Search results for 'sleep' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark C. W. Sleep (1969). Sir William Hamilton (1730–1803): His Work and Influence in Geology. Annals of Science 25 (4):319-338.score: 30.0
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  2. Owen J. Flanagan (2000). Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    What, if anything, do dreams tell us about ourselves? What is the relationship between types of sleep and types of dreams? Does dreaming serve any purpose? Or are dreams simply meaningless mental noise--"unmusical fingers wandering over the piano keys"? With expertise in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, Owen Flanagan is uniquely qualified to answer these questions. In this groundbreaking work, he provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about (...)
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  3. Mark Solms (2000). Dreaming and Rem Sleep Are Controlled by Different Brain Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):843-850.score: 24.0
    The paradigmatic assumption that REM sleep is the physiological equivalent of dreaming is in need of fundamental revision. A mounting body of evidence suggests that dreaming and REM sleep are dissociable states, and that dreaming is controlled by forebrain mechanisms. Recent neuropsychological, radiological, and pharmacological findings suggest that the cholinergic brain stem mechanisms that control the REM state can only generate the psychological phenomena of dreaming through the mediation of a second, probably dopaminergic, forebrain mechanism. The latter mechanism (...)
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  4. Benjamin Hale & Lauren Hale (2009). Choosing to Sleep. In Angus Dawson (ed.), The Philosophy of Public Health. Ashgate.score: 24.0
    In this paper we claim that individual subjects do not have so much control over sleep that it is aptly characterized as a personal choice; and that normative implications related to public health and sleep hygiene do not necessarily follow from current findings. It should be true of any empirical study that normative implications do not necessarily follow, but we think that many public health sleep recommendations falsely infer these implications from a flawed explanatory account of the (...)
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  5. Matthew P. Walker (2005). A Refined Model of Sleep and the Time Course of Memory Formation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):51-64.score: 24.0
    Research in the neurosciences continues to provide evidence that sleep plays a role in the processes of learning and memory. There is less of a consensus, however, regarding the precise stages of memory development during which sleep is considered a requirement, simply favorable, or not important. This article begins with an overview of recent studies regarding sleep and learning, predominantly in the procedural memory domain, and is measured against our current understanding of the mechanisms that govern memory (...)
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  6. Corey Anton (2006). Dreamless Sleep and the Whole of Human Life: An Ontological Exposition. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):181 - 202.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the meaning of dreamless sleep. First, I consider four reasons why we commonly pass over sleep's ontological significance. Second, I compare and contrast death and sleep to show how each is oriented to questions regarding the possibilities of "being-a-whole." In the third and final part, I explore the meaning and implications of "being-toward-sleep," arguing that human existence emerges atop naturally anonymous corporeality (i.e. living being). In sum, I try to show that we can (...)
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  7. Benjamin Hale (2009). Is Justice Good for Your Sleep? (And Therefore, Good for Your Health?). Social Theory and Health 7 (4):354-370.score: 24.0
    In this paper, we present an argument strengthening the view of Norman Daniels, Bruce Kennedy and Ichiro Kawachi that justice is good for one's health. We argue that the pathways through which social factors produce inequalities in sleep more strongly imply a unidirectional and non-voluntary causality than with most other public health issues. Specifically, we argue against the 'voluntarism objection' – an objection that suggests that adverse public health outcomes can be traced back to the free and voluntary choices (...)
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  8. Robert P. Vertes & Kathleen E. Eastman (2000). The Case Against Memory Consolidation in Rem Sleep. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):867-876.score: 24.0
    We present evidence disputing the hypothesis that memories are processed or consolidated in REM sleep. A review of REM deprivation (REMD) studies in animals shows these reports to be about equally divided in showing that REMD does, or does not, disrupt learning/memory. The studies supporting a relationship between REM sleep and memory have been strongly criticized for the confounding effects of very stressful REM deprivation techniques. The three major classes of antidepressant drugs, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), tricyclic antidepressants (...)
