Search results for 'social collective' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Antti Saaristo (2006). There is No Escape From Philosophy: Collective Intentionality and Empirical Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (1):40-66.score: 198.0
    This article examines two empirical research traditions—experimental economics and the social identity approach in social psychology—that may be seen as attempts to falsify and verify the theory of collective intentionality, respectively. The article argues that both approaches fail to settle the issue. However, this is not necessarily due to the alleged immaturity of the social sciences but, possibly, to the philosophical nature of intentionality and intentional action. The article shows how broadly Davidsonian action theory, including Hacking’s (...)
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  2. William Hirst Adam D. Brown, Nicole Kouri (2012). Memory's Malleability: Its Role in Shaping Collective Memory and Social Identity. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 192.0
    Memory's Malleability: Its Role in Shaping Collective Memory and Social Identity.
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  3. A. Wren Montgomery, Peter A. Dacin & M. Tina Dacin (2012). Collective Social Entrepreneurship: Collaboratively Shaping Social Good. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):375-388.score: 192.0
    In this paper, we move beyond the typical focus on the role of individuals in leading social change to examine "collective social entrepreneurship", the role multiple actors collaboratively play to address social problems, create new institutions, and dismantle outdated institutional arrangements. Specifically, we examine collective social entrepreneurship across a diverse range of collaborative activities including movements, alliances and markets for social good. We identify resource utilization approaches and three associated sets of activities that (...)
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  4. Jack J. Vromen (2003). Collective Intentionality, Evolutionary Biology and Social Reality. Philosophical Explorations 6 (3):251-265.score: 174.0
    The paper aims to clarify and scrutinize Searle"s somewhat puzzling statement that collective intentionality is a biologically primitive phenomenon. It is argued that the statement is not only meant to bring out that "collective intentionality" is not further analyzable in terms of individual intentionality. It also is meant to convey that we have a biologically evolved innate capacity for collective intentionality.The paper points out that Searle"s dedication to a strong notion of collective intentionality considerably delimits the (...)
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  5. Helen Lauer (2013). 'Social Identity'and 'Shared Worldview': Free Riders in Explanations of Collective Action. Abstracta 7 (1).score: 174.0
    The notions 'worldview' and 'social identity' are examined to consider whether they contribute substantively to causal sequences or networks or thought clusters that result in group acts executed intentionally. ... Three proposed explanaitons of sectarian conflict or ethnic violence are analysed as examples of theories that causally link intenitonal group behaivour to the worldviews and social identities of the individual agents directly involved. But as will be shown, it is not a priori features of worldivews and identities as (...)
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  6. Thomas Szanto (2014). Social Phenomenology: Husserl, Intersubjectivity, and Collective Intentionality. [REVIEW] International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (2):296-301.score: 168.0
  7. Attila Grandpierre (2001). Measurement of Collective and Social Fields of Consciousness. World Futures 57 (1):85-94.score: 156.0
    It is possible to reveal and to examine the collective and social fields of consciousness experimentally. An account is given of planned experiments based on quantitative calculations, which indicate that the effects of individual and collective fields of consciousness on matter may elicit directly observable physical results. Moreover, it is shown that collective coherent consciousness fields may enhance the physical effects of consciousness at a significant rate. The predicted results have a significance in our picture of (...)
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  8. J. Krause (2012). Collective Intentionality and the (Re)Production of Social Norms: The Scope for a Critical Social Science. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (3):323-355.score: 150.0
    This article aims to contribute to a critical ontology of social objects. Recent works on collective intentionality and norm-following neglect the question how free agents can be brought to collectively intend to x , although x is not in their own interest. By arguing for a natural disposition to empathic understanding and drawing on recent research in the neurosciences, this article outlines an ontological framework that extends collective intentionality to questions of oppression and status asymmetries. In a (...)
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  9. J. K. Swindler (1996). Social Intentions: Aggregate, Collective, and General. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 26 (1):61-76.score: 150.0
    The literature on collective action largely ignores the constraints that moral principle places on action-prompting intentions. Here I suggest that neither individualism nor holism can account for the generality of intentional contents demanded by universalizability principles, respect for persons, or proactive altruism. Utilitarian and communitarian ethics are criticized for nominalism with respect to social intentions. The failure of individualism and holism as grounds for moral theory is confirmed by comparing Tuomela's reductivist analysis of we-intentions with Gilbert's analysis of (...)
