Search results for 'self-other merging' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joshua May (2011). Egoism, Empathy, and Self-Other Merging. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):25-39.score: 540.0
    [Emerging Scholar Prize Essay for Spindel Supplement] Some philosophers and psychologists have evaluated psychological egoism against recent experimental work in social psychology. Dan Batson (1991; forthcoming), in particular, argues that empathy tends to induce genuinely altruistic motives in humans. However, some argue that there are egoistic explanations of the data that remain unscathed. I focus here on some recent criticisms based on the idea of self-other merging or "oneness," primarily leveled by Robert Cialdini and his collaborators (1997). These (...)
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  2. Clay Splawn (2001). “The Self-Other Asymmetry and Act Utilitarianism.”. Utilitas 13 (3):323-333.score: 224.0
    The self-other asymmetry is a prominent and important feature of common-sense morality. It is also a feature that does not find a home in standard versions of act-utilitarianism. Theodore Sider has attempted to make a place for it by constructing a novel version of utilitarianism that incorporates the asymmetry into its framework. So far as I know, it is the best attempt to bring the two together. I argue, however, that Sider's ingenious attempt fails. I also offer a diagnosis (...)
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  3. Bernhard Hommel Lorenza S. Colzato, Ellen R. A. De Bruijn (2012). Up to “Me” or Up to “Us”? The Impact of Self-Construal Priming on Cognitive Self-Other Integration. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 224.0
    The degree to which people construe their perceived self as independent from or interdependent with their social environment can vary. We tested whether the current degree of social self-construal predicts the degree to which individuals integrate others into their self-concept. Participants worked through tasks that drew attention to either personal interdependence (e.g., by instructing participants to circle all relational pronouns in a text, such as “we”, “our”, or “us”) or independence (by having them to circle pronouns such as “I”, “my”, (...)
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  4. Ihor Karivets (2010). Is the Phenomenon of Non-Intentional "Self-Other" Relation Possible? In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), Analecta Husserliana. The Yearbook of Phenomenological Research. Volume CV. Springer. 209-220.score: 220.0
    This article is dedicated to possibility of overcoming the subject-object ontoligy, which is based on intentionality.The author proves that such dualism is rooted into the transcendental level. The transcendental level makes possible our empirical experience on the basis of subject-object relations. The author considers Parmenides' famous sentence "For it is the same thing that can be thought and that can be" and Husserl's well-known claim "Back to things themselves!" as essential for possibility of discovering non-intentional relation between Self and Other, (...)
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  5. Gerald Echterhoff Isabel Lindner, Cécile Schain, René Kopietz (2012). When Do We Confuse Self and Other in Action Memory? Reduced False Memories of Self-Performance After Observing Actions by an Out-Group Vs. In-Group Actor. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 204.0
    Observing another person performing an action can lead to a false memory of having performed the action oneself—the observation-inflation effect. In the experimental paradigm, participants first perform or do not perform simple actions, and then observe another person perform some of these actions. The observation-inflation effect is found when participants later remember performing actions that they have merely observed. In this case, self and other are confused in action memory. We examined social conditions of this self-other confusion when remembering (...)
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  6. Ed Cohen (2004). My Self as an Other: On Autoimmunity and “Other” Paradoxes. Medical Humanities 30 (1):7-11.score: 200.0
    The rubric autoimmunity currently encompasses sixty to seventy diverse illnesses which affect many of the tissues of the human body. Western medical practice asserts that the crisis known as autoimmune disease arises when a biological organism compromises its own integrity by misrecognising parts of itself as other than itself and then seeks to eliminate these unrecognised and hence antagonistic aspects of itself. That is, autoimmune illnesses seem to manifest the contradictory and sometimes deadly proposition that the “identity”: body/self both is (...)
