Search results for 'shame' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lisa Guenther (2012). Resisting Agamben: The Biopolitics of Shame and Humiliation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (1):59-79.score: 24.0
    In Remnants of Auschwitz , Giorgio Agamben argues that the hidden structure of subjectivity is shame. In shame, I am consigned to something that cannot be assumed, such that the very thing that makes me a subject also forces me to witness my own desubjectification. Agamben’s ontological account of shame is problematic insofar as it forecloses collective responsibility and collapses the distinction between shame and humiliation. By recontextualizing three of Agamben’s sources – Primo Levi, Robert Antelme (...)
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  2. Alison Bailey (2011). On White Shame and Vulnerabiltiy. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):472-483.score: 24.0
    In this paper I address a tension in Samantha Vice’s claim that humility and silence offer effective moral responses to white shame in the wake of South African apartheid. Vice describes these twin virtues using inward-turning language of moral self-repair, but she also acknowledges that this ‘personal, inward directed project’ has relational dimensions. Her failure to explore the relational strand, however, leaves her description of white shame sounding solitary and penitent. -/- My response develops the missing relational dimensions (...)
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  3. Julien A. Deonna & Fabrice Teroni (2008). Differentiating Shame From Guilt. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1063-1400..score: 24.0
    How does shame differ from guilt? Empirical psychology has recently offered distinct and seemingly incompatible answers to this question. This article brings together four prominent answers into a cohesive whole. These are that (a) shame differs from guilt in being a social emotion; (b) shame, in contrast to guilt, affects the whole self; (c) shame is linked with ideals, whereas guilt concerns prohibitions and (d) shame is oriented towards the self, guilt towards others. After presenting (...)
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  4. Lisa Guenther (2011). Shame and the Temporality of Social Life. Continental Philosophy Review 44 (1):23-39.score: 24.0
    Shame is notoriously ambivalent. On one hand, it operates as a mechanism of normalization and social exclusion, installing or reinforcing patterns of silence and invisibility; on the other hand, the capacity for shame may be indispensible for ethical life insofar as it attests to the subject’s constitutive relationality and its openness to the provocation of others. Sartre, Levinas and Beauvoir each offer phenomenological analyses of shame in which its basic structure emerges as a feeling of being exposed (...)
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  5. Peter Boghossian (2011). Socratic Pedagogy: Perplexity, Humiliation, Shame and a Broken Egg. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (7):710-720.score: 24.0
    This article addresses and rebuts the claim that the purpose of the Socratic method is to humiliate, shame, and perplex participants. It clarifies pedagogical and exegetical confusions surrounding the Socratic method, what the Socratic method is, what its epistemological ambitions are, and how the historical Socrates likely viewed it. First, this article explains the Socratic method; second, it clarifies a misunderstanding regarding Socrates' role in intentionally perplexing his interlocutors; third, it discusses two different types of perplexity and relates these (...)
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  6. Fabrice Teroni & Otto Bruun (2011). Shame, Guilt and Morality. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (2):223-245.score: 24.0
    The connection between shame, guilt and morality is the topic of many recent debates. A broad tendency consists in attributing a higher moral status and a greater moral relevance to guilt, a claim motivated by arguments that tap into various areas of morality and moral psychology. The Pro-social Argument has it that guilt is, contrary to shame, morally good since it promotes pro-social behaviour. Three other arguments claim that only guilt has the requisite connection to central moral concepts: (...)
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  7. Fabrice Teroni & Julien A. Deonna (2009). The Self of Shame. In Mikko Salmela & Verena Mayer (eds.), Emotions, Ethics, and Authenticity. John Benjamins.score: 24.0
    The evaluations involved in shame are, intuitively at least, of many different sorts. One feels ashamed when seen by others doing something one would prefer doing alone (social shame). One is ashamed because of one’s ugly nose (shame about permanent traits). One feels ashamed of one’s dishonest behavior (moral shame), etc. The variety of evaluations in shame is striking; and it is even more so if one takes a cross-cultural perspective on this emotion. So the (...)
