Search results for 'self-preservation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Patricia Sheridan (2012). Resisting the Scaffold: Self-Preservation and Limits of Obligation in Hobbes's Leviathan. Hobbes Studies 24 (2):137-157.score: 240.0
    The degree to which Hobbes's citizenry retains its right to resist sovereign power has been the source of a significant debate. It has been argued by a number of scholars that there is a clear avenue for legitimate rebellion in Hobbes's state, as described in the Leviathan - in this work, Hobbes asserts that subjects can retain their natural right to self-preservation in civil society, and that this represents an inalienable right that cannot, under any circumstances, be transferred to (...)
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  2. Andrew Youpa (2003). Spinozistic Self-Preservation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):477-490.score: 240.0
    In Part 4 of his "Ethics," Spinoza puts forward and defends what might appear to be the controversial Hobbesean thesis that the desire to prolong one’s life is the basis of virtue (i.e., E4p22). Indeed there is a tradition of commentators offering an egoistic, Hobbesean interpretation of Spinoza’s ethical theory. In this paper, however, I argue that we should not understand Spinozistic self-preservation in the commonsense, empiricist sense of prolonging our lives. Instead I argue that, for Spinoza, self-preservation (...)
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  3. Mitchell Gabhart (1999). Spinoza on Self-Preservation and Self-Destruction. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (4):613-628.score: 198.0
  4. Frederick Ochieng'-odhiambo (2005). International Justice and Individual Self-Preservation. Journal of Global Ethics 1 (2):99 – 112.score: 180.0
    The article explores the fundamental difference between two aspects of justice: international and global. It is then argued that for the sake of global justice, the difference can be overcome by taking a closer look at the basic human right of self-preservation in relation to moral agency, human well-being and social/distributive justice at both global and national levels. In an endeavour to attain global justice, the article defends an absolute moral right to a human minimum.
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  5. Mary B. Mahowald (2004). Self-Preservation: An Argument for Therapeutic Cloning, and a Strategy for Fostering Respect for Moral Integrity. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):56-66.score: 180.0
    The issues of human cloning and stem cell retrieval are inseparable in circumstances in which the rationale of self-preservation may be invoked as a negative right. I apply this rationale to a hypothetical case in which cloning is necessary to preserve the bodily integrity or life of an individual. Self-preservation as moral integrity is examined in a narrower context, i.e., as applicable to those for whom deliberate termination of embryonic life is morally-problematic. This issue is addressed through comparison (...)
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  6. Whiting Jennifer (2013). Love: Self-Propagation, Self-Preservation, or Ekstasis? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):403-429.score: 180.0
    (2013). Love: self-propagation, self-preservation, or ekstasis? Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 43, No. 4, pp. 403-429.
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  7. C. D. Meyers (2013). Hobbes and the Rationality of Self-Preservation: Grounding Morality on the Desires We Should Have. The European Legacy 18 (3):269-286.score: 180.0
    In deriving his moral code, Hobbes does not appeal to any mind-independent good, natural human telos, or innate human sympathies. Instead he assumes a subjectivist theory of value and an egoistic theory of human motivation. Some critics, however, doubt that his laws of nature can be constructed from such scant material. Hobbes ultimately justifies the acceptance of moral laws by the fact that they promote self-preservation. But, as Hobbes himself acknowledges, not everyone prefers survival over natural liberty. In this (...)
