Search results for 'science of religion' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kelly James Clark (2010). Reformed Epistemology and the Cognitive Science of Religion. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. 500--513.score: 762.0
    This chapter contains sections titled: * Introduction * The Cognitive Science of Religion * The Internal Witness: The Sensus Divinitatis * Reformed Epistemology * Reformed Epistemology and Cognitive Science * Obstinacy in Belief * The External Witness: The Order of the Cosmos * The External Witness and the Cognitive Science of Religion * Conclusion * Notes * Bibliography.
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  2. Helen De Cruz (2014). Cognitive Science of Religion and the Study of Theological Concepts. Topoi 33 (2):487-497.score: 720.0
    The cultural transmission of theological concepts remains an underexplored topic in the cognitive science of religion (CSR). In this paper, I examine whether approaches from CSR, especially the study of content biases in the transmission of beliefs, can help explain the cultural success of some theological concepts. This approach reveals that there is more continuity between theological beliefs and ordinary religious beliefs than CSR authors have hitherto recognized: the cultural transmission of theological concepts is influenced by content biases (...)
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  3. Taede A. Smedes (2014). Emil Brunner Revisited: On the Cognitive Science of Religion, the Imago Dei, and Revelation. Zygon 49 (1):190-207.score: 720.0
    This article aims at a constructive and argumentative engagement between the cognitive science of religion (CSR) and philosophical and theological reflection on the imago Dei. The Swiss theologian Emil Brunner argued that the theological notion that humans were created in the image of God entails that there is a “point of contact” for revelation to occur. This article argues that Brunner's notion resonates quite strongly with the findings of the CSR. The first part will give a short overview (...)
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  4. Sean Esbjörn-Hargens & Ken Wilber (2006). Toward a Comprehensive Integration of Science and Religion: A Postmetaphysical Approach. In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press. 523--546.score: 696.0
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712251; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 523-546.; Physical Description: diag ; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 544-546.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  5. Willem B. Drees (2013). Islam and Bioethics in the Context of “Religion and Science”. Zygon 48 (3):732-744.score: 696.0
    This paper places “Islam and bioethics” within the framework of “religion and science” discourse. It thus may be seen as a complement to the paper by Henk ten Have () with which this thematic section in Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science opens, which places “Islam and bioethics” in the context of contemporary bioethics. It turns out that in Zygon there have been more submitted articles on Islam and bioethics than on any other Islam-related topic. This (...)
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  6. Alan Padgett (2010). Overcoming the Problem of Induction: Science and Religion as Ways of Knowing. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. 862--883.score: 693.0
    This chapter contains sections titled: * The Problem of Induction * Reid’s Common-Sense Realism * Tradition and Reason in the Principles of Informal Inference * Back to the Rationality of Religion * Notes * Bibliography.
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  7. Philip Clayton (2014). The Fruits of Pluralism: A Vision for the Next Seven Years in Religion/Science. Zygon 49 (2):430-442.score: 666.0
    This article offers a vision for work at the intersection of science and religion over the coming seven years. Because predictions are inherently risky and are more often than not false, the text first offers an assessment of the current state of the science-religion discussion and a quick survey of the last 50 years of work in this field. The implications of the six features of this vision for the future of the field are then presented (...)
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  8. Karl E. Peters (2014). The Changing Cultural Context of the Institute on Religion in an Age of Science and Zygon. Zygon 49 (3):612-628.score: 654.0
    Since Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science was founded 49 years ago and since one of its co-publishers, the Institute on Religion in an Age of Science (IRAS), was founded 60 years ago, there have been significant developments in their various cultural contexts—in science, in religion, in culture, in academia, and in the science and religion dialogue. This article is a personal remembrance and reflection that compares the context of IRAS in 1954 (...)
