Search results for 'social practices' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Construction Of Social (1994). Practices of Truth-Finding in a Court of Law: The Case of Revised Stories Kim Lane Scheppele. In Theodore R. Sarbin & John I. Kitsuse (eds.), Constructing the Social. Sage. 84.score: 280.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Andrea Zhok (2009). Towards a Theory of Social Practices. Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (2):187-210.score: 198.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Theodore R. Schatzki (1996). Social Practices: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social. Cambridge University Press.score: 192.0
    This book addresses key topics in social theory such as the basic structures of social life, the character of human activity, and the nature of individuality. Drawing on the work of Wittgenstein, the author develops an account of social existence that argues that social practices are the fundamental phenomenon in social life. This approach offers new insight into the social formation of individuals, surpassing and critiquing the existing practice theories of Bourdieu, Giddens, Lyotard, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Francesc Prior & Antonio Argandoña (2009). Best Practices in Credit Accessibility and Corporate Social Responsibility in Financial Institutions. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):251 - 265.score: 192.0
    The purpose of this article is to present and discuss some of the best practices of financial industry, in three emerging economies: Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. The main thesis is that, notwithstanding the importance of certain specific deficiencies, such as an inadequate regulatory context or the lack of financial education among the population, the main factor that explains the low banking levels in emerging and developing economies, affecting mostly lower-income segments, is the use of inefficient financial service distribution models. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Adam Lindgreen, Valérie Swaen & Timothy T. Campbell (2009). Corporate Social Responsibility Practices in Developing and Transitional Countries: Botswana and Malawi. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):429 - 440.score: 192.0
    This research empirically investigated the CSR practices of 84 Botswana and Malawi organizations. The findings revealed that the extent and type of CSR practices in these countries did not significantly differ from that proposed by a U. S. model of CSR, nor did they significantly differ between Botswana and Malawi. There were, however, differences between the sampled organizations that clustered into a stakeholder perspective and traditional capitalist model groups. In the latter group, the board of directors, owners, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Marian Eabrasu (2012). A Moral Pluralist Perspective on Corporate Social Responsibility: From Good to Controversial Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (4):429-439.score: 192.0
    This study starts from the observation that there are relatively few controversial issues in corporate social responsibility (CSR). Given its strong normative background, CSR is rather an atypical discipline, especially in comparison with moral philosophy or applied ethics. Exploring the mainstream CSR agenda, this situation was echoed by widespread consensus on what was considered to be "good practice": reducing pollution, shutting down sweatshops, discouraging tax evasion, and so on. However, interpretation of these issues through the lens of moral pluralism (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Joseph Rouse (2007). Social Practices and Normativity. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (1):46-56.score: 186.0
    The Social Theory of Practices effectively criticized conceptions of social practices as rule-governed or regularity-exhibiting performances. Turner’s criticisms nevertheless overlook an alternative, "normative" conception of practices as constituted by the mutual accountability of their performances. Such a conception of practices also allows a more adequate understanding of normativity in terms of accountability to what is at issue and at stake in a practice. We can thereby understand linguistic practice and normative authority without having to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Robert Schmidt & Jörg Volbers (2011). Siting Praxeology. The Methodological Significance of “Public” in Theories of Social Practices. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (4):419-440.score: 186.0
    The concept of “site” is at the center of current debates in theories of social practices as well as in cultural anthropology. It is unclear, however, how to assess the associated methodological assumption that overriding social structures or cultural formations can manifest themselves in sites. The article draws on the conception of social practices and introduces the notion of “publicness” in order to explicate how and why sociality and social structures can be accessed through (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Guido Nicolosi & Guido Ruivenkamp (2013). Re-Skilling the Social Practices: Open Source and Life-Towards a Commons-Based Peer Production in Agro-Biotechnology? Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1181-1200.score: 186.0
    Inspired by the thinking of authors such as Andrew Feenberg, Tim Ingold and Richard Sennett, this article sets forth substantial criticism of the ‘social uprooting of technology’ paradigm, which deterministically considers modern technology an autonomous entity, independent and indifferent to the social world (practices, skills, experiences, cultures, etc.). In particular, the authors’ focus on demonstrating that the philosophy,methodology and experience linked to open source technological development represent an emblematic case of re-encapsulation of the technical code within (...) relations (reskilling practices). Open source is discussed as a practice, albeit not unique, of community empowerment aimed at the participated and shared rehabilitation of technological production ex-ante. Furthermore, the article discusses the application of open source processes in the agro-biotechnological field, showing how they may support a more democratic endogenous development, capable of binding technological innovation to the objectives of social (reducing inequalities) and environmental sustainability to a greater degree. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Michael Esfeld, What Are Social Practices?score: 180.0