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  9. Tore A. Nielsen (2000). A Review of Mentation in Rem and NRem Sleep: “Covert” Rem Sleep as a Possible Reconciliation of Two Opposing Models. [REVIEW] Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):851-866.score: 24.0
    Numerous studies have replicated the finding of mentation in both rapid eye movement (REM) and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. However, two different theoretical models have been proposed to account for this finding: (1) a one-generator model, in which mentation is generated by a single set of processes regardless of physiological differences between REM and NREM sleep; and (2) a two-generator model, in which qualitatively different generators produce cognitive activity in the two states. First, research is reviewed demonstrating (...)
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  10. M. Jason Reddoch (2012). Philo of Alexandrias Use of Sleep and Dreaming as Epistemological Metaphors in Relation to Joseph. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 5 (2):283-302.score: 24.0
    Dreams are used figuratively throughout Greek literature to refer to something fleeting and/or unreal. In Plato, this metaphorical language is specifically used to describe an epistemological distinction: the one who has false knowledge or opinion is said to be dreaming while the one who has true knowledge is said to be awake. These figures are also central to Philo of Alexandria's philosophical language in De somniis 1-2 and De Iosepho . Although scholars have documented these epistemological metaphors in Plato and (...)
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  11. Lampros Perogamvros, Thien Thanh Dang-Vu, Martin Desseilles & Sophie Schwartz (2013). Sleep and Dreaming Are for Important Matters. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Recent studies in sleep and dreaming have described an activation of emotional and reward systems, as well as the processing of internal information during these states. Specifically, increased activity in the amygdala and across mesolimbic dopaminergic regions during REM sleep is likely to promote the consolidation of memory traces with high emotional/motivational value. Moreover, coordinated hippocampal-striatal replay during NREM sleep may contribute to the selective strengthening of memories for important events. In this review, we suggest that, via (...)
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  12. Francesca Siclari, Joshua J. LaRocque, Bradley R. Postle & Giulio Tononi (2013). Assessing Sleep Consciousness Within Subjects Using a Serial Awakening Paradigm. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Dreaming - a particular form of consciousness that occurs during sleep - undergoes major changes in the course of the night. We aimed to outline state-dependent features of consciousness using a paradigm with multiple serial awakenings/questionings that allowed for within as well as between subject comparisons. Seven healthy participants who spent 44 experimental study nights in the laboratory were awakened by a computerized sound at 15-30 minute intervals, regardless of sleep stage, and questioned for the presence or absence (...)
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  13. Helmut Laufs Enzo Tagliazucchi, Marion Behrens (2013). Sleep Neuroimaging and Models of Consciousness. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Human deep sleep is characterized by reduced or absent sensory activity, responsiveness to stimuli and conscious awareness. Given its ubiquity and reversible nature, it represents an attractive paradigm to study the neural changes which accompany the loss of consciousness in humans. In particular, the deepest stages of sleep can serve as an empirical test for the predictions of theoretical models relating the phenomenology of consciousness with underlying neural activity. A relatively recent shift of attention from the analysis of (...)
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  14. Fabian Guénolé, Geoffrey Marcaggi & Jean-Marc Baleyte (2013). Do Dreams Really Guard Sleep? Evidence for and Against Freud's Theory of the Basic Function of Dreaming. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Do dreams really guard sleep? Evidence for and against Freud's theory of the basic function of dreaming.
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  15. Megan Brown (2004). Taking Care of Business: Self-Help and Sleep Medicine in American Corporate Culture. Journal of Medical Humanities 25 (3):173-187.score: 24.0
    This article argues that corporate management in the United States has expanded its scope beyond office walls and encompasses many aspects of workers' daily lives. One new element of corporate training is the micromanagement of sleep; self-help books, newspaper reports, magazine articles, and consulting firms currently advise workers and supervisors on optimizing productivity by cultivating certain sleep habits. Although consultants and self-help books make specific recommendations about sleep, most medical research is inconclusive about sleep's benefits for (...)
