Search results for 'skill' (try it on Scholar)

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Bibliography: Skills in Philosophy of Action
  1. Mohan Matthen (forthcoming). Play, Skill, and the Origins of Perceptual Art. British Journal of Aesthetics.score: 24.0
    Art is universal across cultures. Yet, it is biologically expensive because of the energy expended and reduced vigilance. Why do humans make and contemplate it? This paper advances a thesis about the psychological origins of perceptual art. First, it delineates the aspects of art that need explaining: not just why it is attractive, but why fine execution and form—which have to do with how the attraction is achieved—matter over and above attractiveness. Second, it states certain constraints: we need to explain (...)
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  2. Matt Stichter (2007). Ethical Expertise: The Skill Model of Virtue. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):183 - 194.score: 24.0
    Julia Annas is one of the few modern writers on virtue that has attempted to recover the ancient idea that virtues are similar to skills. In doing so, she is arguing for a particular account of virtue, one in which the intellectual structure of virtue is analogous to the intellectual structure of practical skills. The main benefit of this skill model of virtue is that it can ground a plausible account of the moral epistemology of virtue. This benefit, though, (...)
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  3. Ellen Fridland (2014). They've Lost Control: Reflections on Skill. Synthese 191 (12):2729-2750.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I submit that it is the controlled part of skilled action, that is, that part of an action that accounts for the exact, nuanced ways in which a skilled performer modifies, adjusts and guides her performance for which an adequate, philosophical theory of skill must account. I will argue that neither Jason Stanley nor Hubert Dreyfus have an adequate account of control. Further, and perhaps surprisingly, I will argue that both Stanley and Dreyfus relinquish an account (...)
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  4. Jason D. Swartwood (2013). Wisdom as an Expert Skill. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (3):511-528.score: 24.0
    Practical wisdom is the intellectual virtue that enables a person to make reliably good decisions about how, all-things-considered, to live. As such, it is a lofty and important ideal to strive for. It is precisely this loftiness and importance that gives rise to important questions about wisdom: Can real people develop it? If so, how? What is the nature of wisdom as it manifests itself in real people? I argue that we can make headway answering these questions by modeling wisdom (...)
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  5. Andrew Geeves, Doris J. F. McIlwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen (2013). To Think or Not To Think: The Apparent Paradox of Expert Skill in Music Performance. Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-18.score: 24.0
    Expert skill in music performance involves an apparent paradox. On stage, expert musicians are required accurately to retrieve information that has been encoded over hours of practice. Yet they must also remain open to the demands of the ever-changing situational contingencies with which they are faced during performance. To further explore this apparent paradox and the way in which it is negotiated by expert musicians, this article profiles theories presented by Roger Chaffin, Hubert Dreyfus and Tony and Helga Noice. (...)
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  6. John Sutton (2013). Skill and Collaboration in the Evolution of Human Cognition. Biological Theory 8 (1):28-36.score: 24.0
    I start with a brief assessment of the implications of Sterelny’s anti-individualist, anti-internalist apprentice learning model for a more historical and interdisciplinary cognitive science. In a selective response I then focus on two core features of his constructive account: collaboration and skill. While affirming the centrality of joint action and decision making, I raise some concerns about the fragility of the conditions under which collaborative cognition brings benefits. I then assess Sterelny’s view of skill acquisition and performance, which (...)
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  7. John W. Krakauer Jason Stanley (2013). Motor Skill Depends on Knowledge of Facts. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Those in 20th century philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience who have discussed the nature of skilled action have, for the most part, accepted the view that being skilled at an activity is independent of knowing facts about that activity, i.e. that skill is independent of knowledge of facts. In this paper we question this view of motor skill. We begin by situating the notion of skill in historical and philosophical context. We use the discussion to explain and motivate (...)
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  8. Oskar Lindwall & Anna Ekström (2012). Instruction-in-Interaction: The Teaching and Learning of a Manual Skill. [REVIEW] Human Studies 35 (1):27-49.score: 24.0
    This study takes an interest in instructions and instructed actions in the context of manual skills. The analysis focuses on a video recorded episode where a teacher demonstrates how to crochet chain stitches, requests a group of students to reproduce her actions, and then repeatedly corrects the attempts of one of the students. The initial request, and the students’ responses to it, could be seen as preliminary to the series of corrective sequences that come next: the request and the following (...)