    In the framework of the current revival of Wittgenstein’s later philosophy as well as American pragmatism, social practices are seen as determining the conceptual content of our beliefs. This position amounts to an inferential semantics with inferential relations supervening on social norms and these norms, in turn, supervening on normative attitudes. The paper elaborates on the distinction between social practices and social behaviour. Three conceptions of social practices are considered: (1) social (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Giorgio Bongiovanni, Antonino Rotolo, Corrado Roversi & Chiara Valentini (2009). The Structure of Social Practices and the Connection Between Law and Morality. Ratio Juris 22 (1):1-23.score: 180.0
    In his work, Jules Coleman has held that the rule of recognition, if conceived of as a shared cooperative activity, should be the gateway through which to incorporate moral constraints on the content of law. This analysis, however, leaves unanswered two important questions. For one thing, we do not know when or even why morality becomes a criterion of legality. And, for another thing, we still do not know what conception of morality it is that we are dealing with. In (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Dr Felissa K. Lee & Dr James E. Mattingly (2009). Using Stakeholder Orientation to Explain Candidate Attraction to Specific Corporate Social Practices. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:77-88.score: 180.0
    Early research examining the relationship between corporate social practices and candidate attraction generally concludes that prospective employees prefer to be affiliated with socially responsible organizations (Dolan, 1997; Greening & Turban, 2000; Turban & Greening, 1996). A basic assumption embedded in these studies is that there is a generalized consensus among job candidates regarding the factors that constitute a desirable social record. Our project challenges this assumption and seeks to uncover variation among prospective job candidates’ attraction to specific (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Ericka Tucker (2012). Developing Normative Consensus: How the ‘International Scene’ Reshapes the Debate Over the Internal and External Criticism of Harmful Social Practices. Journal of East-West Thought 2 (1):107-121.score: 168.0
    Can we ever justly critique the norms and practices of another culture? When activists or policy-makers decide that one culture’s traditional practice is harmful and needs to be eradicated, does it matter whether they are members of that culture? Given the history of imperialism, many argue that any critique of another culture’s practices must be internal. Others argue that we can appeal to a universal standard of human wellbeing to determine whether or not a particular practice is legitimate (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Ana Viseu & Heather Maguire (2012). Integrating and Enacting 'Social and Ethical Issues' in Nanotechnology Practices. Nanoethics 6 (3):195-209.score: 168.0
    The integration of nanotechnology’s ‘social and ethical issues’ (SEI) at the research and development stage is one of the defining features of nanotechnology governance in the United States. Mandated by law, integration extends the field of nanotechnology to include a role for the “social”, the “public” and the social sciences and humanities in research and development (R&D) practices and agendas. Drawing from interviews with scientists, engineers and policymakers who took part in an oral history of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. C. M. Melenovsky (2013). The Basic Structure as a System of Social Practices. Social Theory and Practice 39 (4):599-624.score: 162.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Sarit Nisim & Orly Benjamin (2008). Power and Size of Firms as Reflected in Cleaning Subcontractors' Practices of Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):673 - 683.score: 156.0
    Recent discussions in the area of corporate social responsibility suggest that organizational size has complex meanings and thus requires more scholarly attention. This article explores organizational size in the context of relative power in inter-organizational networks. To shed light on the ways relative power interacts with size we studied social responsibility practices among cleaning subcontractors in three firms of different sizes. Our focus on the network differentiates these firms on the basis of their size and sector. Semi-structured (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Derrick Darby (2003). Grounding Rights in Social Practices: A Defence. Res Publica 9 (1):1-18.score: 156.0
    This paper defends a social practiceconception of moral rights possession againstwhat many of its critics take to be a decisiveobjection, namely that such a conceptionprevents us from using moral rights forcritical purposes.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Brook J. Sadler (2007). Collective Responsibility, Universalizability, and Social Practices. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (3):486–503.score: 156.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Eddy S. Ng & Greg J. Sears (2012). CEO Leadership Styles and the Implementation of Organizational Diversity Practices: Moderating Effects of Social Values and Age. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):41-52.score: 156.0
