Search results for 'science fiction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  36
    Simon J. Evnine (2015). “But Is It Science Fiction?”: Science Fiction and a Theory of Genre. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):1-28.
    If science fiction is a genre, then attempts to think about the nature of science fiction will be affected by one’s understanding of what genres are. I shall examine two approaches to genre, one dominant but inadequate, the other better, but only occasionally making itself seen. I shall then discuss several important, interrelated issues, focusing particularly on science fiction : what it is for a work to belong to a genre, the semantics of genre (...)
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  2.  6
    A. Morton (1997). Review. How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. SRL Clark. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (2):310-312.
    While admiring the breadth and interest of Clark's discussion of a persistent theme in science fiction, I worry about its capacity to reveal fundamental features of the genre. I also try to make explicit some of Clark's unstated assumptions.
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  3.  5
    Ugo Bellagamba (2016). From Ideal to Future Cities: Science Fiction as an Extension of Utopia. Philosophy and Technology 29 (1):79-96.
    The future is not a new idea. The philosophers of the Enlightenment freed it of the historic wrappings of Christian eschatology and the notion of Providence itself by rationalising the idea of progress, the possible improvement of Mankind and the terrestrial city that stemmed from it. Making use of the Renaissance, the utopian authors transformed spiritual preparation for the end of time into a view of material, earthly delight made possible by science and scientific research. This ideal was certainly (...)
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  4.  51
    Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways (...)
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  5.  3
    Yannick Rumpala (2015). Littérature à potentiel heuristique pour temps incertains. La science-fiction comme support de réflexion et de production de connaissances. Methodos 15.
    Alors que le temps présent paraît marqué par une incertitude forte, voire croissante, comment trouver des prises sur ce qui est en devenir et qui pourrait composer le futur? Cette contribution propose de montrer que la science-fiction offre un matériau qui a aussi une pertinence et qui peut être travaillé pour être incorporé dans un processus de production de connaissance. Les textes de science-fiction peuvent en effet être pris à la fois comme un réservoir d’expériences de (...)
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  6.  4
    Anne Franciska Pusch (2015). Splices: When Science Catches Up with Science Fiction. NanoEthics 9 (1):55-73.
    This paper examines human-nonhuman splices from a multidisciplinary approach, involving bioengineering and literary studies. Splices are hybrid beings, created through gene-splicing—a process which combines the DNA of the two species, resulting in a hybrid or chimeric being. A current trend in biotechnological research is the use of spliced pigs for xenotransplantation. Hiromitsu Nakauchi’s pancreas study that splices pigs with human iPS [induced pluripotent stem] cells in order to grow human organs inside pigs is being compared to a highly similar case (...)
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  7.  2
    Nicholas R. Maradin Iii (2013). Militainment and Mechatronics: Occultatio and the Veil of Science Fiction Cool in United States Air Force Advertisements. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 15 (2):77-86.
    In 2009, the United States Air Force aired a series of science fiction-themed recruitment commercials on network television and their official YouTube channel. In these advertisements, the superimposition of science fiction imagery over depictions of Air Force operations frames these missions as near-future sci-fi adventure, ironically summarized by the tagline: “It’s not science fiction. It’s what we do every day.” Focusing on an early advertisement for the Air Force’s Reaper unmanned aerial (...)
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  8. Ryan Nichols, N. D. Smith & Fred Dycus Miller (eds.) (2008). Philosophy Through Science Fiction: A Coursebook with Readings. Routledge.
    Philosophy Through Science Fiction offers a fun, challenging, and accessible way in to the issues of philosophy through the genre of science fiction. Tackling problems such as the possibility of time travel, or what makes someone the same person over time, the authors take a four-pronged approach to each issue, providing a clear and concise introduction to each subject amd a science fiction story that exemplifies a feature of the philosophical discussion ú historical and (...)
     