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  8. Eleanor Curran (2006). Can Rights Curb the Hobbesian Sovereign? The Full Right to Self-Preservation, Duties of Sovereignty and the Limitations of Hohfeld. Law and Philosophy 25 (2):243-265.score: 150.0
  9. J. David Newell (1991). Assisted Suicide and the Ethics of Self-Preservation. HEC Forum 3 (6):321-328.score: 150.0
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  10. Helen Pringle & Robert Lawton (1993). A Life Well Lost? Hobbes and Self-Preservation. Hobbes Studies 6 (1):58-79.score: 150.0
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  11. Justin Oakley (forthcoming). Can Self-Preservation Be Virtuous in Disaster Situations? Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101631.score: 150.0
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  12. Brian Stoffell (1991). Hobbes on Self-Preservation and Suicide. Hobbes Studies 4 (1):26-33.score: 150.0
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  13. Pamela Lyon (2011). 6To Be or Not To Be: Where Is Self-Preservation in Evolutionary Theory? In Brett Calcott & Kim Sterelny (eds.), The Major Transitions in Evolution Revisited. Mit Press.score: 150.0
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  14. L. Andrasik (1998). Virtual Life and Perpetualogy (Self-Preservation of Virtual Entities in Computational Technology). Filozofia 53 (1):15-26.score: 150.0
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  15. J. Thomas Cook (1986). Self-Knowledge as Self-Preservation?. In. In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer. 191--210.score: 150.0
  16. J. E. V. Hafner (2000). Is Environmental Ethics a Collective Egoism of Mankind?: Philosophical Investigation on the Difference Between Self-Conservation and Self-Preservation. Analecta Husserliana 68:103-114.score: 150.0
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  17. Richard Löwenthal (1963). The Role of Ideology for the Self-Preservation of a Totalitarian Regime. Studies in East European Thought 3 (3):179-183.score: 150.0
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  18. Virpi Mäkinen (2010). Self-Preservation and Natural Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Political Thought. In , The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. The Philosophical Society of Finland.score: 150.0
  19. Dinesh Joseph Wadiwel (2014). The Will for Self-Preservation: Locke and Derrida on Dominion, Property and Animals. Substance 43 (2):148-161.score: 150.0
    “Consider, once more, the universal cannibalism of the sea; all of whose creatures prey upon each other, carrying on eternal war since the world began”Despite the strong growth of animal studies within the academy, fundamental critiques of human utilization of animals remain, arguably, on the margins. Classic analytic approaches, such as that advanced by Peter Singer (1975) and Tom Regan (1983), while having a powerful shaping effect on the language of animal advocacy, have been slow to dent academic endeavor, and (...)
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  20. Carolyn McLeod (2004). Integrity and Self-Protection. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):216–232.score: 96.0
    Self-protection seems to be negatively correlated with integrity on the standard conception of that virtue. To be self-protective is to lose some of our integrity. In this paper, I pursue the somewhat unlikely claim that a certain amount of self-protection is consistent with integrity and is even required by it in many circumstances.
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  21. Hilary Kathleen Sloan (2011). Joy. Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (4):419-431.score: 90.0
    Joy is often mentioned in discussion of theories of hedonism, happiness, desire, or religion, but is rarely considered in itself. Consequently, much about the nature of joy remains unclear. Is it, for example, a distinctive state? A feeling? An emotion? Why is it experienced? Does it have a functional role? Through discussion of joy's nature, role, and importance, it will be demonstrated that joy can indeed be defined: as an intense, positively-valenced emotion, whose inherent connection to the desire for (...) renders it inappropriate for providing the basis for theories of morality. (shrink)
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  22. Michael Lebuffe (2004). Why Spinoza Tells People to Try to Preserve Their Being. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 86 (2):119-145.score: 88.0
    It is puzzling that Spinoza both urges people to seek to preserve themselves and also holds that, as a matter of fact, people do strive to preserve themselves. I argue that the striving for self-preservation that characterizes all individuals grounds, for Spinoza, the claim that human beings seek only whatever they anticipate will lead to pleasure (laetitia). People desire ends other than self-preservation because they anticipate pleasure in those ends, and Spinoza urges people to seek to preserve themselves (...)
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  23. Kelly Rogers (ed.) (1997). Self-Interest: An Anthology of Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge.score: 72.0
    Human beings naturally care a great deal for themselves--and couldn't survive otherwise. As Aquinas observed, the drive for self-preservation is the first law of nature. Yet in the imperative of self-love, philosophers have also perceived a tacit threat. Plato reminds us that 'the excessive love of self is in reality the source to each man of all offences.' And so the inevitability of self- concern must be balanced with its manifest potential for harm. But how is such a reconciliation (...)
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  24. Victoria N. Alexander (2013). Creativity: Self-Referential Mistaking, Not Negating. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (2):253-272.score: 72.0
    In C. S. Peirce, as well as in the work of many biosemioticians, the semiotic object is sometimes described as a physical “object” with material properties and sometimes described as an “ideal object” or mental representation. I argue that to the extent that we can avoid these types of characterizations we will have a more scientific definition of sign use and will be able to better integrate the various fields that interact with biosemiotics. In an effort to end Cartesian dualism (...)
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  25. Frank Lucash (2012). Spinoza on Friendship. Philosophia 40 (2):305-317.score: 62.0
    Friendships have always been one of the most valuable assets in the lives of human beings, and friendships were of utmost importance to Spinoza. There are different kinds of friendship but for Spinoza genuine friendship can only occur among those who pursue the truth. In this paper I will (1) point out what Spinoza means by the truth, (2) show how friendships are possible even though there is tension in our lives between our desire to preserve ourselves and our desire (...)
