remnant, that dissolution (Verschwindung) mentioned by Hegel would suppose that there is no remnant of (...)
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