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  9.  10
    Susan Schneider (ed.) (2009). Science Fiction and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A timely volume that uses science fiction as a springboard to meaningful philosophical discussions, especially at points of contact between science fiction and new scientific developments. Raises questions and examines timely themes concerning the nature of the mind, time travel, artificial intelligence, neural enhancement, free will, the nature of persons, transhumanism, virtual reality, and neuroethics Draws on a broad range of books, films and television series, including _The Matrix, Star Trek, Blade Runner, Frankenstein, Brave New World, (...)
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  10.  48
    Susan Schneider (ed.) (2009). Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This thought-provoking volume is suitable for students and general readers and at the same time examines new and more advanced topics of interest to seasoned ...
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  11. Mark Rowlands (2003/2004). The Philosopher at the End of the Universe: Philosophy Explained Through Science Fiction Films. T. Dunne Books/St. Martin's Press.
    The Philosopher at the End of the Universe demonstrates how anyone can grasp the basic concepts of philosophy while still holding a bucket of popcorn. Mark Rowlands makes philosophy utterly relevant to our everyday lives and reveals its most potent messages using nothing more than a little humor and the plotlines of some of the most spectacular, expensive, high-octane films on the planet. Learn about: The Nature of Reality from The Matrix, Good and Evil from Star Wars, Morality from Aliens, (...)
     
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  12.  7
    Gerry Canavan (2013). Defined by a Hollow: Essays on Utopia, Science Fiction and Political Epistemology, Darko Suvin, Oxford: Peter Lang, 2010. Historical Materialism 21 (1):209-216.
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  13.  4
    J. R. Morgan, A. Georgiadou, D. H. J. Larmour & Lucian (2001). Lucian's Science Fiction Novel True Histories. Interpretation and Commentary. Journal of Hellenic Studies 121:190.
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  14.  4
    Todd McGowan (2009). Hegel and the Impossibility of the Future in Science Fiction Cinema. Film-Philosophy 13 (1):16-37.
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  15. Matthias Fritsch (2003). Wo Nie Zuvor Ein Mensch Gewesen Ist Science-Fiction-Filme: Angewandte Philosophie Und Theologie.
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  16. Judith A. Little (ed.) (2007). Feminist Philosophy and Science Fiction: Utopias and Dystopias. Prometheus Books.
     
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  17.  36
    Scott A. Lukas & John Marmysz (eds.) (2009). Fear, Cultural Anxiety, and Transformation: Horror, Science Fiction, and Fantasy Films Remade. Lexington Books.
    This collection was inspired by the observation that film remakes offer us the opportunity to revisit important issues, stories, themes, and topics in a manner that is especially relevant and meaningful to contemporary audiences. Like mythic stories that are told again and again in differing ways, film remakes present us with updated perspectives on timeless ideas. While some remakes succeed and others fail aesthetically, they always say something about the culture in which_and for which_they are produced. Contributors explore the ways (...)
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  18. Fred Dycus Miller & Nicholas D. Smith (1981). Thought Probes Philosophy Through Science Fiction.
     
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  19. Robert E. Myers (ed.) (1983). The Intersection of Science Fiction and Philosophy: Critical Studies. Greenwood Press.
     
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  20. Michael Philips (ed.) (1984). Philosophy and Science Fiction. Prometheus Books.
     
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  21. Nicholas D. Smith (1982). Philosophers Look at Science Fiction. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  22. Colin Wilson (1978). Science Fiction as Existentialism.
     
