Search results for 'social dominance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John S. Wilkins, Gods Above: Naturalizing Religion in Terms of Our Shared Ape Social Dominance Behavior.score: 90.0
    To naturalize religion we must identify what religion is, and what aspects of it we are trying to explain. In this paper religious social institutional behavior is the explanatory target, and an explanatory hypothesis based on shared primate social dominance psychology is given. The argument is that various religious features, including the high status afforded the religious, and the high status afforded to deities, is an expression of this social dominance psychology in a context for (...)
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  2. Mahdi Muhammad Moosa & S. M. Minhaz Ud-Dean (2011). The Role of Dominance Hierarchy in the Evolution of Social Species. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (2):203-208.score: 81.0
    A number of animal species from different lineages live socially. One of the features of social living is the formation of dominance hierarchy. Despite its obvious benefit in the survival probability of the species, the hierarchical structureitself poses psychological and physiological burden leading to the chronic activation of stress related pathways. Considering these apparently conflicting observations, here we propose that social hierarchy can act as a selective force in the evolution of social species. We also discuss (...)
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  3. Rui F. Oliveira (1998). Of Fish and Men: A Comparative Approach to Androgens and Social Dominance. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):383-384.score: 57.0
    Four aspects of Mazur & Booth's target article are discussed from a comparative perspective using teleost fish as a reference: (a) the relationship between aggression, dominance, and androgens; (b) the interpretation of the data in light of the challenge hypothesis; (c) the potential role of testosterone as a physiological mediator between social status and the expression of male characters; and (d) the fact that metabolic conversions of testosterone may be important in its effect on aggression/ dominance.
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  4. David Terburg & Jack van Honk (2013). Approach–Avoidance Versus Dominance–Submissiveness: A Multilevel Neural Framework on How Testosterone Promotes Social Status. Emotion Review 5 (3):296-302.score: 48.0
    Approach–avoidance generally describes appetitive motivation and fear of punishment. In a social context approach motivation is, however, also expressed as social aggression and dominance. We therefore link approach–avoidance to dominance–submissiveness, and provide a neural framework that describes how the steroid hormone testosterone shifts reflexive as well as deliberate behaviors towards dominance and promotion of social status. Testosterone inhibits acute fear at the level of the basolateral amygdala and hypothalamus and promotes reactive dominance through (...)
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  5. Andrew M. Colman (2003). Cooperation, Psychological Game Theory, and Limitations of Rationality in Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):139-153.score: 45.0
    Rational choice theory enjoys unprecedented popularity and influence in the behavioral and social sciences, but it generates intractable problems when applied to socially interactive decisions. In individual decisions, instrumental rationality is defined in terms of expected utility maximization. This becomes problematic in interactive decisions, when individuals have only partial control over the outcomes, because expected utility maximization is undefined in the absence of assumptions about how the other participants will behave. Game theory therefore incorporates not only rationality but also (...)
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  6. Valerie Rosenblatt (2012). Hierarchies, Power Inequalities, and Organizational Corruption. Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):237-251.score: 45.0
    This article uses social dominance theory (SDT) to explore the dynamic and systemic nature of the initiation and maintenance of organizational corruption. Rooted in the definition of organizational corruption as misuse of power or position for personal or organizational gain, this work suggests that organizational corruption is driven by the individual and institutional tendency to structure societies as group-based social hierarchies. SDT describes a series of factors and processes across multiple levels of analysis that systemically contribute to (...)
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  7. Udo Ebert (2010). Dominance Criteria for Welfare Comparisons: Using Equivalent Income to Describe Differences in Needs. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 69 (1):55-67.score: 45.0
    The article demonstrates that the dominance approach—often used for the measurement of welfare in a population in which there are different household types (see e.g., Atkinson and Bourguignon, Arrow and the foundations of the theory of economic policy, 350–370, 1987)—can be based on explicit value judgments on the households’ living standard. We define living standard by equivalent income (functions) and consider classes of inequality averse social welfare functions: Welfare increases if the inequality of living standard is decreased. In (...)
