Search results for 'self-determination' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Bas van der Vossen (2014). Immigration and Self-Determination. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-14533167.score: 240.0
    This article asks whether states have a right to close their borders because of their right to self-determination, as proposed recently by Christopher Wellman, Michael Walzer, and others. It asks the fundamental question whether self-determination can, in even its most unrestricted form, support the exclusion of immigrants. I argue that the answer is no. To show this, I construct three different ways in which one might use the idea of self-determination to justify immigration restrictions and show that (...)
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  2. Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta & Annemiek Richters (2008). Embodied Subjects and Fragmented Objects: Women's Bodies, Assisted Reproduction Technologies and the Right to Self-Determination. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):239-249.score: 240.0
    This article focuses on the transformation of the female reproductive body with the use of assisted reproduction technologies under neo-liberal economic globalisation, wherein the ideology of trade without borders is central, as well as under liberal feminist ideals, wherein the right to self-determination is central. Two aspects of the body in western medicine—the fragmented body and the commodified body, and the integral relation between these two—are highlighted. This is done in order to analyse the implications of local and global (...)
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  3. Hsin-wen Lee (forthcoming). Institutional Morality and the Principle of National Self-Determination. Philosophical Studies:1-20.score: 240.0
    Allen Buchanan proposes a methodological framework with which theorists may evaluate different theories of secession, including the National Self-Determination theory. An important claim he makes is, because the right to secede is inherently institutional, any adequate theory of secession must include, as an integral part, an analysis of institutional morality. Because the National Self-Determination theory blatantly lacks such an analysis, Buchanan concludes that this theory is inherently flawed. In this paper, I consider Buchanan’s framework and the responses from (...)
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  4. Jeff Corntassel & Cindy Holder (2008). Who's Sorry Now? Government Apologies, Truth Commissions, and Indigenous Self-Determination in Australia, Canada, Guatemala, and Peru. Human Rights Review 9 (4):465-489.score: 240.0
    Official apologies and truth commissions are increasingly utilized as mechanisms to address human rights abuses. Both are intended to transform inter-group relations by marking an end point to a history of wrongdoing and providing the means for political and social relations to move beyond that history. However, state-dominated reconciliation mechanisms are inherently problematic for indigenous communities. In this paper, we examine the use of apologies, and truth and reconciliation commissions in four countries with significant indigenous populations: Canada, Australia, Peru, and (...)
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  5. Jann E. Schlimme (2013). Sense of Self-Determination and the Suicidal Experience. A Phenomenological Approach. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):211-223.score: 240.0
    In this paper phenomenological descriptions of the experiential structures of suicidality and of self-determined behaviour are given; an understanding of the possible scopes and forms of lived self-determination in suicidal mental life is offered. Two possible limits of lived self-determination are described: suicide is always experienced as minimally self-determined, because it is the last active and effective behaviour, even in blackest despair; suicide can never be experienced as fully self-determined, even if valued as the authentic thing to do, (...)
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  6. Lydia Zepeda, Anna Reznickova & Willow Saranna Russell (2013). CSA Membership and Psychological Needs Fulfillment: An Application of Self-Determination Theory. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (4):605-614.score: 240.0
    This qualitative study examines the relevance of self-determination theory to explain retention and attrition in community supported agriculture (CSA). Using a focus group study of CSA members, we examined whether belonging to a CSA supports basic psychological needs for autonomy, competency and relatedness. We found that it did for continuing members. However, for those who did not renew, membership reduced their sense of autonomy, competency, and relatedness. For continuing members, the intensity of their involvement did not affect their needs (...)
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  7. Leah McClimans (2010). Towards Self-Determination in Quality of Life Research: A Dialogic Approach. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (1):67-76.score: 240.0
    Health-related quality of life measures aim to assess patients’ subjective experience in order to gauge an increasingly wide variety of health care issues such as patient needs; satisfaction; side effects; quality of care; disease progression and cost effectiveness. Their popularity is undoubtedly due to a larger initiative to provide patient-centered care. The use of patient perspectives to guide health care improvements and spending is rooted in the idea that we must respect patients as self-determining agents. In this paper I look (...)