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  8. John Deigh (2006). The Politics of Disgust and Shame. Journal of Ethics 10 (4):383 - 418.score: 24.0
    This is a critical study of Martha Nussbaum’s Hiding from Humanity. Central to Nussbaum’s book are arguments against society’s or the state’s using disgust and shame to forward the aims of the criminal law. Patrick Devlin’s appeal to the common man’s disgust to determine what acts of customary morality should be made criminal is an example of how society might use disgust to forward the aims of the criminal law. The use of so-called shaming penalties as alternative sanctions to (...)
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  9. Richard Arneson (2007). Shame, Stigma, and Disgust in the Decent Society. Journal of Ethics 11 (1):31 - 63.score: 24.0
    Would a just society or government absolutely refrain from shaming or humiliating any of its members? "No," says this essay. It describes morally acceptable uses of shame, stigma and disgust as tools of social control in a decent (just) society. These uses involve criminal law, tort law, and informal social norms. The standard of moral acceptability proposed for determining the line is a version of perfectionistic prioritarian consequenstialism. From this standpoint, criticism is developed against Martha Nussbaum's view that to (...)
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  10. Gunnar Karlsson & Lennart Gustav Sjöberg (2009). The Experiences of Guilt and Shame: A Phenomenological–Psychological Study. [REVIEW] Human Studies 32 (3):335 - 355.score: 24.0
    This study aims at discovering the essential constituents involved in the experiences of guilt and shame. Guilt concerns a subject’s action or omission of action and has a clear temporal unfolding entailing a moment in which the subject lives in a care-free way. Afterwards, this moment undergoes a reconstruction, in the moment of guilt, which constitutes the moment of negligence. The reconstruction is a comprehensive transformation of one’s attitude with respect to one’s ego; one’s action; the object of guilt (...)
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  11. Agnes Heller (1985). The Power of Shame: A Rational Perspective. Routledge & K. Paul.score: 24.0
    The Power of Shame Introduction The problem of shame, in marked contrast with the problem of conscience, has seldom been thematized in modern moral ...
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  12. Thom Brooks (2008). Shame on You, Shame on Me? Nussbaum on Shame Punishment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):322-334.score: 24.0
    abstract Shame punishments have become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional punishments, often taking the form of convicted criminals holding signs or sweeping streets with a toothbrush. In her Hiding from Humanity, Martha Nussbaum argues against the use of shame punishments because they contribute to an offender's loss of dignity. However, these concerns are shared already by the courts which also have concerns about the possibility that shaming might damage an offender's dignity. This situation has not led the (...)
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  13. Ward E. Jones (2012). A Lover's Shame. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (5):615-630.score: 24.0
    Shame is one of the more painful consequences of loving someone; my beloved’s doing something immoral can cause me to be ashamed of her. The guiding thought behind this paper is that explaining this phenomenon can tell us something about what it means to love. The phenomenon of beloved-induced shame has been largely neglected by philosophers working on shame, most of whom conceive of shame as being a reflexive attitude. Bennett Helm has recently suggested that in (...)
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  14. Julien Deonna, Fabrice Teroni & Raffaele Rodogno (2011). In Defense of Shame. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Is shame social? Is it superficial? Is it a morally problematic emotion? Researchers in disciplines as different as psychology, philosophy, and anthropology have thought so. But what is the nature of shame and why are claims regarding its social nature and moral standing interesting and important? Do they tell us anything worthwhile about the value of shame and its potential legal and political applications? -/- In this book, Julien Deonna, Raffaele Rodogno, and Fabrice Teroni propose an original (...)
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  15. Glen Pettigrove & Nigel Parsons (2012). Shame: A Case Study of Collective Emotion. Social Theory and Practice 38 (3):504-530.score: 24.0
    This paper outlines what we call a network model of collective emotions. Drawing upon this model, we explore the significance of collective emotions in the Palestine-Israel conflict. We highlight some of the ways in which collective shame, in particular, has contributed to the evolution of this conflict. And we consider some of the obstacles that shame and the pride-restoring narratives to which it gave birth pose to the conflict’s resolution.
