Search results for 'science vs humanities' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). Who Knows What - The War Between Science and the Humanities. Aeon.score: 108.0
    Whenever we try to make an inventory of humankind’s store of knowledge, we stumble into an ongoing battle between what CP Snow called ‘the two cultures’. On one side are the humanities, on the other are the sciences (natural and physical), with social science and philosophy caught somewhere in the middle. This is more than a turf dispute among academics. It strikes at the core of what we mean by human knowledge.
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  2. Edward G. Slingerland (2008). What Science Offers the Humanities: Integrating Body and Culture. Cambridge University Press.score: 72.0
    What Science Offers the Humanities examines some of the deep problems facing current approaches to the study of culture. It focuses especially on the excesses of postmodernism, but also acknowledges serious problems with postmodernism's harshest critics. In short, Edward Slingerland argues that in order for the humanities to progress, its scholars need to take seriously contributions from the natural sciences—and particular research on human cognition—which demonstrate that any separation of the mind and the body is entirely untenable. (...)
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  3. Katinka de Wet (2010). The Importance of Ethical Appraisal in Social Science Research: Reviewing a Faculty of Humanities' Research Ethics Committee. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):301-314.score: 66.0
    Research Ethics Committees (RECs) or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are rapidly becoming indispensable mechanisms in the overall workings of university institutions. In fact, the ethical dimension is an important aspect of research governance processes present in institutions of higher learning. However, it is often deemed that research in the social sciences do not require ethical appraisal or clearance, because of the alleged absence of harm in conducting such research. This is an erroneous and dangerous assumption given that research in social (...)
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  4. Georg Marckmann (2001). Teaching Science Vs. The Apprentice Model €“ Do We Really Have the Choice? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):85-89.score: 62.0
    The debate about the appropriate methodology of medical education has been (and still is) dominated by the opposing poles of teaching science versus teaching practical skills. I will argue that this conflict between scientific education and practical training has its roots in the underlying, more systematic question about the conceptual foundation of medicine: how far or in what respects can medicine be considered to be a science? By analyzing the epistemological status of medicine I will show that the (...)
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  5. Nancy Tuana (2013). Embedding Philosophers in the Practices of Science: Bringing Humanities to the Sciences. Synthese 190 (11):1955-1973.score: 60.0
    The National Science Foundation (NSF) in the United States, like many other funding agencies all over the globe, has made large investments in interdisciplinary research in the sciences and engineering, arguing that interdisciplinary research is an essential resource for addressing emerging problems, resulting in important social benefits. Using NSF as a case study for problem that might be relevant in other contexts as well, I argue that the NSF itself poses a significant barrier to such research in not sufficiently (...)
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  6. A. Koj & Piotr Sztompka (eds.) (2001). Images of the World: Science, Humanities, Art. Jagiellonian University.score: 60.0
     
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  7. Moody E. Prior (1962). Science and the Humanities. Evanston [Ill.]Northwestern University Press.score: 60.0
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  8. Carl Rubino (1993). Managing the Future: Science, the Humanities, and the Myth of Omniscience. World Futures 38 (1):157-164.score: 56.0
    (1993). Managing the future: Science, the Humanities, and the myth of omniscience. World Futures: Vol. 38, Theoretical Achievements and Practical Applications of General Evolutionary Theory, pp. 157-164.
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  9. Nicholas Maxwell (2007). From Knowledge to Wisdom: A Revolution for Science and the Humanities (Second Edition). Pentire Press.score: 54.0
    From Knowledge to Wisdom argues that there is an urgent need, for both intellectual and humanitarian reasons, to bring about a revolution in science and the humanities. The outcome would be a kind of academic inquiry rationally devoted to helping humanity learn how to create a better world. Instead of giving priority to solving problems of knowledge, as at present, academia would devote itself to helping us solve our immense, current global problems – climate change, war, poverty, population (...)
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  10. Sergei Serebriany (2005). On the 'Soviet Paradigm' (Remarks of an Indologist). Studies in East European Thought 57 (2):93 - 138.score: 54.0
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  11. Paola Spinozzi & Alessandro Zironi (eds.) (2010). Origins as a Paradigm in the Sciences and in the Humanities. V & R Unipress.score: 52.0
    The assumption that origins can be defined as a hermeneutic paradigm in the humanities and in the sciences is explored in relation to specific theoretical ...
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  12. Darrell P. Rowbottom (2013). Kuhn Vs. Popper on Criticism and Dogmatism in Science, Part II: How to Strike the Balance. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (2):161-168.score: 51.0
    This paper is a supplement to, and provides a proof of principle of, Kuhn vs. Popper on Criticism and Dogmatism in Science: A Resolution at the Group Level. It illustrates how calculations may be performed in order to determine how the balance between different functions in science—such as imaginative, critical, and dogmatic—should be struck, with respect to confirmation (or corroboration) functions and rules of scientific method.
