Search results for 'simplicity of mental acts' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Paloma Pérez-Ilzarbe (2009). Jerónimo Pardo on the Unity of Mental Propositions. In J. Biard (ed.), Le langage mental du Moyen Âge à l'Âge Classique. Peeters Publishers.score: 891.0
    Originally motivated by a sophism, Pardo's discussion about the unity of mental propositions allows him to elaborate on his ideas about the nature of propositions. His option for a non-composite character of mental propositions is grounded in an original view about syncategorems: propositions have a syncategorematic signification, which allows them to signify aliquid aliqualiter, just by virtue of the mental copula, without the need of any added categorematic element. Pardo's general claim about the simplicity of (...) propositions is developed into several specific thesis about mental propositions: a) it is not judgement which gives its unity to mental propositions, but judicative acts always follow some previous apprehensive act that is simple in its own right; b) this simplicity is compatible with a certain kind of complexity, that can be explained in terms of the "causal history" of the acts of knowing; c) traditional conceptions about subject and predicate must be recast, while keeping their usual explicative power concerning logical properties; d) of course, the traditional conception about the copula has been modified, giving rise to a fully innovative conception of the nature of mental propositions. Nevertheless, this innovative conception of mental language seems still infected by certain "common sense" prejudices, which lead Pardo to propose also a provocative conception of vocal language, which I consider unnecessary. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Richard W. Taylor (1963). The Stream of Thoughts Versus Mental Acts. Philosophical Quarterly 13 (October):311-321.score: 532.5
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Gilbert Ryle (2000). Courses of Action or the Uncatchableness of Mental Acts. Philosophy 75 (3):331-344.score: 524.3
    We falter and stammer when trying to describe our own mental acts. Many mental acts, including thinking, are what the author calls ‘chain-undertakings’, that is, courses of action with some over-arching purpose governing the moment-by-moment sub-acts of which we are introspectively aware. Hence the intermittency and sporadicness of the passage of mental activity which constitutes thinking about something.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Richard E. Aquila (1976). Intentionality: A Study Of Mental Acts. Penn St University Press.score: 477.8
  5. M. M. Large, C. J. Ryan, O. B. Nielssen & R. A. Hayes (2008). The Danger of Dangerousness: Why We Must Remove the Dangerousness Criterion From Our Mental Health Acts. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):877-881.score: 451.5
    Objectives: The mental health legislation of most developed countries includes either a dangerousness criterion or an obligatory dangerousness criterion (ODC). A dangerousness criterion holds that mentally ill people may be given treatment without consent if they are deemed to be a risk to themselves or others. An ODC holds that mentally ill people may be given treatment without consent only if they are deemed to be a risk to themselves or others. This paper argues that the dangerousness criterion is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Dallas Willard (1981). Intentionality: A Study of Mental Acts. Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (1):132-134.score: 447.8
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. David Barnett, On the Simplicity of Mental Beings.score: 438.8
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Robert E. Innis (1973). Polanyi's Model of Mental Acts. New Scholasticism 47 (2):147-178.score: 438.8
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Gilbert Ry le (2000). Courses of Action or the Uncatchableness of Mental Acts. Philosophy 75:331.score: 438.8
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Matthew M. Large, Christopher J. Ryan, Olav B. Nielssen & R. A. Hayes (2008). The Danger of Dangerousness: Why We Must Remove the Dangerousness Criterion From Our Mental Health Acts. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):877-881.score: 414.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Kathleen R. Gibson (1991). Genetically Determined Neural Modules Versus Mental Constructional Acts in the Genesis of Human Intelligence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):308-309.score: 405.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Yiwei Zheng (1998). Metaphysical Simplicity and Semantical Complexity of Connotative Terms in Ockham's Mental Language. Modern Schoolman 75 (4):253-264.score: 405.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Joëlle Proust (2001). A Plea for Mental Acts. Synthese 129 (1):105-128.score: 329.3
    A prominent but poorly understood domain of human agency is mental action, i.e., thecapacity for reaching specific desirable mental statesthrough an appropriate monitoring of one's own mentalprocesses. The present paper aims to define mentalacts, and to defend their explanatory role againsttwo objections. One is Gilbert Ryle's contention thatpostulating mental acts leads to an infinite regress.The other is a different although related difficulty,here called the access puzzle: How can the mindalready know how to act in order to (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Joëlle Proust (forthcoming). Mental Acts as Natural Kinds. In Till Vierkant, Julian Kieverstein & Andy Clark (eds.), Decomposing the will. Oxford University Press.score: 290.3