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  16. Jenny Chamarette & Jennifer Higgins (eds.) (2010). Guilt and Shame: Essays in French Literature, Thought and Visual Culture. Peter Lang.score: 24.0
    This collection of essays, on French and francophone prose, poetry, drama, visual art, cinema and thought, assesses guilt and shame in relation to structures of ...
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  17. Fabrice Teroni & Julien A. Deonna (2011). Is Shame a Social Emotion. In Anita Konzelmann Ziv, Keith Lehrer & Hans Bernard Schmid (eds.), Self-Evaluation: Affective and Social Grounds of Intentionality. Springer.score: 24.0
    In this article, we present, assess and give reasons to reject the popular claim that shame is essentially social. We start by presenting several theses which the social claim has motivated in the philosophical literature. All of them, in their own way, regard shame as displaying a structure in which ‘others’ play an essential role. We argue that while all these theses are true of some important families of shame episodes, none of them generalize so as to (...)
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  18. Majid Ghorbani, Yuan Liao, Sinan Çayköylü & Masud Chand (2013). Guilt, Shame, and Reparative Behavior: The Effect of Psychological Proximity. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):311-323.score: 24.0
    Research has paid scant attention to reparative behavior to compensate for unintended wrongdoing or to the role of emotions in doing the right thing. We propose a new approach to investigating reparative behavior by looking at moral emotions and psychological proximity. In this study, we compare the effects of moral emotions (guilt and shame) on the level of compensation for financial harm. We also investigate the role of transgressors’ perceived psychological proximity to the victims of wrongdoing. Our hypotheses were (...)
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  19. Krista K. Thomason (2013). Shame and Contempt in Kant's Moral Theory. Kantian Review 18 (2):221-240.score: 24.0
    Attitudes like shame and contempt seem to be at odds with basic tenets of Kantian moral theory. I argue on the contrary that both attitudes play a central role in Kantian morality. Shame and contempt are attitudes that protect our love of honour, or the esteem we have for ourselves as moral persons. The question arises: how are these attitudes compatible with Kant's claim that all persons deserve respect? I argue that the proper object of shame and (...)
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  20. Thorian R. Harris (2014). Aristotle and Confucius on the Socioeconomics of Shame. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):323-342.score: 24.0
    The sociopolitical significance Aristotle and Confucius attribute to possessing a sense of shame serves to emphasize the importance of its development. Aristotle maintains that social class and wealth are prerequisites for its acquisition, while Confucius is optimistic that it can be developed regardless of socioeconomic considerations. The difference between their positions is largely due to competing views of praiseworthy dispositions. While Aristotle conceives of praiseworthy dispositions as “consistent” traits of character, traits that calcifiy as one reaches adulthood, Confucius offers (...)
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  21. Claudia Welz (2014). Scenes of Shame, Social Roles, and the Play with Masks. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (1):107-121.score: 24.0
    This article explores various scenes of shame, raising the questions of what shame discloses about the self and how this self-disclosure takes place. Thereby, the common idea that shame discloses the self’s debasement will be challenged. The dramatic dialectics of showing and hiding display a much more ambiguous, dynamic self-image as result of an interactive evaluation of oneself by oneself and others. Seeing oneself seen contributes to the sense of who one becomes. From being absorbed in what (...)
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  22. Nathaniel F. Barrett (forthcoming). A Confucian Theory of Shame. Sophia:1-21.score: 24.0
    This essay develops a Confucian theory of shame within a framework of related concepts, including concepts of value, personhood, and human flourishing. It proposes that all of these concepts should be understood in terms of a metaphysical concept of harmony (he). Moreover, it argues that this concept of harmony entails a relational experience of value, such that the experience of self-value and ‘other value’ are deeply intertwined. An important implication of this theory is that the harmonic realization of value (...)
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  23. Rupert Brown, Jesse Allpress, Roger Giner Sorolla, Julien Deonna & Fabrice Teroni (2014). Two Faces of Shame: Moral Shame and Image Shame Differently Predict Positive and Negative Responses to Ingroup Wrongdoing. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 40 (10):1270-1284.score: 24.0
    This article proposes distinctions between guilt and two forms of shame: Guilt arises from a violated norm and is characterized by a focus on specific behavior; shame can be characterized by a threatened social image (Image Shame) or a threatened moral essence (Moral Shame). Applying this analysis to group-based emotions, three correlational studies are reported, set in the context of atrocities committed by (British) ingroup members during the Iraq war (Ns = 147, 256, 399). Results showed (...)
