Search results for 'science education' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Gilbert Burgh & Kim Nichols (2012). The Parallels Between Philosophical Inquiry and Scientific Inquiry: Implications for Science Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (10):1045-1059.score: 242.0
    The ‘community of inquiry’ as formulated by C. S. Peirce is grounded in the notion of communities of discipline-based inquiry engaged in the construction of knowledge. The phrase ‘transforming the classroom into a community of inquiry’ is commonly understood as a pedagogical activity with a philosophical focus to guide classroom discussion. But it has a broader application. Integral to the method of the community of inquiry is the ability of the classroom teacher to actively engage in the theories and practices (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Robert Shaw (2013). The Implications for Science Education of Heidegger's Philosophy of Science. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):546-570.score: 242.0
    Science teaching always engages a philosophy of science. This article introduces a modern philosophy of science and indicates its implications for science education. The hermeneutic philosophy of science is the tradition of Kant, Heidegger, and Heelan. Essential to this tradition are two concepts of truth, truth as correspondence and truth as disclosure. It is these concepts that enable access to science in and of itself. Modern science forces aspects of reality to reveal (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Michalinos Zembylas (2008). The Unbearable Lightness of Representing 'Reality' in Science Education: A Response to Schulz. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (4):494-514.score: 242.0
    This article responds to Schulz's criticisms of an earlier paper published in Educational Philosophy and Theory. The purpose in this paper is to clarify and extend some of my earlier arguments, to indicate what is unfortunate (i.e. what is lost) from a non-charitable, modernist reading of Lyotardian postmodernism (despite its weaknesses), and to suggest what new directions are emerging in science education from efforts to move beyond an either/or dichotomy of foundationalism and relativism.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Massimo Pigliucci & Maarten Boudry (2011). Why Machine-Information Metaphors Are Bad for Science and Science Education. Science and Education 20 (453):471.score: 240.0
    Genes are often described by biologists using metaphors derived from computa- tional science: they are thought of as carriers of information, as being the equivalent of ‘‘blueprints’’ for the construction of organisms. Likewise, cells are often characterized as ‘‘factories’’ and organisms themselves become analogous to machines. Accordingly, when the human genome project was initially announced, the promise was that we would soon know how a human being is made, just as we know how to make airplanes and buildings. Impor- (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Krishnasamy T. Selvan (2004). An Approach for Harmonizing Engineering and Science Education with Humaneness. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):573-577.score: 240.0
    The world is facing an apparently increasing dose of violence. Obviously, there cannot be a simple solution to this complex problem. But at the same time it may be appreciated that, in the interests of humanity, a solution must be pursued in every possible way by everyone. This article is concerned with what one could possibly do at the academic level. Since lack of openness of thought appears to be a fundamental contributor to this unfortunate problem, attempting to cultivate this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Catherine Kendig (2013). Integrating History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences in Practice to Enhance Science Education: Swammerdam's Historia Insectorum Generalis and the Case of the Water Flea. Science and Education 22 (8):1939-1961.score: 216.0
    Hasok Chang (Science & Education 20:317–341, 2011) shows how the recovery of past experimental knowledge, the physical replication of historical experiments, and the extension of recovered knowledge can increase scientific understanding. These activities can also play an important role in both science and history and philosophy of science education. In this paper I describe the implementation of an integrated learning project that I initiated, organized, and structured to complement a course in history and philosophy of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Roland M. Schulz (2007). Lyotard, Postmodernism and Science Education: A Rejoinder to Zembylas. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (6):633–656.score: 212.0
  8. Georgina Stewart (2011). Science in the Māori-Medium Curriculum: Assessment of Policy Outcomes in Pūtaiao Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (7):724-741.score: 212.0