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  8. Jan Christoph Bublitz & Reinhard Merkel (2014). Crimes Against Minds: On Mental Manipulations, Harms and a Human Right to Mental Self-Determination. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (1):51-77.score: 210.0
    The neurosciences not only challenge assumptions about the mind’s place in the natural world but also urge us to reconsider its role in the normative world. Based on mind-brain dualism, the law affords only one-sided protection: it systematically protects bodies and brains, but only fragmentarily minds and mental states. The fundamental question, in what ways people may legitimately change mental states of others, is largely unexplored in legal thinking. With novel technologies to both intervene into minds and detect mental activity, (...)
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  9. Nirmala Erevelles (2002). Voices of Silence: Foucault, Disability, and the Question of Self-Determination. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (1):17-35.score: 210.0
    In this paper I examine two controversialissues that occurred in two different centuriesbut that are inextricably linked with eachother – the 1835 murder committed by a Frenchpeasant, Pierre Riviere and documented byMichel Foucault and the 1990's debate regardingthe controversial methods of FacilitatedCommunication used with students labeledautistic in the United States. In this paper Iargue that both controversies foreground thecrisis of the humanist subject. In other words,I argue that both controversies are generatedby a seemingly simple question: Are personsidentified as mentally disabledcapable/incapable (...)
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  10. Bill Bowring (2011). Marx, Lenin and Pashukanis on Self-Determination: Response to Robert Knox. Historical Materialism 19 (2):113-127.score: 210.0
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  11. Michael Cholbi (forthcoming). No Last Resort: Pitting the Right to Die Against the Right to Medical Self-Determination. Journal of Ethics.score: 210.0
    Many participants in debates about the morality of assisted dying maintain that individuals may only turn to assisted dying as a ‘last resort’, i.e., that a patient ought to be eligible for assisted suicide or voluntary euthanasia only after she has exhausted certain treatment or care options. Here I argue that this last resort condition is unjustified, that it is in fact wrong to require patients to exhaust a prescribed slate of treatment or care options before being eligible for assisted (...)
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  12. T. M. Pope (2012). Legal Briefing: The New Patient Self-Determination Act. Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (2):156-167.score: 210.0
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  13. Watson & Nima Ghorbani (2009). Mysticism and Self-Determination in Iran: Multidimensional Complexity of Relationships with Basic Need Satisfaction and Mindfulness. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 31 (1):75-90.score: 210.0
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  14. Nima Ghorbani & P. J. Watson (2009). Mysticism and Self-Determination in Iran: Multidimensional Complexity of Relationships with Basic Need Satisfaction and Mindfulness. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 31 (1):75-90.score: 210.0
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  15. Hsin-wen Lee (2012). The Identity Argument for National Self-Determination. Public Affairs Quarterly 26 (2):123-139.score: 210.0
    http://paq.press.illinois.edu/26/2/lee.html A number of philosophers argue that the moral value of national identity is sufficient to justify at least a prima facie right of a national community to create its own independent, sovereign state. In the literature, this argument is commonly referred to as the identity argument. In this paper, I consider whether the identity argument successfully proves that a national group is entitled to a state of its own. To do so, I first explain three important steps in the (...)
     
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  16. Mark Stephen Pestana (2001). Complexity Theory, Quantum Mechanics and Radically Free Self Determination. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (4):365-388.score: 210.0
  17. Mitchell Aboulafia (2010). Transcendence: On Self-Determination and Cosmopolitanism. Stanford University Press.score: 192.0
    Don't fence me in : Rorty and Sartre -- On freedom and action : Dewey and Sartre -- A (neo) American in Paris : Bourdieu and Mead -- Mead on cosmopolitanism, sympathy, and war -- W.E.B. Du Bois : double-consciousness, Jamesian sympathy, and the cosmopolitan -- Self-concept in the new sociology of ideas : reflections on Neil Gross's Richard Rorty : the making of an American philosopher -- Eros and self-determination -- What if Hegel's master and slave were women?
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  18. Jann E. Schlimme (2010). Addiction and Self-Determination: A Phenomenological Approach. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (1):49-62.score: 192.0
    In this article, I focus on possibly impaired self-determination in addiction. After some methodological reflections, I introduce a phenomenological description of the experience of being self-determined. I argue that being self-determined implies effectivity of agency regarding three different behavioural domains. Such self-referential agency shall be called ‘self-effectivity’ in this article. In a second step, I will use this phenomenological description to understand the impairments of self-determination in addiction. While addiction does not necessarily imply a basic lack of control (...)
