Search results for 'social determinants of health' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ashley M. Fox & Benjamin Mason Meier (2009). Health as Freedom: Addressing Social Determinants of Global Health Inequities Through the Human Right to Development. Bioethics 23 (2):112-122.score: 1617.0
    In spite of vast global improvements in living standards, health, and well-being, the persistence of absolute poverty and its attendant maladies remains an unsettling fact of life for billions around the world and constitutes the primary cause for the failure of developing states to improve the health of their peoples. While economic development in developing countries is necessary to provide for underlying determinants of health – most prominently, poverty reduction and the building of comprehensive primary (...) systems – inequalities in power within the international economic order and the spread of neoliberal development policy limit the ability of developing states to develop economically and realize public goods for health. With neoliberal development policies impacting entire societies, the collective right to development, as compared with an individual rights-based approach to development, offers a framework by which to restructure this system to realize social determinants of health. The right to development, working through a vector of rights, can address social determinants of health, obligating states and the international community to support public health systems while reducing inequities in health through poverty-reducing economic growth. At an international level, where the ability of states to develop economically and to realize public goods through public health systems is constrained by international financial institutions, the implementation of the right to development enables a restructuring of international institutions and foreign-aid programs, allowing states to enter development debates with a right to cooperation from other states, not simply a cry for charity. (shrink)
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  2. Wilson James (2009). Not So Special After All? Daniels and the Social Determinants of Health. Journal of Medical Ethics 35:3 - 6..score: 1236.0
    Just health: meeting health needs fairly is an ambitious book, in which Norman Daniels attempts to bring together in a single framework all his work on health and justice from the past 25 years. One major aim is to reconcile his earlier work on the special moral importance of healthcare with his later work on the social determinants of health. In his earlier work, Daniels argued that healthcare is of special moral importance because it (...)
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  3. Sridhar Venkatapuram (2009). A Bird's Eye View. Two Topics at the Intersection of Social Determinants of Health and Social Justice Philosophy. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):224-234.score: 1236.0
    The article discusses two areas at the intersection of social determinants of health research and social justice theory. The first section examines the affinity between social epidemiology and the capabilities approach. The second section examines how social epidemiology's expansion of the scope of the causal chain and determinants raises questions about epistemology and ontology in epidemiology as well as the field's link to the moral concern for human health.
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  4. Jonathan Wolff (2009). Disadvantage, Risk and the Social Determinants of Health. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):214-223.score: 1236.0
    The paper describes a project in which the thesis of the social determinants of health is used in order to help identify groups that will be among the least advantaged members of society, when disadvantage is understood in terms of lack of genuine opportunity for secure functioning. The analysis is derived from the author's work with Avner de-Shalit in Disadvantage (Oxford University Press, 2007).
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  5. Ruth Bell, Sebastian Taylor & Michael Marmot (2010). Global Health Governance: Commission on Social Determinants of Health and the Imperative for Change. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):470-485.score: 1236.0
    In May 2009 the World Health Assembly passed a resolution on reducing health inequities through action on the social determinants of health, based on the work of the global Commission on Social Determinants of Health, 2005–2008. The Commission's genesis and findings raise some important questions for global health governance. We draw out some of the essential elements, themes, and mechanisms that shaped the Commission. We start by examining the evolving nature of (...)
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  6. Sridhar Venkatapuram & Michael Marmot (2009). Epidemiology and Social Justice in Light of Social Determinants of Health Research. Bioethics 23 (2):79-89.score: 1224.0
    The present article identifies how social determinants of health raise two categories of philosophical problems that also fall within the smaller domain of ethics; one set pertains to the philosophy of epidemiology, and the second set pertains to the philosophy of health and social justice. After reviewing these two categories of ethical concerns, the limited conclusion made is that identifying and responding to social determinants of health requires inter-disciplinary reasoning across epidemiology and (...)
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  7. Audrey R. Chapman (2009). Globalization, Human Rights, and the Social Determinants of Health. Bioethics 23 (2):97-111.score: 1224.0
    Globalization, a process characterized by the growing interdependence of the world's people, impacts health systems and the social determinants of health in ways that are detrimental to health equity. In a world in which there are few countervailing normative and policy approaches to the dominant neoliberal regime underpinning globalization, the human rights paradigm constitutes a widely shared foundation for challenging globalization's effects. The substantive rights enumerated in human rights instruments include the right to the highest (...)