    This second research paper on science education in Māori-medium school contexts complements an earlier article published in this journal (Stewart, 2005). Science and science education are related domains in society and in state schooling in which there have always been particularly large discrepancies in participation and achievement by Māori. In 1995 a Kaupapa Māori analysis of this situation challenged New Zealand science education academics to deal with ‘the Māori crisis’ within science (...). Recent NCEA results suggest Pūtaiao (Māori-medium Science) education, for which a national curriculum statement was published in 1996, has so far increased, rather than decreased, the level of inequity for Māori students in science education. What specific issues impact on this lack of success, which contrasts with the overall success of Kura Kaupapa Māori, and how might policy frameworks and operational systems of Pūtaiao need to change, if better achievement in science education for Māori-medium students is the goal? A pathway towards further research and development in this area is suggested. (shrink)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. David W. Blades (2006). Levinas and an Ethics for Science Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (5):647–664.score: 212.0
  10. Lyn Carter (2006). Postcolonial Interventions Within Science Education: Using Postcolonial Ideas to Reconsider Cultural Diversity Scholarship. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (5):677–691.score: 212.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Noel Gough (2006). Shaking the Tree, Making a Rhizome: Towards a Nomadic Geophilosophy of Science Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (5):625–645.score: 212.0
  12. Michalinos Zembylas (2006). Science Education as Emancipatory: The Case of Roy Bhaskar's Philosophy of Meta-Reality. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (5):665–676.score: 212.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. N. Hulin (2001). [Science education in the 19th century and the links to other disciplines]. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 55 (1):101-120.score: 212.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Adele L. Schmidt (2010). The Battle for Creativity: Frontiers in Science and Science Education. Bioessays 32 (12):1016-1019.score: 210.0
  15. Alphonse Buccino (1985). Responding to the Condition of Science Education. Appraisal 18 (1):3-15.score: 210.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Dimitri Jordan Ginev (2008). Hermeneutics of Science and Multi-Gendered Science Education. Science and Education 17 (10):1139-1156.score: 204.0
    In this paper, I consider the relevance of the view of cognitive existentialism to a multi-gendered picture of science education. I am opposing both the search for a particular feminist standpoint epistemology and the reduction of philosophy of science to cultural studies of scientific practices as championed by supporters of postmodern political feminism. In drawing on the theory of gender plurality and the conception of dynamic objectivity, the paper suggests a way of treating the nexus between the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Hanne Andersen (2000). Learning by Ostension: Thomas Kuhn on Science Education. Science and Education 9 (1-2):91-106.score: 204.0
    Significant claims about science education form an integral part of Thomas Kuhn's philosophy. Since the late 1950s, when Kuhn started wrestling with the ideas of ‘normal research’ and ‘convergent thought’, the nature of science education has played an important role in his argument. Hence, the nature of science education is an essential aspect of the phase-model of scientific development developed in his famous The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, just as his later work on categories (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Fabio Bevilacqua & Enrico Giannetto (1995). Hermeneutics and Science Education: The Role of History of Science. [REVIEW] Science and Education 4 (2):115-126.score: 204.0
    Eger's contribution towards a reapprochment of Hermeneutics, Science and Science Education is very welcome. His focus on the problem of misconceptions is relevant. All the same in our opinion some not minor points need a clarification. We will try to argue that: a) Hermeneutics cannot be reduced to a semantical interpretation of science texts; its phenomenological aspects have to be taken in account. b) Science has an unavoidable historical dimension; original papers and advanced textbooks are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Bonnie Spanier (2000). Transforming Science Curricula in Higher Education: Feminist Contributions. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):467-480.score: 198.0
    Feminist contributions to the science curricula in higher education constitute invaluable but often overlooked resources for truly effective communication about science. Here I share a sampling of feminist science studies and discuss the origins of this effort to create inclusive and less biased science curricula that serve all students and citizens. Challenges from scientists center on assumptions and values about the appropriate relationship between science and politics, while challenges from educators extend to assumptions about (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Marc Lampe (2012). Science, Human Nature, and a New Paradigm for Ethics Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):543-549.score: 198.0
