Search results for 'sense of justice' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eric M. Cave (1996). The Individual Rationality of Maintaining a Sense of Justice. Theory and Decision 41 (3):229-256.score: 450.0
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  2. Erin M. Cline (2013). Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice. Fordham University Press.score: 378.0
    Methods in comparative work -- The sense of justice in Rawls -- The sense of justice in the analects -- Two senses of justice -- The contemporary relevance of a sense of justice.
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  3. John Deigh (1982). Love, Guilt, and the Sense of Justice. Inquiry 25 (4):391 – 416.score: 360.0
    Theories about man's moral sensibilities, particularly his sense of justice, tend to reflect either optimism or pessimism about human nature. Among modern theorists Hobbes, Hume, and Freud are perhaps the most outstanding representatives of pessimism. Recently, optimistic theories, which view the sense of justice as linked essentially to the sentiments of love and friendship, have found favor with philosophers. Of these theories John Rawls's is the most notable. Section I considers the conceptual scheme optimists advance to (...)
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  4. Giovanni de Grandis (2001). Making Sense of A Theory of Justice. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):283-306.score: 357.0
    The primary aim of this interpretive essay is to reconstruct some of the most important features of Rawls’s theory of justice, and to offer a hypothesis about how its assumptions and arguments are tied together in a highly structured construction. An almost philological approach is adopted to highlight Rawlsian ideas. First, I consider in what sense Rawls is an individualist and in what sense he is not. Fromthis I conclude that he ought not be charged of psychological (...)
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  5. Claire Valier (2004). The Sense of Atrocity and the Passion for Justice. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (2):145-159.score: 357.0
    A penal ethics for today examines the connections between affect and morality. It scrutinises closely the felt moralities within the apprehension of crime. These felt moralities underpin interventions that are seemingly mobilised by a passion for justice. A penal ethics questions whether these sensibilities really do move moral actors as just feelings. This proposition is readily defended by reference to the emotive moralism in some notable areas. These include legitimation of the death penalty as ?closure? for victims, and the (...)
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  6. Haroon Rashid (2002). Making Sense of Marxian Concept of Justice. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 29 (4):445-469.score: 348.0
    The purpose of this paper is to make sense of Marx's own view about justice in the light of the controversy between classical Marxism and normative Marxism. Normative Marxism claims that Marx's condemnation of capitalist exploitation and his conception of communism entertain a principle of justice, while classical Marxism does not allow any such principle in Marx's thought. However, I argue that although Marx uses normative terms, he does not provide any specific theory of justice. Marx's (...)
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  7. Gabriel Wollner (2010). Framing, Reciprocity and the Grounds of Egalitarian Justice. Res Publica 16 (3):281-298.score: 279.0
    John Rawls famously claims that ‘justice is the first virtue of social institutions’. On one of its readings, this remark seems to suggest that social institutions are essential for obligations of justice to arise. The spirit of this interpretation has recently sparked a new debate about the grounds of justice. What are the conditions that generate principles of distributive justice? I am interested in a specific version of this question. What conditions generate egalitarian principles of distributive (...)
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  8. Katharine Schweitzer (2013). Making Feminist Sense of the Global Justice Movement. By Catherine Eschle and Bice Maiguashca Lanham., Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2010. [REVIEW] Hypatia 28 (2):388-390.score: 279.0
  9. Erin M. Cline (2007). Two Senses of Justice: Confucianism, Rawls, and Comparative Political Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):361-381.score: 273.0
    This paper argues that a comparative study of the idea of a sense of justice in the work of John Rawls and the early Chinese philosopher Kongzi is mutually beneficial to our understanding of the thought of both figures. It also aims to provide an example of the relevance of moral psychology for basic questions in political philosophy. The paper offers an analysis of Rawls’s account of a sense of justice and its place within his theory (...)