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  7. Jack Reynolds (2004). Possible and Impossible, Self and Other, and the Reversibility of Merleau-Ponty and Derrida. Philosophy Today 48 (1):35-49.score: 200.0
    This essay examines some of Derrida’s most famous ‘possible-impossible’ aporias, including his discussions of giving, hospitality, forgiveness, and mourning. He argues that the condition of the possibility of such themes is also, and at once, the condition of their impossibility. In order to reveal the shared logic upon which these aporias rely, and also to raise some questions about their persuasive efficacy, it will be argued that of the two polarities evoked by each of his possible-impossible aporias, the ‘impossible’ term (...)
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  8. Kristin Zeiler (2009). Self and Other in Global Bioethics: Critical Hermeneutics and the Example of Different Death Concepts. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (2):137-145.score: 200.0
    Our approach to global bioethics will depend, among other things, on how we answer the questions whether global bioethics is possible and whether it, if it is possible, is desirable. Our approach to global bioethics will also vary depending on whether we believe that the required bioethical deliberation should take as its principal point of departure that which we have in common or that which we have in common and that on which we differ. The aim of this article is (...)
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  9. Michael J. Banissy & Jamie Ward (2013). Mechanisms of Self-Other Representations and Vicarious Experiences of Touch in Mirror-Touch Synesthesia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 196.0
  10. Arindam Chakrabarti (2011). Troubles with a Second Self: The Problem of Other Minds in 11th Century Indian and 20th Century Western Philosophy. ARGUMENT 1 (1):23-35.score: 192.0
    In contemporary Western analytic philosophy, the classic analogical argument explaining our knowledge of other minds has been rejected. But at least three alternative positive theories of our knowledge of the second person have been formulated: the theory-theory, the simulation theory and the theory of direct empathy. After sketching out the problems faced by these accounts of the ego’s access to the contents of the mind of a “second ego”, this paper tries to recreate one argument given by Abhinavagupta (Shaiva philosopher (...)
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  11. Shaun Nichols & Stephen P. Stich (2003). Mindreading. An Integrated Account of Pretence, Self-Awareness, and Understanding Other Minds. Oxford University Press.score: 170.0
    The everyday capacity to understand the mind, or 'mindreading', plays an enormous role in our ordinary lives. Shaun Nichols and Stephen Stich provide a detailed and integrated account of the intricate web of mental components underlying this fascinating and multifarious skill. The imagination, they argue, is essential to understanding others, and there are special cognitive mechanisms for understanding oneself. The account that emerges has broad implications for longstanding philosophical debates over the status of folk psychology. Mindreading is another trailblazing volume (...)
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  12. David Alm (2008). Deontological Restrictions and the Self/Other Asymmetry. Noûs 42 (4):642-672.score: 168.0
    This paper offers a partial justification of so-called "deontological restrictions." Specifically it defends the "self/other asymmetry," that we are morally obligated to treat our own agency, and thus its results, as specially important. The argument rests on a picture of moral obligation of a broadly Kantian sort. In particular, it rests on the basic normative assumption that our fundamental obligations are determined by the principles which a rational being as such would follow. These include principles which it is not essential (...)
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  13. Shiloh Whitney (2012). Affects, Images and Childlike Perception: Self-Other Difference in Merleau-Ponty's Sorbonne Lectures. Phaenex 7 (2):185-211.score: 168.0
    I begin by reviewing recent research by Merleau-Ponty scholars opposing aspects of the critique of Merleau-Ponty made by Meltzoff and colleagues based on their studies of neonate imitation. I conclude the need for reopening the case for infant self-other indistinction, starting with a re-examination of Merleau-Ponty’s notion of indistinction in the Sorbonne lectures, and attending especially to the role of affect and to the non-exclusivity of self-other distinction and indistinction. In undertaking that study, I discover the importance of (...)
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  14. Ursula Tidd (1999). The Self-Other Relation in Beauvoir’s Ethics and Autobiography. Hypatia 14 (4):163-174.score: 168.0
    : This article examines how some of Simone de Beauvoir's ethical notions about the Self-Other relation explored in her theoretical philosophy of the 1940s were developed in her subsequent autobiography. It argues that Beauvoir represents reciprocal alter-ity in these autobiographical texts through a testimonial engagement with autobiography conceptualized as an act of bearing witness for the Other, through the privileging of various interlocutors and privileged others with whom "the real" is experienced and through a negotiation with the reader. The (...)