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  8. Lorne Campbell, Jeffry A. Simpson, Mark Stewart & John G. Manning (2002). The Formation of Status Hierarchies in Leaderless Groups. Human Nature 13 (3):345-362.score: 45.0
    Two studies examined the link between social dominance and male waist-to-hip ratio (WHR). Groups of four men interacted in a leaderless group discussion. In both studies, men with higher WHRs (associated with current and long-term health status) were rated by other group members as behaving more leader-like when an observer was present, and rated themselves as being more assertive. In Study 2, men with higher WHRs were rated by independent observers as behaving more dominantly, but only when the (...)
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  9. Dennis L. Clark, Karen L. Kessler & John E. Dillon (1973). Long-Term Stability of Pairwise Social Dominance in Squirrel Monkeys. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 2 (4):203-205.score: 45.0
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  10. J. Martin Ramirez (1980). Behavioral Parameters of Social Dominance in Rats. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 15 (2):96-98.score: 45.0
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  11. P. L. Bates, D. J. Langenes & D. L. Clark (1973). Reliability of Social Dominance in Guinea Pigs. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 2 (4):229-230.score: 45.0
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  12. Devon D. Brewer (1995). The Social Structural Basis of the Organization of Persons in Memory. Human Nature 6 (4):379-403.score: 45.0
    This paper summarizes and discusses three studies of patterns in the recall of persons in socially bounded communities. Individual sin three different communities (a graduate academic program, a religious fellowship, and a department in a formal organization) free-listed the names of persons in their respective communities. Results indicate that the individuals in each community share a common cognitive structure of community members that is based on the community’s social structure. These studies, combined with the results of other research, strongly (...)
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  13. Theodore D. Kemper (1993). Social Dominance Attainment, Testosterone, Libido and Reproductive Success. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):298.score: 45.0
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  14. C. T. Lee, Paul T.-P. Wong & Jawsy Chen (1974). Durable Partial Reinforcement Effect and Social Dominance in Two Inbred Mouse Strains. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (4):400-402.score: 45.0
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  15. Bella L. Galperin, Rebecca J. Bennett & Karl Aquino (2011). Status Differentiation and the Protean Self: A Social-Cognitive Model of Unethical Behavior in Organizations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):407 - 424.score: 42.0
    Based on social-cognitive theory, this article proposes a model that seeks to explain why high status organizational members engage in unethical behavior. We argue that status differentiation in organizations creates social isolation which initiates activation of high status group identity and a deactivation of moral identity. We further argue that high status group identity results in insensitivity to the needs of out-group members which, in turn, results in lessened motivation to selfregulate ethical decision making. As a result of (...)
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  16. Elizabeth Levy Paluck (2012). The Dominance of the Individual in Intergroup Relations Research: Understanding Social Change Requires Psychological Theories of Collective and Structural Phenomena. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):33-34.score: 39.0
    Dixon et al. suggest that the psychological literature on intergroup relations should shift from theorizing to A focus on social change exposes the importance of psychological theories involving collective phenomena like social norms and institutions. Individuals' attitudes and emotions may follow, rather than cause, changes in social norms and institutional arrangements.
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  17. Kees van der Pijl (2003). The Global Gamble - Washington's Faustian Bid for World Dominance Peter Gowan and Global Social Policy - International Organizations and the Future of Welfare Bob Deacon with Michelle Hulse and Paul Stubbs. Historical Materialism 11 (3):201-213.score: 36.0
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  18. Eva Gilboa-Schechtman & Iris Shachar-Lavie (2013). More Than a Face: A Unified Theoretical Perspective on Nonverbal Social Cue Processing in Social Anxiety. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:904.score: 36.0
    Processing of nonverbal social cues (NVSCs) is essential to interpersonal functioning and is particularly relevant to models of social anxiety. This article provides a review of the literature on NVSC processing from the perspective of social rank and affiliation biobehavioral systems, based on functional analysis of human sociality. We examine the potential of this framework for integrating cognitive, interpersonal, and evolutionary accounts of social anxiety. We argue that NVSCs are uniquely suited to rapid and effective conveyance (...)
