Search results for 'sociality' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  12
    Jo-Jo Koo (2015). Concrete Interpersonal Encounters or Sharing a Common World: Which is More Fundamental in Phenomenological Approaches to Sociality? In Thomas Szanto & Dermot Moran (eds.), The Phenomenology of Sociality: Discovering the ‘We’. Routledge Publishing 93-106.
    A central question along which phenomenological approaches to sociality or intersubjectivity have diverged concerns whether concrete interpersonal encounters or sharing a common world is more fundamental in working out an adequate phenomenology of human sociality. On one side we have philosophers such as the early Sartre, Martin Buber, Michael Theunissen, and Emmanuel Levinas, all of whom emphasize, each in his own way, the priority of some mode of interpersonal encounters (broadly construed) in determining the basic character of human (...)
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  2. Michael Bratman (2009). Modest Sociality and the Distinctiveness of Intention. Philosophical Studies 144 (1):149 - 165.
    Cases of modest sociality are cases of small scale shared intentional agency in the absence of asymmetric authority relations. I seek a conceptual framework that adequately supports our theorizing about such modest sociality. I want to understand what in the world constitutes such modest sociality. I seek an understanding of the kinds of normativity that are central to modest sociality. And throughout we need to keep track of the relations—conceptual, metaphysical, normative—between individual agency and modest (...). In pursuit of these theoretical aims, I propose that a central phenomenon is shared intention. I argue that an adequate understanding of the distinctiveness of the intentions of individuals allows us to provide a construction of attitudes of the participants, and of relevant inter-relations and contexts that constitutes shared intention. I explain how shared intention, so understood, differs from a simple equilibrium within common knowledge. And I briefly contrast my views with aspects of views of John Searle and Margaret Gilbert. (shrink)
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  3.  18
    Corey L. Fincher & Randy Thornhill (2012). Parasite-Stress Promotes in-Group Assortative Sociality: The Cases of Strong Family Ties and Heightened Religiosity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):61-79.
    Throughout the world people differ in the magnitude with which they value strong family ties or heightened religiosity. We propose that this cross-cultural variation is a result of a contingent psychological adaptation that facilitates in-group assortative sociality in the face of high levels of parasite-stress while devaluing in-group assortative sociality in areas with low levels of parasite-stress. This is because in-group assortative sociality is more important for the avoidance of infection from novel parasites and for the management (...)
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  4.  15
    David Copp (2015). Social Glue and Norms of Sociality. Philosophical Studies 172 (12):3387-3397.
    If we are going to understand morality, it is important to understand the nature of societies. What is fundamental to them? What is the glue that holds them together? What is the role of shared norm acceptance in constituting a society? Michael Bratman’s account of modest sociality in his book, Shared Agency, casts significant light on these issues. Bratman’s account focuses on small-scale interactions, but it is instructive of the kinds of factors that can enter into explaining sociality (...)
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  5.  10
    Jo-Jo Koo (2005). Practice and Sociality. In Georg W. Bertram, Stefan Blank, Christophe Laudou & David Lauer (eds.), Intersubjectivité et pratique: Contributions à l’étude des pragmatismes dans la philosophie contemporaine. L'Harmattan 57-74.
    In recent years a growing number of philosophers in the analytic tradition have focused their attention on the significance of human sociality. An older point of departure of analysis, which actually precedes this current tide of accounts of sociality, has revolved around the debate between “holism” and “individualism” in the philosophy of the human or social sciences and social theory. The more recent point of departure for various accounts of sociality has centered on the nature of conventions, (...)
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  6.  37
    Marco C. Rozendaal, Bram A. L. Braat & Stephan A. G. Wensveen (2010). Exploring Sociality and Engagement in Play Through Game-Control Distribution. AI and Society 25 (2):193-201.
    This study explores how distributing the controls of a video game among multiple players affects the sociality and engagement experienced in game play. A video game was developed in which the distribution of game controls among the players could be varied, thereby affecting the abilities of the individual players to control the game. An experiment was set up in which eight groups of three players were asked to play the video game while the distribution of the game controls was (...)
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  7.  6
    Phillip Honenberger (2015). Animality, Sociality, and Historicity in Helmuth Plessner’s Philosophical Anthropology. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 23 (5):707-729.