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  9. Nancey Murphy (2009). Cognitive Science and the Evolution of Religion. In Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.), The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion. Oxford University Press. 265.score: 651.0
    Accession Number: ATLA0001788504; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 265-277.; Physical Description: diag ; Language(s): English; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  10. Del Ratzsch (2010). The Alleged Demise of Religion: Greatly Exaggerated Reports From the Science/Religion €œWars”. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell. 69--84.score: 651.0
    This chapter contains sections titled: * I Refutation: some preliminaries * II Foundations – Deep Conflict? * III Epistemic Undertows: Dissolving Rationality * IV Conflicting Mindsets * V Historical Erosion * VII Conflict and Rational Justification * VII Conclusion * Acknowledgments * Notes.
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  11. Koshy Tharakan (2008). Science Amidst Religion: The Politics of Knowledge. Current Science 94 (6):714.score: 618.0
  12. Michael Naas (2009). Miracle and Machine: The Two Sources of Religion and Science in Derrida's "Faith and Knowledge". Research in Phenomenology 39 (2):184-203.score: 606.0
    This essay attempts to lay out the three principal theses of Jacques Derrida’s 1994-1995 “Faith and Knowledge,‘ Derrida’s most sustained but also most challenging work on the nature of religion and the relationship between religion and science. After demonstrating through these three theses that religion and science not only share a common source-or have a common genesis-but are in what Derrida calls an autoimmune relationship to one another, the essay puts these theses to the test (...)
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  13. Phillip H. Wiebe (2006). Religious Experience, Cognitive Science, and the Future of Religion. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oup Oxford. 503-522.score: 606.0
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712249; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 503-522.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 519-522.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  14. John Hedley Brooke (2006). Contributions From the History of Science and Religion. In Philip Clayton (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oup Oxford. 293-310.score: 606.0
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712198; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 293-310.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 307-310.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  15. M. Brierley (2006). The Potential of Panentheism for Dialogue Between Science and Religion. In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press. 635--651.score: 606.0
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712263; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 635-651.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 647-651.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  16. Salman Hameed (2012). Walking the Tightrope of the Science and Religion Boundary. Zygon 47 (2):337-342.score: 606.0
    AbstractIslam's Quantum Question by Nidhal Guessoum offers a sophisticated approach to reconciling the results of modern science with Islamic tradition. The book provides a valuable critique of existing literature on Islam and science and advocates the promotion of good science and science education in the Muslim world. A central tension in the book revolves around Guessoum's efforts to promote a version of theistic science, while at the same establishing a clear boundary for science and (...)
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  17. Joshua C. Thurow (2013). Does Cognitive Science Show Belief in God to Be Irrational? The Epistemic Consequences of the Cognitive Science of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 74 (1):77-98.score: 600.0
    The last 15 years or so has seen the development of a fascinating new area of cognitive science: the cognitive science of religion (CSR). Scientists in this field aim to explain religious beliefs and various other religious human activities by appeal to basic cognitive structures that all humans possess. The CSR scientific theories raise an interesting philosophical question: do they somehow show that religious belief, more specifically belief in a god of some kind, is irrational? In this (...)
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  18. Peter B. Todd (ed.) (2012). The Individuation of God:Integrating Science and Religion. Chiron Publications.score: 594.0
    Todd argues for the integration of science and religion to form a new paradigm for the third millennium. He counters both the arguments made by fundamentalist Christians against science and the rejection of religion by the New Atheists, in particular Richard Dawkins and his followers. Drawing on the work of scientists, psychologists, philosophers, and theologians, Todd challenges the materialistic reductionism of our age and offers an alternative grounded in the visionary work taking place in a wide (...)
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  19. K. D. Gangrade (2005). Concept of Truth in Science and Religion. Concept Pub. Co..score: 594.0
    Drawing Heavily On The Writings Of Professor D.S. Kothari And Mahatma Gandhi, This Book Analyses The Concept Of Truth In Science And Religion.
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  20. Willem B. Drees (2004). Where to Look for Guidance? On the Nature of "Religion and Science". Zygon 39 (2):367-378.score: 588.0
    . For moral guidance we human beings may be tempted to turn toward the past (scripture, tradition), toward present science, or toward future consequences. Each of these approaches has strengths and limitations. To address those limitations, we need to consider how these various perspectives can be brought together—and “religion and science” is an area in which this may happen. That makes the question of where to look for guidance potentially a central one for religion and science, (...)