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  19. Timothy D. Lee Elizabeth A. Sanli, Jae T. Patterson, Steven R. Bray (2012). Understanding Self-Controlled Motor Learning Protocols Through the Self-Determination Theory. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 192.0
    The purpose of the present review was to provide a theoretical understanding of the learning advantages underlying a self-controlled practice context through the tenets of the self-determination theory (SDT). Three micro theories within the macro theory of SDT (Basic psychological needs theory, Cognitive Evaluation Theory & Organismic Integration Theory) are used as a framework for examining the current self-controlled motor learning literature. A review of 26 peer-reviewed, empirical studies from the motor learning and medical training literature revealed an important (...)
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  20. Allen E. Buchanan (2004). Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law. Oxford University Press.score: 180.0
    This book articulates a systematic vision of an international legal system grounded in the commitment to justice for all persons. It provides a probing exploration of the moral issues involved in disputes about secession, ethno-national conflict, "the right of self-determination of peoples," human rights, and the legitimacy of the international legal system itself. Buchanan advances vigorous criticisms of the central dogmas of international relations and international law, arguing that the international legal system should make justice, not simply peace among (...)
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  21. Saskia K. Nagel (2010). Too Much of a Good Thing? Enhancement and the Burden of Self-Determination. Neuroethics 3 (2):109-119.score: 180.0
    There is a remedy available for many of our ailments: Psychopharmacology promises to alleviate unsatisfying memory, bad moods, and low self-esteem. Bioethicists have long discussed the ethical implications of enhancement interventions. However, they have not considered relevant evidence from psychology and economics. The growth in autonomy in many areas of life is publicized as progress for the individual. However, the broadening of areas at one’s disposal together with the increasing individualization of value systems leads to situations in which the range (...)
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  22. Mark F. N. Franke (2007). Self-Determination Versus the Determination of Self: A Critical Reading of the Colonial Ethics Inherent to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Journal of Global Ethics 3 (3):359 – 379.score: 180.0
    The United Nations' (UN) adoption of a Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is intended to mark a fundamental ethical turn in the relationships between indigenous peoples and the community of sovereign states. This moment is the result of decades of discussion and negotiation, largely revolving around states' discomfort with notion of indigenous self-determination. Member states of the UN have feared that an ethic of indigenous self-determination would undermine the principles of state sovereignty on which the UN (...)
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  23. Fabio Macioce (2012). What can we do? A philosophical analysis of individual self-determination. Eidos 16 (16):100-129.score: 180.0
    The principle of self-determination, as commonly established, is based on a formal and individualistic view of liberty rights. This perspective, however, is inconsistent with the needs of a community and particularly with the necessity to promote integration between subjects and a relatively stable social order. I propose a different perspective, the one that not only takes into account individuals but also relationships. In particular, what I propose is: 1) that any community is aware of a specific social order, which (...)
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  24. Antony Lamb (2008). Self-Determination, Wellbeing, and Threats of Harm. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):145–158.score: 180.0
    David Rodin argues that the right of national-defence as conceived in international law cannot be grounded in the end of defending the lives of individuals. Firstly, having this end is not necessary because there is a right of defence against an invasion that threatens no lives. However, in this context we are to understand that 'defending lives' includes defending against certain non-lethal threats. I will argue that threats to national-self determination and self-government are significant non-lethal threats to the wellbeing of (...)
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  25. Fabio Macioce, 33. “Individual Liberty and Self-Determination”.score: 180.0
    In this essay I will try to demonstrate that the principle of self-determination is based on a formal and individualistic view of liberty rights. I also propose a different perspective that takes into account the relationships rather than the individual. I will show how this result can only be achieved through [...].