    Axel Honneth and Hans Joas claim that Helmuth Plessner’s philosophical anthropology is problematically ‘solipsistic’ insofar as it fails to appreciate the ways in which human persons or selves are brought into being and given their characteristic powers of reflection and action by social processes. Here I review the main argument of Plessner’s Die Stufen des Organischen und der Mensch: Einleitung in die philosophische Anthropologie with this criticism in mind, giving special attention to Plessner’s accounts of organic being, personhood, language, (...), and historicity in that text. I argue that Honneth and Joas’s criticisms understate the extent to which Plessner takes sociality to be a constitutive condition of human forms of life within the structure he calls ‘ex-centric positionality’. This reading of Plessner also provides resources for answering a more common criticism of his philosophical anthropology – namely, that it is problematically ‘essentialist’, paying insufficient heed t.. (shrink)
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  8.  25
    B. Scot Rousse (2014). Heidegger, Sociality, and Human Agency. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):n/a-n/a.
    According to Heidegger's Being and Time, social relations are constitutive of the core features of human agency. On this view, which I call a ‘strong conception’ of sociality, the core features of human agency cannot obtain in an individual subject independently of social relations to others. I explain the strong conception of sociality captured by Heidegger's underdeveloped notion of ‘being-with’ by reconstructing Heidegger's critique of the ‘weak conception’ of sociality characteristic of Kant's theory of agency. According to (...)
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  9.  19
    Peter Taylor (2000). Socio-Ecological Webs and Sites of Sociality:Levins' Strategy of Model Building Revisited. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 15 (2):197-210.
    This essay extends Levins'' 1966 analysis of modelbuilding in ecology and evolutionary biology. Amodel, as the product of modeling, might bevalued according to its correspondence to reality. Yet Levins'' emphasis on provisionality and changeredirects attention to the processes ofmodeling, through which scientists select and generatetheir problems, define their categories, collect theirdata, compare competing models, and present theirfindings. I identify several points where decisionsare required that are not determined by nature. Thisinvites examination of the social considerationsmodelers are reacting to at the (...)
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  10. Kirk Ludwig (2015). Shared Agency in Modest Sociality. Journal of Social Ontology 1 (1):7-15.
    This is contribution to a symposium on Michael Bratman's book Shared Agency : A Planning Theory of Acting Together.
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  11.  5
    David Bevan & Patricia Werhane (2015). The Inexorable Sociality of Commerce: The Individual and Others in Adam Smith. Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):327-335.
    In this paper we reconsider Adam Smith’s ethics, what he means by self-interest and the role this plays in the famous “invisible hand.” Our efforts focus in part on the misreading of “the invisible hand” by certain economists with a view to legitimizing their neoclassical economic paradigm. Through exegesis and by reference to notions that are developed in Smith’s two major works, we deconstruct Smith’s ideas of conscience, justice, self-interest, and the invisible hand. We amplify Smith’s insistence, through his notions (...)
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  12.  8
    Vincent Colapietro (2013). The «Inner» Life of the Social Self: Agency, Sociality, and Reflexivity. Nóema 4 (4-1):2-12.
    Questo saggio offre un ritratto pragmatista del sé e dunque una descrizione che parte dalla premessa per cui il sé è anzitutto un attore sociale incarnato, situato, che possiede la capacità di un’effettiva autocritica. Così, oltre a evidenziare il ruolo dell’azione, l’autore sottolinea anche quello della socialità e della riflessività. A differenza di molti ritratti abbozzati da altri autori pragmatisti, quello presente cerca di rendere una più completa giustizia alla dimensione «interiore» della soggettività umana, soprattutto attraverso la costruzione dell’interiorità come (...)
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  13.  11
    Margaret Gilbert (2000). Sociality and Responsibility: New Essays in Plural Subject Theory. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    One of the most distinguished living social philosophers, Margaret Gilbert develops and extends her application of plural subject theory of human sociality, first introduced in her earlier works On Social Facts and Living Together. Sociality and Responsibility presents an extended discussion of her proposal that joint commitments inherently involve obligations and rights, proposing, in effect, a new theory of obligations and rights. In addition, it demonstrates the extensive range and fruitfulness of plural subject theory by presenting accounts of (...)
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  14.  35
    Raimo Tuomela (2007). The Philosophy of Sociality: The Shared Point of View. OUP Usa.