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  13. Karin M. E. Dahlberg & Helena K. Dahlberg (2004). Description Vs. Interpretation - a New Understanding of an Old Dilemma in Human Science Research. Nursing Philosophy 5 (3):268-273.score: 51.0
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  14. Karin M. E. Dahlberg RN PhD & M. A. Dahlberg (2004). Description Vs. Interpretation – a New Understanding of an Old Dilemma in Human Science Research. Nursing Philosophy 5 (3):268–273.score: 51.0
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  15. Robert Frodeman (2005). The Role of Humanities Policy in Public Science. Environmental Philosophy 2 (1):5-13.score: 50.0
    The relationship between philosophy and the community has become relevant again. It has been the government itself, in the form of public science agencies, which has turned to philosophy and the humanities for help, rather than vice versa. Since 1990, US federal science agencies * agencies such as the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation * have steadily increased their support of social science and humanities research. This support is all the (...)
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  16. Hartwig Wiedebach (2011). Logic of Science Vs. Theory of Creation: The Authority of Annihilation in Hermann Cohens Logic of Origin. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 18 (2):107-120.score: 48.0
  17. Carl A. Rubino (2000). The Politics of Certainty: Conceptions of Science in an Age of Uncertainty. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):499-508.score: 48.0
    The prestige of science, derived from its claims to certainty, has adversely affected the humanities. There is, in fact, a “politics of certainty”. Our ability to predict events in a limited sphere has been idealized, engendering dangerous illusions about our power to control nature and eliminate time. In addition, the perception and propagation of science as a bearer of certainty has served to legitimate harmful forms of social, sexual, and political power. Yet, as Ilya Prigogine has argued, (...)
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  18. Jerzy Giedymin (1975). Antipositivism in Contemporary Philosophy of Social Science and Humanities. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 26 (4):275-301.score: 48.0
    By 'positivism' its contemporary critics mean either (a) the comte-Mill views of science, Or (b) methodological naturalism, Or (c) phenomenalism and/or instrumentalism. However, Most philosophers of science are positivists on some of these criteria and antipositivists otherwise. For example, (b) may be combined with the rejection of (c), E.G., Popper; neo-Wittgensteinians, E.G., Wright, Toulmin, Kuhn, Winch, Like nineteenth century neo-Kantians and conventionalists hold instrumentalist views of language, Theories and explanation; 'positive economics' may be either instrumentalist, E.G., Friedman, Or (...)
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  19. Juan de Dios Vial Correa (2001). Bioethics: A Meeting Place for Science and the Humanities. In A. Koj & Piotr Sztompka (eds.), Images of the World: Science, Humanities, Art. Jagiellonian University.score: 48.0
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  20. M. W. Lefor & Roland C. Clement (eds.) (1996). Determinism and Uniformitarianism in Science Vs. Aton Forest: Transcript of the First Aton Forest Forum, October 28, 1995. Aton Forest, Inc..score: 48.0
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  21. Massimo Pigliucci & Maarten Boudry (2013). Prove It! The Burden of Proof Game in Science Vs. Pseudoscience Disputes. Philosophia 42 (2):487-502.score: 45.0
    The concept of burden of proof is used in a wide range of discourses, from philosophy to law, science, skepticism, and even in everyday reasoning. This paper provides an analysis of the proper deployment of burden of proof, focusing in particular on skeptical discussions of pseudoscience and the paranormal, where burden of proof assignments are most poignant and relatively clear-cut. We argue that burden of proof is often misapplied or used as a mere rhetorical gambit, with little appreciation of (...)
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  22. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2006). Genetic Epistemology and Piaget's Philosophy of Science: Piaget Vs. Kuhn on Scientific Progress. Theory and Psychology 16 (2):203-224.score: 45.0
    This paper concerns Jean Piaget's (1896–1980) philosophy of science and, in particular, the picture of scientific development suggested by his theory of genetic epistemology. The aims of the paper are threefold: (1) to examine genetic epistemology as a theory concerning the growth of knowledge both in the individual and in science; (2) to explicate Piaget's view of ‘scientific progress’, which is grounded in his theory of equilibration; and (3) to juxtapose Piaget's notion of progress with Thomas Kuhn's (1922–1996). (...)
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  23. Steve Fuller (1994). Retrieving the Point of the Realism-Instrumentalism Debate: Mach Vs. Planck on Science Education Policy. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:200 - 208.score: 45.0
    I aim to recover some of the original cultural significance that was attached to the realism-instrumentalism debate (RID) when it was hotly contested by professional scientists in the decades before World War I. Focusing on the highly visible Mach-Planck exchange of 1908-13, I show that arguments about the nature of scientific progress were used to justify alternative visions of science education. Among the many issues revealed in the exchange are realist worries that instrumentalism would subserve science entirely to (...)