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  8. Francisco Rojas Ochoa (2013). Social determinants of health and political action. Humanidades Médicas 13 (2):279-291.score: 1221.0
    Introducción: se presenta un ensayo cuyo objetivo es fijar posiciones frente al resumen del Informe de la Comisión sobre Determinantes Sociales de la Salud (CDSS) proponer las acciones políticas que los movimientos sociales en salud deben emprender. Análisis: las recomendaciones de la CDSS no enfocan el problema en toda su compleja naturaleza y en especial desconoce la influencia decisiva de la formación económica social sobre la situación crítica de la salud en el mundo. Acción: se propone la unidad de (...)
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  9. F. O. X. M. & BENJAMIN MASON MEIER (2009). Health as Freedom: Addressing Social Determinants of Global Health Inequities Through the Human Right to Development. Bioethics 23 (2):112-122.score: 1209.0
    In spite of vast global improvements in living standards, health, and well-being, the persistence of absolute poverty and its attendant maladies remains an unsettling fact of life for billions around the world and constitutes the primary cause for the failure of developing states to improve the health of their peoples. While economic development in developing countries is necessary to provide for underlying determinants of health – most prominently, poverty reduction and the building of comprehensive primary (...) systems – inequalities in power within the international economic order and the spread of neoliberal development policy limit the ability of developing states to develop economically and realize public goods for health. With neoliberal development policies impacting entire societies, the collective right to development, as compared with an individual rights-based approach to development, offers a framework by which to restructure this system to realize social determinants of health. The right to development, working through a vector of rights, can address social determinants of health, obligating states and the international community to support public health systems while reducing inequities in health through poverty-reducing economic growth. At an international level, where the ability of states to develop economically and to realize public goods through public health systems is constrained by international financial institutions, the implementation of the right to development enables a restructuring of international institutions and foreign-aid programs, allowing states to enter development debates with a right to cooperation from other states, not simply a cry for charity. (shrink)
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  10. J. Wilson (2009). Not so Special After All? Daniels and the Social Determinants of Health. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (1):3-6.score: 1044.0
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  11. Stuart Rennie (2012). Medical Scholarships and the Social Determinants of Health. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (5):38-39.score: 1044.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 5, Page 38-39, May 2012.
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  12. Dr James Wilson (2009). Justice and the Social Determinants of Health: An Overview. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):210-213.score: 1032.0
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  13. Andrew Courtwright (2008). The Social Determinants of Health: Moving Beyond Justice. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):16 – 17.score: 1032.0
  14. James Wilson (2009). Justice and the Social Determinants of Health: An Overview. Public Health Ethics 2 (3):210-213.score: 1032.0
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  15. Richard L. Byyny (2011). The Social Determinants of Health. The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-Honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha 75 (4):2 - 7.score: 1032.0
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  16. Norman Daniels, Bruce Kennedy & Ichiro Kawachi (2006). Why Justice is Good for Our Health: The Social Determinants of Health Inequalities. In Sudhir Anand, Fabienne Peter & Amartya Sen (eds.), Public Health, Ethics, and Equity. Oup Oxford.score: 1032.0
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  17. Priya Venkatesan Hays (2012). Whence Social Determinants of Health?: Effective Personalized Medicine and the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 4 (2).score: 1032.0
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  18. Sridhar Venkatapuram (2010). Global Justice and the Social Determinants of Health. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (2):119-130.score: 1020.0
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  19. Patricia Illingworth & Wendy E. Parmet (2009). The Ethical Implications of the Social Determinants of Health: A Global Renaissance for Bioethics. Bioethics 23 (2):ii-v.score: 1020.0
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  20. Daniel Engster (2014). The Social Determinants of Health, Care Ethics and Just Health Care. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (2):149-167.score: 1020.0
  21. Mark Siegler & Richard Allen Epstein (2003). Organizers' Introduction to the Conference on Social Determinants of Health and Disease. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (3x):S1-S8.score: 1020.0
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  22. Ronald Aaron Thisted (2003). Are There Social Determinants of Health and Disease? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (3x):S65-S73.score: 1020.0
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  23. Linda Reutter & Kaysi Eastlick Kushner (2010). 'Health Equity Through Action on the Social Determinants of Health': Taking Up the Challenge in Nursing. Nursing Inquiry 17 (3):269-280.score: 1020.0