    For centuries, religion and philosophy have been the primary basis for efforts to guide humans to be more ethical. However, training in ethics and religion and imparting positive values and morality tests such as those emanating from the categorical imperative and the Golden Rule have not been enough to protect humankind from its bad behaviors. To improve ethics education educators must better understand aspects of human nature such as those that lead to “self-deception” and “personal bias.” Through rationalizations, faulty (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Susan E. F. Chipman (2010). Applications in Education and Training: A Force Behind the Development of Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):386-397.score: 198.0
    This paper reviews 30 years of progress in U.S. cognitive science research related to education and training, as seen from the perspective of a research manager who was personally involved in many of these developments.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Stefano Oliverio (2014). The New Alliance Between Science and Education: Otto Neurath's Modernity Beyond Descartes' 'Adamitic' Science. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):41-59.score: 198.0
    Starting from a suggestion of Stephen Toulmin and through an interpretation of the criticism to which Neurath, one of the founders of the Vienna Circle, submits Descartes’ views on science, the paper attempts to outline a pattern of modernity opposed to the Cartesian one, that has been obtaining over the last four centuries. In particular, it is argued that a new alliance has to be established between science and education, overcoming Descartes’ banishment against education. In a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Hyemin Han & Changwoo Jeong (2013). Improving Epistemological Beliefs and Moral Judgment Through an STS-Based Science Ethics Education Program. Science and Engineering Ethics (1):1-24.score: 198.0
    This study develops a Science–Technology–Society (STS)-based science ethics education program for high school students majoring in or planning to major in science and engineering. Our education program includes the fields of philosophy, history, sociology and ethics of science and technology, and other STS-related theories. We expected our STS-based science ethics education program to promote students’ epistemological beliefs and moral judgment development. These psychological constructs are needed to properly solve complicated moral and social (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. James A. Stieb (2007). On “Bettering Humanity” in Science and Engineering Education. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):265-273.score: 192.0
    Authors such as Krishnasamy Selvan argue that “all human endeavors including engineering and science” have a single primary objective: “bettering humanity.” They favor discussing “the history of science and measurement uncertainty.” This paper respectfully disagrees and argues that “human endeavors including engineering and science” should not pursue “bettering humanity” as their primary objective. Instead these efforts should first pursue individual betterment. One cannot better humanity without knowing what that means. However, there is no one unified theory of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Fabrizio Macagno & Aikaterini Konstantinidou (2013). What Students' Arguments Can Tell Us: Using Argumentation Schemes in Science Education. [REVIEW] Argumentation 27 (3):225-243.score: 192.0
    The relationship between teaching and argumentation is becoming a crucial issue in the field of education and, in particular, science education. Teaching has been analyzed as a dialogue aimed at persuading the interlocutors, introducing a conceptual change that needs to be grounded on the audience’s background knowledge. This paper addresses this issue from a perspective of argumentation studies. Our claim is that argumentation schemes, namely abstract patterns of argument, can be an instrument for reconstructing the tacit premises (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Michael Martin (1972). Concepts of Science Education. Glenview, Ill.,Scott, Foresman.score: 192.0
    INTRODUCTION What relevance — if any — does philosophy of science have for science education? Unfortunately, this question has been largely unexplored. ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Samia Nour (2011). National, Regional and Global Perspectives of Higher Education and Science Policies in the Arab Region. Minerva 49 (4):387-423.score: 192.0
    In this paper we discuss the interaction between science policies (and particularly in the area of scientific research) and higher education policies in Gulf and Mediterranean Arab countries. Our analysis reveals a discrepancy between the two sub-regions with respect to integration in the global market, cooperation in scientific research and international mobility of students. The paper discusses the implications of the analysis of reform policies and higher education restructuring.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Alan H. Cromer (1997). Connected Knowledge: Science, Philosophy, and Education. Oxford University Press.score: 192.0
    When physicist Alan Sokal recently submitted an article to the postmodernist journal Social Text, the periodical's editors were happy to publish it--for here was a respected scientist offering support for the journal's view that science is a subjective, socially constructed discipline. But as Sokal himself soon revealed in Lingua Franca magazine, the essay was a spectacular hoax--filled with scientific gibberish anyone with a basic knowledge of physics should have caught--and the academic world suddenly awoke to the vast gap that (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. James R. Hofmann & Bruce H. Weber (2003). The Fact of Evolution: Implications for Science Education. Science and Education 12 (8):729-760.score: 188.0