    This chapter examines whether, and in what sense, one can speak of agentive mental events. An adequate characterization of mental acts should respond to three main worries. First, mental acts cannot have pre-specified goal contents. For example, one cannot prespecify the content of a judgment or of a deliberation. Second, mental acts seem to depend crucially on receptive attitudes. Third, it does not seem that intentions play any role in mental actions. Given (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Indrek Reiland (2012). Propositional Attitudes and Mental Acts. Thought 1 (3):239-245.score: 288.0
    Peter Hanks and Scott Soames have recently developed similar views of propositional attitudes on which they consist at least partly of being disposed to perform mental acts. Both think that to believe a proposition is at least partly to be disposed to perform the primitive propositional act: one the performance of which is part of the performance of any other propositional act. However, they differ over whether the primitive act is the forceless entertaining or the forceful judging. In (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Simone Gozzano (2008). Tropes' Simplicity and Mental Causation. Ontos Verlag.score: 288.0
    In this paper I first try to clarify the essential features of tropes and then I use the resulting analysis to cope with the problem of mental causation. As to the first step, I argue that tropes, beside being essentially particular and abstract, are simple, where such a simplicity can be considered either from a phenomenal point of view or from a structural point of view. Once this feature is spelled out, the role tropes may play in solving (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Barry Smith (1987). Husserl, Language and the Ontology of the Act. In D. D. Buzzetti & M. Ferriani (eds.), Speculative Grammar, Universal Grammar, and Philosophical Analysis of Language. John Benjamins.score: 273.0
    The ontology of language is concerned with the relations between uses of language, both overt and covert, and other entities, whether in the world or in the mind of the thinking subject. We attempt a first survey of the sorts of relations which might come into question for such an ontology, including: relations between referring uses of expressions and their objects, relations between the use of a (true) sentence and that in the world which makes it true, relations between (...) acts on the one hand and underlying mental states (attitudes, beliefs), on the other, relations between my acts and states, associated uses of language and overt actions on my part and on the part of those other subjects with whom I communicate. (shrink)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Rachel Goodman (forthcoming). Against the Mental Files Conception of Singular Thought. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-25.score: 270.0
    It has become popular of late to identify the phenomenon of thinking a singular (or de re) thought with that of thinking with a mental file. Proponents of the mental files conception of singular thought (the MFC) claim that one thinks a singular thought about an object o iff one employs a mental file to think about o. I argue that this is false by arguing that there are what I call descriptive mental files, so some (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Robert Welsh Jordan, Being and Time: Some Aspects of the Ego's Involvement in His Mental Life.score: 261.0
    The most obvious cases of ego-involvement in conscious life are those which Husserl calls conscious acts or cogitationes.[2] They are the most obvious cases because they are the ones in which the ego explicitly involves himself in some way ; they exhibit the character of being engaged in by the ego or having been engaged in by him. This ego-quality or character belongs demonstrably to every conscious process in which the ego engages or lives. In the ego's conscious life, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Peter T. Geach (1957). Mental Acts: Their Content And Their Objects. Humanities Press.score: 259.5
    ACT, CONTENT, AND OBJECT THE TITLE I have chosen for this work is a mere label for a set of problems; the controversial views that have historically been ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. T. Lucas (2008). Implementing the Mental Capacity Act and the Code of Practice – a Developing Scenario. Clinical Ethics 3 (2):63-68.score: 259.5
    This article sets out a scenario highlighting some of the issues to be faced by NHS hospitals when dealing with patients who may require treatment under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. The article sets out matters to consider when dealing with patients in A&E, assessments of best interests, emergency treatment, lasting powers of attorney and transferring patients to nursing homes. All of these matters come under the remit of the Act.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Natalie F. Banner (2011). The 'Bournewood Gap' and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards in the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (2):123-126.score: 258.0