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  15. Nancy Eisenberg & Michael J. Sulik (2012). Comment: Is Self–Other Overlap the Key to Understanding Empathy? Emotion Review 4 (1):34-35.score: 168.0
    Preston and Hofelich (2012) suggested that researchers disagree on the role of self–other overlap in empathy due to a failure to differentiate among neural overlap, subjective resonance, and personal distress; they also developed a framework for tying neural and subjective overlap to various aspects of functioning they include in the construct of empathy. Although we found their discussion of different processes that have been labeled empathy interesting and helpful, we found their discussion of self–other overlap to be somewhat less useful (...)
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  16. India Morrison (2012). Comment: A Trade-Off Between Broad and Specific Ideas of Neural Self–Other Overlap. Emotion Review 4 (1):36-37.score: 168.0
    Preston and Hofelich’s (2012) conceptualization of self–other overlap includes both neural and subjective levels, but neural overlap is given a central and necessary role in their model. The model’s broad scope includes many types of empathy phenomena and points to stable patterns and relationships among them. A self–other overlap idea that can cover such a range of phenomena makes gains in explanatory cohesiveness. This may come at the expense of specificity and predictive power in investigating particular neural systems implicated in (...)
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  17. Ruth H. Maki & Kevin D. McCaul (1985). The Effects of Self-Reference Versus Other Reference on the Recall of Traits and Nouns. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (3):169-172.score: 168.0
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  18. Patrick Crowley, Noreen Humble & Silvia M. Ross (eds.) (2011). Mediterranean Travels: Writing Self and Other From the Ancient World to Contemporary Society. Legenda/ Modern Humanities Research Association and Maney Publishing.score: 168.0
     
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  19. Takaki Makino (2008). Failure, Instead of Inhibition, Should Be Monitored for the Distinction of Self/Other and Actual/Possible Actions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):32-33.score: 168.0
    I suggest that layer 4 of the shared circuits model (SCM) should monitor the failure of performing an action, instead of output inhibition, to obtain actual/possible and self/other distinctions. The target article's assumption of selective inhibition leaves some questions unanswered, such as the criteria for the selection. Monitoring failure can answer these questions because failure does not require selection. It also provides a basis for more likely explanation for the phylogenetic and ontogenetic origin of both monitoring and output inhibition.
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  20. Paul Healy (2000). Self-Other Relations and the Rationality of Cultures. Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (6):61-83.score: 164.0
    As attested by Taylor, Calhoun and others, recognition is central to (cultural) identity and to a related sense of self-worth. In contrast, by denying the comparable worth of other cultures, non-recognition represents a potentially damaging mode of intercultural relations. Although not widely acknowledged, a related consideration has been at issue in the rationality debate, initiated by Peter Winch, throughout its several phases. Briefly stated, the problem is that the polarized alternatives of ethnocentric universalism and self-sealing relativism that have characterized this (...)
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  21. J. Decety & T. Chaminade (2003). When the Self Represents the Other: A New Cognitive Neuroscience View on Psychological Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):577-596.score: 160.0
    There is converging evidence from developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as from neuroscience, to suggest that the self is both special and social, and that self-other interaction is the driving force behind self-development. We review experimental findings which demonstrate that human infants are motivated for social interactions and suggest that the development of an awareness of other minds is rooted in the implicit notion that others are like the self. We then marshal evidence from functional neuroimaging explorations of (...)
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  22. Marek McGann & Hanne De Jaegher (2009). Self–Other Contingencies: Enacting Social Perception. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):417-437.score: 158.0
    Can we see the expressiveness of other people's gestures, hear the intentions in their voice, see the emotions in their posture? Traditional theories of social cognition still say we cannot because intentions and emotions for them are hidden away inside and we do not have direct access to them. Enactive theories still have no idea because they have so far mainly focused on perception of our physical world. We surmise, however, that the latter hold promise since, in trying to understand (...)
