Search results for 'self-preservation' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Patricia Sheridan (2012). Resisting the Scaffold: Self-Preservation and Limits of Obligation in Hobbes's Leviathan. Hobbes Studies 24 (2):137-157.score: 90.0
    The degree to which Hobbes's citizenry retains its right to resist sovereign power has been the source of a significant debate. It has been argued by a number of scholars that there is a clear avenue for legitimate rebellion in Hobbes's state, as described in the Leviathan - in this work, Hobbes asserts that subjects can retain their natural right to self-preservation in civil society, and that this represents an inalienable right that cannot, under any circumstances, be transferred to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Andrew Youpa (2003). Spinozistic Self-Preservation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):477-490.score: 90.0
    In Part 4 of his "Ethics," Spinoza puts forward and defends what might appear to be the controversial Hobbesean thesis that the desire to prolong one’s life is the basis of virtue (i.e., E4p22). Indeed there is a tradition of commentators offering an egoistic, Hobbesean interpretation of Spinoza’s ethical theory. In this paper, however, I argue that we should not understand Spinozistic self-preservation in the commonsense, empiricist sense of prolonging our lives. Instead I argue that, for Spinoza, self-preservation (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Frederick Ochieng'-odhiambo (2005). International Justice and Individual Self-Preservation. Journal of Global Ethics 1 (2):99 – 112.score: 60.0
    The article explores the fundamental difference between two aspects of justice: international and global. It is then argued that for the sake of global justice, the difference can be overcome by taking a closer look at the basic human right of self-preservation in relation to moral agency, human well-being and social/distributive justice at both global and national levels. In an endeavour to attain global justice, the article defends an absolute moral right to a human minimum.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Mary B. Mahowald (2004). Self-Preservation: An Argument for Therapeutic Cloning, and a Strategy for Fostering Respect for Moral Integrity. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):56-66.score: 60.0
    The issues of human cloning and stem cell retrieval are inseparable in circumstances in which the rationale of self-preservation may be invoked as a negative right. I apply this rationale to a hypothetical case in which cloning is necessary to preserve the bodily integrity or life of an individual. Self-preservation as moral integrity is examined in a narrower context, i.e., as applicable to those for whom deliberate termination of embryonic life is morally-problematic. This issue is addressed through comparison (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Whiting Jennifer (2013). Love: Self-Propagation, Self-Preservation, or Ekstasis? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):403-429.score: 60.0
    (2013). Love: self-propagation, self-preservation, or ekstasis? Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 43, No. 4, pp. 403-429.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. C. D. Meyers (2013). Hobbes and the Rationality of Self-Preservation: Grounding Morality on the Desires We Should Have. The European Legacy 18 (3):269-286.score: 60.0
    In deriving his moral code, Hobbes does not appeal to any mind-independent good, natural human telos, or innate human sympathies. Instead he assumes a subjectivist theory of value and an egoistic theory of human motivation. Some critics, however, doubt that his laws of nature can be constructed from such scant material. Hobbes ultimately justifies the acceptance of moral laws by the fact that they promote self-preservation. But, as Hobbes himself acknowledges, not everyone prefers survival over natural liberty. In this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Eleanor Curran (2006). Can Rights Curb the Hobbesian Sovereign? The Full Right to Self-Preservation, Duties of Sovereignty and the Limitations of Hohfeld. Law and Philosophy 25 (2):243-265.score: 45.0
  8. Mitchell Gabhart (1999). Spinoza on Self-Preservation and Self-Destruction. Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (4):613-628.score: 45.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. J. David Newell (1991). Assisted Suicide and the Ethics of Self-Preservation. HEC Forum 3 (6):321-328.score: 45.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Hilary Kathleen Sloan (2011). Joy. Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (4):419-431.score: 45.0