    Drawing on strategic choice theory, we investigate the influence of CEO leadership styles and personal attributes on the implementation of organizational diversity management practices. Specifically, we examined CEO transformational and transactional leadership in relation to organizational diversity practices and whether CEO social values and age may moderate these relationships. Our results suggest that transformational leadership is most strongly associated with the implementation of diversity practices. Transactional leadership is also related to the implementation of diversity management (...) when either CEO social values or age are relatively high. These findings extend previous work examining predictors of diversity management in organizations and highlight the central role that organizational leaders may play in the successful implementation of these practices. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Hans Berends (2001). Veritistic Value and the Use of Evidence: A Shortcoming of Goldman's Epistemic Evaluation of Social Practices. Social Epistemology 16 (2):177 – 179.score: 156.0
  21. Fikret Berkes, Carl Folke & Johan Colding (eds.) (1998). Linking Social and Ecological Systems: Management Practices and Social Mechanisms for Building Resilience. Cambridge University Press.score: 156.0
    It is usually the case that scientists examine either ecological systems or social systems, yet the need for an interdisciplinary approach to the problems of environmental management and sustainable development is becoming increasingly obvious. Developed under the auspices of the Beijer Institute in Stockholm, this new book analyses social and ecological linkages in selected ecosystems using an international and interdisciplinary case study approach. The chapters provide detailed information on a variety of management practices for dealing with environmental (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Muriel Bebeau & Verna Monson (2011). Authorship and Publication Practices in the Social Sciences: Historical Reflections on Current Practices. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):365-388.score: 156.0
    An historical review of authorship definitions and publication practices that are embedded in directions to authors and in the codes of ethics in the fields of psychology, sociology, and education illuminates reasonable agreement and consistency across the fields with regard to (a) originality of the work submitted, (b) data sharing, (c) human participants’ protection, and (d) conflict of interest disclosure. However, the role of the professional association in addressing violations of research or publication practices varies among these fields. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Daewook Kim & Myung-Il Choi (2013). A Comparison of Young Publics' Evaluations of Corporate Social Responsibility Practices of Multinational Corporations in the United States and South Korea. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):105-118.score: 156.0
    The purpose of this study was to examine how young publics in the United States and South Korea perceive the corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices of multinational corporations and evaluate the effectiveness of CSR practices in terms of organization–public relationship (OPR). Results showed that young publics in the United States and South Korea differently characterized CSR practices of multinational corporations and evaluated relationships with them. Young American participants evaluated the CSR practices of multinational corporations more (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Narilee Hing (2001). Changing the Odds: A Study of Corporate Social Principles and Practices in Addressing Problem Gambling. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 33 (2):115 - 144.score: 156.0
    This paper documents a quantitative study into socially responsible principles and practices adopted in registered clubs in New South Wales Australia to manage one of their social impacts – problem gambling. The survey utilised an adapted version of Aupperle''s (1982) corporate social responsibility instrument to measure the priority given to economic, legal, ethical and discretionary principles in club machine gambling operations. The survey also assessed support for certain management practices in responsible gambling. The results indicate that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Moriah Meyskens & Karen Paul (2010). The Evolution of Corporate Social Reporting Practices in Mexico. Journal of Business Ethics 91 (2):211 - 227.score: 156.0
    This study analyzes corporate social reporting in Mexico as it has evolved in recent years, expanding and updating a previous study. Two sets of Mexican companies were identified, each of whom had expressed a commitment to corporate social responsibility (CSR) through social responsibility reports and practices on their websites. One set (" first generation") were identified as early adopters of CSR reporting in Mexico by a previous study published in 2006. The second set ("second generation") has (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. José-Luis Godos-Díez, Roberto Ferández-Gago & Almudena Martínez-Campillo (2011). How Important Are CEOs to CSR Practices? An Analysis of the Mediating Effect of the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (4):531 - 548.score: 156.0
    Drawing on the Agency-Stewardship approach, which suggests that manager profile may range from the agent model to the steward model, this article aims to examine how important CEOs are to corporate social responsibility (CSR). Specifically, this exploratory study proposes the existence of a relationship between manager profile and CSR practices and that this relation is mediated by the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility. After applying a mediated regression analysis using survey information collected from 149 CEOs (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Gerald J. Postema (1987). “Protestant” Interpretation and Social Practices. Law and Philosophy 6 (3):283 - 319.score: 150.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Todd Stewart (2005). The Competing Social Practices Argument and Self-Defeat. Episteme 2 (1):13-24.score: 150.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Seumas Miller (2003). Review of Raimo Tuomela, Philosophy of Social Practices: A Collective Acceptance View. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (5).score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Paul F. Johnson (2005). Oppression and Responsibility: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Social Practices and Moral Theory. Philosophical Investigations 28 (1):83-86.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Alessandra Tanesini (2003). Review of Peg O'Connor, Oppression and Responsibility: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Social Practices and Moral Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (2).score: 150.0