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  24. Audrey R. Chapman (2009). The Ethical Implications of the Social Determinants of Health: A Global Renaissance for Bioethics (Vol 23, Pg NIL_0002, 2009). [REVIEW] Bioethics 23 (4):261 - 261.score: 1020.0
     
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  25. Us Global Engagement, Carnegie New Leaders & B. Point (2010). Global Justice and the Social Determinants of Health [Full Text]. Ethics and International Affairs 24.score: 1020.0
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  26. Muriel Berkeley (1990). Selected Readings in the Cultural, Social and Behavioural Determinants of Health. Edited by J. C. Caldwell and G. Santow. Pp. 305. Health Transition Series No. 1. (Highland Press, Canberra, 1989.) Price: A$14·95 (Paperback). [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 22 (4):522-523.score: 1017.0
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  27. Stefano Semplici (2011). The Importance of 'Social Responsibility' in the Promotion of Health. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):355-363.score: 879.0
    The publication of the Report of the International Bioethics Committee of Unesco on Social responsibility and health provides an opportunity to reshape the conceptual framework of the right to health care and its practical implications. The traditional distinctions between negative and positive, civil-political and economic-social, legal and moral rights are to be questioned and probably overcome if the goal is to pursue ‘the highest attainable standard of health’ as a fundamental human right, that should as (...)
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  28. Bridget Pratt & Bebe Loff (2013). Linking International Research to Global Health Equity: The Limited Contribution of Bioethics. Bioethics 27 (4):208-214.score: 852.0
    Health research has been identified as a vehicle for advancing global justice in health. However, in bioethics, issues of global justice are mainly discussed within an ongoing debate on the conditions under which international clinical research is permissible. As a result, current ethical guidance predominantly links one type of international research (biomedical) to advancing one aspect of health equity (access to new treatments). International guidelines largely fail to connect international research to promoting broader aspects of health (...)
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  29. David Shaw, Lorna Macpherson & David Conway (2009). Tackling Socially Determined Dental Inequalities: Ethical Aspects of Childsmile, the National Child Oral Health Demonstration Programme in Scotland. Bioethics 23 (2):131-139.score: 766.0
    Many ethical issues are posed by public health interventions. Although abstract theorizing about these issues can be useful, it is the application of ethical theory to real cases which will ultimately be of benefit in decision-making. To this end, this paper will analyse the ethical issues involved in Childsmile, a national oral health demonstration programme in Scotland that aims to improve the oral health of the nation's children and reduce dental inequalities through a combination of targeted and (...)
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  30. Daniel S. Goldberg (2009). In Support of a Broad Model of Public Health: Disparities, Social Epidemiology and Public Health Causation. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):70-83.score: 756.0
    Corresponding Author, Health Policy & Ethics Fellow, Chronic Disease Prevention & Control Research Center, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, 1709 Dryden, Suite 1025, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Tel.: 713.798.5482; Fax: 713 798 3990; Email: danielg{at}bcm.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract This article defends a broad model of public health, one that specifically addresses the social epidemiologic research suggesting that social conditions are primary determinants of health. (...)
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  31. Matt Commers (2002). Determinants of Health: Theory, Understanding, Portrayal, Policy. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 699.0
    For decades, health professionals have asserted the importance of public participation in interventions for health. Medicine has pursued patient participation in clinical decision-making. In the public health realm, target groups have been asked to assist in the design and implementation of initiatives for health. In practice, however, patients and populations expect health professionals to give advice and - in some cases - to make decisions on their behalf. This implies limits to the ideal of participation. (...)
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  32. David A. Buchanan (2013). The Austerity Bargain and the Social Self: Conceptual Clarity Surrounding Health Cutbacks. Nursing Philosophy 14 (1):38-44.score: 648.0
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  33. Benjamin Hale (2009). Is Justice Good for Your Sleep? (And Therefore, Good for Your Health?). Social Theory and Health 7 (4):354-370.score: 630.0
    In this paper, we present an argument strengthening the view of Norman Daniels, Bruce Kennedy and Ichiro Kawachi that justice is good for one's health. We argue that the pathways through which social factors produce inequalities in sleep more strongly imply a unidirectional and non-voluntary causality than with most other public health issues. Specifically, we argue against the 'voluntarism objection' – an objection that suggests that adverse public health outcomes can be traced back to the free (...)