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  16. Srivas Chennu & Tristan A. Bekinschtein (2012). Arousal Modulates Auditory Attention and Awareness: Insights From Sleep, Sedation, and Disorders of Consciousness. Frontiers in Psychology 3:65-65.score: 24.0
    The interplay between top-down, bottom-up attention and consciousness is frequently tested in altered states of consciousness, including transitions between stages of sleep and sedation, and in pathological disorders of consciousness (the vegetative and minimally conscious states; VS and MCS). One of the most widely used tasks to assess cognitive processing in this context is the auditory oddball paradigm, where an infrequent change in a sequence of sounds elicits, in awake subjects, a characteristic EEG event-related potential (ERP) called the mismatch (...)
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  17. Luigi De Gennaro Maria Concetta Pellicciari, Susanna Cordone, Cristina Marzano, Stefano Bignotti, Anna Gazzoli, Carlo Miniussi (2013). Dorsolateral Prefrontal Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Patients with Major Depression Locally Affects Alpha Power of REM Sleep. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Sleep alterations are among the most important disabling manifestation symptoms of Major Depression Disorder (MDD). A critical role of sleep importance is also underlined by the fact that its adjustment has been proposed as an objective marker of clinical remission in MDD. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) represents a relatively novel therapeutic tool for the treatment of drug-resistant depression. Nevertheless besides clinical evaluation of the mood improvement after rTMS, we have no clear understanding of what are the neurophysiological (...)
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  18. Juliana Yordanova, Vasil Kolev & Rolf Verleger (2009). Awareness of Knowledge or Awareness of Processing? Implications for Sleep-Related Memory Consolidation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 24.0
    The present study assessed the effects of awareness at encoding on off-line learning during sleep. A new framework is suggested according to which two aspects of awareness are distinguished: awareness of task information, and awareness of task processing. The number reduction task (NRT) was employed because it has two levels of organization, an overt one based on explicit knowledge of task instructions, and a covert one based on hidden abstract regularities of task structure (implicit knowledge). Each level can be (...)
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  19. Hidenori Aizawa, Wanpeng Cui, Kohichi Tanaka & Hitoshi Okamoto (2013). Hyperactivation in the Habenula as a Link Between Depression and Sleep Disturbance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Depression occurs frequently with sleep disturbance such as insomnia. Sleep in depression is associated with disinhibition of the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Despite the coincidence of the depression and sleep disturbance, neural substrate for depressive behaviors and sleep regulation remains unknown. Habenula is an epithalamic structure regulating the activities of monoaminergic neurons in the brain stem. Since the imaging studies showed blood flow increase in the habenula of depressive patients, hyperactivation of the habenula has (...)
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  20. Annemarie Boschloo, Lydia Krabbendam, Sanne Dekker, Nikki C. Lee, Renate de Groot & Jelle Jolles (2013). Subjective Sleepiness and Sleep Quality in Adolescents Are Related to Objective and Subjective Measures of School Performance. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    This study investigated the relation between sleep and school performance in a large sample of 561 adolescents aged 11-18 years. Three subjective measures of sleep were used: sleepiness, sleep quality and sleep duration. They were compared to three measures of school performance: objective school grades, self-reported school performance, and parent-reported school performance. Sleepiness – ‘I feel sleepy during the first hours at school’ – appeared to predict both school grades and self-reported school performance. Sleep quality (...)
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  21. Lampros Perogamvros (2012). Does Primary Narcissism Exist in Newborn Babies? Evidence From Sleep Science. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Does Primary Narcissism Exist in Newborn Babies? Evidence from Sleep Science.
