Search results for 'soft science' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. George S. Howard (1993). When Psychology Looks Like a "Soft" Science, It's for Good Reasonp. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 13 (1):42-47.score: 150.0
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  2. Massimo Pigliucci (2002). Are Ecology and Evolutionary Biology “Soft” Sciences? Annales Zoologici Finnici 39:87-98.score: 128.0
    Research in ecology and evolutionary biology (evo-eco) often tries to emulate the “hard” sciences such as physics and chemistry, but to many of its practitioners feels more like the “soft” sciences of psychology and sociology. I argue that this schizophrenic attitude is the result of lack of appreciation of the full consequences of the peculiarity of the evo-eco sciences as lying in between a-historical disciplines such as physics and completely historical ones as like paleontology. Furthermore, evo-eco researchers have gotten (...)
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  3. B. Pratt & K. Johnson (2005). SoftScience in the Courtroom?: The Effects of Admitting Neuroimaging Evidence Into Legal Proceedings. Penn Bioethics Journal 1 (1).score: 90.0
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  4. Sheldon Pollock (2009). Future Philology? The Fate of a Soft Science in a Hard World. Critical Inquiry 35 (4):931-961.score: 90.0
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  5. Ross E. G. Upshur (2006). Evidence‐Based Medicine, Reasoned Medicine or Both? Commentary on Jenicek, M. (2006) 'The Hard Art of Soft Science'Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12, 410–419. [REVIEW] Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (4):420-422.score: 90.0
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  6. Milos Jenicek (2006). The Hard Art of Soft Science: Evidence‐Based Medicine, Reasoned Medicine or Both? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (4):410-419.score: 90.0
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  7. Michael Loughlin (2006). Blinded by 'Science': Commentary on Jenicek, M. (2006) 'The Hard Art of Soft Science'Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12, 410–419. [REVIEW] Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (4):423-426.score: 90.0
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  8. Ross E. G. Upshur B. A. Hons Ma (2006). Jenicek, M.(2006)'The Hard Art of Soft Science'Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12, 410–419. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (4):420-422.score: 90.0
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  9. Mike Walsh, Gordon Grant & Zoë Coleman (2008). Action Research—a Necessary Complement to Traditional Health Science? Health Care Analysis 16 (2):127-144.score: 72.0
    There is continuing interest in action research in health care. This is despite action researchers facing major problems getting support for their projects from mainstream sources of R&D funds partly because its validity is disputed and partly because it is difficult to predict or evaluate and is therefore seen as risky. In contrast traditional health science dominates and relies on compliance with strictly defined scientific method and rules of accountability. Critics of scientific health care have highlighted many problems including (...)
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  10. Massimo Pigliucci (2010). Nonsense on Stilts: How to Tell Science From Bunk. University of Chicago Press.score: 60.0
    Introduction : science versus pseudoscience and the "demarcation problem" -- Hard science, soft science -- Almost science -- Pseudoscience -- Blame the media? -- Debates on science : the rise of think tanks and the decline of public intellectuals -- Science and politics : the case of global warming -- Science in the courtroom : the case against intelligent design -- From superstition to natural philosophy -- From natural philosophy to modern (...) -- The science wars I : do we trust science too much? -- The science wars II : do we trust science too little? -- Who's your expert? -- Conclusion : so, what is science after all? (shrink)
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  11. Sheldon Krimsky (2000). Commentary on “the Politics of Certainty” (C. A. Rubino). Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):509-510.score: 58.0
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  12. Anton Moser (2000). The Wisdom of Nature in Integrating Science, Ethics and the Arts. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):365-382.score: 52.0
    This paper deals with an approach to the integration of science (with technology and economics), ethics (with religion and mysticism), the arts (aesthetics) and Nature, in order to establish a world-view based on holistic, evolutionary ethics that could help with problem solving. The author suggests that this integration is possible with the aid of “Nature’s wisdom” which is mirrored in the macroscopic pattern of the ecosphere. The corresponding eco-principles represent the basis for unifying soft and hard sciences resulting (...)
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  13. Katharina T. Kraus (2011). Kant and the 'Soft Sciences'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (4):618-624.score: 48.0
  14. Thomas Sturm (2011). Freedom and the Human Sciences: Hume’s Science of Man Versus Kant’s Pragmatic Anthropology. Kant Yearbook 3 (1):23-42.score: 42.0
    In his Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, Kant formulates the idea of the empirical investigation of the human being as a free agent. The notion is puzzling: Does Kant not often claim that, from an empirical point of view, human beings cannot be considered as free? What sense would it make anyway to include the notion of freedom in science? The answer to these questions lies in Kant’s notion of character. While probably all concepts of character are (...)