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  21. Mark Vernon (2007). Science, Religion, and the Meaning of Life. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 564.0
    Have evolution, science and the trappings of the modern world killed off God irrevocably? And what do we lose if we choose not to believe in him? From Newton and Descartes to Darwin and the discovery of the genome, religion has been pushed back further and further while science has gained ground. But what fills the void that religion leaves behind? This book is an attempt to look at these questions and to suggest a third way (...)
     
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  22. Philip Hefner (2014). Ralph Burhoe: Reconsidering the Man and His Vision of Yoking Religion and Science. Zygon 49 (3):629-641.score: 558.0
    Ralph Wendell Burhoe was a leading figure in relating religion and science in the second half of the twentieth century. His autodidactic style and character as a public intellectual resulted in a vision that is comprehensive in its concern for the salvation of society. He does not fit easily into academic frameworks, even though he has been influential upon scholars who work in academia. This article discusses some conundrums posed by his work. There are also brief presentations of (...)
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  23. Philip Clayton & P. C. W. Davies (eds.) (2006). The Re-Emergence of Emergence: The Emergentist Hypothesis From Science to Religion. Oxford University Press.score: 543.0
    This volume introduces readers to emergence theory, outlines the major arguments in its defence, and summarizes the most powerful objections against it. It provides the clearest explication yet of this exciting new theory of science, which challenges the reductionist approach by proposing the continuous emergence of novel phenomena.
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  24. John Hick (2007). The New Frontier of Religion and Science: Religious Experience, Neuroscience, and the Transcendent. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 543.0
    This is the first major response to the new challenge of neuroscience to religion. There have been limited responses from a purely Christian point of view, but this takes account of eastern as well as western forms of religious experience. It challenges the prevailing naturalistic assumption of our culture, including the idea that the mind is either identical with or a temporary by-product of brain activity. It also discusses religion as institutions and religion as inner experience of (...)
     
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  25. Robin Attfield (2010). Darwin's Doubt, Non-Deterministic Darwinism and the Cognitive Science of Religion. Philosophy 85 (4):465-483.score: 540.0
    Alvin Plantinga, echoing a worry of Charles Darwin which he calls 'Darwin's doubt', argues that given Darwinian evolutionary theory our beliefs are unreliable, since they are determined to be what they are by evolutionary pressures and could have had no other content. This papers surveys in turn deterministic and non-deterministic interpretations of Darwinism, and concludes that Plantinga's argument poses a problem for the former alone and not for the latter. Some parallel problems arise for the Cognitive Science of (...), and in particular for the hypothesis that many of our beliefs, including religious beliefs, are due to a Hypersensitive Agency-Detection Device, at least if this hypothesis is held in a deterministic form. In a non-deterministic form, however, its operation need not cast doubt on the rationality or reliability of the relevant beliefs. (shrink)
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  26. Justin L. Barrett (2010). Reformed Epistemology and the Cognitive Science of Religion. Faith and Philosophy 27 (2):174-189.score: 540.0
    Reformed epistemology and cognitive science have remarkably converged on belief in God. Reformed epistemology holds that belief in God is basic—that is, belief in God is a natural, non-inferential belief that is immediately produced by a cognitive faculty. Cognitive science of religion also holds that belief in gods is (often) non-reflectively and instinctively produced—that is, non-inferentially and automatically produced by a cognitive faculty or system. But there are differences. In this paper, we will show some remarkable points (...)
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  27. Lluís Oviedo (2008). Steps Toward a Cognitive Science of Religion. Zygon 43 (2):385-393.score: 540.0
    The article chronicles the different panels devoted tothe cognitive science of religion at the meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion (SSSR) in Tampa, Florida, in November 2007. The aim is to verify the state of this subdiscipline and to check how much this work-in-progress affects the present state of the dialogue between science and religion. Several signs point to a positive development in this scientific branch and favor a sound reception in (...)
