Search results for 'social determinants of health' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Gabriele Badano (2016). Still Special, Despite Everything: A Liberal Defence of the Value of Healthcare in the Face of the Social Determinants of Health. Social Theory and Practice 42 (1):183-204.
    Recent epidemiological research on the social determinants of health has been used to attack an important framework, associated with Norman Daniels, that depicts healthcare as special. My aim is to rescue the idea that healthcare has special importance in society, although specialness will turn out to be mainly limited to clinical care. I build upon the link between Daniels's theory and the work of John Rawls to develop a conception of public justification liberalism that is suitable to (...)
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  2.  36
    Ashley M. Fox & Benjamin Mason Meier (2009). Health as Freedom: Addressing Social Determinants of Global Health Inequities Through the Human Right to Development. Bioethics 23 (2):112-122.
    In spite of vast global improvements in living standards, health, and well-being, the persistence of absolute poverty and its attendant maladies remains an unsettling fact of life for billions around the world and constitutes the primary cause for the failure of developing states to improve the health of their peoples. While economic development in developing countries is necessary to provide for underlying determinants of health – most prominently, poverty reduction and the building of comprehensive primary (...) systems – inequalities in power within the international economic order and the spread of neoliberal development policy limit the ability of developing states to develop economically and realize public goods for health. With neoliberal development policies impacting entire societies, the collective right to development, as compared with an individual rights-based approach to development, offers a framework by which to restructure this system to realize social determinants of health. The right to development, working through a vector of rights, can address social determinants of health, obligating states and the international community to support public health systems while reducing inequities in health through poverty-reducing economic growth. At an international level, where the ability of states to develop economically and to realize public goods through public health systems is constrained by international financial institutions, the implementation of the right to development enables a restructuring of international institutions and foreign-aid programs, allowing states to enter development debates with a right to cooperation from other states, not simply a cry for charity. (shrink)
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  3.  11
    Adina Preda & Kristin Voigt (2015). The Social Determinants of Health: Why Should We Care? American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):25-36.
    A growing body of empirical research examines the effects of the so-called “social determinants of health” on health and health inequalities. Several high-profile publications have issued policy recommendations to reduce health inequalities based on a specific interpretation of this empirical research as well as a set of normative assumptions. This article questions the framework defined by these assumptions by focusing on two issues: first, the normative judgments about the fairness of particular health inequalities; (...)
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  4.  37
    Jonathan Wolff (2009). Disadvantage, Risk and the Social Determinants of Health. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):214-223.
    The paper describes a project in which the thesis of the social determinants of health is used in order to help identify groups that will be among the least advantaged members of society, when disadvantage is understood in terms of lack of genuine opportunity for secure functioning. The analysis is derived from the author's work with Avner de-Shalit in Disadvantage (Oxford University Press, 2007).
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  5.  76
    Sridhar Venkatapuram & Michael Marmot (2009). Epidemiology and Social Justice in Light of Social Determinants of Health Research. Bioethics 23 (2):79-89.
    The present article identifies how social determinants of health raise two categories of philosophical problems that also fall within the smaller domain of ethics; one set pertains to the philosophy of epidemiology, and the second set pertains to the philosophy of health and social justice. After reviewing these two categories of ethical concerns, the limited conclusion made is that identifying and responding to social determinants of health requires inter-disciplinary reasoning across epidemiology and (...)
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  6.  40
    Sridhar Venkatapuram (2009). A Bird's Eye View. Two Topics at the Intersection of Social Determinants of Health and Social Justice Philosophy. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):224-234.
    The article discusses two areas at the intersection of social determinants of health research and social justice theory. The first section examines the affinity between social epidemiology and the capabilities approach. The second section examines how social epidemiology's expansion of the scope of the causal chain and determinants raises questions about epistemology and ontology in epidemiology as well as the field's link to the moral concern for human health.
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  7.  43
    Wilson James (2009). Not So Special After All? Daniels and the Social Determinants of Health. Journal of Medical Ethics 35:3 - 6..
    Just health: meeting health needs fairly is an ambitious book, in which Norman Daniels attempts to bring together in a single framework all his work on health and justice from the past 25 years. One major aim is to reconcile his earlier work on the special moral importance of healthcare with his later work on the social determinants of health. In his earlier work, Daniels argued that healthcare is of special moral importance because it (...)
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  8.  27
    Ruth Bell, Sebastian Taylor & Michael Marmot (2010). Global Health Governance: Commission on Social Determinants of Health and the Imperative for Change. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (3):470-485.
    In May 2009 the World Health Assembly passed a resolution on reducing health inequities through action on the social determinants of health, based on the work of the global Commission on Social Determinants of Health, 2005–2008. The Commission's genesis and findings raise some important questions for global health governance. We draw out some of the essential elements, themes, and mechanisms that shaped the Commission. We start by examining the evolving nature of (...)