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  15. Simone van der Burg (2011). Taking the “Soft Impacts” of Technology Into Account: Broadening the Discourse in Research Practice. Social Epistemology 23 (3):301-316.score: 42.0
    Public funding institutions are able to influence what aspects researchers take into account when they consider the future impacts of their research. On the basis of a description of the evaluation systems that public research funding institutes in the Netherlands (STW and SenterNovem) use to estimate the quality of engineering science, this article shows that researchers are now predominantly required to reflect on the intellectual merit of their research and on the usability and marketability of the technology it contributes (...)
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  16. Giles Oatley, Brian Ewart & John Zeleznikow (2006). Decision Support Systems for Police: Lessons From the Application of Data Mining Techniques to “Soft” Forensic Evidence. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 14 (1-2):35-100.score: 42.0
    The paper sets out the challenges facing the Police in respect of the detection and prevention of the volume crime of burglary. A discussion of data mining and decision support technologies that have the potential to address these issues is undertaken and illustrated with reference the authors’ work with three Police Services. The focus is upon the use of “soft” forensic evidence which refers to modus operandi and the temporal and geographical features of the crime, rather than “hard” evidence (...)
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  17. J. Herman (2001). Medicine: The Science and the Art. Medical Humanities 27 (1):42-46.score: 42.0
    Medicine has been said to be both a science and an art. Many practitioners regard this statement as containing an element of “either/or”. A brief look at what scientists and artists have written about their work and their world views, however, suggests that the two fields of endeavour form a complementary part of our attempts to understand ourselves and the world about us. Moreover, on occasion, each can perform some of the other's tasks. This paper quotes from the writings (...)
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  18. A. J. M. Oerlemans, M. E. C. Hoek, E. Leeuwen, S. Burg & W. J. M. Dekkers (2013). Towards a Richer Debate on Tissue Engineering: A Consideration on the Basis of NEST-Ethics. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):963-981.score: 42.0
    In their 2007 paper, Swierstra and Rip identify characteristic tropes and patterns of moral argumentation in the debate about the ethics of new and emerging science and technologies (or “NEST-ethics”). Taking their NEST-ethics structure as a starting point, we considered the debate about tissue engineering (TE), and argue what aspects we think ought to be a part of a rich and high-quality debate of TE. The debate surrounding TE seems to be predominantly a debate among experts. When considering the (...)
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  19. A. J. M. Oerlemans, M. E. C. van Hoek, E. van Leeuwen, S. van der Burg & W. J. M. Dekkers (2013). Towards a Richer Debate on Tissue Engineering: A Consideration on the Basis of NEST-Ethics. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):963-981.score: 42.0
    In their 2007 paper, Swierstra and Rip identify characteristic tropes and patterns of moral argumentation in the debate about the ethics of new and emerging science and technologies (or “NEST-ethics”). Taking their NEST-ethics structure as a starting point, we considered the debate about tissue engineering (TE), and argue what aspects we think ought to be a part of a rich and high-quality debate of TE. The debate surrounding TE seems to be predominantly a debate among experts. When considering the (...)
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  20. Wayne D. Gray & Wai‐Tat Fu (2004). Soft Constraints in Interactive Behavior: The Case of Ignoring Perfect Knowledge in‐the‐World for Imperfect Knowledge in‐the‐Head*,*. Cognitive Science 28 (3):359-382.score: 36.0
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  21. Eduardo H. Flichman (1995). Hard and Soft Accidental Uniformities. Philosophy of Science 62 (1):31-43.score: 30.0
    I discuss some aspects of the epistemological distinction between laws of nature and accidental uniformities. In order that the exposition be self-contained I briefly provide a taxonomy proposed in another work for statements that appear in a scientific theory. Once this taxonomy has been presented I attempt to prove two very different types of accidental uniformities: hard and soft. The distinction is fundamental because the latter have frequently been confused with laws of nature. I try to justify why I (...)