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  26. Emanuela Ceva & Sofia Moratti (2013). Whose Self-Determination? Barriers to Access to Emergency Hormonal Contraception in Italy. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (2):139-167.score: 180.0
    It is a standard requirement of democratic theory that all members of society be treated with equal respect as capable of self-determination (Christiano 2004; Dworkin 1977; Gutmann and Thompson 2004; Patten 2011; Waldron 1999). The fulfillment of this requirement is problematic vis-à-vis conscientious dissenters. Conscientious dissenters refuse to comply with legally enforced duties when compliance risks jeopardizing their moral integrity, because the required behavior would compromise their loyalty to (some of) their moral commitments. Coercing conscientious dissenters into behavior they (...)
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  27. Tomis Kapitan, Self-Determination.score: 180.0
    Disputes over territory are among the most contentious in human affairs. Throughout the world, societies view control over land and resources as necessary to ensure their survival and to further their particular life-style, and the very passion with which claims over a region are asserted and defended suggests that difficult normative issues lurk nearby. Questions about rights to territory vary. It is one thing to ask who owns a particular parcel of land, another who has the right to reside within (...)
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  28. John Kilcullen, Self-Determination and the Right to Establish a Government.score: 180.0
    (Abstract: The right of “national self-determination” sometimes claimed for ethnic/religious/linguistic groups is not to be confused with the right to rebel against tyranny or with a right to secede, and it is limited by respect for the territorial integrity of functioning states. In some cases self-determination may take the form of some sort of autonomy within a mixed state. Ockham’s use of the canon..
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  29. Hans-Martin Sass (1992). Criteria for Death: Self-Determination and Public Policy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (4):445-454.score: 180.0
    in Western cultures in regard to post-mortem organ donation and the termination of care for patients meeting these strict criteria. But they are of minimal use in Asian cultures and in the ethics of caring for the persistent vegetative patient. This paper introduces a formula for a global Uniform Determination of Death statute, based on the ‘entire brain including brain stem’ criteria as a default position, but allowing competent adults by means of advance directives to choose other criteria for determining (...)
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  30. Seung-Kee Lee (2012). Self-Determination and the Categories of Freedom in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Kant-Studien 103 (3):337-350.score: 180.0
    Kant speaks of our capacity to be “self-determining [...] in certain [...] laws hold- ing firm a priori” (KrV, B 430). Here the “laws” refer to the categories of freedom introduced in KpV. The categories of freedom, then, are necessary for self-determination. I first explain how Kant employs the notion of determination in his theoretical philosophy. I then explain how the notion is utilized also in his practical philosophy, particularly in connection to the act of determining the forms of (...)
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  31. Ayelet Banai (2013). Political Self-Determination and Global Egalitarianism. Social Theory and Practice 39 (1):45-69.score: 180.0
    Proponents of global egalitarian justice often argue that their positions are compatible with the principle of self-determination. At the same time, prominent arguments in favor of global egalitarianism object to one central component of the principle: namely, that the borders of states (or other political units) are normatively significant for the allocation of rights and duties; that duties of justice and democratic rights should stop or change at borders. In this article, I propose an argument in defense of the (...)
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  32. Alan Strudler (1988). Self-Determination, Incompetence, and Medical Jurisprudence. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (4):349-365.score: 180.0
    Philosophers and others have criticized the courts for ascribing a right of self-determination to severe incompetents. I defend ascription of a right of self-determination to these incompetents against both conceptual and normative attacks. I argue that a court need make no conceptual error when it ascribes a right of self-determination to a being who never had capacity for rational choice, and I argue that proper judicial deference to reflective conventional morality supports ascription of a right of (...) to severe incompetents. Keywords: Self-determination, incompetence, person CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this? (shrink)
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  33. Johnmarshall Reeve (2002). Self-Determination Theory Applied to Educational Settings. In Edward L. Deci & Richard M. Ryan (eds.), Handbook of Self-Determination Research. University of Rochester Press. 2--183.score: 180.0
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  34. Tomis Kapitan (2006). Self-Determination and International Order. The Monist 89 (2):356 - 370.score: 180.0
    Towards the end of the first world war, a “principle of self-determination” was proposed as a foundation for international order. In the words of its chief advocate, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, it specified that the “settlement of every question, whether of territory, of sovereignty, of economic arrangement, or of political relationship” is to be made “upon the basis of the free acceptance of that settlement by the people immediately concerned and not upon the basis of the material interest or (...)
