Search results for 'self-organization' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  75
    Jon Lawhead, Self-Organization, Emergence, and Constraint in Complex Natural Systems.
    Contemporary complexity theory has been instrumental in providing novel rigorous definitions for some classic philosophical concepts, including emergence. In an attempt to provide an account of emergence that is consistent with complexity and dynamical systems theory, several authors have turned to the notion of constraints on state transitions. Drawing on complexity theory directly, this paper builds on those accounts, further developing the constraint-based interpretation of emergence and arguing that such accounts recover many of the features of more traditional accounts. We (...)
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  2.  60
    Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Carlos F. H. Neves (2013). Consciousness as a Phenomenon in the Operational Architectonics of Brain Organization: Criticality and Self-Organization Considerations. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 55:13-31.
    In this paper we aim to show that phenomenal consciousness is realized by a particular level of brain operational organization and that understanding human consciousness requires a description of the laws of the immediately underlying neural collective phenomena, the nested hierarchy of electromagnetic fields of brain activity – operational architectonics. We argue that the subjective mental reality and the objective neurobiological reality, although seemingly worlds apart, are intimately connected along a unified metastable continuum and are both guided by the universal (...)
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  3.  40
    Bruce H. Weber & David J. Depew (1996). Natural Selection and Self-Organization. Biology and Philosophy 11 (1):33-65.
    The Darwinian concept of natural selection was conceived within a set of Newtonian background assumptions about systems dynamics. Mendelian genetics at first did not sit well with the gradualist assumptions of the Darwinian theory. Eventually, however, Mendelism and Darwinism were fused by reformulating natural selection in statistical terms. This reflected a shift to a more probabilistic set of background assumptions based upon Boltzmannian systems dynamics. Recent developments in molecular genetics and paleontology have put pressure on Darwinism once again. Current work (...)
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  4.  39
    Robert C. Richardson (2001). Complexity, Self-Organization and Selection. Biology and Philosophy 16 (5):653-682.
    Recent work on self organization promises an explanation of complex order which is independent of adaptation. Self-organizing systems are complex systems of simple units, projecting order as a consequence of localized and generally nonlinear interactions between these units. Stuart Kauffman offers one variation on the theme of self-organization, offering what he calls a ``statistical mechanics'' for complex systems. This paper explores the explanatory strategies deployed in this ``statistical mechanics,'' initially focusing on the autonomy of statistical explanation as it applies (...)
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  5.  30
    Richard Johns (2011). Self-Organisation in Dynamical Systems: A Limiting Result. Synthese 181 (2):255 - 275.
    There is presently considerable interest in the phenomenon of "self-organisation" in dynamical systems. The rough idea of self-organisation is that a structure appears "by itself in a dynamical system, with reasonably high probability, in a reasonably short time, with no help from a special initial state, or interaction with an external system. What is often missed, however, is that the standard evolutionary account of the origin of multi-cellular life fits this definition, so that higher living organisms are also products of (...)
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  6.  24
    Bernard Feltz (ed.) (2006). Self-Organization and Emergence in Life Sciences (Synthese Library, Volume 331). Dordrecht: Springer.
    Historical aspects of the issue are also broached. Intuitions relative to self-organization can be found in the works of such key Western philosophical figures as Aristotle, Leibniz and Kant. Interacting with more recent authors and cybernetics, self-organization represents a notion in keeping with the modern world’s discovery of radical complexity. The themes of teleology and emergence are analyzed by philosophers of sciences with regards to the issues of modelization and scientific explanation. (publisher, edited).
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  7.  14
    Fabian Chersi, Marcello Ferro, Giovanni Pezzulo & Vito Pirrelli (2014). Topological Self‐Organization and Prediction Learning Support Both Action and Lexical Chains in the Brain. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):476-491.
    A growing body of evidence in cognitive psychology and neuroscience suggests a deep interconnection between sensory-motor and language systems in the brain. Based on recent neurophysiological findings on the anatomo-functional organization of the fronto-parietal network, we present a computational model showing that language processing may have reused or co-developed organizing principles, functionality, and learning mechanisms typical of premotor circuit. The proposed model combines principles of Hebbian topological self-organization and prediction learning. Trained on sequences of either motor or linguistic units, (...)
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  8. Ashley E. Walton, Michael J. Richardson, Peter Langland-Hassan & Anthony Chemero (2015). Improvisation and the Self-Organization of Multiple Musical Bodies. Frontiers in Psychology 6 (313):1-9.
  9.  54
    Iris van Rooij (2012). Self-Organization Takes Time Too. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (1):63-71.