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  34. Jos V. M. Welie (2012). Social Contract Theory as a Foundation of the Social Responsibilities of Health Professionals. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (3):347-355.score: 607.5
    This paper seeks to define and delimit the scope of the social responsibilities of health professionals in reference to the concept of a social contract. While drawing on both historical data and current empirical information, this paper will primarily proceed analytically and examine the theoretical feasibility of deriving social responsibilities from the phenomenon of professionalism via the concept of a social contract.
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  35. Casper Bruun Jensen (2008). Power, Technology and Social Studies of Health Care: An Infrastructural Inversion. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (4):355-374.score: 607.5
    Power, dominance, and hierarchy are prevalent analytical terms in social studies of health care. Power is often seen as residing in medical structures, institutions, discourses, or ideologies. While studies of medical power often draw on Michel Foucault, this understanding is quite different from his proposal to study in detail the “strategies, the networks, the mechanisms, all those techniques by which a decision is accepted” [Foucault, M. (1988). In Politics, philosophy, culture: Interviews and other writings 1977–84 (pp. 96–109). New (...)
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  36. Marina Morrow & Julia Weisser (2012). Towards a Social Justice Framework of Mental Health Recovery. Studies in Social Justice 6 (1):27-43.score: 567.0
    In this paper we set out the context in which experiences of mental distress occur with an emphasis on the contributions of social and structural factors and then make a case for the use of intersectionality as an analytic and methodological framework for understanding these factors. We then turn to the political urgency for taking up the concept of recovery and argue for the importance of research and practice that addresses professional domination of the field, and that promotes ongoing (...)
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  37. Enric J. Novella (2010). Mental Health Care and the Politics of Inclusion: A Social Systems Account of Psychiatric Deinstitutionalization. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (6):411-427.score: 562.5
    This paper provides an interpretation, based on the social systems theory of German sociologist Niklas Luhmann, of the recent paradigmatic shift of mental health care from an asylum-based model to a community-oriented network of services. The observed shift is described as the development of psychiatry as a function system of modern society and whose operative goal has moved from the medical and social management of a lower and marginalized group to the specialized medical and psychological care of (...)
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  38. Carmelo Reverte (2009). Determinants of Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure Ratings by Spanish Listed Firms. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):351 - 366.score: 540.0
    The aim of this paper is to analyze whether a number of firm and industry characteristics, as well as media exposure, are potential determinants of corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure practices by Spanish listed firms. Empirical studies have shown that CSR disclosure activism varies across companies, industries, and time (Gray et al., Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal 8(2), 47–77, 1995; Journal of Business Finance & Accounting 28(3/4), 327–356, 2001; Hackston and Milne, Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal 9(1), 77–108, (...)
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  39. Massimo Reichlin (2011). The Role of Solidarity in Social Responsibility for Health. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):365-370.score: 540.0
    The Article focuses on the concept of social solidarity, as it is used in the Report of the International Bioethics Committee On Social Responsibility and Health. It is argued that solidarity plays a major role in supporting the whole framework of social responsibility, as presented by the IBC. Moreover, solidarity is not limited to members of particular groups, but potentially extended to all human beings on the basis of their inherent dignity; this sense of human solidarity (...)
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  40. Erik Nord, Andrew Street, Jeff Richardson, Helga Kuhse & Peter Singer (1996). The Significance of Age and Duration of Effect in Social Evaluation of Health Care. Health Care Analysis 4 (2):103-111.score: 533.3
    To give priority to the young over the elderly has been labelled ‘ageism’. People who express ‘ageist’ preferences may feel that, all else equal, an individual has greater right to enjoy additional life years the fewer life years he or she has already had. We shall refer to this asegalitarian ageism. They may also emphasise the greater expected duration of health benefits in young people that derives from their greater life expectancy. We may call thisutilitarian ageism. Both these forms (...)
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  41. Anna Maaria Järvinen & Ursula Bellugi (2013). What Does Williams Syndrome Reveal About the Determinants of Social Behavior? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 531.0
    Growing evidence on autonomic nervous system (ANS) function in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) has begun to highlight aberrancies that may have important implications for the social profile characterized by enhanced social motivation and approach. In parallel, neurobiological investigations have identified alterations in the structure, function, and connectivity of the amygdala, as well as prosocial neuropeptide dysregulation, as some of the key neurogenetic features of WS. A recent social approach/withdrawal hypothesis (Kemp and Guastella, 2011) suggests that autonomic (...)