    The Philosophy of Sociality offers new ideas and conceptual tools for philosophers and social scientists in their analysis of the social world.
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  15. Joseph Henrich, Robert Boyd, Samuel Bowles, Colin Camerer, Ernst Fehr & Herbert Gintis (eds.) (2004). Foundations of Human Sociality - Economic Experiments and Ethnographic: Evidence From Fifteen Small-Scale Societies. Oxford University Press Uk.
    What motives underlie the ways humans interact socially? Are these the same for all societies? Are these part of our nature, or influenced by our environments?Over the last decade, research in experimental economics has emphatically falsified the textbook representation of Homo economicus. Literally hundreds of experiments suggest that people care not only about their own material payoffs, but also about such things as fairness, equity and reciprocity. However, this research left fundamental questions unanswered: Are such social preferences stable components of (...)
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  16. Thomas Szanto & Dermot Moran (eds.) (2015). Phenomenology of Sociality: Discovering the ‘We’. Routledge.
    Phenomenological accounts of sociality in Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Scheler, Schütz, Stein and many others offer powerful lines of arguments to recast current, predominantly analytic, discussions on collective intentionality and social cognition. Against this background, the aim of this volume is to reevaluate, critically and in contemporary terms, the rich phenomenological resources regarding social reality: the interpersonal, collective and communal aspects of the life-world. Specifically, the book pursues three interrelated objectives: it aims 1.) to systematically explore the key phenomenological (...)
     
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  17.  5
    B. Scot Rousse (2016). Heidegger, Sociality, and Human Agency. European Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):417-451.
    According to Heidegger's Being and Time, social relations are constitutive of the core features of human agency. On this view, which I call a ‘strong conception’ of sociality, the core features of human agency cannot obtain in an individual subject independently of social relations to others. I explain the strong conception of sociality captured by Heidegger's underdeveloped notion of ‘being-with’ by reconstructing Heidegger's critique of the ‘weak conception’ of sociality characteristic of Kant's theory of agency. According to (...)
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  18.  10
    Elisabeth Pacherie (2015). Modest Sociality: Continuities and Discontinuities. Journal of Social Ontology 1 (1).
    A central claim in Michael Bratman’s account of shared agency is that there need be no radical conceptual, metaphysical or normative discontinuity between robust forms of small-scale shared intentional agency, i.e., modest sociality, and individual planning agency. What I propose to do is consider another potential discontinuity, whose existence would throw doubt on his contention that the structure of a robust form of modest sociality is entirely continuous with structures at work in individual planning agency. My main point (...)
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  19.  61
    Tom Froese & Ezequiel A. Di Paolo (2009). Sociality and the Life–Mind Continuity Thesis. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):439-463.
    The life–mind continuity thesis holds that mind is prefigured in life and that mind belongs to life. The biggest challenge faced by proponents of this thesis is to show how an explanatory framework that accounts for basic biological processes can be systematically extended to incorporate the highest reaches of human cognition. We suggest that this apparent ‘cognitive gap’ between minimal and human forms of life appears insurmountable largely because of the methodological individualism that is prevalent in cognitive science. Accordingly, a (...)
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  20.  63
    Emmanuel Levinas, Translated by François Bouchetoux & Campbell Jones (2007). Sociality and Money. Business Ethics 16 (3):203-207.
    This is a translation of "Socialite et argent", a text by Emmanuel Levinas originally published in 1987. Levinas describes the emergence of money out of inter-human relations of exchange and the social relations - sociality - that result. While elsewhere he has presented sociality as "non-indifference to alterity" it appears here as "proximity of the stranger" and points to the tension between an economic system based on money and the basic human disposition to respond to the face of (...)
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  21.  7
    Thomas E. Currie & Ruth Mace (2012). Analyses Do Not Support the Parasite-Stress Theory of Human Sociality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):83-85.
    Re-analysis of the data provided in the target article reveals a lack of evidence for a strong, universal relationship between parasite stress and the variables relating to sociality. Furthermore, even if associations between these variables do exist, the analyses presented here do not provide evidence for Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) proposed causal mechanism.
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  22.  22
    Joseph C. Flay (1996). Hegel's Phenomenology: The Sociality of Reason. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (1):151-152.