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  22. Abhaya C. Nayak & Eric Sotnak (1995). Kant on the Impossibility of the "Soft Sciences&Quot;. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):133-151.score: 30.0
  23. Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson (1990). Soft Laws. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):256-279.score: 30.0
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  24. Jennifer Culbertson, Paul Smolensky & Colin Wilson (2013). Cognitive Biases, Linguistic Universals, and Constraint‐Based Grammar Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):392-424.score: 30.0
    According to classical arguments, language learning is both facilitated and constrained by cognitive biases. These biases are reflected in linguistic typology—the distribution of linguistic patterns across the world's languages—and can be probed with artificial grammar experiments on child and adult learners. Beginning with a widely successful approach to typology (Optimality Theory), and adapting techniques from computational approaches to statistical learning, we develop a Bayesian model of cognitive biases and show that it accounts for the detailed pattern of results of artificial (...)
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  25. Eric Sotnak (1995). Kant on the Impossibility of the “Soft Sciences”. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):133 - 151.score: 30.0
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  26. Jens Erik Fenstad (1959). Notes on the Application of Formal Methods in the Soft Sciences. Inquiry 2 (1-4):34 – 64.score: 30.0
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  27. Axel Gelfert (2011). Nanotechnology as Ideology: Towards a Critical Theory of ‘Converging Technologies’. Science, Technology and Society 17 (1):143-164.score: 30.0
    The present paper contributes to a growing body of philosophical, sociological, and historical analyses of recent nanoscale science and technology. Through a close examination of the origins of contemporary nanotech efforts, their ambitions, and strategic uses, it also aims to provide the basis for a critical theory of emerging technologies more generally, in particular in relation to their alleged convergence in terms of goals and outcomes. The emergence, allure, and implications of nanotechnology, it is argued, can only be fully (...)
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  28. Alan Ross Anderson (1960). Review: Hans Skjervheim, Reason in Society and Modern Logic; Jens Erik Fenstad, Notes on the Application of Formal Methods in the Soft Sciences. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 25 (1):81-81.score: 30.0
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  29. Matthew A. Baum (2007). Soft News and Foreign Policy: How Expanding the Audience Changes the Policies. Japanese Journal of Political Science 8 (1):115-145.score: 30.0
    Since the 1980s, the mass media have changed the way they cover major political stories, like foreign policy crises. As a consequence, what the public learns about these events has changed. More media outlets cover major events than in the past, including the entertainment-oriented soft news media. When they do cover a political story, soft news outlets focus more on than traditional news media and less on the political or strategic context, or substantive nuances, of policy debates. Many (...)
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  30. Mitchell R. Haney (1999). Dynamical Cognition, Soft Laws, and Moral Theorizing. Acta Analytica 22 (22):227-240.score: 30.0
     
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  31. Patrick Suppes (1954). Review: Arne Naess, Philosophers and Research in the Soft Sciences. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 19 (2):150-150.score: 30.0
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  32. Maxwell Stephen Kennel (2013). What is a Compendium? Parataxis, Hypotaxis, and the Question of the Book. Continent 3 (1):44-49.score: 26.0
    Writing, the exigency of writing: no longer the writing that has always (through a necessity in no way avoidable) been in the service of the speech or thought that is called idealist (that is to say, moralizing), but rather the writing that through its own slowly liberated force (the aleatory force of absence) seems to devote itself solely to itself as something that remains without identity, and little by little brings forth possibilities that are entirely other: an anonymous, distracted, deferred, (...)
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  33. John Earman (2008). Superselection Rules for Philosophers. Erkenntnis 69 (3):377 - 414.score: 24.0
    The overaraching goal of this paper is to elucidate the nature of superselection rules in a manner that is accessible to philosophers of science and that brings out the connections between superselection and some of the most fundamental interpretational issues in quantum physics. The formalism of von Neumann algebras is used to characterize three different senses of superselection rules (dubbed, weak, strong, and very strong) and to provide useful necessary and sufficient conditions for each sense. It is then shown (...)
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  34. Liz Stillwaggon Swan (2009). Synthesizing Insight: Artificial Life as Thought Experimentation in Biology. Biology and Philosophy 24 (5):687-701.score: 24.0
    What is artificial life? Much has been said about this interesting collection of efforts to artificially simulate and synthesize lifelike behavior and processes, yet we are far from having a robust philosophical understanding of just what Alifers are doing and why it ought to interest philosophers of science, and philosophers of biology in particular. In this paper, I first provide three introductory examples from the particular subset of artificial life I focus on, known as ‘soft Alife’ (s-Alife), and (...)