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  10. John Rawls (1963). The Sense of Justice. Philosophical Review 72 (3):281-305.score: 270.0
  11. Michael McFall (2009). Licensing Parents: Family, State, and Child Maltreatment. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 270.0
    In Licensing Parents, Michael McFall argues that political structures, economics, education, racism, and sexism are secondary in importance to the inequality caused by families, and that the family plays the primary role in a child's acquisition of a sense of justice. He demonstrates that examination of the family is necessary in political philosophy and that informal structures (families) and considerations (character formation) must be taken seriously. McFall advocates a threshold that should be accepted by all political philosophers: children (...)
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  12. Carole Pateman (1980). "The Disorder of Women": Women, Love, and the Sense of Justice. Ethics 91 (1):20-34.score: 270.0
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  13. Allan Gibbard (1982). Human Evolution and the Sense of Justice. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 7 (1):31-46.score: 270.0
  14. Daniel M. Farrell (2000). Preferring Justice: Rationality, Self-Transformation, and the Sense of Justice, Eric M. Cave. Westview Press, 1998, XIV + 183 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (1):147-174.score: 270.0
  15. Samantha Brennan & Robert Noggle, Rawls's Neglected Childhood: Reflections on the Original Position, Stability, and the Child's Sense of Justice.score: 270.0
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  16. Roger Paden (1997). Rawls's Just Savings Principle and the Sense of Justice. Social Theory and Practice 23 (1):27-51.score: 270.0
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  17. Sor-Hoon Tan (2014). Cline , Erin M. Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice . New York: Fordham University Press, 2013. Pp. 354. $65.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 124 (2):388-392.score: 270.0
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  18. D. M. Farrell (2000). Review of Eric M. Cave's Preferring Justice: Rationality, Self-Transformation, and the Sense of Justice. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 16 (1):171-174.score: 270.0
     
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  19. Torgny T. Segerstedt (1949). A Research Into the General Sense of Justice. Theoria 15 (1-3):323-338.score: 270.0
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  20. Sor-Hoon Tan (forthcoming). Review: Erin M. Cline, Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice. [REVIEW] .score: 270.0
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  21. Review By: Sor-Hoon Tan (2013). Review: Erin M. Cline, Confucius, Rawls, and the Sense of Justice. [REVIEW] Ethics 124 (2):388-392,.score: 270.0
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  22. Joseph Chan (1994). Making Sense of Confucian Justice. Philosophy East and West 44:559-575.score: 261.0
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  23. Thomas Paine (2009). Peter Linebaugh Presents Thomas Paine: Common Sense, Rights of Man and Agrarian Justice. Verso.score: 243.0
     
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  24. Jiwei Ci (2006). The Two Faces of Justice. Harvard University Press.score: 231.0
    In this book, Jiwei Ci explores the dual nature of justice, in an attempt to make unitary sense of key features of justice reflected in its close relation to ...
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  25. David Fisher (2013). The Virtue of Justice and War. Philosophia 41 (2):361-371.score: 231.0
    There has been a recent revival of interest in the medieval just war theory. But what is the virtue of justice needed to make war just? War is a complex and protracted activity. It is argued that a variety of virtues of justice, as well as a variety of virtues are required to guide the application of the use of force. Although it is mistaken to regard war as punishment, punitive justice—bringing to account those guilty of initiating (...)
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  26. Rob Houtepen & Ruud ter Meulen (2000). The Expectation(s) of Solidarity: Matters of Justice, Responsibility and Identity in the Reconstruction of the Health Care System. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 8 (4):355-376.score: 231.0
    We analyse solidarity as a mixture of social justice on the onehand and a set of cultural values and ascriptions on the otherhand. The latter defines the relevant sense of belonging togetherin a society. From a short analysis of the early stages of theDutch welfare state, we conclude that social responsibility wasoriginally based in religious and political associations. In theheyday of the welfare state, institutions such as sick funds,hospitals or nursing homes became financed collectively entirelyand became accessible to (...)
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  27. Gearoid Millar (2011). Local Evaluations of Justice Through Truth Telling in Sierra Leone: Postwar Needs and Transitional Justice. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 12 (4):515-535.score: 231.0
    This article presents findings from a qualitative case study of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in rural Sierra Leone. It adds to the sparse literature directly evaluating local experiences of transitional justice mechanisms. It investigates the conceptual foundations of retributive and restorative approaches to postwar justice, and describes the emerging alternative argument demanding attention be paid to economic, cultural, and social rights in such transitional situations. The article describes how justice is defined in Makeni, a town (...)