    BOOK REVIEWS 151 excellent companion). It is an insightful account of Schelling's writing and makes a successful run at actualizing Schelling's potential contribution to contemporary debate. BRAD PRAGER CorneU University Terry Pinkard. Hegel's Phenomenology: The Sociality of Reason. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994. Pp. vii + 45 I. Cloth, $59-95. This book is a significant addition to contemporary literature on Hegel. The writing is clear and is free of confusing Hegelian language. At the same time, Pinkard penetrates to (...)
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  23.  15
    Tanja Staehler, Social Networks as Inauthentic Sociality.
    This article argues that social networks constitute an inauthentic form of sociality. The two component concepts of this claim, inauthenticity and sociality, are explored in order to avoid some widespread misinterpretations. Inauthenticity is examined on the basis of the relevant sections in Heidegger’s 'Being and Time', first with respect to its main characteristics, then in terms of what motivates it and its benefits, and finally with respect to its status as a non-normative concept. The second part of the (...)
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  24.  13
    Nikolaos Psarros & Katinka Schulte-Ostermann (eds.) (2007). Facets of Sociality. Ontos.
    The aim of this volume is to explore new approaches to the problem of the constitution of the various aspects of sociality and to confront these with received ideas. Many of the contributions are devoted to a rather holistic and antireductionist conception of social objects, groups, joint actions, and collective knowledge. The topics that are dealt with are: (a) the question of the ontological status of social objects and their relation to physical objects; (b) collective agency; and (c) the (...)
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  25.  64
    Jeff Malpas (1997). Space and Sociality. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 5 (1):53 – 79.
    To what extent is our being as social creatures dependent on our having a grasp of sociality? Is a purely solipsistic space, a space that can be grasped without any grasp of the existence of others, possible? These questions are examined and the possible connection between space and sociality explored. The central claim is that there is indeed an intimate relation between the concept of space and the idea of the social: that any creature that has a grasp (...)
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  26.  1
    A. Wittel (2001). Toward a Network Sociality. Theory, Culture and Society 18 (6):51-76.
    This article explores some current transformations of the social. It argues for a shift from a model of sociality based on community towards a network sociality. This shift is particularly visible in urban spaces and in the cultural industries. However, it seems to become paradigmatic more widely of the information society. The article is to be read as a cultural hypothesis. In the first part I introduce some examples that document the rise of a network sociality. Most (...)
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  27.  17
    Ian Angus (2006). Phenomenology as Critique of Institutions: Movements, Authentic Sociality and Nothingness. Phaenex 1 (1):175-196.
    This essay seeks to demonstrate that the practice of phenomenological philosophy entails a practice of social and political criticism. The original demand of phenomenology is that theoretical and scientific judgments must be based upon the giving of the ‘things themselves’ in self-evident intuition. The continuous radicalization of this demand is what characterizes phenomenological philosophy and determines a practice of social and political criticism which can be traced through four phases: 1. a critique of institutions through the method of unbuilding (Abbau, (...)
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  28.  56
    Margaret P. Gilbert (2001). Sociality, Unity, Objectivity. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 11:153-160.
    Numerous social and political theorists have referred to social groups or societies as “unities.” What makes a unity of a social group? I address this question with special reference to the theory of social groups proposed in my books On Social Facts and Living Together: Rationality, Sociality and Obligation. I argue that social groups of a central kind require an underlying “joint commitment.” I explain what I mean by a “joint commitment” with care. If joint commitments in my sense (...)
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  29. Arne Grøn (2010). Basic Trust?. Trust, Sociality, Selfhood. In Arne Grøn & Claudia Welz (eds.), Trust, Sociality, Selfhood. Mohr Siebeck
     
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  30.  5
    Simon M. Reader & Louis Lefebvre (2001). Social Learning and Sociality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):353-355.
    Sociality may not be a defining feature of social learning. Complex social systems have been predicted to favour the evolution of social learning, but the evidence for this relationship is weak. In birds, only one study supports the hypothesis that social learning is an adaptive specialisation to social living. In nonhuman primates, social group size and social learning frequency are not correlated. Though cetaceans may prove an exception, they provide a useful group with which to test these ideas.
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  31.  41
    Margaret P. Gilbert (1994). Sociality as a Philosophically Significant Category. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (3):5-25.