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  23.  32
    Ann-Sophie Barwich (2013). Science and Fiction: Analysing the Concept of Fiction in Science and its Limits. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 44 (2):357-373.
    A recent and growing discussion in philosophy addresses the construction of models and their use in scientific reasoning by comparison with fiction. This comparison helps to explore the problem of mediated observation and, hence, the lack of an unambiguous reference of representations. Examining the usefulness of the concept of fiction for a comparison with non-denoting elements in science, the aim of this paper is to present reasonable grounds for drawing a distinction between these two kinds of representation. (...)
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  24.  5
    Mark Bassin & Irina Kotkina (2016). The Etnogenez Project: Ideology and Science Fiction in Putin's Russia. Utopian Studies 27 (1):53-76.
    In her recent book We Modern People, Anindita Banerjee suggests that in prerevolutionary Russia, science fiction substantially shaped the way people thought about and understood modernity and modernization.1 This same sort of connection between the structures of science and social life is still with us in the present day. Over the past decade, the proportion of science fiction books compared with other publications in Russia has increased considerably; indeed, according to some reports as many as (...)
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  25.  24
    Ronald Bogue (2011). Deleuze and Guattari and the Future of Politics: Science Fiction, Protocols and the People to Come. Deleuze Studies 5 (supplement):77-97.
    When is the future? Is it to come or is it already here? This question serves as the frame for three further questions: why is utopia a bad concept and in what way is fabulation its superior counterpart? If the object of fabulation is the creation of a people to come, how do we get from the present to the future? And what is a people to come? The answers are that the future is both now and to come, now (...)
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  26.  41
    Richard Hanley (2009). Miracles and Wonders: Science Fiction as Epistemology. In Susan Schneider (ed.), Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence. Wiley-Blackwell 335--342.
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  27.  18
    Paul Atkinson (2007). The Visualization of Utopia in Recent Science Fiction Film. Colloquy 14:5-20.
    Utopia can be conceived as a possibility – a space within language, a set of principles, or the product of technological development – but it cannot be separated from questions of place, or more accurately, questions of “no place.” 1 In between the theoretically imaginable utopia and its realisation in a particular time and place, there is a space of critique, which is exploited in anti-Utopian and critical dystopian narratives. 2 In Science Fiction narratives of this kind, technology (...)
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  28. Susan Schneider (ed.) (2010). Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A timely volume that uses science fiction as a springboard to meaningful philosophical discussions, especially at points of contact between science fiction and new scientific developments. Raises questions and examines timely themes concerning the nature of the mind, time travel, artificial intelligence, neural enhancement, free will, the nature of persons, transhumanism, virtual reality, and neuroethics Draws on a broad range of books, films and television series, including _The Matrix, Star Trek, Blade Runner, Frankenstein, Brave New World, (...)
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  29.  12
    Elana Gomel (2011). Science (Fiction) and Posthuman Ethics: Redefining the Human. The European Legacy 16 (3):339-354.
    The boundaries of the ethical have traditionally coincided with the boundaries of humanity. This, however, is no longer the case. Scientific developments, such as genetic engineering, stem-cell research, cloning, the Human Genome Project, new paleontological evidence, and the rise of neuropsychology call into question the very notion of human being and thus require a new conceptual map for ethical judgment. The contours of this map may be seen to emerge in works of science fiction (SF), which not only (...)
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  30.  8
    James F. McGrath, Religion’s Future and the Future’s Religions Through the Lens of Science Fiction.
    While most scholarship in religious studies focuses on the past and present, the study of what the future may hold in store for religion deserves attention. Studying the treatment of religious themes and characters in science fiction provides one way of accomplishing this objective. From the possibility of time travel to key events in the history of religion, to the possibility of acquiring godlike attributes by technological or other futuristic means, science fiction regularly touches on topics (...)
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  31.  9
    Ruth Levy Guyer & Jonathan D. Moreno (2004). Slouching Toward Policy: Lazy Bioethics and the Perils of Science Fiction. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):W14-W17.
    Too much contemporary bioethical discourse is weak on science, lazily citing and adopting science fiction scenarios rather than science facts in the framing of analyses and policies. We challenge bioethicists to take more seriously the role of providing informed insight into and oversight over contemporary science and its implications and applications. Bioethicists must work harder to understand the fast-changing truths and limits of basic science, and they must incorporate only appropriate and authentic science (...)
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  32.  14
