Search results for 'science of religion' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  53
    Hans Van Eyghen (2016). Two Types of “Explaining Away” Arguments in the Cognitive Science of Religion. Zygon 51 (4):966-982.
    This article discusses “explaining away” arguments in the cognitive science of religion. I distinguish two rather different ways of explaining away religion, one where religion is shown to be incompatible with scientific findings and one where supernatural entities are rendered superfluous by scientific explanations. After discussing possible objections to both varieties, I argue that the latter way offers better prospects for successfully explaining away religion but that some caveats must be made. In a second step, (...)
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  2. Helen De Cruz & Johan De Smedt (2015). A Natural History of Natural Theology. The Cognitive Science of Theology and Philosophy of Religion. MIT Press.
    [from the publisher's website] Questions about the existence and attributes of God form the subject matter of natural theology, which seeks to gain knowledge of the divine by relying on reason and experience of the world. Arguments in natural theology rely largely on intuitions and inferences that seem natural to us, occurring spontaneously—at the sight of a beautiful landscape, perhaps, or in wonderment at the complexity of the cosmos—even to a nonphilosopher. In this book, Helen De Cruz and Johan De (...)
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  3. Helen De Cruz (2015). The Relevance of Hume's Natural History of Religion for Cognitive Science of Religion. Res Philosophica 92 (3):653-674.
    Hume was a cognitive scientist of religion avant la lettre. His Natural History of Religion (1757 [2007]) locates the origins of religion in human nature. This paper explores similarities between some of his ideas and the cognitive science of religion, the multidisciplinary study of the psychological origins of religious beliefs. It also considers Hume’s distinction between two questions about religion: its foundation in reason (the domain of natural theology and philosophy of religion) and (...)
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  4. Taede A. Smedes (2014). Emil Brunner Revisited: On the Cognitive Science of Religion, the Imago Dei, and Revelation. Zygon 49 (1):190-207.
    This article aims at a constructive and argumentative engagement between the cognitive science of religion (CSR) and philosophical and theological reflection on the imago Dei. The Swiss theologian Emil Brunner argued that the theological notion that humans were created in the image of God entails that there is a “point of contact” for revelation to occur. This article argues that Brunner's notion resonates quite strongly with the findings of the CSR. The first part will give a short overview (...)
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  5. Helen De Cruz (2014). Cognitive Science of Religion and the Study of Theological Concepts. Topoi 33 (2):487-497.
    The cultural transmission of theological concepts remains an underexplored topic in the cognitive science of religion (CSR). In this paper, I examine whether approaches from CSR, especially the study of content biases in the transmission of beliefs, can help explain the cultural success of some theological concepts. This approach reveals that there is more continuity between theological beliefs and ordinary religious beliefs than CSR authors have hitherto recognized: the cultural transmission of theological concepts is influenced by content biases (...)
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  6.  68
    Kelly James Clark (2010). Reformed Epistemology and the Cognitive Science of Religion. In Faith and Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell 500--513.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * Introduction * The Cognitive Science of Religion * The Internal Witness: The Sensus Divinitatis * Reformed Epistemology * Reformed Epistemology and Cognitive Science * Obstinacy in Belief * The External Witness: The Order of the Cosmos * The External Witness and the Cognitive Science of Religion * Conclusion * Notes * Bibliography.
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  7.  2
    Daniel Lim (2016). Cognitive Science of Religion and Folk Theistic Belief. Zygon 51 (4):949-965.
    Cognitive scientists of religion promise to lay bare the cognitive mechanisms that generate religious beliefs in human beings. Defenders of the debunking argument believe that the cognitive mechanisms studied in this field pose a threat to folk theism. A number of influential responses to the debunking argument rely on making two sets of distinctions: proximate/ultimate explanations and specific/general religious beliefs. I argue, however, that such responses have drawbacks and do not make room for folk theism. I suggest that a (...)
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  8.  21
    Adam Green (2015). The Mindreading Debate and the Cognitive Science of Religion. Sophia 54 (1):61-75.
    The relationship between understanding other natural minds, often labeled ‘mindreading,’ and putative understanding of the supernatural is a critical one for the dialogue centering on the cognitive science of religion . A basic tenet of much of CSR is that cognitive mechanisms that typically operate in the ‘natural’ domain are co-opted so as to generate representations of the extra-natural. The most important mechanisms invoked are, arguably, the ones that detect agency, represent actions, predicate beliefs and desires of others, (...)