    The Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DOLS) were recently introduced into the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) via an amendment to mental health legislation in England and Wales. As Shah (2011) discusses, the rationale behind creating these protocols was to close what is commonly referred to as the ‘Bournewood gap’; a legislative loophole that allowed a severely autistic man (H.L.) who did not initially dissent to admission to be detained in a hospital and deprived of his liberty in his ‘best (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Andrew Gleeson (2010). More on the Power of God: A Rejoinder to William Hasker. Sophia 49 (4):617-629.score: 258.0
    In ‘The Power of God’ (Gleeson 2010) I elaborate and defend an argument by the late D.Z. Phillips against definitions of omnipotence in terms of logical possibility. In ‘Which God? What Power? A Response to Andrew Gleeson’ (Hasker 2010), William Hasker criticizes my defense of Phillips’ argument. Here I contend his criticisms do not succeed. I distinguish three definitions of omnipotence in terms of logical possibility. Hasker agrees that the first fails. The second fails because negative properties (like disembodiedment and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Ajit Shah (2011). The Paradox of the Assessment of Capacity Under the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (2):111-115.score: 258.0
    The mental capacity Act 2005 (MCA; Department of Constitutional Affairs 2005) was partially implemented on April 1, 2007, and fully implemented on October 1, 2007, in England and Wales. The MCA provides a statutory framework for people who lack decision-making capacity (DMC) or who have capacity and want to plan for the future when they may lack DMC. Health care and social care providers need to be familiar with the MCA and the associated legal structures and processes. The MCA (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Anthony Maden (2007). England's New Mental Health Act Represents Law Catching Up with Science: A Commentary on Peter Lepping's Ethical Analysis of the New Mental Health Legislation in England and Wales. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):16-.score: 258.0
    When seen in the historical context of psychiatry's relatively recent discovery of violence and risk, along with society's adoption of more risk-averse attitudes, the Mental Health Act 2007 in England and Wales is an ethical and proportionate measure.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. W. B. Gallie (1947). Does Psychology Study Mental Acts or Dispositions, Part I. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 134:134-153.score: 250.5
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. C. A. Mace (1947). Does Psychology Study Mental Acts or Dispositions, Part III. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 164:164-174.score: 250.5
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. W. J. H. Sprott (1947). Does Psychology Study Mental Acts or Dispositions, Part II. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 154:154-163.score: 250.5
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Lorne Falkenstein (1995). Hume and Reid on the Simplicity of the Soul. Hume Studies 21 (1):25-45.score: 243.0
    Reid is well known for rejecting the "philosophy of ideas"--a theory of mental representation that he claimed to find in its most vitriolic form in Hume. But there was another component of Hume's philosophy that exerted an equally powerful influence on Reid: Hume's attack on the notion of spiritual substance in _Treatise 1.4.5. I summarize this neglected aspect of Hume's philosophy and argue that much of Reid's epistemology can be explained as an attempt to buttress dualism against the effects (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Michael Wilby (2010). The Simplicity of Mutual Knowledge. Philosophical Explorations 13 (2):83-100.score: 238.5
    Mutual perceptual knowledge is a prevalent feature of our everyday lives, yet appears to be exceptionally difficult to characterise in an acceptable way. This paper argues for a renewed understanding of Stephen Schiffer’s iterative approach to mutual knowledge, according to which mutual knowledge requires an infinite number of overlapping, embedded mental states. It is argued that the charge of ‘psychological implausibility’ that normally accompanies discussion of this approach can be offset by identifying mutual knowledge, not with the infinite iterations (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Peter Geach (1957). Mental Acts. Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 220.5
    ACT, CONTENT, AND OBJECT THE TITLE I have chosen for this work is a mere label for a set of problems; the controversial views that have historically been ...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Gyula Klima, Semantic Complexity and Syntactic Simplicity in Ockham's Mental Language.score: 220.5
    In these comments I am going to argue that Yiwei Zheng's paper, by postulating an imaginary mental language in a proposed new interpretation of Ockham's conception of mental language, provides us with an imaginary solution to what turns out to be an imaginary problem. Having said this, however, I hasten to add that the paper has undeniable merits in pointing us in the right direction for revealing the imaginary character of the problem.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Angela Mendelovici (2013). Reliable Misrepresentation and Tracking Theories of Mental Representation. Philosophical Studies 165 (2):421-443.score: 216.0