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  23. Christina M. Gschwandtner (2007). The Neighbor and the Infinite: Marion and Levinas on the Encounter Between Self, Human Other, and God. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 40 (3):231-249.score: 156.0
    In this article I examine Jean-Luc Marion's two-fold criticism of Emmanuel Levinas’ philosophy of other and self, namely that Levinas remains unable to overcome ontological difference in Totality and Infinity and does so successfully only with the notion of the appeal in Otherwise than Being and that his account of alterity is ambiguous in failing to distinguish clearly between human and divine other. I outline Levinas’ response to this criticism and then critically examine Marion's own account of subjectivity that attempts (...)
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  24. Christopher Cordner (2008). Foucault, Ethical Self-Concern and the Other. Philosophia 36 (4):593-609.score: 156.0
    In his later writings on ethics Foucault argues that rapport à soi – the relationship to oneself – is what gives meaning to our commitment to ‘moral behaviour’. In the absence of rapport à soi, Foucault believes, ethical adherence collapses into obedience to rules (‘an authoritarian structure’). I make a case, in broadly Levinasian terms, for saying that the call of ‘the other’ is fundamental to ethics. This prompts the question whether rapport à soi fashions an ethical subject who is (...)
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  25. Talia Welsh (2006). Do Neonates Display Innate Self-Awareness? Why Neonatal Imitation Fails to Provide Sufficient Grounds for Innate Self-and Other-Awareness. Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):221-238.score: 156.0
    Until the 1970s, models of early infancy tended to depict the young child as internally preoccupied and incapable of processing visual-tactile data from the external world. Meltzoff and Moore's groundbreaking studies of neonatal imitation disprove this characterization of early life: They suggest that the infant is cognizant of its external environment and is able to control its own body. Taking up these experiments, theorists argue that neonatal imitation provides an empirical justification for the existence of an innate ability to engage (...)
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  26. Simon Glynn (2005). The Atomistic Self Versus the Holistic Self in Structural Relation to the Other. Human Studies 28 (4):363 - 374.score: 156.0
    I argue that meaning or significanceper se, along with the capacity to be conscious thereof, and the values, motives and aspirations, etc. central to the constitution of our intrinsic personal identities, arise, as indeed do our extrinsic social identities, and our very self-consciousness as such, from socio-cultural structures and relations to others. However, so far from our identities and behavior therefore being determined, I argue that the capacity for critical reflection and evaluation emerge from these same structural relations, the more (...)
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  27. Andreas Wohlschläger, Kai Engbert & Patrick Haggard (2003). Intentionality as a Constituting Condition for the Own Self--And Other Selves. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):708-716.score: 156.0
    Introspectively, the awareness of actions includes the awareness of the intentions accompanying them. Therefore, the awareness of self-generated actions might be expected to differ from the awareness of other-generated actions to the extent that access to one's own and to other's intentions differs. However, we recently showed that the perceived onset times of self- vs. other-generated actions are similar, yet both are different from comparable events that are conceived as being generated by a machine. This similarity raises two interesting possibilities. (...)
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  28. Javier Saavedra Macías & Rafael Velez Núñez (2011). The Other Self: Psychopathology and Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):257-267.score: 156.0
    The figure of the “double” or the other self is an important topic in the history of literature. Many centuries before Jean Paul Richter coined the term, “doppelgänger,” at the beginning of the Romantic Movement in the year 1796, it is possible to find the figure of the double in myths and legends. The issue of the double emphaszses the contradictory character of the human being and invokes a sinister dimension of the psychological world, what has been called in German (...)