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  19. B. Easlea (1996). Bourdieu, P (1977) Outline of a Theory of Practice, Cambridge Studies in Social Anthropology, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Cockburn, C.(1985) Machinery of Dominance: Women, Men and Technical Know-How, London: Pluto Press, de Beauvoir. S.(1949/1972) The Second Sex, Transl. HM Parshley. Harmondsworth. [REVIEW] In Nancy Duncan (ed.), Bodyspace: Destabilizing Geographies of Gender and Sexuality. Routledge. 26--1.score: 36.0
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  20. Kevin J. Flannelly & Robert J. Blanchard (1981). Dominance: Cause or Description of Social Relationships? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):438.score: 36.0
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  21. John L. Hammond (2012). Ann Ferguson, a Feminist Philosopher and Social Justice Activist, is an Emerita Professor of Philosophy and Women, Gender, and Sexuality Stud-Ies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She has Written Numer-Ous Articles on Feminist Theory, Ethics, and Politics; Written Two Books, Blood at the Root: Motherhood, Sexuality, and Male Dominance (1989) And. In Anatole Anton Anton & Richard Schmitt (eds.), Taking Socialism Seriously. Lexington Books. 263.score: 36.0
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  22. Peter E. Maxim (1981). Dominance: A Useful Dimension of Social Communication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):444.score: 36.0
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  23. K. Simitopoulou & N. I. Xirotiris (2000). The Human Genome Project The Dominance of Economy on Science-Ethical and Social Implications. Global Bioethics 13 (3-4):43-52.score: 36.0
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  24. K. van der Pijl (2003). On Peter Gowan's The Global Gamble-Washington's Faustian Bid for World Dominance and on Bob Deacon's (with Michelle Hulse and Paul Stubbs) Global Social Policy-International Organizations and the Future of Welfare. Historical Materialism 11:201-214.score: 36.0
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  25. Wendy Lipworth, Miles Little, Pippa Markham, Jill Gordon & Ian Kerridge (2013). Doctors on Status and Respect: A Qualitative Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):205-217.score: 33.0
    While doctors generally enjoy considerable status, some believe that this is increasingly threatened by consumerism, managerialism, and competition from other health professions. Research into doctors’ perceptions of the changes occurring in medicine has provided some insights into how they perceive and respond to these changes but has generally failed to distinguish clearly between concerns about “status,” related to the entitlements associated with one’s position in a social hierarchy, and concerns about “respect,” related to being held in high regard for (...)
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  26. Eddy S. Ng & Willi H. Wiesner (2007). Are Men Always Picked Over Women? The Effects of Employment Equity Directives on Selection Decisions. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (2):177 - 187.score: 30.0
    This study replicates and extends previous work by Oppenheimer and Wiesner [1990, Sex discrimination: Who is hired and do employment equity statements make a difference? Proceedings of the 11th Annual Conference of the Administrative Sciences Association of Canada, Personnel and Human Resources Division], and examined the effects of minority qualifications on hiring decisions, the effects of employment equity directives when minority candidates are less qualified and the effects of different types and strengths of employment equity directives on hiring decisions. The (...)
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  27. Michael Harris Bond (2014). How I Am Constructing Culture‐Inclusive Theories of Social‐Psychological Process in Our Age of Globalization. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (2).score: 30.0
    Accepting Cole's the premise that, “cultural-inclusive psychology has been … an elusive goal” (1996, pp. 7–8) but one worth striving to attain, I first set out to identify my domain of interest and competence as an intellectual. Deciding it to be social interaction between individuals, I then searched out theoretical approaches to this domain that encompassed as many approaches to this trans-historical concern that have emerged from cultural traditions bequeathing us their legacies. Doing this search comprehensively required me to (...)