    Creationists who object to evolution in the science curriculum of public schools often cite Jonathan Well’s book Icons of Evolution in their support (Wells 2000). In the third chapter of his book Wells claims that neither paleontological nor molecular evidence supports the thesis that the history of life is an evolutionary process of descent from preexisting ancestors. We argue that Wells inappropriately relies upon ambiguities inherent in the term ‘Darwinian’ and the phrase ‘Darwin’s theory’. Furthermore, he does not accurately (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Michael Martin (1986). Science Education and Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 15 (2):99-108.score: 186.0
    Abstract Science education and moral education are mutually relevant. An education in science provides the factual information necessary to apply and revise ethical principles. In addition, science education aims to achieve certain propensities, e.g. impartiality, that are identical to some of the goals of moral education. Moral education, in turn, gives potential scientists the necessary principles and propensities to make certain decisions in the context of discovery, in the acceptance of hypotheses (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Steve Fuller (1994). Retrieving the Point of the Realism-Instrumentalism Debate: Mach Vs. Planck on Science Education Policy. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:200 - 208.score: 186.0
    I aim to recover some of the original cultural significance that was attached to the realism-instrumentalism debate (RID) when it was hotly contested by professional scientists in the decades before World War I. Focusing on the highly visible Mach-Planck exchange of 1908-13, I show that arguments about the nature of scientific progress were used to justify alternative visions of science education. Among the many issues revealed in the exchange are realist worries that instrumentalism would subserve science entirely (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Mark D. Tschaepe (2012). The Student as Philosopher-Scientist: Dewey's Conception of Scientific Explanation In Science Education. Education and Culture 28 (2):70-80.score: 186.0
    There is no question that the work of John Dewey has been invaluable with regard to theories of education. What has too often been neglected, however, is Dewey's work on the philosophy of science as it pertains specifically to science education.1 Although educators might well concede that children should be encouraged to be "philosophical" within the arts or humanities, most neglect or fail to heed Dewey's insights concerning the child as philosopher-scientist within the science classroom. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Rachel Luther (2013). Fostering Eroticism in Science Education to Promote Erotic Generosities for the Ocean-Other. Educational Studies 49 (5):409-429.score: 182.0
    Despite the increase in marine science curriculum in secondary schools, marine science is not generally required curricula and has been largely deemphasized or ignored in relation to earth science, biology, chemistry, and physics. I call for the integration and implementation of marine science more fully in secondary science education through authentic inquiry practices that foster the development of an erotic relationship with the ocean. Such a relationship can provide an opportunity to develop ocean literacy (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Anniina Leiviskä (2012). Finitude, Fallibilism and Education Towards Non-Dogmatism: Gadamer's Hermeneutics in Science Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):516-530.score: 182.0
    The philosophy of science has witnessed continuous controversy since the mid-twentieth century regarding the justification of science?s privileged position, and which has also reverberated in the philosophy of science education. This contribution brings to the discussion the viewpoint of Hans-Georg Gadamer?s philosophical hermeneutics. I suggest that by relating to the idea of the fallibility of knowledge, Gadamerian philosophy provides a compromise between the extreme positions in the aforementioned debate. Gadamerian hermeneutics also has implications for science (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Gürol Irzık, Gurol Irzik & Robert Nola, A Family Resemblance Approach to the Nature of Science for Science Education.score: 180.0
    Although there is universal consensus both in the science education literature and in the science standards documents to the effect that students should learn not only the content of science but also its nature, there is little agreement about what that nature is. This led many science educators to adopt what is sometimes called “the consensus view” about the nature of science (NOS), whose goal is to teach students only those characteristics of science (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Harvey Siegel (1989). The Rationality of Science, Critical Thinking, and Science Education. Synthese 80 (1):9 - 41.score: 180.0