    Joy is often mentioned in discussion of theories of hedonism, happiness, desire, or religion, but is rarely considered in itself. Consequently, much about the nature of joy remains unclear. Is it, for example, a distinctive state? A feeling? An emotion? Why is it experienced? Does it have a functional role? Through discussion of joy's nature, role, and importance, it will be demonstrated that joy can indeed be defined: as an intense, positively-valenced emotion, whose inherent connection to the desire for (...) renders it inappropriate for providing the basis for theories of morality. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Helen Pringle & Robert Lawton (1993). A Life Well Lost? Hobbes and Self-Preservation. Hobbes Studies 6 (1):58-79.score: 45.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Brian Stoffell (1991). Hobbes on Self-Preservation and Suicide. Hobbes Studies 4 (1):26-33.score: 45.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. L. Andrasik (1998). Virtual Life and Perpetualogy (Self-Preservation of Virtual Entities in Computational Technology). Filozofia 53 (1):15-26.score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. J. Thomas Cook (1986). Self-Knowledge as Self-Preservation?. In. In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer. 191--210.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. J. E. V. Hafner (2000). Is Environmental Ethics a Collective Egoism of Mankind?: Philosophical Investigation on the Difference Between Self-Conservation and Self-Preservation. Analecta Husserliana 68:103-114.score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Richard Löwenthal (1963). The Role of Ideology for the Self-Preservation of a Totalitarian Regime. Studies in East European Thought 3 (3):179-183.score: 45.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Pamela Lyon (2011). 6To Be or Not To Be: Where Is Self-Preservation in Evolutionary Theory? In Brett Calcott & Kim Sterelny (eds.), The Major Transitions in Evolution Revisited. Mit Press.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Virpi Mäkinen (2010). Self-Preservation and Natural Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Political Thought. In , The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. The Philosophical Society of Finland.score: 45.0
  19. Justin Oakley (forthcoming). Can Self-Preservation Be Virtuous in Disaster Situations? Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101631.score: 45.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Carolyn McLeod (2004). Integrity and Self-Protection. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):216–232.score: 42.0
    Self-protection seems to be negatively correlated with integrity on the standard conception of that virtue. To be self-protective is to lose some of our integrity. In this paper, I pursue the somewhat unlikely claim that a certain amount of self-protection is consistent with integrity and is even required by it in many circumstances.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Frank Lucash (2012). Spinoza on Friendship. Philosophia 40 (2):305-317.score: 31.0
    Friendships have always been one of the most valuable assets in the lives of human beings, and friendships were of utmost importance to Spinoza. There are different kinds of friendship but for Spinoza genuine friendship can only occur among those who pursue the truth. In this paper I will (1) point out what Spinoza means by the truth, (2) show how friendships are possible even though there is tension in our lives between our desire to preserve ourselves and our desire (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Kelly Rogers (ed.) (1997). Self-Interest: An Anthology of Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge.score: 30.0
    Human beings naturally care a great deal for themselves--and couldn't survive otherwise. As Aquinas observed, the drive for self-preservation is the first law of nature. Yet in the imperative of self-love, philosophers have also perceived a tacit threat. Plato reminds us that 'the excessive love of self is in reality the source to each man of all offences.' And so the inevitability of self- concern must be balanced with its manifest potential for harm. But how is such a reconciliation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Victoria N. Alexander (2013). Creativity: Self-Referential Mistaking, Not Negating. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (2):253-272.score: 30.0
    In C. S. Peirce, as well as in the work of many biosemioticians, the semiotic object is sometimes described as a physical “object” with material properties and sometimes described as an “ideal object” or mental representation. I argue that to the extent that we can avoid these types of characterizations we will have a more scientific definition of sign use and will be able to better integrate the various fields that interact with biosemiotics. In an effort to end Cartesian dualism (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Marisa Vento (2012). O movimento de expansão E a generalização do interesse E da vontade. Cadernos de Ética E Filosofia Política 21:233-243.score: 30.0
    O estudo aqui apresentado propõe uma interpretação do amor de si como o pathos primordial, da forma como Rousseau o pressentiu.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Hsien-Hsien Chiang, Mei-Bih Chen & I.-Ling Sue (2007). Self-State of Nurses in Caring for Sars Survivors. Nursing Ethics 14 (1):18-26.score: 24.0
    The aim of this study was to analyze nurses' experiences of role strain when taking care of patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). We adopted an interpretive/constructivist paradigm. Twenty-one nurses who had taken care of SARS patients were interviewed in focus groups. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The self-state of nurses during the SARS outbreak evolved into that of professional self as: (1) self-preservation; (2) self-mirroring; and (3) self-transcendence. The relationship between self-state and reflective practice is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Kelly Rogers (ed.) (1997). Self-Interest: An Anthology of Philosophical Perspectives From Antiquity to the Present. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Self-Interest discusses the reconciliation of inevitable self-concern with its manifest potential for harm. This anthology brings together the efforts of twenty three renown philosophers to address the matter of how to bring about such a reconciliation. The drive for self-preservation, as observed by Aquinas, is the first law of nature. With this self-love, however, comes the threat of "the excessive love of self". Self-Interest brings into discussion the reconciliation of necessary self-concern with its manifest potential for harm. This anthology (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Uriah Kriegel (2011). Self-Representationalism and the Explanatory Gap. In J. Liu & J. Perry (eds.), Consciousness and the Self: New Essays. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    According to the self-representational theory of consciousness – self- representationalism for short – a mental state is phenomenally conscious when, and only when, it represents itself in the right way. In this paper, I consider how self- representationalism might address the alleged explanatory gap between phenomenal consciousness and physical properties. I open with a presentation of self- representationalism and the case for it (§1). I then present what I take to be the most promising self-representational approach to the explanatory gap (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Dan Zahavi (2000). Self and Consciousness. In , Exploring the Self: Philosophical and Psychopathological Perspectives on Self-Experience. John Benjamins. 55--74.score: 21.0
    In his recent book ‘Kant and the Mind’ Andrew Brook makes a distinction between two types of selfawareness. The first type, which he calls empirical self-awareness, is an awareness of particular psychological states such as perceptions, memories, desires, bodily sensations etc. One attains this type of self-awareness simply by having particular experiences and being aware of them. To be in possession of empirical self-awareness is, in short, simply to be conscious of one’s occurrent experience. The second type of self-awareness he (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Bill Brewer (1995). Bodily Awareness and the Self. In Jose Luis Bermudez, Anthony J. Marcel & Naomi M. Eilan (eds.), The Body and the Self. Cambridge, Mass: Mit Press. 291-€“303.score: 21.0
    In The Varieties of Reference (1982), Gareth Evans claims that considerations having to do with certain basic ways we have of gaining knowledge of our own physical states and properties provide "the most powerful antidote to a Cartesian conception of the self" (220). In this chapter, I start with a discussion and evaluation of Evans' own argument, which is, I think, in the end unconvincing. Then I raise the possibility of a more direct application of similar considerations in defence of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. J. Campbell (1995). The Body Image and Self-Consciousness. In Jose Luis Bermudez, Anthony J. Marcel & Naomi M. Eilan (eds.), The Body and the Self. Mit Press. 29--42.score: 21.0
    in N. Eilan, A. Marcel and J. Bermudez (eds.), The Body and the Self (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press 1995), 29-42.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Shaun Gallagher & Anthony J. Marcel (2002). The Self in Contextualized Action. In Jonathan Shear & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Models of the Self. Thorverton Uk: Imprint Academic. 273.score: 21.0
    This paper suggests that certain traditional ways of analysing the self start off in situations that are abstract or detached from normal experience, and that the conclusions reached in such approaches are, as a result, inexact or mistaken. The paper raises the question of whether there are more contextualized forms of self- consciousness than those usually appealed to in philosophical or psychological analyses, and whether they can be the basis for a more adequate theoretical approach to the self. First, we (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Dorit Bar-On (2004). Speaking My Mind: Expression and Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    Dorit Bar-On develops and defends a novel view of avowals and self-knowledge. Drawing on resources from the philosophy of language, the theory of action, epistemology, and the philosophy of mind, she offers original and systematic answers to many long-standing questions concerning our ability to know our own minds. We are all very good at telling what states of mind we are in at a given moment. When it comes to our own present states of mind, what we say goes; an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Sanford C. Goldberg (1997). The Very Idea of Computer Self-Knowledge and Self-Deception. Minds and Machines 7 (4):515-529.score: 21.0
    Do computers have beliefs? I argue that anyone who answers in the affirmative holds a view that is incompatible with what I shall call the commonsense approach to the propositional attitudes. My claims shall be two. First,the commonsense view places important constraints on what can be acknowledged as a case of having a belief. Second, computers – at least those for which having a belief would be conceived as having a sentence in a belief box – fail to satisfy some (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Tomis Kapitan (2006). Indexicality and Self-Awareness. In Uriah Kriegel & Kenneth Williford (eds.), Self-Representational Approaches to Consciousness. MIT Press. 379--408.score: 21.0