    Jon Baldwin (2003). Other Bother: The Alien in Science Fiction Cinema, on Aliens R Us: The Other in Science Fiction Cinema , Edited by Ziauddin Sardar and Sean Cubitt. Film-Philosophy 7 (3).
    _Aliens R Us: The Other in Science Fiction Cinema_ Edited by Ziauddin Sardar and Sean Cubitt London: Pluto Press, 2002 ISBN 0-7453-1544-5 (hb) 0-7453-1539-9 (pbk) 208 pp.
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  33.  6
    Élisabeth Vonarburg (1994). La science-fiction et les héroïnes de la modernité. Philosophiques 21 (2):453-457.
    Il y a une convergence obligée entre SF et féminisme. D'abord la SF a 'pour ancêtre l'utopie, et imagine donc des modèles de société autres, tout comme le féminisme est obligé de le faire; ensuite, la SF permet d'aborder les problèmes des femmes d'un point de vue créatif et non réactif comme la littérature normative; enfin la distance mythique retrouvée dans la SF permet aux auteures et lectrices d'accéder pleinement au registre héroïque, qui leur est souvent dénié par la littérature (...)
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  34.  6
    Miguel León (2011). Fetishism, Technology and Science-Fiction. Dilemata 6:123-139.
    In this paper Marx’s concept of fetishism is used in order to analyze contemporary representations of technology in the science-fiction genre (concretely Terminator, The Jetsons and Dune will be used as examples) and discuss their correspondence to two major ideological perceptions of technology (the luddite and the productivist) and to one of the best attempts to grasp technology in a non-fetishized form (Marx’s analysis in Capital).
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  35.  4
    Lysa Rivera (2003). Screening the Postmodern, on Vivian Sobchack Screening Space: The American Science Fiction Film. Film-Philosophy 7 (3).
    Vivian Sobchack _Screening Space: The American Science Fiction Film_ New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1987 ISBN 0-8135-2492-X 345 pp.
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  36.  1
    Laurence A. Rickels (2014). The Race to Fill the Blanks: On Testing in Science Fiction. Philosophy and Rhetoric 47 (4):515-532.
    In systems of meaning that run on a regular setting, allegory is about filling in or identifying the blanks that disclose the “other story.” In the modern setting that Walter Benjamin tracked , allegory must turn significance out of the blank itself, working the blank as a turning point for drawing the reading onward. The work most influential on, indeed syndicated in, Walter Benjamin’s Origin of the German Mourning Play, as I’ve argued elsewhere, was Daniel Paul Schreber’s Memoirs of My (...)
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  37.  3
    Júlio Cézar Adam (2012). Da ficção científica para a ficção religiosa: ideias para pensar o cinema de ficção científica como o culto da religião vivida (From Science Fiction to Religious Fiction: ideas to think on Science Fiction cinema as the cult of lived religion). Horizonte 10 (26):552-565.
    Da ficção científica para a ficção religiosa: ideias para pensar o cinema de ficção científica como o culto da religião vivida (From Science Fiction to Religious Fiction: ideas to think on Science Fiction cinema as the cult of lived religion). DOI - 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n26p552 Este artigo tem como objetivo refletir sobre a chamada religião vivida como uma forma de repensar o papel da teologia e das ciências da religião na contemporaneidade. O estudo da religião vivida será (...)
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  38.  2
    Anna Powell (2003). Selling Space, on King and Krzywinska Science Fiction Cinema: From Outer Space to Cyberspace. Film-Philosophy 7 (3).
    Geoff King and Tanya Krzywinska _Science Fiction Cinema: From Outer Space to Cyberspace_ London: Wallflower Press, 2000 ISBN 1903364035 128 pp.
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  39.  1
    Eric S. Rabkin (1979). Metalinguistics and Science Fiction. Critical Inquiry 6 (1):79-97.
    The dictionary tells us that metalinguistics is simply "the study of the interrelationship between language and other cultural behavioral phenomena."1 However, because most studies are in fact expressed in language, the study itself becomes a candidate for metalinguistic inquiry. In other words, language is not only capable of interrelationships with kinship systems or economic systems or rituals but it is capable of intrarelationships. . . . Language often becomes a subject in science fiction because science fiction (...)
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  40. Stephen R. L. Clark (2015). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality is a subject which has long been explored and imagined by science fiction writers. In his intriguing new study, Stephen R.L.Clark argues that the genre of science fiction writing allows investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He reveals how fantasy accounts of issues such as resurrection, disembodied survival, reincarnation and devices or drugs for preserving life can be used as an important resource for philosophical inquiry and examines how a (...)
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  41. Stephen R. L. Clark & Stephen Clark (2008). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality is a subject which has long been explored and imagined by science fiction writers. In his intriguing new study, Stephen R.L.Clark argues that the genre of science fiction writing allows investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He reveals how fantasy accounts of issues such as resurrection, disembodied survival, reincarnation and devices or drugs for preserving life can be used as an important resource for philosophical inquiry and examines how a (...)
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  42. Adam J. Frisch (1983). Language Fragmentation in Recent Science-Fiction Novels. In Robert E. Myers (ed.), The Intersection of Science Fiction and Philosophy: Critical Studies. Greenwood Press 147--58.
     