    It is a live possibility that certain of our experiences reliably misrepresent the world around us. I argue that tracking theories of mental representation (e.g. those of Dretske, Fodor, and Millikan) have difficulty allowing for this possibility, and that this is a major consideration against them.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Joseph Shieber (2013). Toward a Truly Social Epistemology: Babbage, the Division of Mental Labor, and the Possibility of Socially Distributed Warrant. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (2):266-294.score: 216.0
    In what follows, I appeal to Charles Babbage’s discussion of the division of mental labor to provide evidence that—at least with respect to the social acquisition, storage, retrieval, and transmission of knowledge—epistemologists have, for a broad range of phenomena of crucial importance to actual knowers in their epistemic practices in everyday life, failed adequately to appreciate the significance of socially distributed cognition. If the discussion here is successful, I will have demonstrated that a particular presumption widely held within the (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Michael Jungert (2013). Mental Realities—the Concept of Mental Disorder and the Mind-Body Problem. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 216.0
    Mental realities—the concept of mental disorder and the mind-body problem.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Panagiotis Oulis (2012). On the Nature of Mental Disorder: Towards an Objectivist Account. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (5):343-357.score: 216.0
    According to the predominant view within contemporary philosophy of psychiatry, mental disorders involve essentially personal and societal values, and thus, the concept of mental disorder cannot, even in principle, be elucidated in a thoroughly objective manner. Several arguments have been adduced in support of this impossibility thesis. My critical examination of two master arguments advanced to this effect by Derek Bolton and Jerome Wakefield, respectively, raises serious doubts about their soundness. Furthermore, I articulate an alternative, thoroughly objective, though (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Rachel Cooper (2014). Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Karnac.score: 216.0
    Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Karnac, 2014) evaluates the latest edition of the D.S.M.The publication of D.S.M-5 in 2013 brought many changes. Diagnosing the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders asks whether the D.S.M.-5 classifies the right people in the right way. It is aimed at patients, mental health professionals, and academics with an interest in mental health. Issues addressed include: How is the D.S.M. affected by financial links with the pharmaceutical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Singh Sa Singh Ar (2011). Brain-Mind Dyad, Human Experience, the Consciousness Tetrad and Lattice of Mental Operations: And Further, The Need to Integrate Knowledge From Diverse Disciplines. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):6.score: 216.0
    Brain, Mind and Consciousness are the research concerns of psychiatrists, psychologists, neurologists, cognitive neuroscientists and philosophers. All of them are working in different and important ways to understand the workings of the brain, the mysteries of the mind and to grasp that elusive concept called consciousness. Although they are all justified in forwarding their respective researches, it is also necessary to integrate these diverse appearing understandings and try and get a comprehensive perspective that is, hopefully, more than the sum of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Rachel Cooper, Classifying Madness: A Philosophical Examination of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.score: 216.0
    Classifying Madness (Springer, 2005) concerns philosophical problems with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, more commonly known as the D.S.M. The D.S.M. is published by the American Psychiatric Association and aims to list and describe all mental disorders. The first half of Classifying Madness asks whether the project of constructing a classification of mental disorders that reflects natural distinctions makes sense. Chapters examine the nature of mental illness, and also consider whether mental disorders (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Loveday Alexander (2003). Mapping Early Christianity Acts and the Shape of Early Church History. Interpretation 57 (2):163-173.score: 216.0
    It is no coincidence that the church in Luke's narrative bore the nickname “The Way.” The Evangelist's “mental map” of the early church's development is more fluid and open than the hierarchical model of later centuries.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Irina Basieva & Andrei Khrennikov (2014). Complementarity of Mental Observables. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):74-78.score: 216.0