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  9.  28
    Karl E. Peters (2015). The “Ghosts” of Iras Past and the Changing Cultural Context of Religion and Science. Zygon 50 (2):329-360.
    Beginning with our cosmic ancestors and the 1950s ancestors of Institute on Religion in an Age of Science, this essay highlights the wider, post-World War II cultural context, including other science and religion organizations, in which IRAS was formed. It then considers eight challenges from today's context. From the context of science there are the challenge of scale that leads us to question our place in the scheme of things and can lead to a challenge (...)
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  10.  62
    Willem B. Drees (2013). Islam and Bioethics in the Context of “Religion and Science”. Zygon 48 (3):732-744.
    This paper places “Islam and bioethics” within the framework of “religion and science” discourse. It thus may be seen as a complement to the paper by Henk ten Have () with which this thematic section in Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science opens, which places “Islam and bioethics” in the context of contemporary bioethics. It turns out that in Zygon there have been more submitted articles on Islam and bioethics than on any other Islam-related topic. This (...)
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  11.  99
    Sean Esbjörn-Hargens & Ken Wilber (2006). Toward a Comprehensive Integration of Science and Religion: A Postmetaphysical Approach. In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press 523--546.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712251; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 523-546.; Physical Description: diag ; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 544-546.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  12.  14
    Greg Cootsona (2016). Some Ways Emerging Adults Are Shaping the Future of Religion and Science. Zygon 51 (3):557-572.
    This article addresses how the field of religion and science will change in the coming decades by analyzing the attitudes of emerging adults. I first present an overview of emerging adulthood to set the context for my analysis, especially highlighting the way in which emerging adults find themselves “in between” and in an “age of possibilities," free to explore a variety of options and thus often become “spiritual bricoleurs." Next, I expand on how a broadening pluralism in emerging (...)
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  13.  45
    Alan Padgett (2010). Overcoming the Problem of Induction: Science and Religion as Ways of Knowing. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell 862--883.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * The Problem of Induction * Reid’s Common-Sense Realism * Tradition and Reason in the Principles of Informal Inference * Back to the Rationality of Religion * Notes * Bibliography.
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  14. Philip Clayton (2014). The Fruits of Pluralism: A Vision for the Next Seven Years in Religion/Science. Zygon 49 (2):430-442.
    This article offers a vision for work at the intersection of science and religion over the coming seven years. Because predictions are inherently risky and are more often than not false, the text first offers an assessment of the current state of the science-religion discussion and a quick survey of the last 50 years of work in this field. The implications of the six features of this vision for the future of the field are then presented (...)
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  15.  33
    Karl E. Peters (2014). The Changing Cultural Context of the Institute on Religion in an Age of Science and Zygon. Zygon 49 (3):612-628.
    Since Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science was founded 49 years ago and since one of its co-publishers, the Institute on Religion in an Age of Science (IRAS), was founded 60 years ago, there have been significant developments in their various cultural contexts—in science, in religion, in culture, in academia, and in the science and religion dialogue. This article is a personal remembrance and reflection that compares the context of IRAS in 1954 (...)
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  16.  11
    Matthew Braddock (2016). Debunking Arguments and the Cognitive Science of Religion. Theology and Science 14 (3):268-287.
    Do the cognitive origins of our theistic beliefs debunk them or explain them away? This paper develops an empirically-motivated debunking argument and defends it against objections. First, we introduce the empirical and epistemological background. Second, we develop and defend the main argument, the debunking argument from false god beliefs. Third, we characterize and evaluate the most prominent religious debunking argument to date, the debunking argument from insensitivity. It is found that insensitivity-based arguments are problematic, which makes them less promising than (...)
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  17.  38
    Piotr Bylica (2015). Levels of Analysis in Philosophy, Religion, and Science. Zygon 50 (2):304-328.
    This article introduces a model of levels of analysis applied to statements found in philosophical, scientific, and religious discourses in order to facilitate a more accurate description of the relation between science and religion. The empirical levels prove to be the most crucial for the relation between science and religion, because they include statements that are important parts of both scientific and religious discourse, whereas statements from metaphysical levels are only important in terms of religion (...)
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  18.  86
    Nancey Murphy (2009). Cognitive Science and the Evolution of Religion. In Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.), The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press 265.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001788504; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 265-277.; Physical Description: diag ; Language(s): English; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  19.  43
    Del Ratzsch (2010). The Alleged Demise of Religion: Greatly Exaggerated Reports From the Science/Religion €œWars”. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell 69--84.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * I Refutation: some preliminaries * II Foundations – Deep Conflict? * III Epistemic Undertows: Dissolving Rationality * IV Conflicting Mindsets * V Historical Erosion * VII Conflict and Rational Justification * VII Conclusion * Acknowledgments * Notes.