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  10. T. Kaidesoja (2013). Overcoming the Biases of Microfoundationalism Social Mechanisms and Collective Agents. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (3):301-322.score: 150.0
    The article makes four interrelated claims: (1) The mechanism approach to social explanation does not presuppose a commitment to the individual-level microfoundationalism. (2) The microfoundationalist requirement that explanatory social mechanisms should always consists of interacting individuals has given rise to problematic methodological biases in social research. (3) It is possible to specify a number of plausible candidates for social macro-mechanisms where interacting collective agents (e.g. formal organizations) form the core actors. (4) The distributed cognition perspective (...)
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  11. Raimo Tuomela, Collective Acceptance, Social Institutions, and Social Reality.score: 144.0
    The paper presents an account of social institutions on the basis of collective acceptance. Basically, collective acceptance by some members of a group involves the members’ collectively coming to hold and holding a relevant social attitude (a “we-attitude”), viz. either one in the intention family of concepts or one in the belief family. In standard cases the collective acceptance must be in the “we-mode”, viz. performed as a group member, and involve that it be meant (...)
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  12. Raimo Tuomela, Collective Intentionality and Social Agents.score: 144.0
    In this paper I will discuss a certain philosophical and conceptual program -- that I have called philosophy of social action writ large -- and also show in detail how parts of the program have been, and is currently being carried out. In current philosophical research the philosophy of social action can be understood in a broad sense to encompass such central research topics as action occurring in a social context (this includes multi-agent action); shared we-attitudes (such (...)
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  13. Allan Combs & S. Kripner (2008). Collective Consciousness and the Social Brain. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (s 10-11):264-276.score: 144.0
    This paper discusses supportive neurological and social evidence for 'collective consciousness', here understood as a shared sense of being together with others in a single or unified experience. Mirror neurons in the premotor and posterior parietal cortices respond to the intentions as well as the actions of other individuals. There are also mirror neurons in the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortices which have been implicated in empathy. Many authors have considered the likely role of such mirror systems (...)
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  14. Jelle de Boer (2008). Collective Intention, Social Identity, and Rational Choice. Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (2):169-184.score: 144.0
    In this paper I propose that what social psychologists refer to as social identity is a plausible empirical correlate on the part of the individual to what some philosophers and economists call collective intention. A discussion of an experiment yields the question what kind of mental state social identity might be and how it is related to the standard desire/belief conception. It is argued that social identity involves both a desire and a belief, and that (...)
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  15. Alan Blum (1985). The Collective Representation of Affliction: Some Reflections on Disability and Disease as Social Facts. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (2).score: 144.0
    A perspective is developed for approaching affliction as a social fact. Disability and disease are considered as two ways in which we suffer a disjunction which arises from the need to take initiative with respect to the inexorable, whether that means the mark of disability or the unconquerability of disease.The story of affliction always raises and masks in certain respects the problem of suffering as the collective representation of our experience of subjectivity where that experience passes through the (...)
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  16. Raimo Tuomela (2001). Collective Acceptance and Social Reality. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 11:161-171.score: 144.0
    Many social properties and notions are collectively made. Two collectively created aspects of the social world have been emphasized in recent literature. The first is that of the performative character of many social things (entities, properties). The second is the reflexive nature of many social concepts. The present account adds to this list a third feature, the collective availability or “for-groupness” of collective social items. It is a precise account of social notions (...)
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  17. Frank Zenker & Carlo Proietti (2014). Editors' Introduction: Social Dynamics and Collective Rationality. Synthese 191 (11):2353-2358.score: 144.0
    We provide a brief introduction to this special issue on social dynamics and collective rationality, and summarize the gist of the papers collected therein.
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  18. Raimo Tuomela (2013). Social Ontology: Collective Intentionality and Group Agents. Oup Usa.score: 144.0
    This volume presents a systematic philosophical theory related to the collectivism-versus-individualism debate in the social sciences. A weak version of collectivism (the "we-mode" approach) that depends on group-based collective intentionality is developed in the book. The we-mode approach is used to account for collective intention and action, cooperation, group attitudes, social practices and institutions as well as group solidarity.
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  19. James Avis (2002). Social Capital, Collective Intelligence and Expansive Learning: Thinking Through the Connections. Education and the Economy. British Journal of Educational Studies 50 (3):308 - 326.score: 144.0
    The paper seeks to draw out the connections between social capital, collective intelligence and expansive learning, interrogating the terms for their progressive potential. It sets these concepts within their socio-economic context, one which asserts that the development of social capital will be a vehicle for economic regeneration and competitiveness as well as a mechanism for the generation of social inclusion and cohesion. It concludes by arguing that the debate is set within a context that accepts capitalist (...)