    The aim of this note is to complete the discussion on the possibility of creation of quantum-like (QL) representation for the question order effect which was presented by Wang and Busemeyer (2013). We analyze the role of a fundamental feature of mental operators (given, e.g., by questions), namely, their complementarity.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Arno L. Goudsmit (2000). On the Construction of Mental Objects in Third and in First Persons. Foundations of Science 5 (4):399-428.score: 213.0
    This paper deals with some formal properties of objects that are supposed to be internal to persons, that is, mental structures and mental functions. Depending on the ways of talking about these internal objects, they will appear different. Two types of discourse will be presented, to be called the realist and the nominalist discourses, and for eachdiscourse I will focus upon the construction of `self'.The realist discourse assumes an identity between the person and his construction of himself. I (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. V. C. C. (1958). Mental Acts. Review of Metaphysics 11 (4):691-691.score: 211.5
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. David Gil (1983). Intuitionism, Transformational Generative Grammar and Mental Acts. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 14 (3):231-254.score: 211.5
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Olli Koistinen (2008). Kant on the Simplicity of the Soul. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 16:163-169.score: 211.0
    Kant saw in an old argument a threat to his criticism of traditional rational psychology. He called this argument the Achilles of all dialectical inferences. What the Achilles purports to prove is that the unity of consciousness requires the simplicity of the soul. The argument proceeds from, a distinction between two types ofactions that are ascribable to a subject. For example, when we say that a school of fish moves, this movement can be explained by referring to the movements (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2008). The Reality and Classification of Mental Disorders. Dissertation, University of Chicagoscore: 210.0
    This dissertation examines psychiatry from a philosophy of science perspective, focusing on issues of realism and classification. Questions addressed in the dissertation include: What evidence is there for the reality of mental disorders? Are any mental disorders natural kinds? When are disease explanations of abnormality warranted? How should mental disorders be classified? -/- In addressing issues concerning the reality of mental disorders, I draw on the accounts of realism defended by Ian Hacking and William Wimsatt, arguing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Todd Buras (2009). An Argument Against Causal Theories of Mental Content. American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):117-129.score: 210.0
    Some mental states are about themselves. Nothing is a cause of itself. So some mental states are not about their causes; they are about things distinct from their causes. If this argument is sound, it spells trouble for causal theories of mental content—the precise sort of trouble depending on the precise sort of causal theory. This paper shows that the argument is sound (§§1-3), and then spells out the trouble (§4).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Thomas K. Metzinger (2013). The Myth of Cognitive Agency Subpersonal Thinking as a Cyclically Recurring Loss of Mental Autonomy. Frontiers in Psychology 4:931.score: 210.0
    This metatheoretical paper investigates mind wandering from the perspective of philosophy of mind. It has two central claims. The first is that on a conceptual level, mind wandering can be fruitfully described as a specific form of mental autonomy loss. The second is that most of what we call “conscious thought” is better analysed as a subpersonal process that more often than not lacks crucial properties traditionally taken to be the hallmark of personal-level cognition, such as mental agency, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Liz Brosnan (2012). Power and Participation: An Examination of the Dynamics of Mental Health Service-User Involvement in Ireland. Studies in Social Justice 6 (1):45-66.score: 210.0
    In this paper we set out the context in which experiences of mental distress occur with an emphasis on the contributions of social and structural factors and then make a case for the use of intersectionality as an analytic and methodological framework for understanding these factors. We then turn to the political urgency for taking up the concept of recovery and argue for the importance of research and practice that addresses professional domination of the field, and that promotes ongoing (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Julie M. Aultman (2010). The Diseased Embodied Mind: Constructing a Conception of Mental Disease in Relation to the Person. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (4):321-332.score: 210.0
    Without a better understanding of mental disease, patients diagnosed with a mental disease may be mistreated clinically and/or socially, and caregivers and families may be wrongfully blamed for causing the disease and/or for not effectively helping and developing meaningful relationships with the patient as person. In trying to understand mental disease and why its various dimensions raise difficulties for our systems of classification and our medical models of diagnosis and treatment, a framework is required. This framework will (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000