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  29. Nuala Brady Brendan Rooney, Helen Keyes (2012). Shared or Separate Mechanisms for Self-Face and Other-Face Processing? Evidence From Adaptation. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 156.0
    Evidence that self-face recognition is dissociable from general face recognition has important implications both for models of social cognition and for our understanding of face recognition. In two studies, we examine how adaptation affects the perception of personally familiar faces, and we use a visual adaptation paradigm to investigate whether the neural mechanisms underlying the recognition of one’s own and other faces are shared or separate. In Study 1 we show that the representation of personally familiar faces is rapidly updated (...)
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  30. Mingdi Xu, Fumitaka Homae, Ryu-Ichiro Hashimoto & Hiroko Hagiwara (2013). Acoustic Cues for the Recognition of Self-Voice and Other-Voice. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 156.0
    Self-recognition, being indispensable for successful social communication, has become a major focus in current social neuroscience. The physical aspects of the self are most typically manifested in the face and voice. Compared with the wealth of studies on self-face recognition, self-voice recognition (SVR) has not gained much attention. Converging evidence has suggested that the fundamental frequency (F0) and formant structures serve as the key acoustic cues for other-voice recognition (OVR). However, little is known about which, and how, acoustic cues are (...)
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  31. Jitendranath Mohanty (2000). The Self and its Other: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 156.0
    In Self and Other, J. N. Mohanty addresses contemporary questions of post-modernism without abandoning his fundamental stand on phenomenological method. The essays in this volume reveal a shift from an over-emphasis on identity in classical metaphysical thinking to an emphasis on differences without falling into the fogginess of post-modernism.
     
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  32. Brendan Rooney, Helen Keyes & Nuala Brady (2012). Shared or Separate Mechanisms for Self-Face and Other-Face Processing? Evidence From Adaptation. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 156.0
    Evidence that self-face recognition is dissociable from general face recognition has important implications both for models of social cognition and for our understanding of face recognition. In two studies, we examine how adaptation affects the perception of personally familiar faces, and we use a visual adaptation paradigm to investigate whether the neural mechanisms underlying the recognition of one’s own and other faces are shared or separate. In Study 1 we show that the representation of personally familiar faces is rapidly updated (...)
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  33. Vasudevi Reddy (2003). On Being the Object of Attention: Implications for Self-Other Consciousness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (9):397-402.score: 152.0
  34. John J. Drummond (2005). Self, Other, and Moral Obligation. Philosophy Today 49 (Supplement):39-47.score: 152.0
    This paper (1) questions the manner in which James Mensch's <I>Ethics and Selfhood: Alterity and the Phenomenology of Obligation<D> characterizes the alternatives among moral theories provided, for example, by Kant and Aristotle; (2) considers and criticizes the notion of "inherent alterity" that Mensch uses to articulate a middle ground in moral theory; and (3) offers an alternative phenomenology of obligation. The notion of "inherent alterity," standing on apparently opposed Husserlian and Levinasian legs, is, it is charged, ambiguous. I argue that (...)
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  35. Steven Brown Stuart W. G. Derbyshire, Jody Osborn (2013). Feeling the Pain of Others is Associated with Self-Other Confusion and Prior Pain Experience. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 152.0
    Some chronic pain patients and healthy individuals experience pain when observing injury or others in pain. To further understand shared pain, we investigated perspective taking, bodily ownership and tooth pain sensitivity. First, participants who reported shared pain (responders) and those who did not (non-responders) viewed an avatar on a screen. Intermittently, 0-3 circles appeared. Sometimes the participant's and avatar's perspective were consistent, both directly viewed the same circles, and sometimes inconsistent, both directly viewed different circles. Responders were faster than non-responders (...)
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  36. R. Peter Hobson (2004). Understanding Self and Other. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):109-110.score: 148.0
    Interpersonal understanding is rooted in social engagement. The question is: How? What features of intersubjective coordination are essential for the growth of concepts about the mind, and how does development proceed on this basis? Carpendale & Lewis (C&L) offer many telling insights, but their account begs questions about the earliest forms of self-other linkage and differentiation, especially as mediated by processes of identification.