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  9.  59
    Audrey R. Chapman (2009). Globalization, Human Rights, and the Social Determinants of Health. Bioethics 23 (2):97-111.
    Globalization, a process characterized by the growing interdependence of the world's people, impacts health systems and the social determinants of health in ways that are detrimental to health equity. In a world in which there are few countervailing normative and policy approaches to the dominant neoliberal regime underpinning globalization, the human rights paradigm constitutes a widely shared foundation for challenging globalization's effects. The substantive rights enumerated in human rights instruments include the right to the highest (...)
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  10.  18
    Daniel Engster (2014). The Social Determinants of Health, Care Ethics and Just Health Care. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (2):149-167.
    Political theorists generally defend the moral importance of health care by appealing to its purported importance in promoting good health and saving lives. Recent research on the social determinants of health demonstrates, however, that health care actually does relatively little to promote good health or save lives in comparison with other social and environmental factors. This article assesses the implications of the social determinants of health literature for existing theories (...)
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  11.  43
    Sridhar Venkatapuram (2010). Global Justice and the Social Determinants of Health. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (2):119-130.
    The final report of the WHO's Commission on the Social Determinants of Health is the first to apply social epidemiological analysis to global health.
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  12.  8
    Francisco Rojas Ochoa (2013). Social determinants of health and political action. Humanidades Médicas 13 (2):279-291.
    Introducción: se presenta un ensayo cuyo objetivo es fijar posiciones frente al resumen del Informe de la Comisión sobre Determinantes Sociales de la Salud (CDSS) proponer las acciones políticas que los movimientos sociales en salud deben emprender. Análisis: las recomendaciones de la CDSS no enfocan el problema en toda su compleja naturaleza y en especial desconoce la influencia decisiva de la formación económica social sobre la situación crítica de la salud en el mundo. Acción: se propone la unidad de (...)
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  13.  12
    F. O. X. M. & BENJAMIN MASON MEIER (2009). Health as Freedom: Addressing Social Determinants of Global Health Inequities Through the Human Right to Development. Bioethics 23 (2):112-122.
    In spite of vast global improvements in living standards, health, and well-being, the persistence of absolute poverty and its attendant maladies remains an unsettling fact of life for billions around the world and constitutes the primary cause for the failure of developing states to improve the health of their peoples. While economic development in developing countries is necessary to provide for underlying determinants of health – most prominently, poverty reduction and the building of comprehensive primary (...) systems – inequalities in power within the international economic order and the spread of neoliberal development policy limit the ability of developing states to develop economically and realize public goods for health. With neoliberal development policies impacting entire societies, the collective right to development, as compared with an individual rights-based approach to development, offers a framework by which to restructure this system to realize social determinants of health. The right to development, working through a vector of rights, can address social determinants of health, obligating states and the international community to support public health systems while reducing inequities in health through poverty-reducing economic growth. At an international level, where the ability of states to develop economically and to realize public goods through public health systems is constrained by international financial institutions, the implementation of the right to development enables a restructuring of international institutions and foreign-aid programs, allowing states to enter development debates with a right to cooperation from other states, not simply a cry for charity. (shrink)
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  14.  28
    J. Wilson (2009). Not so Special After All? Daniels and the Social Determinants of Health. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (1):3-6.
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  15.  1
    Stuart Rennie (2012). Medical Scholarships and the Social Determinants of Health. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (5):38-39.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 5, Page 38-39, May 2012.
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  16.  4
    Norman Daniels (2015). Why We Should Care About the Social Determinants of Health. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):37-38.
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  17. Norman Daniels, Bruce Kennedy & Ichiro Kawachi (2006). Why Justice is Good for Our Health: The Social Determinants of Health Inequalities. In Sudhir Anand, Fabienne Peter & Amartya Sen (eds.), Public Health, Ethics, and Equity. OUP Oxford
  18.  1
    Daniel Goldberg (2015). The Naturalistic Fallacy in Ethical Discourse on the Social Determinants of Health. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):58-60.
  19. Audrey R. Chapman (2015). The Social Determinants of Health: Why We Should Care. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):46-47.
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  20. Mark D. Fox, Michael R. Gomez & Ricky T. Munoz (2015). Just Deserts or Icing on the Cake? Addressing the Social Determinants of Health. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):42-44.
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  21. Peter Sheehan & Mark Sheehan (2015). Caring About the Social Determinants of Health. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (3):48-50.
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  22.  8
    Adina Preda & Kristin Voigt (2015). Health and Social Justice: Which Inequalities Matter ? Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “The Social Determinants of Health: Why Should We Care?”. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):1-3.
