Search results for 'sense of justice' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eric M. Cave (1996). The Individual Rationality of Maintaining a Sense of Justice. Theory and Decision 41 (3):229-256.score: 150.0
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  2. Erin M. Cline (2013). Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice. Fordham University Press.score: 126.0
    Methods in comparative work -- The sense of justice in Rawls -- The sense of justice in the analects -- Two senses of justice -- The contemporary relevance of a sense of justice.
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  3. John Deigh (1982). Love, Guilt, and the Sense of Justice. Inquiry 25 (4):391 – 416.score: 120.0
    Theories about man's moral sensibilities, particularly his sense of justice, tend to reflect either optimism or pessimism about human nature. Among modern theorists Hobbes, Hume, and Freud are perhaps the most outstanding representatives of pessimism. Recently, optimistic theories, which view the sense of justice as linked essentially to the sentiments of love and friendship, have found favor with philosophers. Of these theories John Rawls's is the most notable. Section I considers the conceptual scheme optimists advance to (...)
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  4. Giovanni de Grandis (2001). Making Sense of A Theory of Justice. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):283-306.score: 119.0
    The primary aim of this interpretive essay is to reconstruct some of the most important features of Rawls’s theory of justice, and to offer a hypothesis about how its assumptions and arguments are tied together in a highly structured construction. An almost philological approach is adopted to highlight Rawlsian ideas. First, I consider in what sense Rawls is an individualist and in what sense he is not. Fromthis I conclude that he ought not be charged of psychological (...)
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  5. Claire Valier (2004). The Sense of Atrocity and the Passion for Justice. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (2):145-159.score: 119.0
    A penal ethics for today examines the connections between affect and morality. It scrutinises closely the felt moralities within the apprehension of crime. These felt moralities underpin interventions that are seemingly mobilised by a passion for justice. A penal ethics questions whether these sensibilities really do move moral actors as just feelings. This proposition is readily defended by reference to the emotive moralism in some notable areas. These include legitimation of the death penalty as ?closure? for victims, and the (...)
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  6. Haroon Rashid (2002). Making Sense of Marxian Concept of Justice. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 29 (4):445-469.score: 116.0
    The purpose of this paper is to make sense of Marx's own view about justice in the light of the controversy between classical Marxism and normative Marxism. Normative Marxism claims that Marx's condemnation of capitalist exploitation and his conception of communism entertain a principle of justice, while classical Marxism does not allow any such principle in Marx's thought. However, I argue that although Marx uses normative terms, he does not provide any specific theory of justice. Marx's (...)
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  7. Gabriel Wollner (2010). Framing, Reciprocity and the Grounds of Egalitarian Justice. Res Publica 16 (3):281-298.score: 93.0
    John Rawls famously claims that ‘justice is the first virtue of social institutions’. On one of its readings, this remark seems to suggest that social institutions are essential for obligations of justice to arise. The spirit of this interpretation has recently sparked a new debate about the grounds of justice. What are the conditions that generate principles of distributive justice? I am interested in a specific version of this question. What conditions generate egalitarian principles of distributive (...)
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  8. Katharine Schweitzer (2013). Making Feminist Sense of the Global Justice Movement. By Catherine Eschle and Bice Maiguashca Lanham., Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 28 (2):388-390.score: 93.0
  9. Erin M. Cline (2007). Two Senses of Justice: Confucianism, Rawls, and Comparative Political Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):361-381.score: 91.0
    This paper argues that a comparative study of the idea of a sense of justice in the work of John Rawls and the early Chinese philosopher Kongzi is mutually beneficial to our understanding of the thought of both figures. It also aims to provide an example of the relevance of moral psychology for basic questions in political philosophy. The paper offers an analysis of Rawls’s account of a sense of justice and its place within his theory (...)
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  10. John Rawls (1963). The Sense of Justice. Philosophical Review 72 (3):281-305.score: 90.0
  11. Michael McFall (2009). Licensing Parents: Family, State, and Child Maltreatment. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 90.0
    In Licensing Parents, Michael McFall argues that political structures, economics, education, racism, and sexism are secondary in importance to the inequality caused by families, and that the family plays the primary role in a child's acquisition of a sense of justice. He demonstrates that examination of the family is necessary in political philosophy and that informal structures (families) and considerations (character formation) must be taken seriously. McFall advocates a threshold that should be accepted by all political philosophers: children (...)