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  24. Eva-Maria Engelen (2009). Anger, Shame and Justice: The Regulative Function of Emotions in the Ancient and Modern World. In Birgitt Röttger-Rössler & Hans Markowitsch (eds.), Emotions as Bio-cultural Processes. Springer. 395-413.score: 24.0
    Analyzing the ancient Greek point of view concerning anger, shame and justice and a very modern one, one can see, that anger has a regulative function, but shame does as well. Anger puts the other in his place, thereby regulating hierarchies. Shame regulates the social relations of recognition. And both emotions also have an evaluative function, because anger evaluates a situation with regard to a humiliation; shame, with regard to a misdemeanor. In addition, attention has to (...)
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  25. René Thun (2010). Ricoeur on Conscience: His Blind Spot and the Homecoming of Shame. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 1 (1):45-54.score: 24.0
    In his hermeneutic of the self, which he is working out in his Oneself as another , Ricœur writes about the constitutive conditions of conscience as a dimension of the experience of passivity. For the following considerations, I will argue that Ricœur is very right in maintaining the moral impact of the notion of conscience; but if we on the other hand remember older writings by Ricœur like Fallible Man we have to admit that something is missed in the chapter (...)
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  26. Michael Boiger, Simon De Deyne & Batja Mesquita (2013). Emotions in “the World”: Cultural Practices, Products, and Meanings of Anger and Shame in Two Individualist Cultures. Frontiers in Psychology 4:867.score: 24.0
    Three studies tested the idea that people’s cultural worlds are structured in ways that promote and highlight emotions and emotional responses that are beneficial in achieving central goals in their culture. Based on the idea that U.S. Americans strive for competitive individualism, while (Dutch-speaking) Belgians favor a more egalitarian variant of individualism, we predicted that anger and shame, as well as their associated responses, would be beneficial to different extents in these two cultural contexts. A questionnaire study found that (...)
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  27. Kristján Kristjánsson (2014). Is Shame an Ugly Emotion? Four Discourses—Two Contrasting Interpretations for Moral Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (5):495-511.score: 24.0
    This paper offers a sustained philosophical meditation on contrasting interpretations of the emotion of shame within four academic discourses—social psychology, psychological anthropology, educational psychology and Aristotelian scholarship—in order to elicit their implications for moral education. It turns out that within each of these discourses there is a mainstream interpretation which emphasises shame’s expendability or moral ugliness (and where shame is typically described as guilt’s ugly sister), but also a heterodox interpretation which seeks to retrieve and defend (...). As the heterodox interpretation seems to offer a more realistic picture of shame’s role in moral education, the provenance of the mainstream interpretation merits scrutiny. I argue that social scientific studies of the concept of shame, based on its supposed phenomenology, incorporate biases in favour of excessive, rather than medial, forms of the emotion. I suggest ways forward for more balanced analyses of the nature, moral justification and educative role of shame. (shrink)
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  28. Raúl López-Pérez (2010). Guilt and Shame: An Axiomatic Analysis. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 69 (4):569-586.score: 24.0
    Using the machinery of Game Theory, this article analyzes how shame and guilt affect preferences. Based on abundant psychological literature, we posit that the preference ordering of someone who can feel shame (or guilt) must satisfy a number of axioms and prove that it can be represented by a particular utility function. Understanding how shame and guilt work is important to explain why people respect social norms and exhibit prosocial behavior, many times contrary to their material interest.
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  29. Phil Hutchinson (2008). Shame and Philosophy: An Investigation in the Philosophy of Emotions and Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Experimental methods and conceptual confusion : philosophy, science, and what emotions really are -- To 'make our voices resonate' or 'to be silent'? : shame as fundamental ontology -- Emotion, cognition, and world -- Shame and world.