    Different accounts of what it is for something to have a social nature have been given. Sociality does not appear to be a category worthy of philosophical focus, given some of these accounts. If sociality is construed as plural subjecthood, it emerges as a category crucial for our understanding of the human condition. Plural subjects are constituted by a joint commitment of two or more persons to do something as a body. Such commitments generate rights and obligations of (...)
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  32.  5
    Corey L. Fincher & Randy Thornhill (2012). The Parasite-Stress Theory May Be a General Theory of Culture and Sociality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):99-119.
    In the target article, we presented the hypothesis that parasite-stress variation was a causal factor in the variation of in-group assortative sociality, cross-nationally and across the United States, which we indexed with variables that measured different aspects of the strength of family ties and religiosity. We presented evidence supportive of our hypothesis in the form of analyses that controlled for variation in freedom, wealth resources, and wealth inequality across nations and the states of the USA. Here, we respond to (...)
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  33.  25
    Peter Richerson, The Evolution of Human Ultra-Sociality.
    E.O. Wilson (1975) described humans as one of the four pinnacles of social evolution. The other pinnacles are the colonial invertebrates, the social insects, and the non-human mammals. Wilson separated human sociality from that of the rest of the mammals because, with the exception of the social insect like Naked Mole Rats, only humans have generated societies of a grade of complexity that approaches that of the social insects and colonial invertebrates. In the last few millennia, human societies have (...)
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  34.  19
    Rob Boyd, The Evolution of Human Ultra-Sociality.
    E.O. Wilson (1975) described humans as one of the four pinnacles of social evolution. The other pinnacles are the colonial invertebrates, the social insects, and the non-human mammals. Wilson separated human sociality from that of the rest of the mammals because, with the exception of the social insect like Naked Mole Rats, only humans have generated societies of a grade of complexity that approaches that of the social insects and colonial invertebrates. In the last few millennia, human societies have (...)
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  35.  11
    R. Tuomela (2010). The We-Mode Approach: A Response to John Wettersten's Review of The Philosophy of Sociality: The Shared Point of View. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 40 (3):513-517.
    The paper is a response to some critical points and omissions in John Wettersten’s review of my recent book The Philosophy of Sociality: The Shared Point of View (Oxford University Press, 2007). I point out in this short paper that the reviewer has not discussed the most central notions in the book relating to its "we-mode" approach, i.e. collective acceptance, group reasons, the collectivity condition, collective commitment and their role in accounting for e.g. cooperation, social institutions, cultural evolution. I (...)
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  36.  8
    Vernon L. Smith (2005). Sociality and Self Interest. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):833-834.
    Selfishness narrowly defined as choosing dominant outcomes independent of context is widely rejected by experimentalists. Humans live in two worlds of personal and impersonal exchange; both are manifestations of human sociality, but the emphasis on preferences rather than cultural norms of personal exchange across time too much reflects a limited economic modeling, and fails to capitalize on the fresher experimental economics message of culture and diversity.
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  37.  1
    Jacob M. Vigil & Patrick Coulombe (2012). Intra-Regional Assortative Sociality May Be Better Explained by Social Network Dynamics Rather Than Pathogen Risk Avoidance. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):96-97.
    Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) model is not entirely supported by common patterns of affect behaviors among people who live under varying climatic conditions and among people who endorse varying levels of (Western) religiosity and conservative political ideals. The authors' model is also unable to account for intra-regional heterogeneity in assortative sociality, which, we argue, can be better explained by a framework that emphasizes the differential expression of fundamental social cues for maintaining distinct social network structures.
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  38.  1
    Rebekka A. Klein (2011). Sociality as the Human Condition: Anthropology in Economic, Philosophical and Theological Perspective. Brill.
    Examining recent experiments on human altruism in economics, this book offers a critique of naturalistic approaches to the phenomenon of human sociality. It draws on philosophical theories of social conflict and recognition, and on theological concepts of neighborly love.
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  39. Jorge Armando Reyes (2007). Hegel's Science of Logic and the “Sociality of Reason”. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 3 (2-3):51-83.
    span/spanspanspan style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: 16px" class="Apple-style-span"spanThis paper is intended to examine the significance of Hegelrsquo;s emScience of Logic/em for social thought. I attempt to show that the claims advocating directly the social character of reason present in Hegelrsquo;s thought must be regarded against the background of the logical demand of a presuppositionless thinking. After reviewing the criticisms addressed against the possibility of fulfilling that demand, I suggest that Hegelrsquo;s demand of presuppositionless thinking could be understood as a transformation (...)