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  42. K. W. M. Fulford (1993). Praxis Makes Perfect: Illness as a Bridge Between Biological Concepts of Disease and Social Conceptions of Health. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (4).score: 526.5
    Analyses of biological concepts of disease and social conceptions of health indicate that they are structurally interdependent. This in turn suggests the need for a bridge theory of illness. The main features of such a theory are an emphasis on the logical properties of value terms, close attention to the features of the experience of illness, and an analysis of this experience as action failure, drawing directly on the internal structure of action. The practical applications of this theory (...)
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  43. Marc T. Jones (1999). The Institutional Determinants of Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 20 (2):163 - 179.score: 522.0
    Previous research in the social responsibility/social performance area has failed to systematically address the institutional determinants of social responsibility and its various manifestations in terms of social performance. This paper examines the relationship between the configuration of institutional structures at various levels and the necessary and sufficient conditions for the concept of social responsibility to manifest in the practice of stakeholder management. In particular we hypothesize that smaller, closely held firms in profitable niches are (...)
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  44. Sander Kelman (1980). Social Organization and the Meaning of Health. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (2):133-144.score: 522.0
    SummaryThe meaning of the term “health” is properly the subject of social, rather than natural, investigation. The structure of modern industrial capitalist society appears to materially and unavoidably produce a meaning of “health” intrinsically involving substantially preventable disease. Because in such a society private investment responds to cyclical and geographic fluctuations in rates of return and competitive labor markets, much of the disease structure (heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and cancer, among others) encompasses diseases which captive citizens (...)
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  45. C. Yildiz & A. Bartlett (2011). Language, Foreign Nationality and Ethnicity in an English Prison: Implications for the Quality of Health and Social Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (10):637-640.score: 522.0
    Background More than one in 10 of all prisoners in England and Wales are Foreign Nationals. This article discusses whether the research applications to one London prison are aimed at understanding a prisoner population characterised by significant multinational and multilingual complexity. Methods We studied all accessible documents relating to research undertaken at a women's prison between 2005 and 2009 to assess the involvement of Foreign National prisoners and women with limited English. The source of information was prison research applications and (...)
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  46. Lisa Cacari-Stone & Magdalena Avila (2012). Rethinking Research Ethics for Latinos: The Policy Paradox of Health Reform and the Role of Social Justice. Ethics and Behavior 22 (6):445-460.score: 513.0
    This article discusses the paradox of exclusion/inclusion: U.S. health policy prohibits Latinos who fall under certain classifications from accessing health services and insurance yet permits them to be ?human subjects? in health research. We aim to advance the discussion of health research ethics post the Tuskegee syphilis experiment in Latinos by (a) tracing the impacts of policy exclusion and the social context of anti-Latino sentiment on Latinos' low participation rates in health research and inequitable (...)
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  47. Robin Hanson, The Determinants of the Quantity of Health Insurance: Evidence From Self-Insured and Not Self-Insured Employer-Based Health Plans.score: 513.0
    This paper presents an empirical analysis of the determinants of quantity of health insurance in the context of employer-based health insurance using the micro-level data from the 1987 National Medical Expenditure Survey (NMES). It extends the previous research by including additional factors in the analysis, which significantly affect health insurance offers by employers. This paper emphasizes two determinants of employers’ insurance offer decisions that are particularly relevant: union membership and selfinsured versus not self-insured health (...)
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  48. Rosamond Rhodes, Margaret P. Battin & Anita Silvers (eds.) (2002). Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care. OUP USA.score: 513.0
    Because medicine can preserve and restore health and function, it has been widely acknowledged as a basic good that a just society should provide its members. Yet there is wide disagreement over the scope of what is to be provided, to whom, how, when and why. In this uniquely comprehensive book some of the best-known philosophers, doctors, lawyers, political scientists, and economists writing on the subject discuss the concerns and deepen our understanding of the theoretical and practical issues that (...)
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  49. Norman Daniels & Rosamond Rhodes (2002). Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care. In Rosamond Rhodes, Margaret P. Battin & Anita Silvers (eds.), Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care. Oup Usa.score: 513.0
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