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  20. Benjamin Lamb-Books (2013). Adorno and Horkheimer's Collective Psychology On Psychoanalytic Social Explanations. Thesis Eleven 117 (1):40-54.score: 144.0
    This article demonstrates how Adorno and Horkheimer’s turn to psychoanalytic concepts like sublimation and intra-psychic conflict strengthened critical theory. The piecemeal collective psychology they produced was used to understand fascism and anti-Semitism. But the full significance of these psychoanalytic explanations was concealed by Adorno, who elsewhere denied the possibility of psychology proper after the death of the individual. Adorno and Horkheimer’s underhanded borrowing from psychoanalysis for social analysis had the effect of filtering collective psychology through the lens (...)
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  21. Elizabeth Levy Paluck (2012). The Dominance of the Individual in Intergroup Relations Research: Understanding Social Change Requires Psychological Theories of Collective and Structural Phenomena. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):33-34.score: 144.0
    Dixon et al. suggest that the psychological literature on intergroup relations should shift from theorizing to A focus on social change exposes the importance of psychological theories involving collective phenomena like social norms and institutions. Individuals' attitudes and emotions may follow, rather than cause, changes in social norms and institutional arrangements.
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  22. Kirk Ludwig (2007). Foundations of Social Reality in Collective Intentional Behavior. In Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.), Intentional Acts and Institutional Facts: Essays on John Searle's Social Ontology.score: 138.0
    This paper clarifies Searle's account of we-intentions and then argues that it is subject to counterexamples, some of which are derived from examples Searle uses against other accounts. It then offers an alternative reductive account that is not subject to the counterexamples.
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  23. Nuno Martins (2009). Rules, Social Ontology and Collective Identity. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (3):323-344.score: 138.0
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  24. Deborah Perron Tollefsen (2002). Collective Intentionality and the Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 32 (1):25-50.score: 132.0
    In everyday discourse and in the context of social scientific research we often attribute intentional states to groups. Contemporary approaches to group intentionality have either dismissed these attributions as metaphorical or provided an analysis of our attributions in terms of the intentional states of individuals in the group.Insection1, the author argues that these approaches are problematic. In sections 2 and 3, the author defends the view that certain groups are literally intentional agents. In section 4, the author argues that (...)
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  25. Matthew J. Salganik & Duncan J. Watts (2009). Web‐Based Experiments for the Study of Collective Social Dynamics in Cultural Markets. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (3):439-468.score: 132.0
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  26. Kay Mathiesen (2007). Introduction to Special Issue of Social Epistemology on "Collective Knowledge and Collective Knowers". Social Epistemology 21 (3):209 – 216.score: 126.0
  27. Jimmy Bickerstaff (2008). Collaborative Theater/Collective Artist: An Evolving Systems Case Study in Social Creativity. World Futures 64 (4):276 – 291.score: 126.0
    Theater production is a collaborative creative activity. Social creativity recognizes the relationships between creative groups and the contexts in which creativity emerges. It also suggests that the interactive processes between the collaborators and their work form a center, which in turn becomes a kind of creative entity itself. An evolving systems case study of production practices at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival illuminates this process and illustrates the differences between seeing an aggregate creative activity and the more holistic view, in (...)
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  28. Brook J. Sadler (2007). Collective Responsibility, Universalizability, and Social Practices. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (3):486–503.score: 126.0
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  29. N. Press, J. R. Fishman & B. A. Koenig (2000). Collective Fear, Individualized Risk: The Social and Cultural Context of Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer. Nursing Ethics 7 (3):237-249.score: 126.0
    The purpose of this article is to provide a critical examination of two aspects of culture and biomedicine that have helped to shape the meaning and practice of genetic testing for breast cancer. These are: (1) the cultural construction of fear of breast cancer, which has been fuelled in part by (2) the predominance of a ‘risk’ paradigm in contemporary biomedicine. The increasing elaboration and delineation of risk factors and risk numbers are in part intended to help women to contend (...)
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  30. D. N. Osherson, M. Stob & S. Weinstein (1987). Social Learning and Collective Choice. Synthese 70 (3):319 - 347.score: 126.0
    To be pertinent to democratic practice, collective choice functions need not apply to all possible constellations of individual preference, but only to those that are humanly possible in an appropriate sense. The present paper develops a theory of humanly possible preference within the context of the mathematical theory of learning. The theory of preference is then exploited in an attempt to resolve Arrow's voting paradox through restriction of the domain of majoritarian choice functions.