    Four articles in this issue of topiCS (volume 4, issue 1) argue against a computational approach in cognitive science in favor of a dynamical approach. I concur that the computational approach faces some considerable explanatory challenges. Yet the dynamicists’ proposal that cognition is self-organized seems to only go so far in addressing these challenges. Take, for instance, the hypothesis that cognitive behavior emerges when brain and body (re-)configure to satisfy task and environmental constraints. It is known that for certain systems (...)
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  10.  5
    Stanley Krippner & Allan Combs (2000). Self-Organization in the Dreaming Brain. Journal of Mind and Behavior 21 (4):399-412.
    This paper approaches dreaming consciousness through an examination of the self-organizing properties of the sleeping brain. This view offers a step toward reconciliation between brain-based and content-based attempts to understand the nature of dreaming. Here it is argued that the brain can be understood as a complex self-organizing system that in dreaming responds to subtle influences such as residual feelings and memories. The hyper-responsiveness of the brain during dreaming is viewed in terms of the tendency of complex chaotic-like systems to (...)
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  11.  13
    Carlos Gershenson & Nelson Fernandez (2012). Complexity and Information: Measuring Emergence, Self‐Organization, and Homeostasis at Multiple Scales. Complexity 18 (2):29-44.
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  12.  37
    Mikhail Prokopenko, Fabio Boschetti & Alex J. Ryan (2009). An Information‐Theoretic Primer on Complexity, Self‐Organization, and Emergence. Complexity 15 (1):11-28.
  13.  2
    Ping Li, Xiaowei Zhao & Brian Mac Whinney (2007). Dynamic Self‐Organization and Early Lexical Development in Children. Cognitive Science 31 (4):581-612.
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  14.  9
    Ricard V. Solé (2010). Genome Size, Self‐Organization and DNA's Dark Matter. Complexity 16 (1):20-23.
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  15.  49
    Francis Heylighen (2010). The Self-Organization of Time and Causality: Steps Towards Understanding the Ultimate Origin. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 15 (4):345-356.
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  16.  13
    Sergio Pissanetzky (2011). Emergence and Self‐Organization in Partially Ordered Sets. Complexity 17 (2):19-38.
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  17.  20
    Hossein Mobahi, Majid Nili Ahmadabadi & Babak Nadjar Araabi (2006). Swarm Contours: A Fast Self-Organization Approach for Snake Initialization. Complexity 12 (1):41-52.
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  18.  19
    Daniéle Bourcier & Gérard Clergue (1999). From a Rule-Based Conception to Dynamic Patterns. Analyzing the Self-Organization of Legal Systems. Artificial Intelligence and Law 7 (2-3):211-225.
    The representation of knowledge in the law has basically followed a rule-based logical-symbolic paradigm. This paper aims to show how the modeling of legal knowledge can be re-examined using connectionist models, from the perspective of the theory of the dynamics of unstable systems and chaos. We begin by showing the nature of the paradigm shift from a rule-based approach to one based on dynamic structures and by discussing how this would translate into the field of theory of law. In order (...)
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  19.  7
    Jinyun Ke, James W. Minett, Ching‐Pong Au & William S.‐Y. Wang (2002). Self‐Organization and Selection in the Emergence of Vocabulary. Complexity 7 (3):41-54.
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  20.  4
    Ramon Ferrer-I.-Cancho & Núria Forns (2009). The Self-Organization of Genomes. Complexity 15 (5):NA-NA.
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  21.  3
    Benjamin S. Glick (2014). Integrated Self‐Organization of Transitional ER and Early Golgi Compartments. Bioessays 36 (2):129-133.
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  22.  3
    Christopher J. May, Michelle Burgard & Imran Abbasi (2011). Teaching Complexity Theory Through Student Construction of a Course Wiki: The Self-Organization of a Scale-Free Network. Complexity 16 (3):41-48.
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  23. Ralph D. Ellis (1999). Why Isn't Consciousness Empirically Observable? Emotion, Self-Organization, and Nonreductive Physicalism. Journal of Mind and Behavior 20 (4):391-402.
    Most versions of the knowledge argument say that, since scientists observing my brain wouldn't know what my consciousness "is like," consciousness isn't describable as a physical process. Although this argument unwarrantedly equates the physical with the empirically observable, we can conclude, not that consciousness is nonphysical but that consciousness isn't identical with anything empirically observable. But what kind of mind&endash;body relation would render possible this empirical inaccessibility of consciousness? Even if multiple realizability may allow a distinction between consciousness and its (...)