  32. Jae-Bong Yoo (2001). Hirst's Social Practices View of Education: A Radical Change From His Liberal Education? Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (4):615–626.score: 150.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. William James Deangelis (1999). Social Practices—A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social Theodore R. Schatzki Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press, 1996, Xii + 241 Pp., US $52. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (01):225-.score: 150.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Reviewed Paul F. Johnson (2005). Oppression and Responsibility: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Social Practices and Moral Theory. Philosophical Investigations 28 (1):83–86.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Madison Powers & Ruth Faden (2013). Social Practices, Public Health and the Twin Aims of Justice: Responses to Comments. Public Health Ethics 6 (1):45-49.score: 150.0
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Paul Smeyers (2012). Moral Perception and Judgment and a Truly Radical Change of Social Practices: A Reply to Paul Standish's 'Registers of the Religious'. Ethics and Education 7 (2):199-205.score: 150.0
    Ethics and Education, Volume 7, Issue 2, Page 199-205, July 2012.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Sarah Sorenson, James E. Mattingly & Felissa K. Lee (2010). Decoding the Signal Effects of Job Candidate Attraction to Corporate Social Practices. Business and Society Review 115 (2):173-204.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Stephen Satris (1998). Social Practices. Review of Metaphysics 52 (1):174-175.score: 150.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Theodore R. Schatzki (2003). Raimo Tuomela, The Philosophy of Social Practices: A Collective Acceptance View Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (6):409-411.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. James Bohman (1997). Do Practices Explain Anything? Turner's Critique of the Theory of Social Practices. History and Theory 36 (1):93-107.score: 150.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. William James DeAngelis (1999). Social Practices—A Wittgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social. Dialogue 38 (1):225-228.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. P. Giddy (1997). A Communitarian Framework for Understanding Liberal Social Practices? South African Journal of Philosophy 16 (4):150-157.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Arthur A. Joyce (2000). The Founding of Monte Albán: Sacred Propositions and Social Practices. In Marcia-Anne Dobres & John E. Robb (eds.), Agency in Archaeology. Routledge. 71--91.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Peg O'Connor (2002). Oppression and Responsibility: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Social Practices and Moral Theory. Penn State University Press.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2005). Tuomela, Raimo, The Philosophy of Social Practices – A Collective Acceptance View, Cambridge University Press, 2002, 274 Pp. + Xi. [REVIEW] SATS 6 (1).score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Claude Rosental (2004). Fuzzyfying the World: Social Practices of Showing the Properties of Fuzzy Logic. In M. Norton Wise (ed.), Growing Explanations: Historical Perspectives on Recent Science. Duke University Press.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. John Shotter (2001). Towards a Third Revolution in Psychology: From Inner Mental Representations to Dialogically-Structured Social Practices. In David Bakhurst & Stuart Shanker (eds.), Jerome Bruner: Language, Culture, Self. Sage. 167--183.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Craig Squires (1998). Theodore R. Schatzki, Social Practices: A Wttgensteinian Approach to Human Activity and the Social Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (2):148-150.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Stephen P. Turner (1994). The Social Theory of Practices: Tradition, Tacit Knowledge, and Presuppositions. University of Chicago Press.score: 148.0
    The concept of "practices"--whether of representation, of political or scientific traditions, or of organizational culture--is central to social theory. In this book, Stephen Turner presents the first analysis and critique of the idea of practice as it has developed in the various theoretical traditions of the social sciences and the humanities. Understood broadly as a tacit understanding "shared" by a group, the concept of a practice has a fatal difficulty, Turner argues: there is no plausible mechanism by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Daniel Hicks (2012). Scientific Practices and Their Social Context. Dissertation, U. of Notre Damescore: 146.0
    My dissertation combines philosophy of science and political philosophy. Drawing directly on the work of Alasdair MacIntyre and inspired by John Dewey, I develop two rival conceptions of scientific practice. I show that these rivals are closely linked to the two basic sides in the science and values debate -- the debate over the extent to which ethical and political values may legitimately influence scientific inquiry. Finally, I start to develop an account of justice that is sensitive to these legitimate (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000