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  28. Carolyn R. Hodges-Simeon, Steven J. C. Gaulin & David A. Puts (2010). Different Vocal Parameters Predict Perceptions of Dominance and Attractiveness. Human Nature 21 (4):406-427.score: 30.0
    Low mean fundamental frequency (F 0) in men’s voices has been found to positively influence perceptions of dominance by men and attractiveness by women using standardized speech. Using natural speech obtained during an ecologically valid social interaction, we examined relationships between multiple vocal parameters and dominance and attractiveness judgments. Male voices from an unscripted dating game were judged by men for physical and social dominance and by women in fertile and non-fertile menstrual cycle phases for (...)
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  29. L. Raeve (1993). The Nurse Under Physician Authority: Commentary. Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (4):228-229.score: 30.0
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  30. J. Decety & T. Chaminade (2003). When the Self Represents the Other: A New Cognitive Neuroscience View on Psychological Identification. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):577-596.score: 27.0
    There is converging evidence from developmental and cognitive psychology, as well as from neuroscience, to suggest that the self is both special and social, and that self-other interaction is the driving force behind self-development. We review experimental findings which demonstrate that human infants are motivated for social interactions and suggest that the development of an awareness of other minds is rooted in the implicit notion that others are like the self. We then marshal evidence from functional neuroimaging explorations (...)
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  31. Brian Ellis (2011). Humanism and Morality. Sophia 50 (1):135-139.score: 27.0
    A theory of morality acceptable to humanists must be one that can be accepted independently of religion. In this paper, I argue that while there is such a theory, it is a non-standard one, and its acceptance would have some far-reaching consequences. As one might expect, the theory is similar to others in various ways. But it is not the same as any of them. Indeed, it is a radically new theory. Like Hume’s ethics, it is founded on our natural (...)
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  32. Denise Dellarosa Cummins (1996). Dominance Hierarchies and the Evolution of Human Reasoning. Minds and Machines 6 (4):463-480.score: 27.0
    Research from ethology and evolutionary biology indicates the following about the evolution of reasoning capacity. First, solving problems of social competition and cooperation have direct impact on survival rates and reproductive success. Second, the social structure that evolved from this pressure is the dominance hierarchy. Third, primates that live in large groups with complex dominance hierarchies also show greater neocortical development, and concomitantly greater cognitive capacity. These facts suggest that the necessity of reasoning effectively about (...) hierarchies left an indelible mark on primate reasoning architectures, including that of humans. In order to survive in a dominance hierarchy, an individual must be capable of (a) making rank discriminations, (b) recognizing what is forbidden and what is permitted based one's rank, and (c) deciding whether to engage in or refriin from activities that will allow one to move up in rank. The first problem is closely tied to the capacity for transitive reasoning, while the second and third are intimately related to the capacity for deontic reasoning. I argue that the human capacity for these types of reasoning have evolutionary roots that reach deeper into our ancestral past than the emergence of the hominid line, and the operation of these evolutionarily primitive reasoning systems can be seen in the development of human reasoning and domain-specific effects in adult reasoning. (shrink)
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  33. William E. Shafer (2006). Social Paradigms and Attitudes Toward Environmental Accountability. Journal of Business Ethics 65 (2):121 - 147.score: 27.0
    This paper argues that commitment to the Dominant Social Paradigm (DSP) in Western societies, which includes support for such ideologies as free enterprise, private property rights, economic individualism, and unlimited economic growth, poses a threat to progress in imposing greater standards of corporate environmental accountability. It is hypothesized that commitment to the DSP will be negatively correlated with support for the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) and support for corporate environmental accountability, and that belief in the NEP will be positively (...)
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  34. Drew H. Bailey & David C. Geary (2009). Hominid Brain Evolution. Human Nature 20 (1):67-79.score: 27.0
    Hypotheses regarding the selective pressures driving the threefold increase in the size of the hominid brain since Homo habilis include climatic conditions, ecological demands, and social competition. We provide a multivariate analysis that enables the simultaneous assessment of variables representing each of these potential selective forces. Data were collated for latitude, prevalence of harmful parasites, mean annual temperature, and variation in annual temperature for the location of 175 hominid crania dating from 1.9 million to 10 thousand years ago. We (...)