     
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  24.  4
    S. J. Schmidt (2010). Self-Organisation and Learning Culture. Constructivist Foundations 5 (3):121--129.
    Problem: Many disciplines talk about “ learning “, but since each of them relates this term to another domain of reference, each one selects, by this term, other phenomena that are then called “ learning.‘ Method: This article does not strive for a substantial definition of “ learning ‘ nor does it compete with psychological and pedagogical theories of learning, which are therefore not discussed. Instead I will analyse how we talk about learning and whether or not we might perhaps (...)
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  25.  5
    Meng-Hsiang Hsu & Feng-Yang Kuo (2003). The Effect of Organization-Based Self-Esteem and Deindividuation in Protecting Personal Information Privacy. Journal of Business Ethics 42 (4):305 - 320.
    In this research we apply the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to study decisions related to information privacy protection. A TPB-based model was proposed to investigate whether organization-based self-esteem and perceived deindividuation can be employed to measure the strength of the perceived behavioral control construct. In addition, we examined if the addition of a causal path linking subjective norms to attitudes and another causal path linking organization-based self-esteem to subjective norms enhanced our research model's predicting power. Our study shows that (...)
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  26.  42
    Ralph D. Ellis (2000). Consciousness, Self-Organization, and the Process-Substratum Relation: Rethinking Nonreductive Physicalism. Philosophical Psychology 13 (2):173-190.
    Knowing only what is empirically knowable can't by itself entail knowledge of what consciousness "is like." But if dualism is to be avoided, the question arises: how can a process be completely empirically unobservable when all of its components are completely observable? The recently emerging theory of self-organization offers resources with which to resolve this problem: Consciousness can be an empirically unobservable process because the emotions motivating attention are experienced only from the perspective of the one whose phenomenal states (...)
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  27.  6
    Henri Atlan (2011). Selected Writings on Self-Organization, Philosophy, Bioethics, and Judaism. Fordham University Press.
    Self-organization -- Organisms, finalisms, programs, machines -- Spinoza -- Judaism, determinism, and rationalities -- Fabricating the living -- Ethics.
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  28.  14
    Christian Fuchs (2002). Some Implications of Anthony Giddens' Works for a Theory of Social Self-Organization. Emergence: Complexity and Organization 4 (3):7-35.
    (2002). Some Implications of Anthony Giddens' Works for a Theory of Social Self-Organization. Emergence: Vol. 4, No. 3, pp. 7-35. doi: 10.1207/S15327000EM0403-03.
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  29.  11
    Philip Anderson & Jack Cohen (1999). Reviews: Coping with Uncertainty, Insights From the New Sciences of Chaos, Self-Organization, and Complexity, Uri Merry. [REVIEW] Emergence: Complexity and Organization 1 (2):106-108.
    (1999). Reviews: Coping with Uncertainty, Insights from the New Sciences of Chaos, Self-Organization, and Complexity, Uri Merry. Emergence: Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 106-108.
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  30. Rick Dale, Riccardo Fusaroli, Nicholas Duran & Daniel Richardson (2013). The Self Organization of Human Interaction. Psychology of Learning and Motivation 59.
    We describe a “centipede’s dilemma” that faces the sciences of human interaction. Research on human interaction has been involved in extensive theoretical debate, although the vast majority of research tends to focus on a small set of human behaviors, cognitive processes, and interactive contexts. The problem is that naturalistic human interaction must integrate all of these factors simultaneously, and grander theoretical mitigation cannot come only from focused experimental or computational agendas. We look to dynamical systems theory as a framework for (...)
     
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  31.  22
    David Batten, Stanley Salthe & Fabio Boschetti (2008). Visions of Evolution: Self-Organization Proposes What Natural Selection Disposes. Biological Theory 3 (1):17-29.
    This article reviews the seven “visions” of evolution proposed by Depew and Weber , concluding that each posited relationship between natural selection and self-organization has suited different aims and approaches. In the second section of the article, we show that these seven viewpoints may be collapsed into three fundamentally different ones: natural selection drives evolution; self-organization drives evolution; and natural selection and self-organization are complementary aspects of the evolutionary process. We then argue that these three approaches are (...)
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  32. Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent (2009). Self-Assembly, Self-Organization: Nanotechnology and Vitalism. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 3 (1):31-42.
    Over the past decades, self-assembly has attracted a lot of research attention and transformed the relations between chemistry, materials science and biology. The paper explores the impact of the current interest in self-assembly techniques on the traditional debate over the nature of life. The first section describes three different research programs of self-assembly in nanotechnology in order to characterize their metaphysical implications: (1) Hybridization (using the building blocks of living systems for making devices and machines) ; (2) Biomimetics (making artifacts (...)