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  24. William W. Lowrance (1985). Modern Science and Human Values. Oxford University Press.score: 44.0
     
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  25. Jens Høyrup (1995). As Regards the Humanities--: An Approach to Their Theory Through History and Philosophy. Max Planck Institute for the History of Science.score: 43.7
    pt. I. Institutions, professions and ideas -- pt. II. Human science and human nature -- pt. III. The art of knowing.
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  26. Noémie Bouhana (2013). The Reasoning Criminal Vs. Homer Simpson: Conceptual Challenges for Crime Science. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 43.0
  27. Mette Ebbesen (2008). The Role of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Nanotechnology Research and Development. Nanoethics 2 (3):333-333.score: 42.7
    The experience with genetically modified foods has been prominent in motivating science, industry and regulatory bodies to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. The overall objective is to gain the general public’s acceptance of nanotechnology in order not to provoke a consumer boycott as it happened with genetically modified foods. It is stated implicitly in reports on nanotechnology research and development that this acceptance depends on the public’s confidence in the technology and that the confidence is created (...)
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  28. Darrell P. Rowbottom (2011). Kuhn Vs. Popper on Criticism and Dogmatism in Science: A Resolution at the Group Level. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 42 (1):117-124.score: 42.0
    Popper repeatedly emphasised the significance of a critical attitude, and a related critical method, for scientists. Kuhn, however, thought that unquestioning adherence to the theories of the day is proper; at least for ‘normal scientists’. In short, the former thought that dominant theories should be attacked, whereas the latter thought that they should be developed and defended (for the vast majority of the time). -/- Both seem to have missed a trick, however, due to their apparent insistence that each individual (...)
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  29. Nicholas Maxwell (2005). A Revolution for Science and the Humanities: From Knowledge to Wisdom. Dialogue and Universalism 15 (1-2):29-57.score: 42.0
    At present the basic intellectual aim of academic inquiry is to improve knowledge. Much of the structure, the whole character, of academic inquiry, in universities all over the world, is shaped by the adoption of this as the basic intellectual aim. But, judged from the standpoint of making a contribution to human welfare, to the quality of human life, academic inquiry of this type, devoted, in the first instance, to the pursuit of knowledge, is grossly and damagingly irrational. Three of (...)
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  30. Maurice Campbell Cornforth (1950). Science Vs. Idealism: In Defence of Philosophy, Against Positivism and Pragmatism. London, Lawrence & Wishart.score: 42.0
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  31. Mary Midgley, David Papineau, Raymond Tallis, Lewis Wolpert & Anja Steinbauer (2000). Round Table: Science Vs Philosophy? Philosophy Now 27:34-38.score: 42.0
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  32. Nancy A. Walton, Alexander G. Karabanow & Jehangir Saleh (2008). Students as Members of University-Based Academic Research Ethics Boards: A Natural Evolution. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (2):117-127.score: 42.0
    University based academic Research Ethics Boards (REB) face the particularly difficult challenge of trying to achieve representation from a variety of disciplines, methodologies and research interests. Additionally, many are currently facing another decision – whether to have students as REB members or not. At Ryerson University, we are uniquely situated. Without a medical school in which an awareness of the research ethics review process might be grounded, our mainly social science and humanities REB must also educate and (...) awareness of the ethics review process throughout the academic community. Our Board has had and continues to have students as active members. While there are challenges to having students as Board members, these are clearly outweighed by the advantages, for both the academic community and the future of ethically sound research in the social sciences and humanities. Moreover, the challenges are often based on misconceptions and can be easily overcome through increased education and understanding of the research ethics review process by the academic community at large. The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss the experiences, advantages and challenges of having students as REB members. The advantages of having students as REB members include the following: (1) Students are the proposed participants in many of our reviewed protocols and student members may illuminate unique issues of participation. (2) Students are active and highly engaged members of the REB. (3) Having students on the REB enhances awareness of research ethics within the University. (4) Student REB members have an opportunity to mentor other students and provide leadership for both undergraduate and graduate students. (5) Students are more vigorously recruited than faculty members and often apply for student positions with enthusiasm and preparation. (6) In creating an atmosphere of excellence in research, engaging students at the beginning of their research career will help in creating tomorrow’s leaders in research and research ethics. The challenges of having students as REB members include the following: (1) Faculty members may be uneasy regarding the prospect of students reviewing protocols. (2) Faculty members may be concerned about confidentiality and respect with students reviewing faculty research protocols. (3) There may be an increased burden for students who serve as members on an REB. (4) There is concern that students will offer less continuous service to the REB. (5) There is a common misconception that students do not have the experience to carry out ethical reviews. While there are challenges from faculty members and others regarding having students as REB members, these challenges are often based on misconceptions about the nature of the REB work and the ethics review process in general. These challenges are also often based on the misconception of the ethics review process as one of peer review and evaluation, instead of a community-based and inclusive process. Having student members is a long-term strategy for both overcoming the misconceptions of the REB as a “necessary evil” and for fostering an awareness of the imperative for ethically sound research in the social sciences and humanities. (shrink)
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  33. Bernard H. Baumrin (1985). The Autonomy of Medical Ethics: Medical Science Vs. Medical Practice. Metaphilosophy 16 (2‐3):93-102.score: 42.0
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  34. Stephen Jay Gould (2003). The Hedgehog, the Fox and the Magister's Pox: Mending the Gap Between Science and the Humanities. Jonathan Cape.score: 42.0
    The Hedgehog, the Fox, and the Magister's Pox is a controversial discourse, rich with facts and observations gathered by one of the most erudite minds of our ...