    Self-awareness is commonly expressed by means of indexical expressions, primarily, first- person pronouns like.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. John Barresi (2001). Extending Self-Consciousness Into the Future. In C. Moore & Karen Lemmon (eds.), The Self in Time: Developmental Perspectives. Erlbaum. 141-161.score: 21.0
    As adults we have little difficulty thinking of ourselves as mental beings extended in time. Even though our conscious thoughts and experiences are constantly changing, we think of ourselves as the same self throughout these variations in mental content. Indeed, it is so natural for adults to think this way that it was not until the 18th century—at least in Western thought—that the issue of how we come to acquire such a concept of an identical but constantly changing self was (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Frank S. Kessel, P. M. Cole & D. L. Johnson (eds.) (1992). Self and Consciousness: Multiple Perspectives. Lawrence Erlbaum.score: 21.0
    This volume contains an array of essays that reflect, and reflect upon, the recent revival of scholarly interest in the self and consciousness. Various relevant issues are addressed in conceptually challenging ways, such as how consciousness and different forms of self-relevant experience develop in infancy and childhood and are related to the acquisition of skill; the role of the self in social development; the phenomenology of being conscious and its metapsychological implications; and the cultural foundations of conceptualizations of consciousness. Written (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Diana T. Meyers (ed.) (1997). Feminists Rethink the Self. Westview Press.score: 21.0
    How is women’s conception of self affected by the caregiving responsibilities traditionally assigned to them and by the personal vulnerabilities imposed on them? If institutions of male dominance profoundly influence women’s lives and minds, how can women form judgments about their own best interests and overcome oppression? Can feminist politics survive in face of the diversity of women’s experience, which is shaped by race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, as well as by gender? Exploring such questions, leading feminist thinkers have (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Hans Lindahl (2008). Collective Self-Legislation as an Actus Impurus : A Response to Heidegger's Critique of European Nihilism. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 41 (3):323-343.score: 21.0
    Heidegger’s critique of European nihilism seeks to expose self-legislation as the governing principle of central manifestations of modernity such as science, technology, and the interpretation of art as aesthetics. Need we accept the conclusion that modern constitutional democracies are intrinsically nihilistic, insofar as they give political and legal form to the principle of collective self-legislation? An answer to this question turns on the concept of power implied in constituent and constituted power. A confrontation of the genealogies of modern subjectivity proposed (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Mathew Humphrey (2002). Preservation Versus the People?: Nature, Humanity, and Political Philosophy. OUP Oxford.score: 21.0
    Why should any society take the decision to devote scarce resources, as a matter of public policy, to preserving natural objects? This is one of the questions considered in the field of environmental ethics, and the thinking that has taken place in this discipline has been dominated by the 'ecocentric-anthropocentric' distinction. Answers focus on either 'intrinsic values in nature', or on the human welfare benefits that will accrue from preservationist policies. These two answers are generally taken to be both mutually (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Alin Cristian (2008). Fixating the World's Most Caring Cornerstone: Heidegger on Self-Sacrifice. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (1):1-9.score: 21.0
    Prior to having its authenticity and transparency examined the openness of human existence may be said to need preservation as is, regardless of its receptivity and responsiveness to the truth of Being. Paradoxically, in self-sacrifice the fulfilment of Dasein’s ownmost potentiality-for-being is dependent upon a most radical disowning of itself. This investigation approaches self-sacrifice on the basis of its analogy with the creation of the work of art – as the peculiar fixation of the existing, already disclosed world of everydayness (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Black Hawk Hancock & Roberta Garner (2014). Erving Goffman: Theorizing the Self in the Age of Advanced Consumer Capitalism. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1).score: 21.0
    The authors argue that Erving Goffman developed concepts that contribute to an understanding of historical changes in the construction of the self and enable us to see the new forms that self-construction is taking in a society driven by consumption, marketing, and media. These concepts include: commercial realism; dramatic scripting; hyper-ritualization; the glimpse; and the dissolution or undermining of the real, the authentic, and the autonomous. By placing Goffman's under-discussed work, Gender Advertisements, in rapprochement with the work of Guy Debord, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Kate Moran (forthcoming). Delusions of Virtue: Kant on Self-Conceit. Kantian Review.score: 21.0