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  33.  42
    Anders Michelsen (2007). Autotranscendence and Creative Organization: On Self-Creation and Self-Organization. Thesis Eleven 88 (1):55-75.
    This article discusses the issue of social and cultural ‘autotranscendence’ - self-production, creativity - in the debates on self-organization. The point of departure is Cornelius Castoriadis’s idea of ‘self-creation’. First, a schisma between mechanical and ontological modeling is indicated and used to introduce the idea of a ‘creative organization’. This is further discussed in relation to Jean-Pierre Dupuy’s concept of social ‘autotranscendence’ by ‘complex methodological individualism’, with particular respect to the incomprehension of the social. Following Johann P. Arnason’s treatment (...)
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  34.  25
    J. T. Ismael (2011). Self-Organization and Self-Governance. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 41 (3):327-351.
    The intuitive difference between a system that choreographs the motion of its parts in the service of goals of its own formulation and a system composed of a collection of parts doing their own thing without coordination has been shaken by now familiar examples of self-organization. There is a broad and growing presumption in parts of philosophy and across the sciences that the appearance of centralized information-processing and control in the service of system-wide goals is mere appearance, i.e., an (...)
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  35.  23
    Włodzimierz Ługowski (2007). Molecular Self-Organization; a Bridge Between Physics and Biology. Dialogue and Universalism 17 (12):57-66.
    The philosophical foundations of the theory of molecular self-organization (TMS) are reconstructed and compared with the explicit methodological statements made by occasions by its author(s). Special attention is paid to those philosophical fundamentals of TMS which can turn out helpful in answering the question evoking vivid discussions in the philosophy of nature of the recent decades: whether it is possible to search for a physico-chemical explanation of the genesis of life and at the same time defend its specific character. (...)
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  36.  8
    Rod Swenson (2010). Selection is Entailed by Self-Organization and Natural Selection is a Special Case. Biological Theory 5 (2):167-181.
    In their book, Darwinism Evolving: Systems Dynamics and the Genealogy of Natural Selection, Depew and Weber argued for the need to address the relationship between self-organization and natural selection in evolutionary theory, and focused on seven “visions” for doing so. Recently, Batten et al. in a paper in this journal, entitled “Visions of evolution: self-organization proposes what natural selection disposes,” picked up the issue with the work of Depew and Weber as a starting point. While the efforts of (...)
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  37.  53
    J. B. Edelmann & M. J. Denton (2007). The Uniqueness of Biological Self-Organization: Challenging the Darwinian Paradigm. Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):579-601.
    Here we discuss the challenge posed by self-organization to the Darwinian conception of evolution. As we point out, natural selection can only be the major creative agency in evolution if all or most of the adaptive complexity manifest in living organisms is built up over many generations by the cumulative selection of naturally occurring small, random mutations or variants, i.e., additive, incremental steps over an extended period of time. Biological self-organization—witnessed classically in the folding of a protein, or (...)
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  38.  23
    Stanley N. Salthe (1988). Modeling Self -Organization. Semiotics:14-23.
    Foremost among the tasks facing a semiotically-informed modeling of natural open systems is the recognition and representation of self-organization. This forces attention on process, time, and energetics to complement the conventional semiotic bias toward structure, space, and informatics. While self -organization might be captured in numerous operational idioms, we suggest that the fundamentally distinctive formal structures of (a) development (intrinsic predictability) and (b) evolution (unexpected change through change in contextual meaning) constitute thewarp and woof of virtually all observations on (...)
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  39.  42
    Randall Whitaker, Self Organization, Autopoiesis, and Enterprises.
    'Self organization' is a popular theme in current studies of human social activity, enterprises, and information technology (IT). This document introduces one well developed theory of self organization (autopoietic theory) and discusses its application to enterprises and their management.
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  40.  14
    David Aubin (2008). 'The Memory of Life Itself': Bénard's Cells and the Cinematography of Self-Organization. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (3):359-369.
    In 1900, the physicist Henri Bénard exhibited the spontaneous formation of cells in a layer of liquid heated from below. Six or seven decades later, drastic reinterpretations of this experiment formed an important component of ‘chaos theory’. This paper therefore is an attempt at writing the history of this experiment, its long neglect and its rediscovery. It examines Bénard’s experiments from three different perspectives. First, his results are viewed in the light of the relation between experimental and mathematical approaches in (...)
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  41.  7
    Cliff Hooker, Conceptualising Reduction, Emergence and Self-Organisation in Complex Dynamical Systems.