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  23.  28
    Dr James Wilson (2009). Justice and the Social Determinants of Health: An Overview. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):210-213.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  24.  10
    Andrew Courtwright (2008). The Social Determinants of Health: Moving Beyond Justice. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):16 – 17.
  25.  6
    James Wilson (2009). Justice and the Social Determinants of Health: An Overview. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):210-213.
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  26.  2
    Richard L. Byyny (2011). The Social Determinants of Health. The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-Honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha 75 (4):2 - 7.
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  27.  12
    Linda Reutter & Kaysi Eastlick Kushner (2010). Health Equity Through Action on the Social Determinants of Health’: Taking Up the Challenge in Nursing. Nursing Inquiry 17 (3):269-280.
  28.  1
    Ruth Bell, Sebastian Taylor & Michael Marmot (2010). Global Health Governance: Commission on Social Determinants of Health and the Imperative for Change. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):470-485.
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  29. Priya Venkatesan Hays (2012). Whence Social Determinants of Health?: Effective Personalized Medicine and the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 4 (2).
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  30.  8
    Patricia Illingworth & Wendy E. Parmet (2009). The Ethical Implications of the Social Determinants of Health: A Global Renaissance for Bioethics. Bioethics 23 (2):ii-v.
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  31.  10
    Ronald Aaron Thisted (2003). Are There Social Determinants of Health and Disease? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (3x):S65-S73.
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  32.  8
    Ronald Aaron Thisted (2003). Are There Social Determinants of Health and Disease? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (3x):S65-S73.
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  33.  4
    Mark Siegler & Richard Allen Epstein (2003). Organizers' Introduction to the Conference on Social Determinants of Health and Disease. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (3x):S1-S8.
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  34. Audrey R. Chapman (2009). The Ethical Implications of the Social Determinants of Health: A Global Renaissance for Bioethics (Vol 23, Pg NIL_0002, 2009). [REVIEW] Bioethics 23 (4):261 - 261.
     
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  35. Us Global Engagement, Carnegie New Leaders & B. Point (2010). Global Justice and the Social Determinants of Health [Full Text]. Ethics and International Affairs 24.
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  36. Dennis Raphael (2010). Harold J. Cook; Sanjoy Bhattacharya; Anne Hardy .History of the Social Determinants of Health: Global Histories, Contemporary Debates. Xvi + 364 Pp., Illus., Tables, Bibl., Index. Andhra Pradesh, India: Orient BlackSwan, 2009. Rs 895. [REVIEW] Isis 101 (3):625-626.
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  37. Ronald A. Thisted (2003). Are There Social Determinants of Health and Disease? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (3):S65-S73.
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  38.  1
    Muriel Berkeley (1990). Selected Readings in the Cultural, Social and Behavioural Determinants of Health. Edited by J. C. Caldwell and G. Santow. Pp. 305. Health Transition Series No. 1. (Highland Press, Canberra, 1989.) Price: A$14·95 (Paperback). [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 22 (4):522-523.
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  39.  10
    Stefano Semplici (2011). The Importance of 'Social Responsibility' in the Promotion of Health. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):355-363.
    The publication of the Report of the International Bioethics Committee of Unesco on Social responsibility and health provides an opportunity to reshape the conceptual framework of the right to health care and its practical implications. The traditional distinctions between negative and positive, civil-political and economic-social, legal and moral rights are to be questioned and probably overcome if the goal is to pursue ‘the highest attainable standard of health’ as a fundamental human right, that should as (...)
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  40.  2
    Eric A. Friedman & Lawrence O. Gostin (2015). Imagining Global Health with Justice: In Defense of the Right to Health. Health Care Analysis 23 (4):308-329.
    The singular message in Global Health Law is that we must strive to achieve global health with justice—improved population health, with a fairer distribution of benefits of good health. Global health entails ensuring the conditions of good health—public health, universal health coverage, and the social determinants of health—while justice requires closing today’s vast domestic and global health inequities. These conditions for good health should be incorporated into public (...)
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  41.  20
    Bridget Pratt & Bebe Loff (2013). Linking International Research to Global Health Equity: The Limited Contribution of Bioethics. Bioethics 27 (4):208-214.
    Health research has been identified as a vehicle for advancing global justice in health. However, in bioethics, issues of global justice are mainly discussed within an ongoing debate on the conditions under which international clinical research is permissible. As a result, current ethical guidance predominantly links one type of international research (biomedical) to advancing one aspect of health equity (access to new treatments). International guidelines largely fail to connect international research to promoting broader aspects of health (...)
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  42.  4
    Michael J. Selgelid (2016). Capabilities and Incapabilities of the Capabilities Approach to Health Justice. Bioethics 30 (1):25-33.