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  40. B. Scot Rousse (2014). Heidegger, Sociality, and Human Agency. European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1).
    According to Heidegger's Being and Time, social relations are constitutive of the core features of human agency. On this view, which I call a ‘strong conception’ of sociality, the core features of human agency cannot obtain in an individual subject independently of social relations to others. I explain the strong conception of sociality captured by Heidegger's underdeveloped notion of ‘being-with’ by reconstructing Heidegger's critique of the ‘weak conception’ of sociality characteristic of Kant's theory of agency. According to (...)
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  41. Martina Sitling (ed.) (2011). Sociality as the Human Condition: Anthropology in Economic, Philosophical and Theological Perspective. Brill.
    Examining recent experiments on human altruism in economics, this book offers a critique of naturalistic approaches to the phenomenon of human sociality. It draws on philosophical theories of social conflict and recognition, and on theological concepts of neighborly love.
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  42. Thomas Szanto & Dermot Moran (eds.) (2015). Phenomenology of Sociality: Discovering the ‘We’. Routledge.
    Phenomenological accounts of sociality in Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Sartre, Scheler, Schütz, Stein and many others offer powerful lines of arguments to recast current, predominantly analytic, discussions on collective intentionality and social cognition. Against this background, the aim of this volume is to reevaluate, critically and in contemporary terms, the rich phenomenological resources regarding social reality: the interpersonal, collective and communal aspects of the life-world. Specifically, the book pursues three interrelated objectives: it aims 1.) to systematically explore the key phenomenological (...)
     
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  43.  23
    Terry P. Pinkard (1994). Hegel's Phenomenology: The Sociality of Reason. Cambridge University Press.
    Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit is at once one of his most widely read and yet most obscure texts. This book is the most detailed commentary on Hegel's work available and develops an independent philosophical account of the general theory of knowledge, culture and history contained in it. Written in a clear and straightforward style, the book reconstructs Hegel's theoretical philosophy and shows its connection to the ethical and political theory. Terry Pinkard sets the work in a historical context and reveals (...)
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  44. Raimo Tuomela (2007). The Philosophy of Sociality: The Shared Point of View. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Concepts based on full-blown collective intentionality are central for understanding the social world. The book systematically studies social groups, collective commitment, group intentions, beliefs, and actions, especially authority-based group attitudes and actions, also addressing cooperation, cultural evolution, and responsibility.
     
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  45. Henrik Høgh-Olesen (ed.) (2010). Human Morality and Sociality: Evolutionary and Comparative Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  46. Bettina Schmitz & Translated By Julia Jansen (2005). Homelessness or Symbolic Castration? Subjectivity, Language Acquisition, and Sociality in Julia Kristeva and Jacques Lacan. Hypatia 20 (2):69-87.
    How much violence can a society expect its members to accept? A comparison between the language theories of Julia Kristeva and Jacques Lacan is the starting point for answering this question. A look at the early stages of language acquisition exposes the sacrificial logic of patriarchal society. Are those forces that restrict the individual to be conceived in a martial imagery of castration or is it possible that an existing society critically questions those points of socialization that leave their members (...)
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  47. Margaret Gilbert (1989). Folk Psychology Takes Sociality Seriously. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):707.
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  48.  22
    Gary Bartlett (2016). Review of "The Feeling Body: Affective Science Meets the Enactive Mind" and "Feeling Extended: Sociality as Extended Body-Becoming-Mind". [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 17 (1):164-188.
  49.  96
    David M. Rasmussen (1973). Between Autonomy and Sociality. Philosophy and Social Criticism 1 (1):3-45.
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  50. Qingping Liu (2003). Filiality Versus Sociality and Individuality: On Confucianism as "Consanguinitism". Philosophy East and West 53 (2):234-250.
    : Confucianism is often valued as a doctrine that highlights both the individual and social dimensions of the ideal person, for it indeed puts special emphasis on such lofty goals as loving all humanity and cultivating the self. Through a close and critical analysis of the texts of the Analects and the Mencius, however, it is attempted to demonstrate that because Confucius and Mencius always take filial piety, or, more generally, consanguineous affection, as not only the foundation but also the (...)
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