    Little extended attention has been given to Kant’s notion of self-conceit (Eigendünkel), though it appears throughout his theoretical and practical philosophy. Authors who have discussed self-conceit often describe it as a kind of imperiousness or arrogance in which the conceited agent seeks to impose selfish principles upon others, or perhaps even sees others as worthless. I argue that these features of self-conceit are actually symptoms of a deeper and more thoroughgoing failure. Self-conceit is best described as the tendency to insist (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Mingdi Xu, Fumitaka Homae, Ryu-Ichiro Hashimoto & Hiroko Hagiwara (2013). Acoustic Cues for the Recognition of Self-Voice and Other-Voice. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
    Self-recognition, being indispensable for successful social communication, has become a major focus in current social neuroscience. The physical aspects of the self are most typically manifested in the face and voice. Compared with the wealth of studies on self-face recognition, self-voice recognition (SVR) has not gained much attention. Converging evidence has suggested that the fundamental frequency (F0) and formant structures serve as the key acoustic cues for other-voice recognition (OVR). However, little is known about which, and how, acoustic cues are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Paul Silva (2013). Epistemically Self-Defeating Arguments and Skepticism About Intuition. Philosophical Studies 164 (3):579-589.score: 18.0
    An argument is epistemically self-defeating when either the truth of an argument’s conclusion or belief in an argument’s conclusion defeats one’s justification to believe at least one of that argument’s premises. Some extant defenses of the evidentiary value of intuition have invoked considerations of epistemic self-defeat in their defense. I argue that there is one kind of argument against intuition, an unreliability argument, which, even if epistemically self-defeating, can still imply that we are not justified in thinking intuition has evidentiary (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. James Giles (1993). The No-Self Theory: Hume, Buddhism, and Personal Identity. Philosophy East and West 43 (2):175-200.score: 18.0
    The problem of personal identity is often said to be one of accounting for what it is that gives persons their identity over time. However, once the problem has been construed in these terms, it is plain that too much has already been assumed. For what has been assumed is just that persons do have an identity. A new interpretation of Hume's no-self theory is put forward by arguing for an eliminative rather than a reductive view of personal identity, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. John A. Foster (1991). The Immaterial Self: A Defense of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of Mind. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The Immaterial Self examines and defends this thesis, and in particular argues for its Cartesian version, which assigns the non-physical ingredients of the ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Sylvia Burrow (2012). Protecting One's Commitments: Integrity and Self-Defense. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (1):49-66.score: 18.0
    Living in a culture of violence against women leads women to employ any number of avoidance and defensive strategies on a daily basis. Such strategies may be self protective but do little to counter women’s fear of violence. A pervasive fear of violence comes with a cost to integrity not addressed in moral philosophy. Restricting choice and action to avoid possibility of harm compromises the ability to stand for one’s commitments before others. If Calhoun is right that integrity is a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Neil Van Leeuwen (2009). Self-Deception Won't Make You Happy. Social Theory and Practice 35 (1):107-132.score: 18.0
    I argue here that self-deception is not conducive to happiness. There is a long train of thought in social psychology that seems to say that it is, but proper understanding of the data does not yield this conclusion. Illusion must be distinguished from mere imagining. Self-deception must be distinguished from self-inflation bias and from self-fulfilling belief. Once these distinctions are in place, the case for self-deception falls apart. Furthermore, by yielding false beliefs, self-deception undermines desire satisfaction. Finally, I argue for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. John Schwenkler (2014). Vision, Self‐Location, and the Phenomenology of the 'Point of View'. Noûs 48 (1):137-155.score: 18.0
    According to the Self-Location Thesis, one’s own location can be among the things that visual experience represents, even when one’s body is entirely out of view. By contrast, the Minimal View denies this, and says that visual experience represents things only as "to the right", etc., and never as "to the right of me". But the Minimal View is phenomenologically inadequate: it cannot explain the difference between a visual experience of self-motion and one of an oppositely moving world. To show (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Michael L. Anderson & Donald R. Perlis (2005). The Roots of Self-Awareness. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (3):297-333.score: 18.0
    In this paper we provide an account of the structural underpinnings of self-awareness. We offer both an abstract, logical account.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000