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  22. Varsha Singh (2013). Dual Conception of Risk in the Iowa Gambling Task: Effects of Sleep Deprivation and Test-Retest Gap. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Risk in the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is often understood in terms of intertemporal choices, i.e., preference for immediate outcomes in favor of delayed outcomes is considered risky. According to behavioral economics, decision makers refrain from choosing the short-sighted immediate gain because, over time (10 trials), the immediate gains result in a net loss. Instead decision makers are expected to maximize their gains by choosing options that, over time (10 trials), result in net gain. However, task choices are sometimes made (...)
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  23. Dara S. Manoach & Robert Stickgold (2009). Does Abnormal Sleep Impair Memory Consolidation in Schizophrenia? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 24.0
    Although disturbed sleep is a prominent feature of schizophrenia, its relation to the pathophysiology, signs, and symptoms of schizophrenia remains poorly understood. Sleep disturbances are well known to impair cognition in healthy individuals. Yet, in spite of its ubiquity in schizophrenia, abnormal sleep has generally been overlooked as a potential contributor to cognitive deficits. Amelioration of cognitive deficits is a current priority of the schizophrenia research community, but most efforts to define, characterize, and quantify cognitive deficits focus (...)
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  24. Patrick McNamara, Jayme Dowdall & Sanford Auerbach (2002). Rem Sleep, Early Experience, and the Development of Reproductive Strategies. Human Nature 13 (4):405-435.score: 24.0
    We hypothesize that rapid eye movement or REM sleep evolved, in part, to mediate sexual/reproductive behaviors and strategies. Because development of sexual and mating strategies depends crucially on early attachment experiences, we further hypothesize that REM functions to mediate attachment processes early in life. Evidence for these hypotheses comes from (1) the correlation of REM variables with both attachment and sexual/reproductive variables; (2) attachment-related and sex-related hormonal release during REM; (3) selective activation during REM of brain sites implicated in (...)
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  25. George K. Kostopoulos Vasileios Kokkinos, Andreas M. Koupparis (2013). An Intra-K-Complex Oscillation with Independent and Labile Frequency and Topography in NREM Sleep. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    NREM sleep is characterized by K-complexes (KCs), over the negative phase of which we identified brief activity in the theta range. We recorded high resolution EEG of whole-night sleep from 7 healthy volunteers and visually identified 2nd and 3rd stage NREM spontaneous KCs. We identified 3 major categories: a) KCs without intra-KC-activity (iKCa), b) KCs with non-oscillatory iKCa, and c) KCs with oscillatory iKCa. The latter group of KCs with intra-KC-oscillation (iKCo), was clustered according to the duration of (...)
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  26. Matthew Wolf‐Meyer (2013). Where Have All Our Naps Gone? Or Nathaniel Kleitman, the Consolidation of Sleep, and the Historiography of Emergence. Anthropology of Consciousness 24 (2):96-116.score: 24.0
    In this article, I focus on two moments of Nathaniel Kleitman's career, specifically that of his Mammoth Cave experiment in the 1930s and his consultation with the United States military in the 1940s–1950s. My interests in bringing these two moments of Kleitman's career together are to examine the role of nature and the social in his understanding of human sleep and the legacies these have engendered for sleep science and medicine in the present; more specifically, I am interested (...)
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  27. Philippe Peigneux Alison Mary, Svenia Schreiner (2013). Accelerated Long-Term Forgetting in Aging and Intra-Sleep Awakenings. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    The architecture of sleep and the functional neuroanatomical networks subtending memory consolidation processes are both modified with aging, possibly leading to accelerated forgetting in long-term memory. We investigated associative learning and declarative memory consolidation processes in 16 young (18–30 years) and 16 older (65–75 years) healthy adults. Performance was tested using a cued recall procedure at the end of learning (immediate recall), and 30 minutes and 7 days later. A delayed recognition test was also administered on day 7. Daily (...)