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  12. Carole Pateman (1980). "The Disorder of Women": Women, Love, and the Sense of Justice. Ethics 91 (1):20-34.score: 90.0
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  13. Allan Gibbard (1982). Human Evolution and the Sense of Justice. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 7 (1):31-46.score: 90.0
  14. Daniel M. Farrell (2000). Preferring Justice: Rationality, Self-Transformation, and the Sense of Justice, Eric M. Cave. Westview Press, 1998, XIV + 183 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (1):147-174.score: 90.0
  15. Samantha Brennan & Robert Noggle, Rawls's Neglected Childhood: Reflections on the Original Position, Stability, and the Child's Sense of Justice.score: 90.0
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  16. Roger Paden (1997). Rawls's Just Savings Principle and the Sense of Justice. Social Theory and Practice 23 (1):27-51.score: 90.0
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  17. Sor-Hoon Tan (2014). Cline , Erin M. Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice . New York: Fordham University Press, 2013. Pp. 354. $65.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 124 (2):388-392.score: 90.0
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  18. D. M. Farrell (2000). Review of Eric M. Cave's Preferring Justice: Rationality, Self-Transformation, and the Sense of Justice. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (1):171-174.score: 90.0
     
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  19. Torgny T. Segerstedt (1949). A Research Into the General Sense of Justice. Theoria 15 (1-3):323-338.score: 90.0
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  20. Sor-Hoon Tan (forthcoming). Review: Erin M. Cline, Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice. [REVIEW] .score: 90.0
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  21. Review By: Sor-Hoon Tan (2013). Review: Erin M. Cline, Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice. [REVIEW] Ethics 124 (2):388-392,.score: 90.0
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  22. Xianzhong Huang (2007). Justice as a Virtue: An Analysis of Aristotle's Virtue of Justice. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (2):265-279.score: 87.0
    People currently regard justice as the main principle of institutions and society, while in ancient Greek people took it as the virtue of citizens. This article analyzes Aristotle’s virtue of justice in his method of virtue ethics, discussing the nature of virtue, how justice is the virtue of citizens, what kind of virtue the justice of citizens is, and the prospect of the virtue of justice against a background of institutional justice. Since virtue can (...)
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  23. Laurence Ashworth & Clinton Free (2006). Marketing Dataveillance and Digital Privacy: Using Theories of Justice to Understand Consumers' Online Privacy Concerns. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):107 - 123.score: 87.0
    Technology used in online marketing has advanced to a state where collection, enhancement and aggregation of information are instantaneous. This proliferation of customer information focused technology brings with it a host of issues surrounding customer privacy. This article makes two key contributions to the debate concerning digital privacy. First, we use theories of justice to help understand the way consumers conceive of, and react to, privacy concerns. Specifically, it is argued that an important component of consumers’ privacy concerns relates (...)
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  24. Sheldene Simola (2003). Ethics of Justice and Care in Corporate Crisis Management. Journal of Business Ethics 46 (4):351 - 361.score: 87.0
    Despite the importance of ethics in corporate crisis management, they have received limited attention in the academic literature. This article contributes to the evolving conversation on ethics in crisis management by elucidating the ethics of "justice" and "care" and distinguishing between them. Examples of the two approaches are offered through consideration of cases in corporate crisis management, including the alleged glass contamination case faced by Gerber Products Company, and, the shooting tragedy at San Ysidro faced by McDonald''s Corporation. It (...)
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  25. Costas Pagondiotis & Spyros Petrounakos (2007). The Sense of Agency and the Naturalization of the Mental. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 6:139-143.score: 87.0
    In this paper we examine whether the sense of agency represents an obstacle to the project of naturalizing the mental. On the basis of a thought experiment we suggest that the sense of agency is not an epiphenomenon. We also examine Frith's attempt to explain in functionalist terms the sense of agency through the comparator and metarepresentational mechanisms. Through a variety of arguments we try to show that explanation by recourse to these mechanisms is inadequate. We conclude (...)