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  28. Justin D'Arms, Robert Batterman & Krzyzstof Gorny (1998). Game Theoretic Explanations and the Evolution of Justice. Philosophy of Science 65 (1):76-102.score: 225.0
    Game theoretic explanations of the evolution of human behavior have become increasingly widespread. At their best, they allow us to abstract from misleading particulars in order to better recognize and appreciate broad patterns in the phenomena of human social life. We discuss this explanatory strategy, contrasting it with the particularist methodology of contemporary evolutionary psychology. We introduce some guidelines for the assessment of evolutionary game theoretic explanations of human behavior: such explanations should be representative, robust, and flexible. Distinguishing these features (...)
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  29. Richard Norman (2002). Equality, Envy, and the Sense of Injustice. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):43–54.score: 225.0
    This paper attempts to defend the value of equality against the accusation that it is an expression of irrational and disreputable feelings of envy of those who are better off. It draws on Rawls’ account of the sense of justice to suggest that resentment of inequalities may be a proper resentment of injustice. The case of resentment of ‘free riders’ is taken as one plausible example of a justified resentment of those who benefit unfairly from a scheme of (...)
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  30. Kc Klement (2010). The Senses of Functions in the Logic of Sense and Denotation. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 16 (2):153-188.score: 224.0
    This paper discusses certain problems arising within the treatment of the senses of functions in Alonzo Church's Logic of Sense and Denotation. Church understands such senses themselves to be "sense-functions," functions from sense to sense. However, the conditions he lays out under which a sense-function is to be regarded as a sense presenting another function as denotation allow for certain undesirable results given certain unusual or "deviant" sense-functions. Certain absurdities result, e.g., an argument (...)
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  31. Gail Bruner Murrow & Richard W. Murrow (2013). A Biosemiotic Body of Law: The Neurobiology of Justice. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (2):275-314.score: 222.0
    We offer a theory regarding the symbolism of the human body in legal discourse. The theory blends legal theory, the neuroscience of empathy, and biosemiotics, a branch of semiotics that combines semiotics with theoretical biology. Our theory posits that this symbolism of the body is not solely a metaphor or semiotic sign of how law is cognitively structured in the mind. We propose that it also signifies neurobiological mechanisms of social emotion in the brain that are involved in the social (...)
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  32. Stephen Wood, Johan Braeken & Karen Niven (2013). Discrimination and Well-Being in Organizations: Testing the Differential Power and Organizational Justice Theories of Workplace Aggression. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):617-634.score: 222.0
    People may be subjected to discrimination from a variety of sources in the workplace. In this study of mental health workers, we contrast four potential perpetrators of discrimination (managers, co-workers, patients, and visitors) to investigate whether the negative impact of discrimination on victims’ well-being will vary in strength depending on the relative power of the perpetrator. We further explore whether the negative impact of discrimination is at least partly explained by its effects on people’s sense of organizational justice, (...)
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  33. Philip Pettit (1974). A Theory of Justice? Theory and Decision 4 (3-4):311-324.score: 216.0
    AnsrRAcr. This is a critical analysis of John Rawls’s A Theory of Justice. Rawls offers a theoretical justihcation of social democratic principles of justice. He argues that they are the principles which rational men would choose, under defined constraints, in an original position of social contract. The author criticises Rawls’s assumption that men of any background, of any socialisation, would choose these principles in the original position. He argues that the choice which Rawls imputes to his contractors reflects (...)
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  34. David Johnston (2011). A Brief History of Justice. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 216.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction. -- Prologue: From the Standard Model to a Sense of Justice. -- 1: The Terrain of Justice. -- 2: Teleology and Tutelage in Plato's Republic. -- 3: Aristotle's Theory of Justice. -- 4: From Nature to Artifice: Aristotle to Hobbes. -- 5: The Emergence of Utility. -- 6: Kant's Theory of Justice. -- 7: The Idea of Social Justice. -- 8: The Theory of Justice as Fairness. -- Epilogue: (...)