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  35. Alex Levitov (forthcoming). Human Rights, Self-Determination, and External Legitimacy. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-14544285.score: 180.0
    It is commonly supposed that (a) at least some states possess a moral right against external intervention in their domestic affairs and (b) all human rights violations give members of the international community reasons to undertake preventive or remedial action against offending states. No state, however, currently protects or could reasonably be expected to protect its subjects’ human rights to a perfect degree. In view of this reality, many have found it difficult to explain how any existing or readily foreseeable (...)
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  36. E. Christensen (2012). The Re-Emergence of the Liberal-Communitarian Debate in Bioethics: Exercising Self-Determination and Participation in Biomedical Research. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (3):255-276.score: 180.0
    Biomedical research has brought to the fore the issue of which rights and duties we have to each other and society. Several scholars have advocated reframing the notion of participation, arguing that we have a moral duty to participate in research from which we all benefit. However, less attention has been paid to how we justify and defend the concept of self-determination and what the implications are in a biomedical setting. The author discusses the value and importance of (...) on the basis of the framework of the liberal-communitarian debate. Biobank research is used as an example of a project wherein, through our participation, we confirm our sense of belonging to society and acknowledge our mutual dependence on each other. We need a richer concept of self-determination that encompasses both liberal and communitarian insights in order to make sense of the value we attach to self-determination. (shrink)
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  37. Edward L. Deci & Richard M. Ryan (2002). L9: Self-Determination Research: Reflections and Future Directions. In Edward L. Deci & Richard M. Ryan (eds.), Handbook of Self-Determination Research. University of Rochester Press. 431.score: 180.0
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  38. Ulla W. Hellström & Anneli Sarvimäki (2007). Experiences of Self-Determination By Older Persons Living in Sheltered Housing. Nursing Ethics 14 (3):413-424.score: 180.0
    Respect for autonomy and self-determination is a central principle in nursing ethics. Autonomy and quality of life are strongly connected, and, at the same time, autonomy is an important quality indicator on how older persons' housing functions. In this study, autonomy was conceived as self-determination. The aim of the study was to describe how older people living in sheltered housing experience self-determination and how they are valued as human beings. Eleven persons living in five different housing facilities (...)
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  39. Marshall B. Kapp (1993). Nursing Home Compliance with the Patient Self-Determination Act: Does Jewish Affiliation Make a Difference? [REVIEW] HEC Forum 5 (4):223-236.score: 180.0
    This paper reports on a mail survey of Jewish nursing homes nationally regarding their compliance with the federal Patient Self-Determination Act that became effective in December, 1991. Data is presented about the extent to which institutions' religious affiliation has influenced their advance directive policies and the procedures they have adopted to implement those policies. A content analysis of written advance directive policies used in Jewish nursing homes is presented also.
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  40. Scarta (2012). Call for Papers: Territory, Belonging: Secession, Self-Determination and Territorial Rights in the Age of Identity Politics. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.score: 180.0
    Symposium: Territory, Belonging: secession, self-determination and territorial rights in the age of identity politics With a discussion of Neera Chandhoke’s Contested Secessions. Rights, Self-determination, Democracy and Kashmir (OUP 2012) Guest Editor: Valentina Gentile Submission Deadline Long(1,000 words max): November 15, 2012 Full paper (10,000 words max, upon acceptance): March 15, 2013 Invited Contributors Allen Buchanan (DukeUniversity), Will Kymlicka (Queen’s University), Margaret Moore (Queen’s University) and Neera Chandhoke (University of Delhi).
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  41. Ellen Skinner & Kathleen Edge (2002). L4: Self-Determination, Coping, and Development. In Edward L. Deci & Richard M. Ryan (eds.), Handbook of Self-Determination Research. University of Rochester Press. 297.score: 180.0
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  42. Daniel D. De Haan (2011). Thomistic Hylomorphism, Self-Determination, Neuroplasticity, and Grace. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 85:99-120.score: 180.0
    This paper presents a Thomistic analysis of addiction that incorporates scientific, philosophical, and theological features of addiction. I will argue first, that a Thomistic hylomorphic anthropology provides a cogent explanation of the causal interactions between human action and neuroplasticity. I will employ Karol Wojtyła’s account of self-determination to further clarify the kind of neuroplasticity involved in addiction. Next, I will elucidate how a Thomistic anthropology can accommodate, without reductionism, both the neurophysiological and psychological elements of addiction, and finally, I (...)