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  20.  21
    Peter Harrison (2016). The Modern Invention of “Science‐and‐Religion”: What Follows? Zygon 51 (3):742-757.
    I am grateful to the four reviewers of The Territories of Science and Religion for their careful and insightful readings of the book, and their kind words about it. They all got the central arguments pretty much right, and thus any critical comments are not the result of fundamental misunderstandings. While there are some common themes in the assessments, each reviewer, happily, has offered a distinct perspective on the book. For this reason I will deal with their comments (...)
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  21. Philip Clayton & P. C. W. Davies (eds.) (2006). The Re-Emergence of Emergence: The Emergentist Hypothesis From Science to Religion. Oxford University Press.
    This volume introduces readers to emergence theory, outlines the major arguments in its defence, and summarizes the most powerful objections against it. It provides the clearest explication yet of this exciting new theory of science, which challenges the reductionist approach by proposing the continuous emergence of novel phenomena.
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  22.  13
    Christopher H. Pearson & Matthew P. Schunke (2015). Reduction, Explanation, and the New Science of Religion. Sophia 54 (1):47-60.
    In this essay, we set out to survey and critically assess various attitudes and understandings of reductionism as it appears in discussions regarding the scientific study of religion. Our objective in the essay is twofold. First, we articulate what we will refer to as three ‘meta-interpretative’ frameworks, which summarize the distinct positions one can witness in response to the explanations coming out of research within the new science of religion. Second, and more importantly, we seek to demonstrate (...)
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  23. Koshy Tharakan (2008). Science Amidst Religion: The Politics of Knowledge. Current Science 94 (6):714.
  24.  40
    Salman Hameed (2012). Walking the Tightrope of the Science and Religion Boundary. Zygon 47 (2):337-342.
    AbstractIslam's Quantum Question by Nidhal Guessoum offers a sophisticated approach to reconciling the results of modern science with Islamic tradition. The book provides a valuable critique of existing literature on Islam and science and advocates the promotion of good science and science education in the Muslim world. A central tension in the book revolves around Guessoum's efforts to promote a version of theistic science, while at the same establishing a clear boundary for science and (...)
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  25. Mikael Stenmark (1997). An Unfinished Debate: What Are the Aims of Religion and Science? Zygon 32 (4):491-514.
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  26. Joshua C. Thurow (2013). Does Cognitive Science Show Belief in God to Be Irrational? The Epistemic Consequences of the Cognitive Science of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (1):77-98.
    The last 15 years or so has seen the development of a fascinating new area of cognitive science: the cognitive science of religion (CSR). Scientists in this field aim to explain religious beliefs and various other religious human activities by appeal to basic cognitive structures that all humans possess. The CSR scientific theories raise an interesting philosophical question: do they somehow show that religious belief, more specifically belief in a god of some kind, is irrational? In this (...)
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  27. Phillip H. Wiebe (2006). Religious Experience, Cognitive Science, and the Future of Religion. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. OUP Oxford 503-522.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712249; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 503-522.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 519-522.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  28.  95
    M. Brierley (2006). The Potential of Panentheism for Dialogue Between Science and Religion. In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press 635--651.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712263; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 635-651.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 647-651.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  29.  89
    John Hedley Brooke (2006). Contributions From the History of Science and Religion. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. OUP Oxford 293-310.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712198; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 293-310.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 307-310.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  30. Michael Naas (2009). Miracle and Machine: The Two Sources of Religion and Science in Derrida's "Faith and Knowledge". Research in Phenomenology 39 (2):184-203.
    This essay attempts to lay out the three principal theses of Jacques Derrida’s 1994-1995 “Faith and Knowledge,‘ Derrida’s most sustained but also most challenging work on the nature of religion and the relationship between religion and science. After demonstrating through these three theses that religion and science not only share a common source-or have a common genesis-but are in what Derrida calls an autoimmune relationship to one another, the essay puts these theses to the test (...)
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  31.  5
    K. D. Gangrade (2005). Concept of Truth in Science and Religion. Concept Pub. Co..
    Drawing Heavily On The Writings Of Professor D.S. Kothari And Mahatma Gandhi, This Book Analyses The Concept Of Truth In Science And Religion.