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  28. David Leech & Aku Visala (2011). The Cognitive Science of Religion: Implications for Theism? Zygon 46 (1):47-64.score: 540.0
    Abstract. Although the Cognitive Science of Religion (CSR), a current approach to the scientific study of religion, has exerted an influence in the study of religion for almost twenty years, the question of its compatibility or incompatibility with theism has not been the subject of serious discussion until recently. Some critics of religion have taken a lively interest in the CSR because they see it as useful in explaining why religious believers consistently make costly commitments (...)
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  29. Leo Näreaho (2008). The Cognitive Science of Religion: Philosophical Observations. Religious Studies 44 (1):83-98.score: 540.0
    The cognitive science of religion seeks to find genuine causal explanations for the origin and transmission of religious ideas. In the cognitive approach to religion, so-called intuitive and counter-intuitive concepts figure importantly. In this article it is argued that cognitive scientists of religion should clarify their views about the explanatory and semantic role they give to counter-intuitive concepts and beliefs in their theory. Since the cognitive science of religion is a naturalistic research programme, it (...)
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  30. Michael Naas (2012). Miracle and Machine: Jacques Derrida and the Two Sources of Religion, Science, and the Media. Fordham University Press.score: 540.0
    Miracle and Machine is a sort of "reader's guide" to Jacques Derrida's 1994 essay "faith and knowledge," his most important work on the nature of religion in general and on the unprecedented forms it is taking today through science and the ...
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  31. Steven Horst (2013). Notions of Intuition in the Cognitive Science of Religion. The Monist 96 (3):377-398.score: 540.0
    This article examines the notions of “intuitive” and “counterintuitive” beliefs and concepts in cognitive science of religion. “Intuitive” states are contrasted with those that are products of explicit, conscious reasoning. In many cases the intuitions are grounded in the implicit rules of mental models, frames, or schemas. I argue that the pathway from intuitive to high theological concepts and beliefs may be distinct from that from intuitions to “folk religion,” and discuss how Christian theology might best interpret (...)
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  32. George Karuvelil (2012). Science of Religion and Theology: An Existential Approach. Zygon 47 (2):415-437.score: 537.0
    Abstract Stephen Jay Gould's NOMA (nonoverlapping magisteria) theory was meant to be an alternative to the traditional “conflict model” regarding the relationship between science and religion. But NOMA has been plagued with problems from the beginning. The problem most acutely felt was that of demarcating the disciplines of science and theology. This paper is an attempt to retain the insights of NOMA and the conflict model, while eliminating their shortcomings. It acknowledges with the conflict model that the (...)
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  33. Fabio Gironi (2012). The Theological Hijacking of Realism: Critical Realism in 'Science and Religion'. Journal of Critical Realism 11 (1):40-75.score: 531.0
    This paper questions and criticizes the employment of critical realism in the field of ‘science and religion’. Referring to the texts of four main actors in this field, I demonstrate how the choice of critical realism is justified by a (disguised) apologetic interest in defending the epistemic privilege of the theological enterprise against that of the natural sciences. I argue that this is possible thanks to the reactivation of ‘theological potential’ latent in some under-examined assumptions and conceptual structures (...)
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  34. Abraham C. Flipse (2008). Against the ScienceReligion Conflict: The Genesis of a Calvinist Science Faculty in the Netherlands in the Early Twentieth Century. Annals of Science 65 (3):363-391.score: 528.0
    Summary This paper gives an account of the establishment and expansion of a Faculty of Science at the Calvinist ?Free University? in the Netherlands in the 1930s. It describes the efforts of a group of orthodox Christians to come to terms with the natural sciences in the early twentieth century. The statutes of the university, which had been founded in 1880, prescribed that all research and teaching should be based on Calvinist, biblical principles. This ideal was formulated in opposition (...)
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  35. Philip Clayton & Mark S. Railey (1998). What Every Teacher of Science and Religion Needs to Know About Pedagogy. Zygon 33 (1):121-130.score: 522.0
    This essay provides practical tips for effective teaching in science-and-religion courses. It offers suggestions for dealing with difficult questions and creating a climate of shared learning. Along with pedagogical advice, it covers fundamental principles for teaching broadly integrative religion-and-science courses. Instructors are encouraged to reflect on their purpose(s) in offering their course and to formulate specific objectives using the techniques and resources outlined here.