    This chapter describes the application of reduction concepts in emergence and self organization of complex dynamical system. Condition-dependent laws compress and dynamical equation sets provide implicit compressed representations even when most of that information is not explicitly available without decompression. And, paradoxically, there is still the determined march of fundamental analytical dynamics expanding its compression reach toward a Theory of Everything—even while the more rapidly expanding domain of complex systems dynamics confronts its assumptions and its monolithicity. Nor does science fall (...)
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  42.  3
    Joanna Raczaszek-Leonardi (2009). Symbols as Constraints: The Structuring Role of Dynamics and Self-Organization in Natural Language. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 17 (3):653-676.
    The paper draws a parallel between natural language symbols and the symbolic mode in living systems. The inextricability of symbols and the dynamics with which they are functionally related shows that much of their structuring is due to dynamics and self-organization. It is also stressed that important factors that determine the shape of language structure lie outside individual mind/brains and they draw on time-scales quite different from those of phenomenological experience. Analysis of language into units and subsystems is thus (...)
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  43.  10
    Robert E. Page & Sandra D. Mitchell (1990). Self Organization and Adaptation in Insect Societies. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:289 - 298.
    Division of labor and its associated phenomena have been viewed as prime examples of group-level adaptations. However, the adaptations are the result of the process of evolution by natural selection and thus require that groups of insects once existed and competed for reproduction, some of which had a heritable division of labor while others did not. We present models, based on those of Kauffman (1984) that demonstrate how division of labor may occur spontaneously among groups of mutually tolerant individuals. We (...)
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  44.  8
    Kyungrock Paik & Praveen Kumar (2008). Emergence of Self-Similar Tree Network Organization. Complexity 13 (4):30-37.
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  45.  13
    Nicolas Glade, Jacques Demongeot & James Tabony (2002). Numerical Simulations of Microtubule Self-Organisation by Reaction and Diffusion. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (4):239-268.
    This article addresses the physical chemical processes underlying biological self-organisation by which a homogenous solution of reacting chemicals spontaneously self-organises. Theoreticians have predicted that self-organisation can arise from a coupling of reactive processes with molecular diffusion. In addition, the presence of an external field, such as gravity, at a critical moment early in the process may determine the morphology that subsequently develops. The formation, in-vitro, of microtubules, a constituent of the cellular skeleton, shows this type of behaviour. The preparations spontaneously (...)
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  46.  17
    Nicolas Glade (2012). On the Nature and Shape of Tubulin Trails: Implications on Microtubule Self-Organization. Acta Biotheoretica 60 (1-2):55-82.
    Microtubules, major elements of the cell skeleton are, most of the time, well organized in vivo, but they can also show self-organizing behaviors in time and/or space in purified solutions in vitro. Theoretical studies and models based on the concepts of collective dynamics in complex systems, reaction–diffusion processes and emergent phenomena were proposed to explain some of these behaviors. In the particular case of microtubule spatial self-organization, it has been advanced that microtubules could behave like ants, self-organizing by ‘talking (...)
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  47.  10
    A. O. Barut (1987). Irreversibility, Organization, and Self-Organization in Quantum Electrodynamics. Foundations of Physics 17 (6):549-559.
    QED is a fundamental microscopic theory satisfying all the conservation laws and discrete symmetries C, P, T. Yet, dissipative phenomena, organization, and self-organization occur even at this basic microscopic two-body level. How these processes come about and how they are described in QED is discussed. A possible new phase of QED due to self-energy effects leading to self-organization is predicted.
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  48.  6
    J. Boissonade (2009). Self-Organization Phenomena in Non-Equilibrium Chemical Systems. In Maryvonne Gérin & Marie-Christine Maurel (eds.), Origins of Life: Self-Organization and/or Biological Evolution? Edp Sciences 23--36.
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  49.  20
    János Szentágothai (1993). Self-Organization: The Basic Principle of Neural Functions. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (2).
    Recent neurophysiological observations are giving rise to the expectation that in the near future genuine biological experiments may contribute more than will premature speculations to the understanding of global and cognitive functions. The classical reflex principle — as the basis of neural functions — has to yield to new ideas, like autopoiesis and/or self-organization, as the basic paradigm in the framework of which the essence of the neural can be better understood. Neural activity starts in the very earliest stages (...)
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  50.  6
    George Székely (2000). Self-Organisation or Reflex Theory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):549-550.
    Neuromodelling is one of the techniques of modern neurosciences. The “at a distance” type of triadic synapse is probably the prevailing form of impulse transmission in many parts of the brain. If the genetically controlled cell-to-cell neuronal interconnections are abandoned, self-organisation may be the mechanism of structure formation in the brain. This assumption weakens the position of the reflex arc as the basic functional unit of nervous activities.
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