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  35. Eléonore Le Jallé (2008). Théorie de la justice et idéologie : Hume et Rawls. Methodos 8.score: 216.0
    Les points d’accord entre Rawls et Hume vont au-delà du seul repérage des « circonstances de la justice ». Même si Hume se trouve attaché à la théorie utilitariste de l’impartialité que Rawls rejette, Hume n’est pas, selon Rawls, « à proprement parler » utilitariste : il a su reconnaître l’idée selon laquelle les institutions doivent fonctionner dans l’intérêt de chacun. L’idée d’une coopération sociale en vue de l’avantage mutuel est donc commune à ces deux auteurs. Ils partagent, en (...)
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  36. Simon Hope (2012). The Circumstances of Justice. Hume Studies 36 (2):125-148.score: 213.0
    David Hume famously states, in his A Treatise of Human Nature, “that ’tis only from the selfishness and confin’d generosity of men, along with the scanty provision nature has made for his wants, that justice derives its origin” (T.3.2.2.18; SBN 495).1 This is Hume’s summary of the conditions under which the very idea of rules of justice makes practical sense, and he effectively repeats it in the Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals (EPM 3.12; SBN 188).2 To (...)
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  37. Gerald Doppelt (2003). The Theory of Justice From a Hermeneutic Perspective. Inquiry 46 (4):449 – 472.score: 213.0
    In this article, I argue that Gadamer's hermeneutics of historical tradition does not imply a conservative stance on ethical and political issues. My essay seeks to show that Gadamer's philosophy leaves ample room for normative criticism, objectivity, and theories of justice at odds with conventional common sense. I critically examine Walzer's Spheres of Justice, reading it as an attempt to obtain a normative account of justice based on a hermeneutical framework of interpretation. I make several criticisms (...)
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  38. Alan Fox, The Aesthetics of Justice: Harmony and Order in Chinese Thought.score: 213.0
    In his A Theory of Justice, John Rawls suggests that a society's notion of justice informs its distribution of rights, obligations, and goods. For him, "justice as fairness" ensures that the principles dictating this distribution be agreed upon fairly. I will argue that there is no exact parallel in the Chinese tradition to what Rawls is calling "justice as fairness." Instead, we see serving a similar purpose an emphasis on the regulation of harmonious processes within the (...)
     
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  39. Marc Hauser & Liane Young, The Psychology of Justice.score: 207.0
    In Natural Justice Binmore offers a game-theoretic map to the landscape of human morality. Following a long tradition of such accounts, Binmore’s argument concerns the forces of biological and cultural evolution that have shaped our judgments about the appropriate distribution of resources. In this sense, Binmore focuses on the morality of outcomes. This is a valuable perspective to which we add a friendly amendment from our own research: moral judgments appear to depend on process just as much as (...)
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  40. William E. Murnion (1989). The Ideology of Social Justice in Economic Justice for All. Journal of Business Ethics 8 (11):847 - 854.score: 207.0
    Although both the American Catholic bishops and their commentators seem to agree that the economics pastoral is capitalist, if anything, in its ideology, a careful reading of the pastoral shows that the principle of social justice implicit in it is actually socialist, indeed communist, in nature. The bishops arrived at such a principle because of their interpretation of the biblical sense of justice as entailing a preferential option for the poor. To justify this option on a rational (...)
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  41. John Sallis (2008). Transfigurements: On the True Sense of Art. University of Chicago Press.score: 207.0
    What is art really about? What is its true sense? For John Sallis, we cannot gain a genuine understanding of art by merely translating its effects into conceptual language. Rather, works of art must be approached in a way that does justice to their sensuous and enigmatic character—that illuminates their capacity to present truth without pretending to dispel the real mystery at art’s core. Transfigurements develops a framework for thinking about art through innovative readings of some of the (...)
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  42. Mariam Thalos (2008). Two Conceptions of Collectivity. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):83-104.score: 207.0
    This paper distinguishes two conceptions of collectivity, each of which tracks the targets of classification according to their aetiology. Collectivities falling under the first conception are founded on (more-or-less) explicit negotiations amongst the members who are known to one another personally. Collectivities falling under the second (philosophically neglected) conception are founded - at least initially - purely upon a shared conception of "we", very often in the absence of prior acquaintance and personal interaction. The paper argues that neglect of collectivities (...)