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  36. Robert N. McCauley, The Naturalness of Religion and the Unnaturalness of Science.score: 522.0
    Aristotle's observation that all human beings by nature desire to know aptly captures the spirit of "intellectualist" research in psychology and anthropology. Intellectualists in these fields agree that humans' have fundamental explanatory interests (which reflect their rationality) and that the idioms in which their explanations are couched can differ considerably across places and times (both historical and developmental). Intellectualists in developmental psychology (e.g., Gopnik and Meltzoff, 1997) maintain that young children's conceptual structures, like those of scientists, are theories and that (...)
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  37. Robert M. Schaible (2003). What Poetry Brings to the Table of Science and Religion. Zygon 38 (2):295-316.score: 522.0
    Ever since Plato’s famous attack on artists and poets in Book 10 of The Republic, lovers of literature have felt pressed to defend poetry, and indeed from ancient times down to the present, literature and art have had to fight various battles against philosophy, religion, and science. After providing a brief overview of this conflict and then arguing that between poetry and science there are some noteworthy similarities---that is, that some of the basic mental structures with which (...)
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  38. Rodney D. Holder (2009). Science and Religion in the Theology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Zygon 44 (1):115-132.score: 522.0
    The German theologian and martyr Dietrich Bonhoeffer is not widely known for engaging with scientific thought, having been heavily influenced by Karl Barth's celebrated stance against natural theology. However, during the period of his maturing theology in prison Bonhoeffer read a significant scientific work, Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker's The World View of Physics. From this he gained two major insights for his theological outlook. First, he realized that the notion of a "God of the gaps" is futile, not just in (...)
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  39. Timothy Fuller (2009). Oakeshott on the Character of Religious Experience: Need There Be a Conflict Between Science and Religion? Zygon 44 (1):153-167.score: 522.0
    Michael Oakeshott reflected on the character of religious experience in various writings throughout his life. In Experience and Its Modes (1933) he analyzed science as a distinctive "mode," or account of experience as a whole, identifying those assumptions necessary for science to achieve its coherent account of experience in contrast to other modes of experience whose quests for coherence depend on different assumptions. Religious experience, he thought, was integral to the practical mode. The latter experiences the world as (...)
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  40. Brad S. Gregory (2008). No Room for God? History, Science, Metaphysics, and the Study of Religion. History and Theory 47 (4):495 - 519.score: 522.0
    Intellectual history, philosophy, and science’s own self-understanding undermine the claim that science entails or need even tend toward atheism. By definition a radically transcendent creator-God is inaccessible to empirical investigation. Denials of the possibility or actual occurrence of miracles depend not on science itself, but on naturalist assumptions that derive originally from a univocal metaphysics with its historical roots in medieval nominalism, which in turn have deeply influenced philosophy and science since the seventeenth century. The metaphysical (...)
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  41. Hava Tirosh-Samuelson (2010). History and the Future of Science and Religion. Zygon 45 (2):448-461.score: 522.0
    Philip Hefner identifies three settings in which to assess the future of science and religion: the academy, the public sphere, and the faith community. This essay argues that the discourse of science and religion could improve its standing within the secular academy in America by shifting the focus from theology to history. In the public sphere, the science-and-religion discourse could play an important role of promoting tolerance and respect toward the religious Other. For a (...)
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  42. Yiftach J. H. Fehige (2010). The Negation of Nonsense is Nonsense: Hilary Putnam on Science and Religion. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 52 (4):350-376.score: 522.0
    While the influential analytical philosopher Hilary Putnam has made significant contributions to philosophy of mind, philosophy of language and philosophy of science, he isn't generally regarded as a philosopher of religion or a theologian. Nonetheless, I argue that his work should be of great interest to philosophers of religion and theologians. Focusing on the relationship between science and religion, this paper explores the importance of Putnam's attempt to reconcile his anti-metaphysical stance and his commitment to (...)