    This paper considers two philosophical problems and their relation to science education. The first involves the rationality of science; it is argued here that the traditional view, according to which science is rational because of its adherence to (a non-standard conception of) scientific method, successfully answers one central question concerning science''s rationality. The second involves the aims of education; here it is argued that a fundamental educational aim is the fostering of rationality, or its (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Darrell Patrick Rowbottom, Kuhn Versus Popper on Science Education: A Response to Richard Bailey.score: 180.0
    In a recent contribution to Learning for Democracy, Richard Bailey argues that Thomas Kuhn advocated an indoctrinatory model of science education, which is fundamentally authority-based. While agreeing with Bailey’s conclusion, this article suggests that Kuhn was attempting to solve an important problem which Bailey only touches on – how to ensure that science students do not become hypercritical. It continues by offering a critical rationalist solution to this problem, arguing that paradigms qua exemplars should be historical problem-solving (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Gürol Irzık & Gurol Irzik, Introduction: Commercialization of Academic Science and a New Agenda for Science Education.score: 180.0
    Certain segments of science are becoming increasingly commercialized. This article discusses the commercialization of academic science and its impact on various aspects of science. It also aims to provide an introduction to the articles in this special issue. I briefly describe the major factors that led to this phenomenon, situate it in the context of the changing social regime of science and give a thumbnail sketch of its costs and benefits. I close with a general discussion (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Amy R. Taylor, M. Gail Jones, Bethany Broadwell & Tom Oppewal (2008). Creativity, Inquiry, or Accountability? Scientists' and Teachers' Perceptions of Science Education. Science Education 92 (6):1058-1075.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. William J. Boone & Kathryn Scantlebury (2006). The Role of Rasch Analysis When Conducting Science Education Research Utilizing Multiple‐Choice Tests. Science Education 90 (2):253-269.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Leah A. Bricker & Philip Bell (2008). Conceptualizations of Argumentation From Science Studies and the Learning Sciences and Their Implications for the Practices of Science Education. Science Education 92 (3):473-498.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Fred Finley, Frances Lawrenz & Patricia Heller (1992). A Summary of Research in Science Education‐1990. Science Education 76 (3):239-281.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Olugbemiro J. Jegede (1996). In Support of Culturally and Individually Responsive Science Education Graduate Programs for International Students: Comment on Lunetta and Van den Berg. Science Education 80 (1):101-104.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. A. Kumar, D. P. Khandelwal & Simon George (1987). Science Education in India. Science Education 71 (2):189-200.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Douglas L. Medin & Megan Bang (2014). Who's Asking?: Native Science, Western Science, and Science Education. The Mit Press.score: 180.0
    Analysis and case studies show that including different orientations toward the natural world makes for more effective scientific practice and science education.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Edward L. Pizzini, Daniel P. Shepardson & Sandra K. Abell (1989). A Rationale for and the Development of a Problem Solving Model of Instruction in Science Education. Science Education 73 (5):523-534.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. William B. Stanley & Nancy W. Brickhouse (1994). Multiculturalism, Universalism, and Science Education. Science Education 78 (4):387-398.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. William B. Stanley & Nancy W. Brickhouse (1995). Science Education Without Foundations: A Response to Loving. Science Education 79 (3):349-354.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Paula Viterbo (2007). History of Science as Interdisciplinary Education in American Colleges: Its Origins, Advantages, and Pitfalls. Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M16.score: 180.0
    Before 1950, history of science did not exist as an independent academic branch, but was instead pursued by practitioners across various humanities and scientific disciplines. After professionalization, traces of its prehistory as a cross-disciplinary area of interest bound to an interdisciplinary, educational philosophy have remained. This essay outlines the development of history of science as an interdisciplinary academic field, and argues that it constitutes an obvious choice for inclusion in an interdisciplinary academic program, provided faculty and administrators learn (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Beverley Bell & Bronwen Cowie (2001). The Characteristics of Formative Assessment in Science Education. Science Education 85 (5):536-553.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000