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  28. Owen J. Flanagan (1995). Deconstructing Dreams: The Spandrels of Sleep. Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):5-27.score: 21.0
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  29. Allan Rechtschaffen (1997). Current Perspectives on the Function of Sleep. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 41 (3):359-390.score: 21.0
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  30. E. Bentley (2000). Awareness: Biorhythms, Sleep and Dreaming. Routledge.score: 21.0
  31. J. Allan Hobson (2002). Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First-Person Account. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):377-390.score: 21.0
  32. W. Moorcroft & J. Breitenstein (2000). Awareness of Time During Sleep. Annals of Medicine 32 (4):236-238.score: 21.0
  33. Edwin M. Robertson, Alvaro Pascual-Leone & Daniel Z. Press (2004). Awareness Modifies the Skill-Learning Benefits of Sleep. Current Biology 14 (3):208-212.score: 21.0
  34. Jan Born & Ullrich Wagner (2004). Awareness in Memory: Being Explicit About the Role of Sleep. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (6):242-244.score: 21.0
  35. Robert Brown (1957). Sound Sleep and Sound Scepticism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 35 (May):47-53.score: 21.0
  36. Robert L. Caldwell (1965). Malcolm and the Criterion of Sleep. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (December):339-352.score: 21.0
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  37. Henry W. Johnstone Jr (1973). Toward a Philosophy of Sleep. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (September):73-81.score: 21.0
    My chief claim is that no one could understand the meaning of either 'consciousness' or 'unconsciousness' unless his consciousness had been interrupted on at least one occasion. I consider various attempts that might be made to teach the meanings of these terms to a person who had never lost consciousness, And I show how these attempts fail. The ideas of consciousness and unconsciousness can occur only to a person in whose experience there has been a gap.
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  38. Mark W. Mahowald (2004). Commentary on Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First Person Account by J. Allan Hobson. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):134-137.score: 21.0
  39. William Dement & Nathaniel Kleitman (1957). The Relation of Eye Movements During Sleep to Dream Activity: An Objective Method for the Study of Dreaming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (5):339.score: 21.0
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  40. Bruce R. Ekstrand (1967). Effect of Sleep on Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 75 (1):64.score: 21.0
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  41. Terry R. Barrett & Bruce R. Ekstrand (1972). Effect of Sleep on Memory: III. Controlling for Time-of-Day Effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):321.score: 21.0
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  42. M. J. Bass (1931). Differentiation of the Hypnotic Trance From Normal Sleep. Journal of Experimental Psychology 14 (4):382.score: 21.0
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  43. J. A. Hobson, R. Lydic & H. A. Baghdoyan (1986). Evolving Concepts of Sleep Cycle Generation: From Brain Centers to Neuronal Populations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):371.score: 21.0
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  44. Anders Broström, Bengt Fridlund, Martin Ulander, Ola Sunnergren, Eva Svanborg & Per Nilsen (2013). A Mixed Method Evaluation of a Group‐Based Educational Programme for CPAP Use in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (1):173-184.score: 21.0
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  45. Adam G. Elshaug, John R. Moss, Anne Marie Southcott & Janet E. Hiller (2007). An Analysis of the Evidence‐Practice Continuum: Is Surgery for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Contraindicated? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (1):3-9.score: 21.0
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  46. E. A. Graves (1936). The Effect of Sleep Upon Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (3):316.score: 21.0
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  47. Glenn Gunzelmann, Joshua B. Gross, Kevin A. Gluck & David F. Dinges (2009). Sleep Deprivation and Sustained Attention Performance: Integrating Mathematical and Cognitive Modeling. Cognitive Science 33 (5):880-910.score: 21.0
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  48. C. E. Henry (1941). Electroencephalographic Individual Differences and Their Constancy: I. During Sleep. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (2):117.score: 21.0
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  49. J. R. Knott, C. E. Henry & J. M. Hadley (1939). Brain Potentials During Sleep: A Comparative Study of the Dominant and Non-Dominant Alpha Groups. Journal of Experimental Psychology 24 (2):157.score: 21.0
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  50. H. R. Laslett (1928). Experiments on the Effects of the Loss of Sleep. Journal of Experimental Psychology 11 (5):370.score: 21.0
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