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  9. Dario D. Salvucci (2013). Integration and Reuse in Cognitive Skill Acquisition. Cognitive Science 37 (5):829-860.score: 24.0
    Previous accounts of cognitive skill acquisition have demonstrated how procedural knowledge can be obtained and transformed over time into skilled task performance. This article focuses on a complementary aspect of skill acquisition, namely the integration and reuse of previously known component skills. The article posits that, in addition to mechanisms that proceduralize knowledge into more efficient forms, skill acquisition requires tight integration of newly acquired knowledge and previously learned knowledge. Skill acquisition also benefits from reuse of (...)
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  10. Harvey Siegel (1993). Not by Skill Alone: The Centrality of Character to Critical Thinking. Informal Logic 15 (3).score: 24.0
    Connie Missimer (1990) challenges what she calls the Character View, according to which critical thinking involves both skill and character, and argues for a rival conception-the Skill View-according to which critical thinking is a matter of skill alone. In this paper I criticize the Skill View and defend the Character View from Missimer's critical arguments.
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  11. Takuma Kimura (2013). The Moderating Effects of Political Skill and Leader–Member Exchange on the Relationship Between Organizational Politics and Affective Commitment. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):587-599.score: 24.0
    Previous empirical studies have shown that perceptions of organizational politics are negatively related to individuals’ affective commitment. The key contribution of this study was that it found the interactive moderating effects of political skill and quality of leader–member exchange (LMX) on the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics and affective commitment. Our results indicated that politics perception affective commitment relationship was weaker when both political skill and quality of LMX are high. When only political skill is high (...)
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  12. Elizabeth Ooi & Paul Lajbcygier (2013). Virtue Remains After Removing Sin: Finding Skill Amongst Socially Responsible Investment Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):199-224.score: 24.0
    We examine the investment skill of socially responsible investment (SRI) fund managers. Prior studies use the ‘alpha’ from standard asset pricing models as a proxy for management skill. However, implicit in the use of such models is that managers operate under no investment constraints. In the SRI context, this is patently false and can lead to biased alpha estimates and false conclusions about the existence of skill. We introduce a novel three-factor Fama–French asset-pricing model with the aim (...)
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  13. K. Michele Kacmar, Martha C. Andrews, Kenneth J. Harris & Bennett J. Tepper (2013). Ethical Leadership and Subordinate Outcomes: The Mediating Role of Organizational Politics and the Moderating Role of Political Skill. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (1):33-44.score: 24.0
    This paper posits that ethical leadership increases important organizational and individual outcomes by reducing politics in the workplace. Specifically, we propose that perceptions of organizational politics serve as a mechanism through which ethical leadership affects outcomes. We further argue that the modeled relationships are moderated by political skill. By means of data from 136 matched pairs of supervisors and subordinates employed by a state agency in the southern US, we found support for our predictions. Specifically, we found that perceptions (...)
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  14. Stéphanie Lefebvre, Patrice Laloux, André Peeters, Philippe Desfontaines, Jacques Jamart & Yves Vandermeeren (2012). Dual-tDCS Enhances Online Motor Skill Learning and Long-Term Retention in Chronic Stroke Patients. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Background Since motor learning is a key component for stroke recovery, enhancing motor skill learning is a crucial challenge for neurorehabilitation. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising approach for improving motor learning. The aim of this trial was to test the hypothesis that dual-tDCS applied bilaterally over the primary motor cortices (M1) improves online motor skill learning with the paretic hand and its long-term retention. Methods Eighteen chronic stroke patients participated in a randomised, cross-over, placebo-controlled, double (...)
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  15. Dagmar Sternad Masaki O. Abe (2013). Directionality in Distribution and Temporal Structure of Variability in Skill Acquisition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Observable structure of variability presents a window into the underlying processes of skill acquisition, especially when the task affords a manifold of solutions to the desired task result. This study examined skill acquisition by analyzing variability in both its distributional and temporal structure. Using a virtual throwing task, data distributions were analyzed by the TNC-method (Tolerance, Noise, Covariation); the temporal structure was quantified by autocorrelation and detrended fluctuation analysis. We tested four hypotheses: 1) Tolerance and Covariation, not Noise, (...)