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  31. Eileen Barner (1975). Ideology and Social Knowledge. Harold J. Bershady. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, I973. Pp. I78. £3.25. Psychoanalytic Sociology : An Essay on the Interpretation of Historical and the Phenomena of Collective Behaviour. Fred Weinstein and Gerald M. Platt. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, I973. Pp. XI+I24. $8.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 5 (2):215-221.score: 126.0
  32. Guy E. Swanson (1985). The Powers and Capabilities of Selves: Social and Collective Approaches. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 15 (3):331–354.score: 126.0
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  33. Raimo Tuomela & Wolfgang Balzer (2002). 13 Collective Acceptance and Collective Attitudes: On the Social. In Uskali Mäki (ed.), Fact and Fiction in Economics: Models, Realism and Social Construction. Cambridge University Press. 269.score: 126.0
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  34. Raimo Tuomela & Wolfgang Balzer (1998). Collective Acceptance and Collective Social Notions. Synthese 117 (2):175-205.score: 120.0
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  35. H. Gomperz (1939). Individual, Collective, and Social Responsibility. Ethics 49 (3):329-342.score: 120.0
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  36. Seumas Miller (2003). Review of Raimo Tuomela, Philosophy of Social Practices: A Collective Acceptance View. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (5).score: 120.0
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  37. Warren Schmaus (1995). The Critical Mass in Collective Action: A Micro-Social Theory, Marwell Gerald and Oliver Pamela. Cambridge University Press, 1993, Xii + 206 Pages and On Social Facts, Gilbert Margaret. Princeton University Press, 1989, X + 521 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 11 (01):203-.score: 120.0
  38. Michael A. Rosenthal (1998). Two Collective Action Problems in Spinoza's Social Contract Theory. History of Philosophy Quarterly 15 (4):389 - 409.score: 120.0
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  39. Tuomo Takala & Paul Pallab (2000). Individual, Collective and Social Responsibility of the Firm. Business Ethics 9 (2):109–118.score: 120.0
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  40. Ingvar Johansson (2003). Review of Georg Meggle, (Ed.), Social Facts & Collective Intentionality. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (3).score: 120.0
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  41. Tom R. Burns & Erik Engdahl (1998). The Social Construction of Consciousness. Part 1: Collective Consciousness and its Socio-Cultural Foundations. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (1):67-85.score: 120.0
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  42. Erich Weede (1985). Dilemmas of Social Order: Collective and Positional Goods, Leadership and Political Conflicts. Sociological Theory 3 (2):46-57.score: 120.0
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  43. Shay Welch (2014). A Discursive General Will: How Collective Reasoning Strengthens Social Freedom. Constellations 21 (1):96-110.score: 120.0
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  44. H. C. Greisman (1981). Social Structure, Psychoanalysis, and Collective Aggression. History of European Ideas 2 (1):35-48.score: 120.0
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  45. Review by: Maura Priest (2014). Review: Raimo Tuomela, Social Ontology: Collective Intentionality and Group Agents. [REVIEW] Ethics 125 (1):293-298,.score: 120.0
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  46. Diamond Ashiagbor (2009). Collective Labor Rights and the European Social Model. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 3 (2):223-266.score: 120.0
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  47. Wendy Olsen (2007). Originality or Collective Progress in the Social Sciences? Review of Social Science in Question by M.J. Smith. Journal of Critical Realism 2 (2).score: 120.0
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  48. Steven B. Smith (1980). Book Review:Claude Levi-Strauss: Social Psychotherapy and the Collective Unconscious. Thomas Shalvey. [REVIEW] Ethics 90 (2):311-.score: 120.0
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  49. Werner Callebaut (1978). Social Indicators Research and the Theory of Collective Action. Philosophica 21:159-97.score: 120.0
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  50. John Dixon, Mark Levine, Steve Reicher & Kevin Durrheim (2012). Beyond Prejudice: Relational Inequality, Collective Action, and Social Change Revisited. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):41 - 56.score: 120.0
    This response clarifies, qualifies, and develops our critique of the limits of intergroup liking as a means of challenging intergroup inequality. It does not dispute that dominant groups may espouse negative attitudes towards subordinate groups. Nor does it dispute that prejudice reduction can be an effective way of tackling resulting forms of intergroup hostility. What it does dispute is the assumption that getting dominant group members and subordinate group members to like each other more is the best way of improving (...)
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