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  32. Peter B. Todd (ed.) (2012). The Individuation of God:Integrating Science and Religion. Chiron Publications.
    Todd argues for the integration of science and religion to form a new paradigm for the third millennium. He counters both the arguments made by fundamentalist Christians against science and the rejection of religion by the New Atheists, in particular Richard Dawkins and his followers. Drawing on the work of scientists, psychologists, philosophers, and theologians, Todd challenges the materialistic reductionism of our age and offers an alternative grounded in the visionary work taking place in a wide (...)
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  33.  25
    Philip Hefner (2014). Ralph Burhoe: Reconsidering the Man and His Vision of Yoking Religion and Science. Zygon 49 (3):629-641.
    Ralph Wendell Burhoe was a leading figure in relating religion and science in the second half of the twentieth century. His autodidactic style and character as a public intellectual resulted in a vision that is comprehensive in its concern for the salvation of society. He does not fit easily into academic frameworks, even though he has been influential upon scholars who work in academia. This article discusses some conundrums posed by his work. There are also brief presentations of (...)
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  34. Willem B. Drees (2004). Where to Look for Guidance? On the Nature of "Religion and Science". Zygon 39 (2):367-378.
    . For moral guidance we human beings may be tempted to turn toward the past (scripture, tradition), toward present science, or toward future consequences. Each of these approaches has strengths and limitations. To address those limitations, we need to consider how these various perspectives can be brought together—and “religion and science” is an area in which this may happen. That makes the question of where to look for guidance potentially a central one for religion and science, (...)
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  35. Raymond Aaron Younis (2010). Science Religion and the Limits of Reason. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 15 (2):317-335.
  36.  76
    Philippe Gagnon (2016). The Emperor's New Science, or Jerry Coyne on the Incompatibility of Science and Religion. [REVIEW] ESSSAT News and Reviews 26 (1):19-26.
    Review Article on Jerry A. Coyne, Faith versus Fact: Why Science and Religion are Incompatible.
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  37.  1
    Maria Rogińska (2016). Science, Religion, and the Meaning of Life and the Universe: “Amalgam” Narratives of Polish Natural Scientists. Zygon 51 (4):904-924.
    This article deals with phenomena occurring at the interface of the existential, the religious, and scientific inquiry. On the basis of in-depth interviews with Polish physicists and biologists, I examine the role that science and religion play in their narrative of the meaning of the Universe and human life. I show that the narratives about meaning have a system-related character that is associated with responses to adjacent metaphysical questions, including those based on scientific knowledge. I reconstruct the typical (...)
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  38.  41
    David H. Nikkel (2015). The Dualistic, Discarnate Picture That Haunts the Cognitive Science of Religion. Zygon 50 (3):621-646.
    A dualistic, discarnate picture haunts contemporary cognitive science of religion. Cognitive scientists of religion generally assert or assume a reductive physicalism, primarily through unconscious mental mechanisms that detect supernatural agency where none exists and a larger purpose to life when none exists. Accompanying this focus is a downplaying of conscious reflection in religious belief and practice. Yet the mind side of dualism enters into CSR in interesting ways. Some cognitive scientists turn practitioners of religion into dualists (...)
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  39. Mark Vernon (2007). Science, Religion, and the Meaning of Life. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Have evolution, science and the trappings of the modern world killed off God irrevocably? And what do we lose if we choose not to believe in him? From Newton and Descartes to Darwin and the discovery of the genome, religion has been pushed back further and further while science has gained ground. But what fills the void that religion leaves behind? This book is an attempt to look at these questions and to suggest a third way (...)
     
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  40.  10
    Michael Naas (2012). Miracle and Machine: Jacques Derrida and the Two Sources of Religion, Science, and the Media. Fordham University Press.
    Miracle and Machine is a sort of "reader's guide" to Jacques Derrida's 1994 essay "faith and knowledge," his most important work on the nature of religion in general and on the unprecedented forms it is taking today through science and the ...
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  41. Arthur Peacocke, James T. Cushing, C. F. Delaney & Gary M. Gutting (1985). Intimations of Reality: Critical Realism in Science and Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 18 (3):176-178.
     
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  42.  93
    David Leech & Aku Visala (2011). The Cognitive Science of Religion: Implications for Theism? Zygon 46 (1):47-64.
    Abstract. Although the Cognitive Science of Religion (CSR), a current approach to the scientific study of religion, has exerted an influence in the study of religion for almost twenty years, the question of its compatibility or incompatibility with theism has not been the subject of serious discussion until recently. Some critics of religion have taken a lively interest in the CSR because they see it as useful in explaining why religious believers consistently make costly commitments (...)