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  16. Felix Rauner & Klaus Ruth (1989). Industrial Cultural Determinants of Technological Developments: Skill Transfer or Power Transfer? [REVIEW] AI and Society 3 (2):88-102.score: 24.0
    This paper discusses the social effects resulting from the transfer of knowledge and skill both in the spheres of production and machine design. Relevant design determinants and their impact on technological developments are discussed within the theoretical framework of industrial cultures. Two types of skill transfer are analysed in connection with different production philosophies — one more Tayloristic, the other more workshop-oriented. Finally, the paper discusses the relation of both philosophies to the requirements of future production concepts.
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  17. Y. Vandermeeren S. Lefebvre, P. Laloux, A. Peeters, P. Desfontaines, J. Jamart (2012). Dual-tDCS Enhances Online Motor Skill Learning and Long-Term Retention in Chronic Stroke Patients. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Background Since motor learning is a key component for stroke recovery, enhancing motor skill learning is a crucial challenge for neurorehabilitation. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising approach for improving motor learning. The aim of this trial was to test the hypothesis that dual-tDCS applied bilaterally over the primary motor cortices (M1) improves online motor skill learning with the paretic hand and its long-term retention. Methods Eighteen chronic stroke patients participated in a randomised, cross-over, placebo-controlled, double (...)
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  18. Rick Grush (2007). Skill Theory V2.0: Dispositions, Emulation, and Spatial Perception. Synthese 159 (3):389 - 416.score: 22.0
    An attempt is made to defend a general approach to the spatial content of perception, an approach according to which perception is imbued with spatial content in virtue of certain kinds of connections between perceiving organism's sensory input and its behavioral output. The most important aspect of the defense involves clearly distinguishing two kinds of perceptuo-behavioral skills—the formation of dispositions, and a capacity for emulation. The former, the formation of dispositions, is argued to by the central pivot of spatial content. (...)
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  19. Ruchika S. Prakash, Angeline A. De Leon, Lyla Mourany, Hyunkyu Lee, Michelle W. Voss, Walter R. Boot, Chandramallika Basak, Monica Fabiani, Gabriele Gratton & Arthur F. Kramer (2012). Examining Neural Correlates of Skill Acquisition in a Complex Videogame Training Program. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 22.0
    Acquisition of complex skills is a universal feature of human behavior that has been conceptualized as a process that starts with intense resource dependency, requires effortful cognitive control, and ends in relative automaticity on the multi-faceted task. The present study examined the effects of different theoretically-based training strategies on cortical recruitment during acquisition of complex videogame skills. Seventy-five participants were recruited and assigned to one of three training groups: Fixed Emphasis Training (FET), in which participants practiced the game, Hybrid Variable (...)
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  20. John Sutton (2007). Batting, Habit, and Memory: The Embodied Mind and the Nature of Skill. Sport in Society 10 (5):763-786.score: 21.0
    in Jeremy McKenna (ed), At the Boundaries of Cricket, to be published in 2007 as a special issue of the journal Sport in Society and as a book in the series Sport in the Global Society (Taylor and Francis).
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  21. Edwin M. Robertson, Alvaro Pascual-Leone & Daniel Z. Press (2004). Awareness Modifies the Skill-Learning Benefits of Sleep. Current Biology 14 (3):208-212.score: 21.0
  22. Daniel B. Willingham, Joanna Salidis & John D. E. Gabrieli (2002). Direct Comparison of Neural Systems Mediating Conscious and Unconscious Skill Learning. Journal of Neurophysiology 88 (3):1451-1460.score: 21.0
  23. Ellen Fridland (2014). Skill Learning and Conceptual Thought: Making Our Way Through the Wilderness. In Bana Bashour Hans Muller (ed.), Contemporary Philosophical Naturalism and Its Implications. Routledge.score: 21.0
  24. Gary F. Marcus (2012). Musicality: Instinct or Acquired Skill? Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):498-512.score: 21.0
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  25. Ellen Fridland (2013). Imitation, Skill Learning, and Conceptual Thought: An Embodied, Developmental Approach. In Liz Swan (ed.), Origins of Mind. 203--224.score: 21.0
  26. Jerome S. Bruner, George A. Miller & Claire Zimmerman (1955). Discriminative Skill and Discriminative Matching in Perceptual Recognition. Journal of Experimental Psychology 49 (3):187.score: 21.0
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  27. James A. Dyal (1966). Effects of Delay of Knowledge of Results and Subject Response Bias on Extinction of a Simple Motor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (4):559.score: 21.0
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  28. Alfred H. Fuchs (1962). The Progression-Regression Hypotheses in Perceptual-Motor Skill Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (2):177.score: 21.0