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  35. Casper Bruun Jensen (2008). Power, Technology and Social Studies of Health Care: An Infrastructural Inversion. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (4):355-374.score: 27.0
    Power, dominance, and hierarchy are prevalent analytical terms in social studies of health care. Power is often seen as residing in medical structures, institutions, discourses, or ideologies. While studies of medical power often draw on Michel Foucault, this understanding is quite different from his proposal to study in detail the “strategies, the networks, the mechanisms, all those techniques by which a decision is accepted” [Foucault, M. (1988). In Politics, philosophy, culture: Interviews and other writings 1977–84 (pp. 96–109). New (...)
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  36. Barbara Smuts (1995). The Evolutionary Origins of Patriarchy. Human Nature 6 (1):1-32.score: 27.0
    This article argues that feminist analyses of patriarchy should be expanded to address the evolutionary basis of male motivation to control female sexuality. Evidence from other primates of male sexual coercion and female resistance to it indicates that the sexual conflicts of interest that underlie patriarchy predate the emergence of the human species. Humans, however, exhibit more extensive male dominance and male control of female sexuality than is shown by most other primates. Six hypotheses are proposed to explain how, (...)
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  37. Denise Dellarosa Cummins (2000). How the Social Environment Shaped the Evolution of Mind. Synthese 122 (1-2):3 - 28.score: 24.0
    Dominance hierarchies are ubiquitous in the societies of human and non-human animals. Evidence from comparative, developmental, and cognitive psychological investigations is presented that show how social dominance hierarchies shaped the evolution of the human mind, and hence, human social institutions. It is argued that the pressures that arise from living in hierarchical social groups laid a foundation of fundamental concepts and cognitive strategies that are crucial to surviving in social dominance hierarchies. These include (...)
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  38. Rana Jawad (2007). Human Ethics and Welfare Particularism: An Exploration of the Social Welfare Regime in Lebanon. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (2):123-146.score: 24.0
    This paper presents a profile of the welfare regime in Lebanon which is posited on the twin precepts of human ethics and welfare particularism. It highlights the key role that moral values play in the conceptualization and implementation of social policy, as well as in the measurement of welfare outcomes. This is marked by the dominance of duty, traditionalism and elitism in the ethics of religious welfare in Lebanon. The paper argues that the social welfare regime in (...)
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  39. Liza Mügge (2012). Women in Transnational Migrant Activism: Supporting Social Justice Claims of Homeland Political Organizations. Studies in Social Justice 7 (1):65-81.score: 24.0
    This article studies the conceptions of social justice of women active in transnational migrant politics over a period of roughly 20 years in the Netherlands. The novel focus on migrant women reveals that transnational politics is almost completely male-dominated and -directed. Two of the exceptions found in this article include a leftist and a Kurdish women organization supporting the communist cause in the 1980s and the Kurdish struggle in the 1990s in Turkey, respectively. In both organizations gender equality was (...)
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  40. Frederique De Vignemont & Tania Singer (2006). The Empathic Brain: How, When and Why? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (10):435-441.score: 24.0
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  41. Marco Mariotti (2000). An Ethical Interpretation of the Nash Choice Rule. Theory and Decision 49 (2):151-157.score: 24.0
    This paper provides an ethical intepretation of the Nash choice rule. In a setting in which (cardinal) utilities are interpersonally comparable, this procedure is characterised by an impartiality requirement and by the assumption that choices are not responsive to the agents' relative ability to convert resources into utility.
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  42. Marina Morrow & Julia Weisser (2012). Towards a Social Justice Framework of Mental Health Recovery. Studies in Social Justice 6 (1):27-43.score: 24.0
    In this paper we set out the context in which experiences of mental distress occur with an emphasis on the contributions of social and structural factors and then make a case for the use of intersectionality as an analytic and methodological framework for understanding these factors. We then turn to the political urgency for taking up the concept of recovery and argue for the importance of research and practice that addresses professional domination of the field, and that promotes ongoing (...)