     
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  30. Michael L. Morgan (2008). On Shame. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Shame, the Holocaust, and dark times -- Locating moral shame -- Film, literature, and the ramification of shame -- Beyond shame : emotional reaction and moral response.
     
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  31. Raffaele Rodogno (2008). Shame and Guilt in Restorative Justice. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law 14 (2):142-176.score: 24.0
    In this article, I examine the relevance and desirability of shame and guilt to restorative justice conferences. I argue that a careful study of the psychology of shame and guilt reveals that both emotions possess traits that can be desirable and traits that can be undesirable for restoration. More in particular, having presented the aims of restorative justice, the importance of face-to-face conferences in reaching these aims, the emotional dynamics that take place within such conferences, and the relevant (...)
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  32. Ayfer Dost & Bilge Yagmurlu (2008). Are Constructiveness and Destructiveness Essential Features of Guilt and Shame Feelings Respectively? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (2):109–129.score: 21.0
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  33. Thom Brooks (2007). Hiding From Humanity: Disgust, Shame, and the Law. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):329–331.score: 21.0
    This is a book review of Martha C. Nussbaum - "Hiding from Humanity".
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  34. Micah Lott (2012). Ignorance, Shame and Love of Truth: Diagnosing the Sophist’s Error in Plato’s Sophist. Phoenix (1-2):36-56.score: 21.0
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  35. Chloë FitzGerald (forthcoming). Extended Review Article: Defending Shame. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy.score: 21.0
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  36. Klaus Jaffe (2008). Evolution of Shame as an Adaptation to Social Punishment and its Contribution to Social Cohesiveness. Complexity 14 (2):46-52.score: 21.0
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  37. Karen Sanders, Stephen Pattison & Brian Hurwitz (2011). Tracking Shame and Humiliation in Accident and Emergency. Nursing Philosophy 12 (2):83-93.score: 21.0
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  38. Christopher Boehm (2010/2012). Moral Origins: The Evolution of Virtue, Altruism, and Shame. Basic Books.score: 21.0
    Darwin's inner voice -- Living the virtuous life -- Of altruism and free riders -- Knowing our immediate predecessors -- Resurrecting some venerable ancestors -- A natural Garden of Eden -- The positive side of social selection -- Learning morals across the generations -- Work of the moral majority -- Pleistocene ups, downs, and crashes -- Testing the selection-by-reputation hypothesis -- The evolution of morals -- Epilogue: humanity's moral future.
     
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  39. Gregory M. Simon (2005). Shame, Knowing, and Anthropology: On Robert I. Levy and the Study of Emotion. Ethos 33 (4):493-498.score: 21.0
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  40. Gabriele Taylor (1985). Pride, Shame, and Guilt: Emotions of Self-Assessment. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This discussion of pride, shame, and guilt centers on the beliefs involved in the experience of any of these emotions. Through a detailed study, the author demonstrates how these beliefs are alike--in that they are all directed towards the self--and how they differ. The experience of these three emotions are illustrated by examples taken from English literature. These concrete cases supply a context for study and indicate the complexity of the situations in which these emotions usually occur.
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  41. Raffaele Rodogno (2009). Shame, Guilt, and Punishment. Law and Philosophy 28 (5):429 - 464.score: 18.0
    The emotions of shame and guilt have recently appeared in debates concerning legal punishment, in particular in the context of so called shaming and guilting penalties. The bulk of the discussion, however, has focussed on the justification of such penalties. The focus of this article is broader than that. My aim is to offer an analysis of the concept of legal punishment that sheds light on the possible connections between punishing practices such as shaming and guilting penalties, on the (...)
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  42. Heidi Maibom (2010). The Descent of Shame. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (3):566 - 594.score: 18.0
    Shame is a painful emotion concerned with failure to live up to certain standards, norms, or ideals. The subject feels that she falls in the regard of others; she feels watched and exposed. As a result, she feels bad about the person that she is. The most popular view of shame is that someone only feels ashamed if she fails to live up to standards, norms, or ideals that she, herself, accepts. In this paper, I provide support for (...)