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  37. Bindu Puri (2013). Freedom and the Dynamics of the Self and the 'Other'; Re-Constructing the Debate Between Tagore and Gandhi. Sophia 52 (2):335-357.score: 148.0
    Tagore and Gandhi shared a relationship across 26 years. They argued about many things including the means for the attainment of swaraj/freedom. In terms of this central concern with the nature of freedom they came fairly close to an issue that has perhaps dominated the (European) Enlightenment. For the Enlightenment has sought to clarify what is meant by individual freedom and attempted to secure such freedom to the individual. This article argues that the Tagore-Gandhi debate can perhaps be reconstructed around (...)
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  38. Steve Bein (2008). Self Power, Other Power, and Non-Dualism in Japanese Buddhism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 6:7-13.score: 148.0
    A traditional distinction is made in scholarship on Japanese Buddhism between two means for attaining enlightenment: jiriki 自力, or "self power," and tariki 他力, or "other power." Dōgen's Sōtō Zen is the paradigmatic example of a jiriki school: according to Dōgen, one attains enlightenment through strenuous zazen and rigorous ascetic practices. Shinran's Jōdo Shin Buddhism is the paradigmatic example of a tariki school: according to Shinran, human beings are incapable of self-salvation, but by chanting the nembutsu they can invoke the (...)
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  39. William McEvoy (2009). 'Leaving a Space for the Non-Theorizable': Self and Other in Hélène Cixous's Writing for the Theatre. The European Legacy 14 (1):19-30.score: 148.0
    This essay argues that Hélène Cixous's writings on theatre demonstrate an ongoing concern with the non-theorizable as a fundamental element of her experience of theatre. This creates a tension between Cixous's role as a theorist and her role as a creative writer, and this essay explores how this tension manifests itself in her reflections on theatre. It looks at the strategies Cixous adopts to allow the non-theoretical to inflect her critical and creative writing, focusing on her denial of specialist knowledge (...)
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  40. Stephanie Preston & Alicia J. Hofelich (2012). The Many Faces of Empathy: Parsing Emathic Phenomena Through a Proximate, Dynamic-Systems View Reprsenting the Other in the Self. Emotion Review 4 (1):24-33.score: 148.0
    A surfeit of research confirms that people activate personal, affective, and conceptual representations when perceiving the states of others. However, researchers continue to debate the role of self–other overlap in empathy due to a failure to dissociate neural overlap, subjective resonance, and personal distress. A perception–action view posits that neural-level overlap is necessary during early processing for all social understanding, but need not be conscious or aversive. This neural overlap can subsequently produce a variety of states depending on the context (...)
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  41. Liane Gabora, Self-Other Organization: Why Early Life Did Not Evolve Through Natural Selection.score: 146.0
    The improbability of a spontaneously generated self-assembling molecule has suggested that life began with a set of simpler, collectively replicating elements, such as an enclosed autocatalytic set of polymers (or autocell). Since replication occurs without a self-assembly code, acquired characteristics are inherited. Moreover, there is no strict distinction between alive and dead; one can only infer that an autocell was alive if it replicates. These features of early life render natural selection inapplicable to the description of its change-of-state because they (...)
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  42. Tamra Wright (2014). Self, Other, God: 20<sup>th≪/Sup>century Jewish Philosophy. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:149-169.score: 146.0
    Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig and Emmanuel Levinas are three of the most prominent Jewish philosophers of the 20th century. This paper looks at the different understandings each author offers of intersubjectivity and authentic self-hood and questions the extent to which for each author God plays a role in interpersonal relationships.
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  43. Jovan Babic (2006). Self-Regarding / Other-Regarding Acts: Some Remarks. Prolegomena 5 (2):193-207.score: 144.0
    In his essay On Liberty, John Stuart Mill presents the famous harm principle in the following manner: “[…] the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self-protection. […] The only part of the conduct of anyone, for which he is amenable to society, is that which concerns others. […] Over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign.” Hence, there is a (...)