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  43. M. Eisemann & J. Richter (1999). Relationships Between Various Attitudes Towards Self-Determination in Health Care with Special Reference to an Advance Directive. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (1):37-41.score: 180.0
    OBJECTIVES: The subject of patient self-determination in health care has gained broad interest because of the increasing number of incompetent patients. In an attempt to solve the problems related to doctors' decision making in such circumstances, advance directives have been developed. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between public attitudes towards patient autonomy and advance directives. SUBJECTS AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A stratified random sample of 600 adults in northern Sweden was surveyed by a questionnaire with (...)
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  44. Cindy Holder (2006). Self-Determination as a Universal Human Right. Human Rights Review 7 (4):5-18.score: 180.0
    Conventional wisdom suggests that promoting self-determination for peoples and protecting the human rights of individuals are competing priorities. However, many recent international human rights documents include rights of peoples in their lists of basic human rights. In this paper, I defend including at least one people’s right, the right to self-determination, in the list of basic rights. Recognizing that self-determination is a constitutive element of human dignity casts state sovereignty in a different light, with interesting consequences both (...)
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  45. D. S. Silva (2013). Powers and Faden's Concept of Self-Determination and What It Means to 'Achieve' Well-Being in Their Theory of Social Justice. Public Health Ethics 6 (1):35-44.score: 180.0
    Powers and Faden argue that social justice ‘is concerned with securing and maintaining the social conditions necessary for a sufficient level of well-being in all of its essential dimensions for everyone’ (2006: 50). Moreover, social justice is concerned with the ‘achievement of well-being, not the freedom or capability to achieve well-being’ (p. 40). Although Powers and Faden note that an agent alone cannot achieve well-being without the necessary social conditions of life (e.g. equal civil liberties and basic material resources, such (...)
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  46. Christina M. Frederick-Recascino (2002). L3: Self-Determination Theory and Participation Motivation Research in the Sport and Exercise Domain. In Edward L. Deci & Richard M. Ryan (eds.), Handbook of Self-Determination Research. University of Rochester Press. 277.score: 180.0
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  47. Jeff Noonan (2013). Subjecthood and Self-Determination: The Limitations of Postmodernism as Democratic Theory. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (sup1):147-169.score: 180.0
    (1999). Subjecthood and Self-Determination: The Limitations of Postmodernism as Democratic Theory. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 29, Supplementary Volume 25: Civilization and Oppression, pp. 147-169.
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  48. Sabrina P. Ramet (2000). The so-Called Right of National Self-Determination and Other Myths. Human Rights Review 2 (1):84-103.score: 180.0
    The doctrine of the right of national self-determination has been pernicious in its effects. And let no one doubt that the proclamation of the so-called “right” by Wilson and Lenin, and its widespread validation, including for that matter by sundry scholars,55 has encouraged people to take up arms on be-half of the nation. Ideas are not without their effects, and bad ideas are apt to have bad effects. While no set of ideas can solve problems absolutely, the widespread abandonment (...)
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  49. Maritta Välimäki, Helena Haapsaari, Jouko Katajisto & Riitta Suhonen (2008). Nursing Students' Perceptions of Self-Determination in Elderly People. Nursing Ethics 15 (3):346-359.score: 180.0
    The purpose of this study was to compare nursing students' perceptions of self-determination in elderly patients before and after clinical training in long term care institutions as a part of their course in gerontological nursing. A pre- post-test design was employed. The data were collected by questionnaires completed by students at one nurse education organization college in Finland (pre-test n ± 120, response rate 95%; post-test n ± 115, response rate 91%). The students' perceptions of elderly patients' self-determination (...)
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  50. J. Wright (1999). Minority Groups, Autonomy, and Self-Determination. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 19 (4):605-629.score: 180.0
    Although this decade has seen a growing focus on the issue of minority rights at both political and legal levels, accompanied by states' accession to a range of international instruments, the collective dimension to minority rights continues largely to elude both legal and academic treatment. This paper argues that autonomy for minority groups is an appropriate mechanism through which a state's obligation to afford a right of self-determination to all its peoples may be fulfilled. Autonomy is the counterweight to (...)
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