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  26. Hsien-Hsien Chiang, Mei-Bih Chen & I.-Ling Sue (2007). Self-State of Nurses in Caring for Sars Survivors. Nursing Ethics 14 (1):18-26.score: 60.0
    The aim of this study was to analyze nurses' experiences of role strain when taking care of patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). We adopted an interpretive/constructivist paradigm. Twenty-one nurses who had taken care of SARS patients were interviewed in focus groups. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The self-state of nurses during the SARS outbreak evolved into that of professional self as: (1) self-preservation; (2) self-mirroring; and (3) self-transcendence. The relationship between self-state and reflective practice is (...)
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  27. Marisa Vento (2012). O movimento de expansão E a generalização do interesse E da vontade. Cadernos de Ética E Filosofia Política 21:233-243.score: 60.0
    O estudo aqui apresentado propõe uma interpretação do amor de si como o pathos primordial, da forma como Rousseau o pressentiu.
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  28. Kelly Rogers (ed.) (1997). Self-Interest: An Anthology of Philosophical Perspectives From Antiquity to the Present. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Self-Interest discusses the reconciliation of inevitable self-concern with its manifest potential for harm. This anthology brings together the efforts of twenty three renown philosophers to address the matter of how to bring about such a reconciliation. The drive for self-preservation, as observed by Aquinas, is the first law of nature. With this self-love, however, comes the threat of "the excessive love of self". Self-Interest brings into discussion the reconciliation of necessary self-concern with its manifest potential for harm. This anthology (...)
     
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  29. Alin Cristian (2008). Fixating the World's Most Caring Cornerstone: Heidegger on Self-Sacrifice. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (1):1-9.score: 54.0
    Prior to having its authenticity and transparency examined the openness of human existence may be said to need preservation as is, regardless of its receptivity and responsiveness to the truth of Being. Paradoxically, in self-sacrifice the fulfilment of Dasein’s ownmost potentiality-for-being is dependent upon a most radical disowning of itself. This investigation approaches self-sacrifice on the basis of its analogy with the creation of the work of art – as the peculiar fixation of the existing, already disclosed world of everydayness (...)
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  30. Mathew Humphrey (2002). Preservation Versus the People?: Nature, Humanity, and Political Philosophy. OUP Oxford.score: 54.0
    Why should any society take the decision to devote scarce resources, as a matter of public policy, to preserving natural objects? This is one of the questions considered in the field of environmental ethics, and the thinking that has taken place in this discipline has been dominated by the 'ecocentric-anthropocentric' distinction. Answers focus on either 'intrinsic values in nature', or on the human welfare benefits that will accrue from preservationist policies. These two answers are generally taken to be both mutually (...)
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  31. A. MishAra (2007). Is Minimal Self Preserved in Schizophrenia? A Subcomponents View☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):715-721.score: 50.0
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  32. Eva Mark (2001). Is the Self of the Infant Preserved in the Adult? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):347-353.score: 40.0
    What does a confrontation between philosophy and psychoanalysis look like? My task is a philosophical investigation of a psychoanalytic concept. Thus, I offer a conceptual analysis of a concept that is used both clinically and as a part of a metapsychology. The concept that I investigate in this article is regression. I work with the following two problems: What does a conceptual analysis of the phenomenon called regression look like? Regression can be regarded as an instrument that can give us (...)
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  33. Endestad Tor (2011). Preserved Attenuation of the N1-Response to Self-Initiated Relative to Externally Initiated Sounds in Patients with Focal Cerebellar Lesions Due to Tumor Resection in Childhood. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 40.0
  34. Dorit Bar-On (2004). Speaking My Mind: Expression and Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 38.0
    Dorit Bar-On develops and defends a novel view of avowals and self-knowledge. Drawing on resources from the philosophy of language, the theory of action, epistemology, and the philosophy of mind, she offers original and systematic answers to many long-standing questions concerning our ability to know our own minds. We are all very good at telling what states of mind we are in at a given moment. When it comes to our own present states of mind, what we say goes; an (...)
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  35. Sanford C. Goldberg (1997). The Very Idea of Computer Self-Knowledge and Self-Deception. Minds and Machines 7 (4):515-529.score: 38.0
    Do computers have beliefs? I argue that anyone who answers in the affirmative holds a view that is incompatible with what I shall call the commonsense approach to the propositional attitudes. My claims shall be two. First,the commonsense view places important constraints on what can be acknowledged as a case of having a belief. Second, computers – at least those for which having a belief would be conceived as having a sentence in a belief box – fail to satisfy some (...)