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  26. Glenn Carruthers (2013). Toward a Cognitive Model of the Sense of Embodiment in a (Rubber) Hand. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (3-4):3 - 4.score: 87.0
    The rubber hand illusion (RHI) is the experience of an artificial body part as being a real body part and the experience of touch coming from that artificial body part. An explanation of this illusion would take significant steps towards explaining the experience of embodiment in one’s own body. I present a new cognitive model to explain the RHI. I argue that the sense of embodiment arises when an on-line representation of the candidate body part is represented as matching (...)
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  27. Joseph Chan (1994). Making Sense of Confucian Justice. Philosophy East and West 44:559-575.score: 87.0
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  28. Karen McAuliffe (2011). Hybrid Texts and Uniform Law? The Multilingual Case Law of the Court of Justice of the European Union. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (1):97-115.score: 87.0
    The case law of the Court of Justice of the European Union (ECJ) is shaped by the language in which it is drafted—i.e. French. However, because French is rarely the mother tongue of those drafting that case law, the texts produced are often stilted and awkward. In addition, those drafting such case law are constrained in their use of language and style of writing (owing to pressures of technology and in order to reinforce the rule of law). These factors (...)
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  29. Le Cheng (2011). Administration of Justice and Multimodality in Media: Semiotic Translation, Conflict and Compatibility. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (4):491-502.score: 87.0
    Law as one sign system can be recorded and interpreted by another sign system—media. If each transaction in court is taken as a sign, it can be interpreted or transferred by different signs of media for the same purpose, though with different effects. This study focuses on the transformative effects of the semiotic revolution in media on law. The present research revealed that the evolution of media has driven the administration of justice to pay more attention to the process (...)
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  30. Lucinda Vandervort (2012). Access to Justice and the Public Interest in the Administration of Justice. University of New Brunswick Law Journal 63:124-144.score: 87.0
    The public interest in the administration of justice requires access to justice for all. But access to justice must be “meaningful” access. Meaningful access requires procedures, processes, and institutional structures that facilitate communication among participants and decision-makers and ensure that judges and other decision-makers have the resources they need to render fully informed and sound decisions. Working from that premise, which is based on a reconceptualization of the objectives and methods of the justice process, the author (...)
     
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  31. Lucinda Vandervort (2001). Mistake of Law and Obstruction of Justice: A 'Bad Excuse' ... Even for a Lawyer! University of New Brunswick Law Journal 50: 171-186.score: 87.0
    In Regina v. Murray, (2000, Ont S.Ct.J.) the learned trial judge, Justice Gravely, errs in his interpretation and application of the law of mens rea in the offense of willfully attempting to obstruct justice under section 139(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada. In view of his findings of fact and law, including the determination that the accused knowingly and intentionally committed the actus reus of the offense and the absence of any suggestion that he lacked awareness of (...)
     
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  32. Glenn Carruthers (2012). The Case for the Comparator Model as an Explanation of the Sense of Agency and its Breakdowns. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):30-45.score: 84.0
    I compare Frith and colleagues’ influential comparator account of how the sense of agency is elicited to the multifactorial weighting model advocated by Synofzik and colleagues. I defend the comparator model from the common objection that the actual sensory consequences of action are not needed to elicit the sense of agency. I examine the comparator model’s ability to explain the performance of healthy subjects and those suffering from delusions of alien control on various self-attribution tasks. It transpires that (...)
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  33. Elisabeth Pacherie (2007). The Sense of Control and the Sense of Agency. Psyche 13 (1):1 - 30.score: 84.0
    The now growing literature on the content and sources of the phenomenology of first-person agency highlights the multi-faceted character of the phenomenology of agency and makes it clear that the experience of agency includes many other experiences as components. This paper examines the possible relations between these components of our experience of acting and the processes involved in action specification and action control. After a brief discussion of our awareness of our goals and means of action, it will focus on (...)
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  34. Sanneke de Haan & Leon de Bruin (2010). Reconstructing the Minimal Self, or How to Make Sense of Agency and Ownership. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):373-396.score: 84.0
    We challenge Gallagher’s distinction between the sense of ownership (SO) and the sense of agency (SA) as two separable modalities of experience of the minimal self and argue that a careful investigation of the examples provided to promote this distinction in fact reveals that SO and SA are intimately related and modulate each other. We propose a way to differentiate between the various notions of SO and SA that are currently used interchangeably in the debate, and suggest a (...)