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  43. Ryan Nichols, Nicholas D. Smith & Fred Miller (2008). Philosophy Through Science Fiction: A Coursebook with Readings. Routledge.
    _Philosophy Through Science Fiction_ offers a fun, challenging, and accessible way in to the issues of philosophy through the genre of science fiction. Tackling problems such as the possibility of time travel, or what makes someone the same person over time, the authors take a four-pronged approach to each issue, providing · a clear and concise introduction to each subject · a science fiction story that exemplifies a feature of the philosophical discussion · historical and (...)
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  44. Robert G. Pielke (1983). The Rejection of Traditional Theism in Feminist Theology and Science Fiction. In Robert E. Myers (ed.), The Intersection of Science Fiction and Philosophy: Critical Studies. Greenwood Press 225--33.
     
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  45. Pinsky Pinsky (2003). Future Present: Ethics and/as Science Fiction. Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
    To prepare for the Other: this is the mission of ethics. Future Present: Ethics and/as Science Fiction fuses contemporary philosophy from Heidegger, Derrida, Levinas, and others with cultural texts preoccupied with the future arrival of an Other: science fiction. We peer through the lens of science fiction with the help of H. G. Wells, Walt Disney, Star Trek, David Cronenberg, Philip K. Dick, and many others, in search of a theory of ethics that leaves (...)
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  46. Susan Schneider (ed.) (2012). Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A timely volume that uses science fiction as a springboard to meaningful philosophical discussions, especially at points of contact between science fiction and new scientific developments. Raises questions and examines timely themes concerning the nature of the mind, time travel, artificial intelligence, neural enhancement, free will, the nature of persons, transhumanism, virtual reality, and neuroethics Draws on a broad range of books, films and television series, including _The Matrix, Star Trek, Blade Runner, Frankenstein, Brave New World, (...)
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  47. Susan Schneider (ed.) (2009). Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A timely volume that uses science fiction as a springboard to meaningful philosophical discussions, especially at points of contact between science fiction and new scientific developments. Raises questions and examines timely themes concerning the nature of the mind, time travel, artificial intelligence, neural enhancement, free will, the nature of persons, transhumanism, virtual reality, and neuroethics Draws on a broad range of books, films and television series, including _The Matrix, Star Trek, Blade Runner, Frankenstein, Brave New World, (...)
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  48. Frans Van der Bogert (1983). Nature Through Science Fiction. In Robert E. Myers (ed.), The Intersection of Science Fiction and Philosophy: Critical Studies. Greenwood Press
     
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  49.  7
    Lawrence Dritsas (2007). Cultures of Science Fiction. Metascience 16 (2):345-348.
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  50.  12
    Amnon Eden (2010). Susan Schneider (Ed): Science Fiction and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 20 (3):481-482.
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