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  29. Ludger van Dijk & Raoul M. Bongers (2013). Knowledge and Skill: A Case for Ontological Equality. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
  30. Katherine E. Baker, Ruth C. Wylie & Robert M. Gagné (1951). The Effects of an Interfering Task on the Learning of a Complex Motor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (1):1.score: 21.0
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  31. William F. Battig (1954). The Effect of Kinesthetic, Verbal, and Visual Cues on the Acquisition of a Lever-Positioning Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (5):371.score: 21.0
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  32. Mymon Goldstein & Carl H. Rittenhouse (1954). Knowledge of Results in the Acquisition and Transfer of a Gunnery Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 48 (3):187.score: 21.0
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  33. Norman B. Gordon (1968). Guidance Versus Augmented Feedback and Motor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (1):24.score: 21.0
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  34. John Sutton & Evelyn Tribble (2014). The Creation of Space: Narrative Strategies, Group Agency, and Skill in Lloyd Jones’s The Book of Fame. In Chris Danta & Helen Groth (eds.), Mindful Aesthetics. Bloomsbury/ Continuum. 141-160.score: 21.0
  35. Niels Taatgen (2005). Modeling Parallelization and Flexibility Improvements in Skill Acquisition: From Dual Tasks to Complex Dynamic Skills. Cognitive Science 29 (3):421-455.score: 21.0
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  36. Don Trumbo, Merrill Noble, Kenneth Cross & Lynn Ulrich (1965). Task Predictability in the Organization, Acquisition, and Retention of Tracking Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (3):252.score: 21.0
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  37. Robert B. Ammons (1947). Acquisition of Motor Skill: II. Rotary Pursuit Performance with Continuous Practice Before and After a Single Rest. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (5):393.score: 21.0
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  38. William F. Battig, Donald R. Hoffeld, Sidney Seidenstein & W. J. Brogden (1957). Supplementary Report: Effect of Verbal Pretraining on the Acquisition of a Complex Motor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (5):375.score: 21.0
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  39. Edward A. Bilodeau & Ina McD Bilodeau (1958). Variable Frequency of Knowledge of Results and the Learning of a Simple Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (4):379.score: 21.0
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  40. Kenneth A. Blick & Edward A. Bilodeau (1963). Interpolated Activity and the Learning of a Simple Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (5):515.score: 21.0
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  41. J. H. Bowen, T. G. Andrews & Sherman Ross (1957). Effects of Counting and Ordering Habits on the Acquisition of a Simple Motor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (2):121.score: 21.0
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  42. George E. Briggs & W. J. Brogden (1954). The Effect of Component Practice on Performance of a Lever-Positioning Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 48 (5):375.score: 21.0
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  43. S. K. Chou (1929). A Multiple Groove Board for Testing Motor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (3):249.score: 21.0
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  44. Edwin A. Fleishman & James F. Parker Jr (1962). Factors in the Retention and Relearning of Perceptual-Motor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (3):215.score: 21.0
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  45. Lawrence Karlin & Rudolf G. Mortimer (1963). Effect of Verbal, Visual, and Auditory Augmenting Cues on Learning a Complex Motor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (1):75.score: 21.0
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  46. Eva Neumann & R. B. Ammons (1957). Acquisition and Long-Term Retention of a Simple Serial Perceptual-Motor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (3):159.score: 21.0
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  47. R. B. Ammons & Leslie Willig (1956). Acquisition of Motor Skill: IV. Effects of Repeated Periods of Massed Practice. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (2):118.score: 21.0
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  48. Katherine E. Baker, Ruth C. Wylie & Robert M. Gagné (1950). Transfer of Training to a Motor Skill as a Function of Variation in Rate of Response. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (6):721.score: 21.0
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  49. H. A. Carr & E. B. Osbourn (1922). Influence of Vision in Acquiring Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 5 (5):301.score: 21.0
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  50. R. Conrad (1954). Missed Signals in a Sensorimotor Skill. Journal of Experimental Psychology 48 (1):1.score: 21.0
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