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  44. Dan Zahavi (2007). Self and Other: The Limits of Narrative Understanding. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 82 (60):179-.score: 144.0
    If the self – as a popular view has it – is a narrative construction, if it arises out of discursive practices, it is reasonable to assume that the best possible avenue to self-understanding will be provided by those very narratives. If I want to know what it means to be a self, I should look closely at the stories that I and others tell about myself, since these stories constitute who I am. In the following I wish to question (...)
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  45. Philip J. Kain (1998). Self-Consciousness, the Other and Hegel's Dialectic of Recognition: Alternative to a Postmodern Subterfuge. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (5):105-126.score: 144.0
    This article examines Hegel's treatment of self-consciousness in light of the contemporary problem of the other. It argues that Hegel tries to subvert the Kantian opposition between theoretical and practical reason and tries to establish a form of idealism that can avoid solipsism. All of this requires that Hegel get beyond the Kantian concept of the object - or the other. Hegel attempts to establish an other that is not marginalized, dominated, or negated. What he gives us is a valuable (...)
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  46. Gregory Brown (2011). Disinterested Love: Understanding Leibniz's Reconciliation of Self- and Other-Regarding Motives. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (2):265-303.score: 144.0
    While he was in the employ of the Elector of Mainz, between 1668 and 1671, Leibniz produced a series of important studies in natural law. One of these, dated between 1670 and 1671, is especially noteworthy since it contains Leibniz's earliest sustained attempt to develop an account of justice. Central to this account is the notion of what Leibniz would later come to call `disinterested love', a notion that remained essentially unchanged in Leibniz's work from this period to the end (...)
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  47. M. H. Gendel, E. Brooks, S. R. Early, D. C. Gundersen, S. L. Dubovsky, S. L. Dilts & J. H. Shore (2012). Self-Prescribed and Other Informal Care Provided by Physicians: Scope, Correlations and Implications. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):294-298.score: 144.0
    Background While it is generally acknowledged that self-prescribing among physicians poses some risk, research finds such behaviour to be common and in certain cases accepted by the medical community. Largely absent from the literature is knowledge about other activities doctors perform for their own medical care or for the informal treatment of family and friends. This study examined the variety, frequency and association of behaviours doctors report providing informally. Informal care included prescriptions, as well as any other type of personal (...)
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  48. Bindu Puri (2011). The Self and the Other: Liberalism and Gandhi. Philosophia 39 (4):673-698.score: 144.0
    This paper makes an attempt to philosophically re-construct what I have termed as a fundamental paradox at the heart of deontological liberalism. It is argued that liberalism attempts to create the possibilities of rational consensus and of bringing people together socially and politically by developing methodologies which overcome the divisive nature of essentially parochial substantive conceptions of the good. Such methodologies relying on the supposed universally valid dictates of reason and notions of procedural rationality proceed by disengaging men from the (...)
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  49. Ilan Gur-Ze'ev (2001). The Production of Self and the Destruction of the Other's Memory and Identity in Israeli/Palestinian Education on the Holocaust/Nakbah. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):255-266.score: 144.0
    This paper characterizes a present institutionalizedunwillingness of both the Israeli and Palestinian educationalsystems to acknowledge each other's suffering because of the presenceof what the author terms `the otherness of the other.' This isdone largely through hegemonic control of memory of genocidesendured by both and through limiting constructions of the self.Coming to terms with `each other' paves the way for ahumanistic-oriented counter-education, one based in mutualacknowledgment and open dialogue.
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  50. Dilip Ninan (2013). Self‐Location and Other‐Location. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 87 (1):301-331.score: 144.0
    According to one tradition in the philosophy of language and mind, the content of a psychological attitude can be characterized by a set of possibilities. On the classic version of this account, advocated by Hintikka (1962) and Stalnaker (1984) among others, the possibilities in question are possible worlds, ways the universe might be. Lewis (1979, 1983a) proposed an alternative to this account, according to which the possibilities in question are possible individuals or centered worlds, ways an individual might be. The (...)
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