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  35. Martijn Boot (2012). The Aim of a Theory of Justice. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):7-21.score: 84.0
    Amartya Sen argues that for the advancement of justice identification of ‘perfect’ justice is neither necessary nor sufficient. He replaces ‘perfect’ justice with comparative justice. Comparative justice limits itself to comparing social states with respect to degrees of justice. Sen’s central thesis is that identifying ‘perfect’ justice and comparing imperfect social states are ‘analytically disjoined’. This essay refutes Sen’s thesis by demonstrating that to be able to make adequate comparisons we need to identify (...)
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  36. Glenn Carruthers (2010). A Problem for Wegner and Colleagues' Model of the Sense of Agency. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):341-357.score: 84.0
    The sense of agency, that is the sense that one is the agent of one’s bodily actions, is one component of our self-consciousness. Recently, Wegner and colleagues have developed a model of the causal history of this sense. Their model takes it that the sense of agency is elicited for an action when one infers that one or other of one’s mental states caused that action. In their terms, the sense of agency is elicited by (...)
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  37. Glenn Carruthers (2008). Types of Body Representation and the Sense of Embodiment. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1302):1316.score: 84.0
    The sense of embodiment is vital for self recognition. An examination of anosognosia for hemiplegia—the inability to recognise that one is paralysed down one side of one’s body—suggests the existence of ‘online’ and ‘offline’ representations of the body. Online representations of the body are representations of the body as it is currently, are newly constructed moment by moment and are directly “plugged into” current perception of the body. In contrast, offline representations of the body are representations of what the (...)
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  38. Glenn Carruthers (2009). Is the Body Schema Sufficient for the Sense of Embodiment? An Alternative to de Vignmont's Model. Philosophical Psychology 22 (2):123-142.score: 84.0
    De Vignemont argues that the sense of ownership comes from the localization of bodily sensation on a map of the body that is part of the body schema. This model should be taken as a model of the sense of embodiment. I argue that the body schema lacks the theoretical resources needed to explain this phenomenology. Furthermore, there is some reason to think that a deficient sense of embodiment is not associated with a deficient body schema. The (...)
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  39. Darryl J. Murphy (2012). Are Intellectual Property Rights Compatible with Rawlsian Principles of Justice? Ethics and Information Technology 14 (2):109-121.score: 84.0
    This paper argues that intellectual property rights are incompatible with Rawls’s principles of justice. This conclusion is based upon an analysis of the social stratification that emerges as a result of the patent mechanism which defines a marginalized group and ensure that its members remain alienated from the rights, benefits, and freedoms afforded by the patent product. This stratification is further complicated, so I argue, by the copyright mechanism that restricts and redistributes those rights already distributed by means of (...)
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  40. Paulo Sousa & Lauren Swiney (2013). Thought Insertion: Abnormal Sense of Thought Agency or Thought Endorsement? Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):637-654.score: 84.0
    The standard approach to the core phenomenology of thought insertion characterizes it in terms of a normal sense of thought ownership coupled with an abnormal sense of thought agency. Recently, Fernández (2010) has argued that there are crucial problems with this approach and has proposed instead that what goes wrong fundamentally in such a phenomenology is a sense of thought commitment, characterized in terms of thought endorsement. In this paper, we argue that even though Fernández raises new (...)
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  41. Robert C. Robinson (2009). A Defense of the Maximin Principle in Rawls' Theory of Justice. Humanity and Social Science Journal 4 (2):175-179.score: 84.0
    In his celebrated work, A Theory of Justice (1971), John Rawls argues that, from behind the veil of ignorance, parties in the original position will employ the maximin decision rule to reason to his two principles of justice. In this journal, Olatunji Oyeshile offers a brief and concise outline of some of the historical criticisms of that argument. Oyeshile offers two important criticisms of Rawls' argument. Both, however, are somewhat misplaced, as I shall show. First, he claims that (...)