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  36. Hans Lindahl (2008). Collective Self-Legislation as an Actus Impurus : A Response to Heidegger's Critique of European Nihilism. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 41 (3):323-343.score: 38.0
    Heidegger’s critique of European nihilism seeks to expose self-legislation as the governing principle of central manifestations of modernity such as science, technology, and the interpretation of art as aesthetics. Need we accept the conclusion that modern constitutional democracies are intrinsically nihilistic, insofar as they give political and legal form to the principle of collective self-legislation? An answer to this question turns on the concept of power implied in constituent and constituted power. A confrontation of the genealogies of modern subjectivity proposed (...)
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  37. Kate A. Moran (2014). Delusions of Virtue: Kant on Self-Conceit. Kantian Review 19 (3):419-447.score: 38.0
    Little extended attention has been given to Kantnkel), though it appears throughout his theoretical and practical philosophy. Authors who discuss self-conceit often describe it as a kind of imperiousness or arrogance in which the conceited agent seeks to impose selfish principles upon others, or sees others as worthless. I argue that these features of self-conceit are symptoms of a deeper and more thoroughgoing failure. Self-conceit is best described as the tendency to insist upon one to oneself or to others s (...)
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  38. Mingdi Xu, Fumitaka Homae, Ryu-Ichiro Hashimoto & Hiroko Hagiwara (2013). Acoustic Cues for the Recognition of Self-Voice and Other-Voice. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 38.0
    Self-recognition, being indispensable for successful social communication, has become a major focus in current social neuroscience. The physical aspects of the self are most typically manifested in the face and voice. Compared with the wealth of studies on self-face recognition, self-voice recognition (SVR) has not gained much attention. Converging evidence has suggested that the fundamental frequency (F0) and formant structures serve as the key acoustic cues for other-voice recognition (OVR). However, little is known about which, and how, acoustic cues are (...)
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  39. Kate Moran (2014). Delusions of Virtue: Kant on Self-Conceit. Kantian Review 19 (3):419-447.score: 38.0
    Little extended attention has been given to Kantnkel), though it appears throughout his theoretical and practical philosophy. Authors who discuss self-conceit often describe it as a kind of imperiousness or arrogance in which the conceited agent seeks to impose selfish principles upon others, or sees others as worthless. I argue that these features of self-conceit are symptoms of a deeper and more thoroughgoing failure. Self-conceit is best described as the tendency to insist upon one to oneself or to others s (...)
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  40. Black Hawk Hancock & Roberta Garner (2014). Erving Goffman: Theorizing the Self in the Age of Advanced Consumer Capitalism. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (3).score: 38.0
    The authors argue that Erving Goffman developed concepts that contribute to an understanding of historical changes in the construction of the self and enable us to see the new forms that self-construction is taking in a society driven by consumption, marketing, and media. These concepts include: commercial realism; dramatic scripting; hyper-ritualization; the glimpse; and the dissolution or undermining of the real, the authentic, and the autonomous. By placing Goffman's under-discussed work, Gender Advertisements, in rapprochement with the work of Guy Debord, (...)
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  41. Sanford C. Goldberg (2007). Anti-Individualism, Content Preservation, and Discursive Justification. Nos 41 (2):178�203.score: 36.0
    Most explorations of the epistemic implications of Semantic Anti- Individualism (SAI) focus on issues of self-knowledge (first-person au- thority) and/or external-world skepticism. Less explored has been SAIs implications forthe epistemology of reasoning. In this paperI argue that SAI has some nontrivial implications on this score. I bring these out by reflecting on a problem first raised by Boghossian (1992). Whereas Boghos- sians main interest was in establishing the incompatibility of SAI and the a priority of logical abilities (Boghossian 1992: 22), (...)
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  42. Linda Martin Alcoff, Knowing Self in Power and Truth.score: 36.0
    In her book, Real Knowing (Cornell UP, 1996), and in many articles, she argues, in opposition to many post-structuralists and pragmatists, for the preservation of a notion of truth as partly referential albeit inextricably tied to a context. Furthermore, and in connection to this, she also critiques pure proceduralism in the normative dimension, defending instead a notion of normativity that is substantive but context related, thus, not universal or absolute.