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  35. Andrew Melnyk (1995). Two Cheers for Reductionism, or, the Dim Prospects for Nonreductive Materialism. Philosophy of Science 62 (3):370-88.score: 24.0
    I argue that a certain version of physicalism, which is viewed by both its admirers and its detractors as non-reductionist, in fact entails two claims which, though not reductionist in the currently most popular sense of 'reductionist', conform to the spirit of reductionism sufficiently closely to compromise its claim to be a comprehensively non-reductionist version of physicalism. Putatively non-reductionist versions of physicalism in general, I suggest, are likely to be non-reductionist only in some senses, but not in others, and hence (...)
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  36. Steven M. Rosen (2013). Bridging the “Two Cultures”: Merleau-Ponty and the Crisis in Modern Physics. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (2):1-12.score: 24.0
    This paper brings to light the significance of Merleau-Ponty’s thinking for contemporary physics. The point of departure is his 1956–57 Collège de France lectures on Nature, coupled with his reflections on the crisis in modern physics appearing in THE VISIBLE AND THE INVISIBLE. Developments in theoretical physics after his death are then explored and a deepening of the crisis is disclosed. The upshot is that physics’ intractable problems of uncertainty and subject-object interaction can only be addressed by shifting its philosophical (...)
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  37. Jon Elster (2011). Hard and Soft Obscurantism in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Diogenes 58 (1-2):159-170.score: 24.0
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  38. Ute Deichmann (2010). Gemmules and Elements: On Darwin's and Mendel's Concepts and Methods in Heredity. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 41 (1):85-112.score: 24.0
    Inheritance and variation were a major focus of Charles Darwin’s studies. Small inherited variations were at the core of his theory of organic evolution by means of natural selection. He put forward a developmental theory of heredity (pangenesis) based on the assumption of the existence of material hereditary particles. However, unlike his proposition of natural selection as a new mechanism for evolutionary change, Darwin’s highly speculative and contradictory hypotheses on heredity were unfruitful for further research. They attempted to explain many (...)
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  39. M. Andrew Holowchak (2010). Technology and Freudian Discontent: Freud's'muffled' Meliorism and the Problem of Human Annihilation. Sophia 49 (1):95-111.score: 24.0
    This paper is a comprehensive investigation of Freud’s views on technology and human well-being, with a focus on ‘Civilization and Its Discontents’. In spite of his thesis in ‘Civilization and Its Discontents’, I shall argue that Freud, always in some measure under the influence of Comtean progressivism, was consistently a meliorist: He was always at least guardedly optimistic about the realizable prospect of utopia, under the ‘soft dictatorship’ of reason and guided by advances in science and technology, in (...)
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  40. Danial Yusof (2012). Parallels Between Contemporary Western and Islamic Thought on the Discourse of Power and Knowledge. Cultura 9 (1):7-28.score: 24.0
    This paper examines parallels between contemporary Western and Islamic thought. It will propose that there is congruence between Western and Muslim political thought processes on issues of soft-foundationalism, negative theology, provisional truth claims and religious democracy, in order to offset hegemonic tendencies. This will be illustrated by a concise juxtaposition of the ideas of Davutoglu, Winkel, Sardar, Tariq Ali, Derrida, Foucault, Abdolkarim Soroush, Mohammed Arkoun and others. In the social sciences, namely political science, the neutralization of ideology is (...)
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  41. Brad D. Hume (2008). Quantifying Characters: Polygenist Anthropologists and the Hardening of Heredity. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (1):119 - 158.score: 24.0
    Scholars studying the history of heredity suggest that during the 19th-century biologists and anthropologists viewed characteristics as a collection of blended qualities passed on from the parents. Many argued that those characteristics could be very much affected by environmental circumstances, which scholars call the inheritance of acquired characteristics or "soft" heredity. According to these accounts, Gregor Mendel reconceived heredity - seeing distinct hereditary units that remain unchanged by the environment. This resulted in particular traits that breed true in succeeding (...)