    This first part of this article critiques Sridhar Venkatapuram's conception of health as a capability. It argues that Venkatapuram relies on the problematic concept of dignity, implies that those who are unhealthy lack lives worthy of dignity, sets a low bar for health, appeals to metaphysically problematic thresholds, fails to draw clear connections between appealed-to capabilities and health, and downplays the importance/relevance of health functioning. It concludes by questioning whether justice entitlements should pertain to the capability (...)
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  43.  9
    David A. Buchanan (2013). The Austerity Bargain and the Social Self: Conceptual Clarity Surrounding Health Cutbacks. Nursing Philosophy 14 (1):38-44.
    As necessary austerity measures make major inroads into western health services, this paper investigates the philology of austerity and finds that there are two subtly similar yet importantly different derivations from the Latin and the Greek. The Latin austerus is an abstract term meaning dry, harsh, sour; whereas the Greek austeros has a more embodied and literal meaning of making the tongue dry. What seems an initially subtle difference between the metaphorical and the metonymic plays out as involving seriously (...)
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  44. Eszter Kollar, Sebastian Laukötter & Alena Buyx (2016). Humanity and Justice in Global Health: Problems with Venkatapuram's Justification of the Global Health Duty. Bioethics 30 (1):41-48.
    One of the most ambitious and sophisticated recent approaches to provide a theory of global health justice is Sridhar Venkatapuram's recent work. In this commentary, we first outline the core idea of Venkatapuram's approach to global health justice. We then argue that one of the most important elements of the account, Venkatapuram's basis of global health duties, is either too weak or assumed implicitly without a robust justification. The more explicit grounding of the duty to protect and (...)
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  45.  2
    Seiji Yamada, Sheldon Riklon & Gregory G. Maskarinec (2016). Ethical Responsibility for the Social Production of Tuberculosis. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (1):57-64.
    Approximately one in two hundred persons in the Marshall Islands have active tuberculosis. We examine the historical antecedents of this situation in order to assign ethical responsibility for the present situation. Examining the antecedents in terms of Galtung’s dialectic of personal versus structural violence, we can identify instances in the history of the Marshall Islands when individual subjects made decisions with large-scale ecologic, social, and health consequences. The roles of medical experimenters, military commanders, captains of the weapons industry (...)
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  46.  16
    A. Albertsen (2015). Luck Egalitarianism, Social Determinants and Public Health Initiatives. Public Health Ethics 8 (1):42-49.
    People’s health is hugely affected by where they live, their occupational status and their socio-economic position. It has been widely argued that the presence of such social determinants in health provides good reasons to reject luck egalitarianism as a theory of distributive justice in health. The literature provides different reasons why this responsibility-sensitive theory of distributive justice should not be applied to health. The critiques submit that the social circumstances undermine or remove people’s (...)
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  47.  44
    Daniel S. Goldberg (2009). In Support of a Broad Model of Public Health: Disparities, Social Epidemiology and Public Health Causation. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):70-83.
    Corresponding Author, Health Policy & Ethics Fellow, Chronic Disease Prevention & Control Research Center, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, 1709 Dryden, Suite 1025, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Tel.: 713.798.5482; Fax: 713 798 3990; Email: danielg{at}bcm.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract This article defends a broad model of public health, one that specifically addresses the social epidemiologic research suggesting that social conditions are primary determinants of health. (...)
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  48.  17
    Matt Commers (2002). Determinants of Health: Theory, Understanding, Portrayal, Policy. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    For decades, health professionals have asserted the importance of public participation in interventions for health. Medicine has pursued patient participation in clinical decision-making. In the public health realm, target groups have been asked to assist in the design and implementation of initiatives for health. In practice, however, patients and populations expect health professionals to give advice and - in some cases - to make decisions on their behalf. This implies limits to the ideal of participation. (...)
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  49.  3
    Jed Horner (2016). From Exceptional to Liminal Subjects: Reconciling Tensions in the Politics of Tuberculosis and Migration. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (1):65-73.
    Controlling the movement of potentially infectious bodies has been central to Australian immigration law. Nowhere is this more evident than in relation to tuberculosis, which is named as a ground for refusal of a visa in the Australian context. In this paper, I critically examine the “will to knowledge” that this gives rise to. Drawing on a critical analysis of texts, including interviews with migrants diagnosed with TB and healthcare professionals engaged in their care, I argue that this focus on (...)
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  50.  19
    Benjamin Hale (2009). Is Justice Good for Your Sleep? (And Therefore, Good for Your Health?). Social Theory and Health 7 (4):354-370.
    In this paper, we present an argument strengthening the view of Norman Daniels, Bruce Kennedy and Ichiro Kawachi that justice is good for one's health. We argue that the pathways through which social factors produce inequalities in sleep more strongly imply a unidirectional and non-voluntary causality than with most other public health issues. Specifically, we argue against the 'voluntarism objection' – an objection that suggests that adverse public health outcomes can be traced back to the free (...)
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