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  43. Lisa Bortolotti & Rochelle Cox (2009). Faultless Ignorance: Strengths and Limitations of Epistemic Definitions of Confabulation. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):952-965.score: 36.0
    There is no satisfactory account for the general phenomenon of confabulation, for the following reasons: (1) confabulation occurs in a number of pathological and non-pathological conditions; (2) impairments giving rise to confabulation are likely to have different neural bases; and (3) there is no unique theory explaining the aetiology of confabulations. An epistemic approach to defining confabulation could solve all of these issues, by focusing on the surface features of the phenomenon. However, existing epistemic accounts are unable to offer sufficient (...)
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  44. Gilbert F. LaFreniere (1997). Greenline Parks in France: Les Parcs Naturels Régionaux. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 14 (4):337-352.score: 36.0
    Greenline parks are typically regions of mixed agricultural,grazing, and forest lands of sufficient scenic and/orecological value to merit conservation and preservationunder a land-use management plan for land largely in privateownership. The Parcs Naturels Régionaux (PNR) are anational system of greenline parks created in France in1967 to protect agriculture and other values in less favoredareas (typically hills or low mountains) suffering depopulationand economic deprivation aggravated by the Common AgriculturalPolicy created under the European Economic Community in 1956with a major objective of self-sufficiency (...)
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  45. Michael Cholbi (2009). The Murderer at the Door: What Kant Should Have Said. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (1):17-46.score: 30.0
    Embarrassed by the apparent rigorism Kant expresses so bluntly in 'On a Supposed Right to Lie,' numerous contemporary Kantians have attempted to show that Kant's ethics can justify lying in specific circumstances, in particular, when lying to a murderer is necessary in order to prevent her from killing another innocent person. My aim is to improve upon these efforts and show that lying to prevent the death of another innocent person could be required in Kantian terms. I argue (1) that (...)
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  46. Renaud Barbaras (2008). Life, Movement, and Desire. Research in Phenomenology 38 (1):3-17.score: 30.0
    In French, the verb "to live" designates both being alive and the experience of something. This ambiguity has a philosophical meaning. The task of a phenomenology of life is to describe an originary sense of living from which the very distinction between life in the intransitive sense and life in the transitive, or intentional, sense proceeds. Hans Jonas is one of those rare authors who has tried to give an account of the specificity of life instead of reducing life to (...)
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  47. Matthias Kiesselbach (2011). Hobbes's Struggle with Contractual Obligation. On the Status of the Laws of Nature in Hobbes's Work. Hobbes Studies 23 (2):105-123.score: 30.0
    This paper argues that throughout his intellectual career, Hobbes remains unsatisfied with his own attempts at proving the invariant advisability of contract-keeping. Not only does he see himself forced to abandon his early idea that contractual obligation is a matter of physical laws. He also develops and retains doubts concerning its theoretical successor, the doctrine that the obligatoriness characteristic of contracts is the interest in self-preservation in alliance with instrumental reason - i.e. prudence. In fact, it is during his (...)
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  48. Lara Denis (2008). Animality and Agency: A Kantian Approach to Abortion. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):117-37.score: 30.0
    This paper situates abortion in the context of women’s duties to themselves. I argue that Kant’s fundamental moral requirement (found in the formula of humanity) to respect oneself as a rational being, combined with Kant’s view of our animal nature, form the basis for a view of pregnancy and abortion that focuses on women’s agency and moral character without diminishing the importance of their bodies and emotions. The Kantian view of abortion that emerges takes abortion to be morally problematic, but (...)
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  49. John Hawthorne & Daniel Nolan (2006). What Would Teleological Causation Be? In , Metaphysical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    As is well known, Aristotelian natural philosophy, and many other systems of natural philosophy since, have relied heavily on teleology and teleological causation. Somehow, the purpose or end of an obj ect can be used to predict and explain what that object does: once you know that the end of an acorn is to become an oak, and a few things about what sorts of circumstances are conducive to the attainment of this end, you can predict a lot about the (...)
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  50. Hanne Andrea Kraugerud (2010). 'Essentially Social'? A Discussion of the Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):481-494.score: 30.0
    Abstract: The spirited part, thumos, plays a complex and often disputed role in Plato's account of the soul. The doctrine of the soul as specifically tri-partitioned seems to depend on a substantial conception of thumos as fundamental and non-reducible. Building on John Cooper's contribution in the discussion of the topic, this article aims to show that the role of thumos is characterised by an indispensable, deep-rooted urge for dignified self-preservation. The view is supported by Plato's own examples, and discussed (...)
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