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  43. C. L. Sheng (1994). A Note on the Prisoner's Dilemma. Theory and Decision 36 (3):233-246.score: 24.0
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  44. Viren Swami (2012). Social Psychological Origins of Conspiracy Theories: The Case of the Jewish Conspiracy Theory in Malaysia. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Two studies examined correlates of belief in a Jewish conspiracy theory among Malays in Malaysia, a culture in which state-directed conspiracism as a means of dealing with perceived external and internal threats is widespread. In Study 1, 368 participants from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, completed a novel measure of belief in a Jewish conspiracy theory, along with measures of general conspiracist ideation and anomie. Initial analysis showed that the novel scale factorially reduced to a single dimension. Further analysis showed that belief (...)
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  45. Mariska Esther Kret, Swann Pichon, Julie Grèzes & Beatrice de Gelder (2011). Men Fear Other Men Most: Gender Specific Brain Activations in Perceiving Threat From Dynamic Faces and Bodies – An fMRI Study. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
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  46. Neven Sesardic (2010). Race: A Social Destruction of a Biological Concept. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 25 (2):143-162.score: 21.0
    It is nowadays a dominant opinion in a number of disciplines (anthropology, genetics, psychology, philosophy of science) that the taxonomy of human races does not make much biological sense. My aim is to challenge the arguments that are usually thought to invalidate the biological concept of race. I will try to show that the way “race” was defined by biologists several decades ago (by Dobzhansky and others) is in no way discredited by conceptual criticisms that are now fashionable and widely (...)
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  47. Donovan Miyasaki (2004). Freud or Nietzsche: The Drives, Pleasure, and Social Happiness. Dissertation, University of Torontoscore: 21.0
    Many commentators have remarked upon the striking points of correspondence that can be found in the works of Freud and Nietzsche. However, this essay argues that on the subject of desire their work presents us with a radical choice: Freud or Nietzsche. I first argue that Freud’s theory of desire is grounded in the principle of inertia, a principle that is incompatible with his later theory of Eros and the life drive. Furthermore, the principle of inertia is not essentially distinct (...)
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  48. Mason Richey (2008). What Can Philosophers Offer Social Scientists?; or The Frankfurt School and its Relevance to Social Science: From the History of Philosophical Sociology to an Examination of Issues in the Current EU. International Journal of Interdisciplinary Social Sciences 3 (6):63-72.score: 21.0
    This paper presents the history of the Frankfurt School’s inclusion of normative concerns in social science research programs during the period 1930-1955. After examining the relevant methodology, I present a model of how such a program could look today. I argue that such an approach is both valuable to contemporary social science programs and overlooked by current philosophers and social scientists.
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  49. Arto Laitinen, Social Equality, Recognition, and Preconditions of Good Life. Social Inequality Today.score: 21.0
    In this paper I analyze interpersonal and institutional recognition and discuss the relation of different types of recognition to various principles of social justice (egalitarianism, meritarianism, legitimate favouritism, principles of need and free exchange). Further, I try to characterize contours of good autonomous life, and ask what kind of preconditions it has. I will distinguish between five kinds of preconditions: psychological, material, cultural, intersubjective and institutional. After examining what the role of recognition is among such preconditions, and how they (...)
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  50. Fernando Aguiar & Andrés de Francisco (2009). Rational Choice, Social Identity, and Beliefs About Oneself. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (4):547-571.score: 21.0
    Social identity poses one of the most important challenges to rational choice theory, but rational choice theorists do not hold a common position regarding identity. On one hand, externalist rational choice ignores the concept of identity or reduces it to revealed preferences. On the other hand, internalist rational choice considers identity as a key concept in explaining social action because it permits expressive motivations to be included in the models. However, internalist theorists tend to reduce identity to desire—the (...)
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