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  43. Fiery Cushman, The Psychology of Justice.score: 207.0
    In Natural Justice Binmore offers a game-theoretic map to the landscape of human morality. Following a long tradition of such accounts, Binmore’s argument concerns the forces of biological and cultural evolution that have shaped our judgments about the appropriate distribution of resources. In this sense, Binmore focuses on the morality of outcomes. This is a valuable perspective to which we add a friendly amendment from our own research: moral judgments appear to depend on process just as much as (...)
     
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  44. Hillel Steiner & Peter Vallentyne (2009). Libertarian Theories of Intergenerational Justice. In Axel Gosseries & Lucas Meyer (eds.), Justice Between Generations. Oxford University Press.score: 204.0
    Justice and Libertarianism The term ‘justice’ is commonly used in several different ways. Sometimes it designates the moral permissibility of political structures (such as legal systems). Sometimes it designates moral fairness (as opposed to efficiency or other considerations that are relevant to moral permissibility). Sometimes it designates legitimacy in the sense of it being morally impermissible for others to interfere forcibly with the act or omission (e.g., my failing to go to dinner with my mother may be (...)
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  45. M. W. Jackson (1985). Aristotle on Rawls: A Critique of Quantitative Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 19 (2):99-110.score: 204.0
    Is the 20th Century as obviously preferable to all other times as Rawls would have us assume? Is 20th Century Stockholm preferable to 12th Century Florence in each and every way? In 12th Century Florence men lived without liberty or equality. Yet Florentines were reasonably happy, accepted their place in life, and communicated directly with others. R. Dworkin, ‘The Social Contract’, The Sunday Times, 9 July 1972, p. 31. It was a society with sharply marked class distinctions. In such a (...)
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  46. William Desmond (2005). Doing Justice and the Practice of Philosophy. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79:41-59.score: 204.0
    There is a sense of doing justice prior to the juxtaposition of theory and practice, accounting for an ontological vulnerability prior to both social power andsocial vulnerability. Justice in the sense of “being true” involves fidelity to truth that we neither possess nor construct, preceding all efforts to enact justice. The charge to be just precedes any just act. There is a “patience of being,” or a receiving of being before acting, which we must then (...)
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  47. Mihaela Mihai (2010). Transitional Justice and the Quest for Democracy: A Contribution to a Political Theory of Democratic Transformations. Ratio Juris 23 (2):183-204.score: 198.0
    The paper seeks to contribute to the transitional justice literature by overcoming the Democracy v. Justice debate. This debate is normatively implausible and prudentially self-defeating. Normatively, transitional justice will be conceptualised as an imperative of democratic equal concern. Prudentially, it can prevent further violence and provide an opportunity for initiating processes of democratic emotional socialisation. The resentment and indignation animating transitions should be acknowledged as markers of a sense of justice. As such, they can help (...)
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  48. Hans-Martin Sass (1983). Justice, Beneficence, or Common Sense?: The President's Commission's Report on Access to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (4):381-388.score: 198.0
    The President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical and Behavioral Research published in March of 1983 its Report, Securing Access to Health Care: The Ethical Implications of Differences in the Availability of Health Services . Concluding that there are "ethical obligations" on behalf of society which are balanced by individual obligations, the Report provides an ethical framework for ensuring "ultimate responsibility" of the Federal government to arrange for equitable access to health and to a fair (...)
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  49. Jovan Babić (2012). On State, Identity and Rights: Putting Identity First. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (2):197-209.score: 198.0
    The paper considers the nature of the state understood as the political unity articulated on the basis of a collective identity which provides the state with its capacity to make decisions. The foremost decision of the state to protect and defend this identity is the source of its authority to enforce laws. Collective identity thus represents an object of special interest, unlike both “political” interests (Millian other-regarding acts) and private interests (Millian self-regarding acts). The validation of laws through this special (...)
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