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  42. Clarence W. Joldersma (2011). Education: Understanding, Ethics, and the Call of Justice. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):441-447.score: 84.0
    Education is interpreted as something basic to our humanity. As part of our primordial way of being human, education is intrinsic to the understanding’s functioning. At the same time education involves an originary ethical relation to the other, unsettling the self-directed character of the striving to live. And because of its social setting, the call of many others, education orients one to the social, to the call of justice.
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  43. Chong Un Choe Smith (2014). Confronting Ethical Permissibility in Animal Research: Rejecting a Common Assumption and Extending a Principle of Justice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (2):175-185.score: 84.0
    A common assumption in the selection of nonhuman animal subjects for research and the approval of research is that, if the risks of a procedure are too great for humans, and if there is a so-called scientific necessity, then it is permissible to use nonhuman animal subjects. I reject the common assumption as neglecting the central ethical issue of the permissibility of using nonhuman animal subjects and as being inconsistent with the principle of justice used in human subjects research (...)
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  44. Yochai Ataria (2013). Sense of Ownership and Sense of Agency During Trauma. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-14.score: 84.0
    This paper seeks to describe and analyze the traumatic experience through an examination of the sense of agency—the sense of controlling one’s body, and sense of ownership—the sense that it is my body that undergoes experiences. It appears that there exist (at least) two levels of traumatic experience: on the first level one loses the sense of agency but retains the sense of ownership, whilst on the second one loses both of these, with symptoms (...)
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  45. Raymond Bouden & Emmanuelle Betton (1999). Explaining the Feelings of Justice. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (4):365-398.score: 84.0
    Philosophical theories about justice feelings and axiological feelings generally suffer from the fact that they look for simple criteria of justice, legitimacy, fairness. For this reason, they appear as of little help to account for the findings from sociological empirical studies. Weber's notion of "axiological rationality" can be interpreted as suggesting a "cognitivist" theory of axiological feelings. According to this theory, the causes responsible for the fact that a social actor endorses an axiological statement would not be basically (...)
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  46. Nicole David (2012). New Frontiers in the Neuroscience of the Sense of Agency. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 84.0
    The sense that I am the author of my own actions, including the ability to distinguish my own from other people’s actions, is a fundamental building block of our sense of self, on the one hand, and successful social interactions, on the other. Using cognitive neuroscience techniques, researchers have attempted to elucidate the functional basis of this intriguing phenomenon, also trying to explain pathological abnormalities of action awareness in certain psychiatric and neurological disturbances. Recent conceptual, technological and methodological (...)
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  47. Giovanni Maio (2003). Research Ethics and the Principle of Justice as Fairness – a Restatement. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):395-406.score: 84.0
    In my recent article, I addressed the question of whether a potential categorical exclusion of decisionally impaired patients from non-therapeutic medical research would be inaccordance with the Principle of Justice as Fairness. I came to the conclusion that a categorical exclusion of decisionally impaired persons from relevant research projects may collide with Rawls’s understanding of Justice as Fairness. Derek Bell has criticized my paper by denying that it is legitimate to apply Rawls to this bioethical problem. In my (...)
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  48. Lyra Jakulevičienė (2012). Lessons of the First EU Court of Justice Judgments in Asylum Cases. Jurisprudence 19 (2):477-505.score: 84.0
    Starting from 2009, national courts of the EU Member States for the first time gained a “real” right to request the EU Court of Justice for preliminary rulings in asylum matters. First judgments of this Court demonstrate equivocal tendencies: some are blaming the Court for incompetence in asylum matters, others believe that the adoption of authoritative decisions at the European level will assist in developing consistent practice of applying asylum law in the European Union, something that failed at international (...)
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  49. William Hirstein (2011). The Contribution of Prefrontal Executive Processes to Creating a Sense of Self. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):150.score: 84.0
    According to several current theories, executive processes help achieve various mental actions such as remembering, planning and decision-making, by executing cognitive operations on representations held in consciousness. I plan to argue that these executive processes are partly responsible for our sense of self, because of the way they produce the impression of an active, controlling presence in consciousness. If we examine what philosophers have said about the "ego" (Descartes), "the Self" (Locke and Hume), the "self of all selves" (William (...)
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