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  43. Louis Caruana (2009). The Force of Counter-Evidence in Science and Religion. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (3):361-374.score: 522.0
    The role of empirical evidence in scientific and in religious discourse has been revisited in a recent paper by John Worrall, who argues for the overlap between these two types of discourse and for the superiority of the former. His main thesis is that the epistemic attitude of natural science is superior because it is essentially related to evidence and falsifiability, whereby the search for counter-evidence is taken as the primary driving force for research. The epistemic attitude of (...), on the contrary, is essentially related to faith, whereby the effects of counter-evidence are always minimized or neutralized. In this paper, I question Worrall’s analysis of the role of evidence in the two kinds of discourse. I argue that the debate has systematically neglected the question of holism of meaning. When such holism is taken into consideration, the very idea of a purely given experience becomes questionable. I argue that this neglected area is as pivotal in our understanding of religious discourse as it has been acknowledged to be in philosophy of science. I then propose a refined account of religious language, illustrating thereby that between the role of evidence in science and its roles in religion there is a lot in common. (shrink)
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  44. Eric R. Dorman (2011). Hinduism and Science: The State of the South Asian Science and Religion Discourse. Zygon 46 (3):593-619.score: 522.0
    Abstract. The science and religion discourse in the Western academy, though expansive, has not paid significant enough attention to South Asian views, particularly those from Hindu thought. This essay seeks to address this issue in three parts. First, I present the South Asian standpoint as it currently relates to the science and religion discourse. Second, I survey and evaluate some available literature on South Asian approaches to the science and religion discourse. Finally, I promote (...)
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  45. Edward B. St Clair (1993). The Why of Science and the How of Religion. Tradition and Discovery 20 (3):5-15.score: 522.0
    Though it is commonplace in discussions of science and religion to make the distinction between scientific explanations of how and religious explanations of why, the distinction does not hold up under close examination. In recent discussions of big bang cosmology, scientists are more and more addressing of the questions of why, particularly in discussions of the role of symmetry in contemporary physics and in debates about the relevance of the anthropic principle.
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  46. Niels Henrik Gregersen (2014). Prospects for the Field of Science and Religion: An Octopus View. Zygon 49 (2):419-429.score: 522.0
    The organic unity between the head and the vital arms of the octopus is proposed as a metaphor for science and religion as an academic field. While the specific object of the field is to pursue second-order reflections on existing and possible relations between sciences and religions, it is argued that several aspects of realism and normativity are constitutive to the field. The vital arms of the field are related to engagements with distinctive scientific theories, specialized philosophy of (...)
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  47. K. Helmut Reich (2012). How Could We Get to a More Peaceful and Sustainable Human World Society? The Role of Science and Religion. Zygon 47 (2):308-321.score: 522.0
    Abstract This call to think, to feel, to read about the title subject and to act first lists five hurdles on the way to a more peaceful and sustainable human society. A number of successful solutions are then presented, such as the UN Convention of the Law of the Sea. There follow sections on potential contributions by religion and by collaboration between science and religion. My plea is for a widespread participation at all levels of society and (...)
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  48. Charles Taliaferro & Jil Evans (eds.) (2011). Turning Images in Philosophy, Science, and Religion: A New Book of Nature. OUP Oxford.score: 522.0
    Turning Images in Philosophy, Science, and Religion: A New Book of Nature brings together new essays addressing the role of images and imagination recruited in the perennial debates surrounding nature, mind, and God. -/- The debate between "new atheists" and religious apologists today is often hostile. This book sets a new tone by locating the debate between theism and naturalism (most "new atheists" are self-described "naturalists") in the broader context of reflection on imagination and aesthetics. The eleven essays (...)
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  49. Zachary Simpson (2008). The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oup Oxford.score: 522.0
    The field of `science and religion' is exploding in popularity among both academics and the reading public. This is a comprehensive and authoritative introduction to the debate, written by the leading experts yet accessible to the general reader.
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  50. Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.) (2006). The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press.score: 522.0
    The field of 'religion and science' is exploding in popularity among academics as well as the general reading public. Spawning an increasing number of conferences and courses, this field has shown an unprecedented rate of growth in recent years. Here for the first time is a single-volume introduction to the debate, written by the leading experts. Making no pretence to encyclopaedic neutrality, each chapter defends a major intellectual position - at the heart of the book is a series (...)
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