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  43. Dan Zahavi (2010). Shame and the Exposed Self. In Jonathan Webber (ed.), Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. Routledge.score: 18.0
    On many standard readings, shame is an emotion that in an accentuated manner targets and involves the self in its totality. In shame, the self is affected by a global devaluation: it feels defective, objectionable, condemned. The basic question I wish to raise and discuss is the following: What does the fact that we feel shame tell us about the nature of self? What kind of self is it that is affected in shame?
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  44. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2002). Jealousy, Shame, and the Rival. Philosophical Studies 108 (1-2):143 - 150.score: 18.0
    This essay is a critique of the two chapters on jealousy in Jerome Neu's book A Tear is an Intellectual Thing. The rival — as anobject of both fear and hatred — is of central importance in romantic jealousy, but it is here argued that the role of the rival cannot be fully understood in Neu's account of jealousy and that shame (not noted by Neu) must be seen as central to the concept of jealousy if the role of (...)
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  45. M. K. Sokolon (2013). The Shameless Truth: Shame and Friendship in Aristotle. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (4):447-465.score: 18.0
    Does shame have a limited moral role because it is associated with a loss of self-respect or is it an important emotional support for socially beneficial behaviours? Aristotle supports the latter position. In his ethical theory, he famously claims that shame is a semi-virtue essential in the habituation of moral norms. He clarifies this role in the Rhetoric’s lesser-known distinction between true and conventional shame, which implies human beings make subjective evaluations of those appropriated cultural norms. Importantly, (...)
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  46. Richard Paul Hamilton (2010). Shame and Philosophy. Res Publica 16 (4):431-439.score: 18.0
    Shame is a ubiquitous and highly intriguing feature of human experience. It can motivate but it can also paralyse. It is something which one can legitimately demand of another, but is not usually experienced as a choice. Perpetrators of atrocities can remain defiantly immune to shame while their victims are racked by it. It would be hard to understand any society or culture without understanding the characteristic occasions upon which shame is expected and where it is mitigated. (...)
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  47. Ellen K. Feder (2011). Tilting the Ethical Lens: Shame, Disgust, and the Body in Question. Hypatia 26 (3):632-650.score: 18.0
    Cheryl Chase has argued that “the problem” of intersex is one of “stigma and trauma, not gender,” as those focused on medical management would have it. Despite frequent references to shame in the critical literature, there has been surprisingly little analysis of shame, or of the disgust that provokes it. This paper investigates the function of disgust in the medical management of intersex and seeks to understand the consequences—material and moral—with respect to the shame it provokes.Conventional ethical (...)
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  48. Sandy Berkovski, A Hobbesian Theory of Shame.score: 18.0
    On most accounts present in the literature, the complex experience of shame has the injury to self-esteem as its main component. A major objection to this idea is that it fails to differentiate between shame and disappointment in oneself. I argue that previous attempts to respond to the objection are unsatisfactory. I argue further that the distinction should refer to the different ways the subject’s self-esteem is formed. A necessary requirement for shame is that the standards and (...)
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  49. Erin N. Taylor & Lora Ebert Wallace (2012). For Shame: Feminism, Breastfeeding Advocacy, and Maternal Guilt. Hypatia 27 (1):76-98.score: 18.0
    In this paper, we provide a new framework for understanding infant-feeding-related maternal guilt and shame, placing these in the context of feminist theoretical and psychological accounts of the emotions of self-assessment. Whereas breastfeeding advocacy has been critiqued for its perceived role in inducing maternal guilt, we argue that the emotion women often feel surrounding infant feeding may be better conceptualized as shame in its tendency to involve a negative self-assessment—a failure to achieve an idealized notion of good motherhood. (...)
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  50. Hans Muller (2008). Varieties of Shame. Philosophy of Management 6 (3):87-96.score: 18.0
    This paper takes seriously the idea that one person in a workplace could cause a co-worker to feel ashamed without realising it. This is because the most widely accepted conception of shame does not adequately explain the eliciting conditions of that emotion. I begin by setting out what I take to be the most common account of shame. Next, I note what predictions we would make about which situations will elicit shame in a subject were we to (...)
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