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  35. Evandro Agazzi (2001). Science and the Humanities in the New Paideia. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2001:223-234.score: 42.0
    The paideia of modernity is now in crisis. What is needed is a deeper, global understanding of the human being, and a broader determination of its ends and needs. Such a picture of the human being, its life, its real problems and expectations, can be called a paideia, in a sense that is the hard core of the different modulations this concept has received during its long history. It is suggested that this new paideia will be of service to humanity (...)
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  36. Roger Pierson & Raymond Stephanson (2010). Imagining Reproduction in Science and History. Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):1-9.score: 42.0
    Reproduction is at the core of many aspects of human existence. It is intrinsic in our biology and in the broad social constructs in which we all reside. The introduction to this special issue is designed to reflect on some of the differences between the humanities/arts and the sciences on the subject of Reproduction now and in the past. The intellectual/cultural distance between humanists and reproductive biologists is vast, yet communication between the Two Cultures has much to offer in (...)
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  37. Veikko Rantala (1992). Reduction and Explanation: Science Vs. Mathematics. In Javier Echeverria, Andoni Ibarra & Thomas Mormann (eds.), The Space of Mathematics. De Gruyter. 47-59.score: 42.0
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  38. Rolf Ahlzén (2007). Medical Humanities — Arts and Humanistic Science. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):385-393.score: 42.0
    The nature and scope of medical humanities are under debate. Some regard this field as consisting of those parts of the humanistic sciences that enhance our understanding of clinical practice and of medicine as historical phenomenon. In this article it is argued that aesthetic experience is as crucial to this project as are humanistic studies. To rightly understand what medicine is about we need to acknowledge the equal importance of two modes of understanding, intertwined and mutually reinforcing: the mode (...)
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  39. Alister Browne, Katharine Browne, Ezekiel J. Emanual, Joseph J. Fins, Colin Gavaghan, Christine Grady & Leonard C. Groopman (2007). William Andereck, MD, is an Internist at California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, California, Where He Chairs the Ethics Committee and is Founder and Codirector of the Program in Medicine and Human Values. R. Blake Brown, Ph. D., is a Social Science and Humanities Research Council Post-Doctoral Fellow at Saint Mary's University and a Research Associate at The. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16:1-2.score: 42.0
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  40. Roberto Busa (2009). Postscript. Computer Science and Humanities. In Bernard Reber & Claire Brossaud (eds.), Digital Cognitive Technologies: Epistemology and Knowledge Society. Iste Ltd.score: 42.0
  41. F. G. Connolly (1952). Science Vs. Philosophy. The Modern Schoolman 29 (3):197-209.score: 42.0
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  42. Robert J. Deltete (2009). Steve Fuller, Science Vs Religion? Intelligent Design and the Problem of Evolution. Philosophy in Review 29 (3):183.score: 42.0
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  43. Hongyu Jiang (2004). Ren Wen Jing Yan Yu Ke Xue Jing Yan: Dui Ren Wen Ke Xue Yu Zi Ran Ke Xue Guan Nian de Sheng Cun Lun Tou Shi = Human Experience and Science Experience: The Re-Interpretation on the Idea of the Human Science and the Natural Science From the Prespective of Existential. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She.score: 42.0
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  44. F. S. C. Northrop (1959/1979). The Logic of the Sciences and the Humanities. Greenwood Press.score: 42.0
     
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  45. Danielle Rush (2009). College of Science Vs. Main Building: The Kick-Off of A Yearlong Energy Conservation Contest. Scientia 1 (1).score: 42.0
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  46. Jan Such (1996). Types of Determination Vs. The Development of Science in Historical Epistemology. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 47:157-168.score: 42.0
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  47. Roger S. Taylor & Michel Ferrari (eds.) (2010). Epistemology and Science Education: Understanding the Evolution Vs. Intelligent Design Controversy. Routledge.score: 42.0
     
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  48. Roger S. Taylor & Michel Ferrari (eds.) (2011). Epistemology and Science Education: Understanding the Evolution Vs. Routledge.score: 42.0
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