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  42. Takashi Inoguchi (2012). Introduction to the Special Issue: Soft Power of Civil Society in International Relations. Japanese Journal of Political Science 13 (4):473-476.score: 24.0
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  43. François Laruelle (2012). The End Times of Philosophy. Continent 2 (3):160-166.score: 24.0
    Translated by Drew S. Burk and Anthony Paul Smith. Excerpted from Struggle and Utopia at the End Times of Philosophy , (Minneapolis: Univocal Publishing, 2012). THE END TIMES OF PHILOSOPHY The phrase “end times of philosophy” is not a new version of the “end of philosophy” or the “end of history,” themes which have become quite vulgar and nourish all hopes of revenge and powerlessness. Moreover, philosophy itself does not stop proclaiming its own death, admitting itself to be half dead (...)
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  44. J. Recas Bayón (1994). ¿Hacia un nuevo concepto de transcendentalismo? Logos: Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica 28 (2):139-170.score: 24.0
    In this article, I defend the idea that Kant’s interest in an emergent science in the 18th century as the Embriology (especially in the concept of epigenesis) allows to deepen in a soft naturalization of Kant’s trancendental idealism, as well as to justify the validity of a priori knowledge.
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  45. Erik Conrad (2011). Soft Architectures for Everyday Life. AI and Society 26 (2):123-128.score: 24.0
    Technologies not only change “external reality” but also change our internal consciousness, shaping the way we experience the world. As the reality of intelligent environments is upon us—ushered along with the age of ubiquitous computing—we must be careful that the ideology these technologies embody is not blindly incorporated into the environment. As disciplines, engineering and computer science make implicit assumptions about the world that conflict with traditional modes of cultural production. For example, space is commonly understood to be the (...)
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  46. Ieva Deviatnikovaitė (2013). The Concept of European Administrative Law and the Background of the Development of the Law on Administrative Procedure of the European Union. Jurisprudence 20 (3):1005-1022.score: 24.0
    There are several reasons, according to which it is worth analyzing European administrative law. First, this is a rather new branch of law. Second, the European administrative law is treated in different countries from different legal traditions positions, consequently, any effort to unify the approach to it can provide a basis for a unified European administrative law model. Third, there are no works dedicated to the analysis of the phenomenon of the European administrative law in Lithuania. Therefore, this article deals (...)
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  47. Ralph Keyes (2004). The Post-Truth Era: Dishonesty and Deception in Contemporary Life. St. Martin's Press.score: 24.0
    "Dishonesty inspires more euphemisms than copulation or defecation. This helps desensitize us to its implications. In the post-truth era we don't just have truth and lies but a third category of ambiguous statements that are not exactly the truth but fall just short of a lie. Enhanced truth it might be called. Neo-truth . Soft truth . Faux truth . Truth lite ." Deception has become the modern way of life. Where once the boundary line between truth and lies (...)
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  48. Young Bin Moon (2012). The Mediatized Co-Mediatizer: Anthropology in Niklas Luhmann's World. Zygon 47 (2):438-466.score: 24.0
    Abstract This essay explores what it means to be human in an age of infomedia. Appropriating Niklas Luhmann's systems theory/media theory in dialogue with other resources, I propose a post-Luhmannian paradigm of (1) extended media/meaning that conceives the world as world multimedia systems processing variegated meanings, and (2) an embodied, contextualized soft posthumanist anthropology that conceives the human as emergent collective phenomena of distinct meaning making by body-mind-society-technology media couplings. I argue: (1) Homo sapiens is Homo medialis distinct with (...)
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  49. A. Staley Groves (2012). A New Negentropic Subject: Reviewing Michel Serres' Biogea. Continent 2 (2):155-158.score: 24.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 155–158 Michel Serres. Biogea . Trans. Randolph Burks. Minneapolis: Univocal Publishing. 2012. 200 pp. | ISBN 9781937561086 | $22.95 Conveying to potential readers the significance of a book puts me at risk of glad handing. It’s not in my interest to laud the undeserving, especially on the pages of this journal. This is not a sales pitch, but rather an affirmation of a necessary work on very troubled terms: human, earth, nature, and the problematic world we made. (...)
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  50. Lauren Haaftern-Schick & Sura Levine (2011). Remembering Robert Seydel. Continent 1 (2):141-144.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 141-144. This January, while preparing a new course, Robert Seydel was struck and killed by an unexpected heart attack. He was a critically under-appreciated artist and one of the most beloved and admired professors at Hampshire College. At the time of his passing, Seydel was on the brink of a major artistic and career milestone. His Book of Ruth was being prepared for publication by Siglio Press. His publisher describes the book as: “an alchemical assemblage that composes (...)
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