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  43.  1
    Leonardo Ambasciano (2016). Science, Religious Beliefs, and Historiography: Assessing the Scientification of Religion's Method and Theory. Zygon 51 (4):1062-1066.
    In the recent past, attempts to revitalize historico-religious studies have challenged the charismatic appeal of some of the most celebrated scholars of the twentieth century. At the same time, the old and ideological frameworks that characterized the field have been critically analyzed and deconstructed. The disciplinary status quo, taken for granted for quite a long time, has been shaken to its foundation, paving the way for new approaches. However, the postmodern tenet of problematizing any authority has also become a convenient (...)
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  44. Robert N. McCauley, The Naturalness of Religion and the Unnaturalness of Science.
    Aristotle's observation that all human beings by nature desire to know aptly captures the spirit of "intellectualist" research in psychology and anthropology. Intellectualists in these fields agree that humans' have fundamental explanatory interests (which reflect their rationality) and that the idioms in which their explanations are couched can differ considerably across places and times (both historical and developmental). Intellectualists in developmental psychology (e.g., Gopnik and Meltzoff, 1997) maintain that young children's conceptual structures, like those of scientists, are theories and that (...)
     
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  45. John Hick (2007). The New Frontier of Religion and Science: Religious Experience, Neuroscience, and the Transcendent. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This is the first major response to the new challenge of neuroscience to religion. There have been limited responses from a purely Christian point of view, but this takes account of eastern as well as western forms of religious experience. It challenges the prevailing naturalistic assumption of our culture, including the idea that the mind is either identical with or a temporary by-product of brain activity. It also discusses religion as institutions and religion as inner experience of (...)
     
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  46. Justin L. Barrett (2010). Reformed Epistemology and the Cognitive Science of Religion. Faith and Philosophy 27 (2):174-189.
    Reformed epistemology and cognitive science have remarkably converged on belief in God. Reformed epistemology holds that belief in God is basic—that is, belief in God is a natural, non-inferential belief that is immediately produced by a cognitive faculty. Cognitive science of religion also holds that belief in gods is (often) non-reflectively and instinctively produced—that is, non-inferentially and automatically produced by a cognitive faculty or system. But there are differences. In this paper, we will show some remarkable points (...)
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  47.  34
    Zainal Abidin Bagir (2015). The “Relation” Between Science and Religion in the Pluralistic Landscape of Today's World. Zygon 50 (2):403-417.
    The attempt to expand the discourse of science and religion by considering the pluralistic landscape of today's world requires not only adding new voices from more religious traditions but a rethinking of the basic categories of the discourse, that is, “science,” “religion,” and the notion that the main issue to be investigated is the relationship between the two. Making use of historical studies of science and religion discourse and a case study from Indonesia, this (...)
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  48.  25
    Leo Näreaho (2008). The Cognitive Science of Religion: Philosophical Observations. Religious Studies 44 (1):83-98.
    The cognitive science of religion seeks to find genuine causal explanations for the origin and transmission of religious ideas. In the cognitive approach to religion, so-called intuitive and counter-intuitive concepts figure importantly. In this article it is argued that cognitive scientists of religion should clarify their views about the explanatory and semantic role they give to counter-intuitive concepts and beliefs in their theory. Since the cognitive science of religion is a naturalistic research programme, it (...)
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  49.  81
    Aku Visala (2008). Religion and the Human Mind: Philosophical Perspectives on the Cognitive Science of Religion. Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 50 (2):109-130.
    SUMMARYThe cognitive science of religion is a multi-disciplinary research program that attempts to integrate the study of religion with behavioural sciences such as cognitive sciences. Such integration raises several methodological questions that concern, for example, the nature of the relationship between psychology and social life, the autonomy of the study of religion and the role of causal explanations in social sciences. This article examines the methodological assumptions of the cognitive science of religion and analyses (...)
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  50. Lluís Oviedo (2008). Steps Toward a Cognitive Science of Religion. Zygon 43 (2):385-393.
    The article chronicles the different panels devoted tothe cognitive science of religion at the meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion (SSSR) in Tampa, Florida, in November 2007. The aim is to verify the state of this subdiscipline and to check how much this work-in-progress affects the present state of the dialogue between science and religion. Several signs point to a positive development in this scientific branch and favor a sound reception in (...)
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