Search results for 'soft science' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. George S. Howard (1993). When Psychology Looks Like a "Soft" Science, It's for Good Reasonp. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 13 (1):42-47.score: 210.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Massimo Pigliucci (2002). Are Ecology and Evolutionary Biology “Soft” Sciences? Annales Zoologici Finnici 39:87-98.score: 156.0
    Research in ecology and evolutionary biology (evo-eco) often tries to emulate the “hard” sciences such as physics and chemistry, but to many of its practitioners feels more like the “soft” sciences of psychology and sociology. I argue that this schizophrenic attitude is the result of lack of appreciation of the full consequences of the peculiarity of the evo-eco sciences as lying in between a-historical disciplines such as physics and completely historical ones as like paleontology. Furthermore, evo-eco researchers have gotten (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. B. Pratt & K. Johnson (2005). SoftScience in the Courtroom?: The Effects of Admitting Neuroimaging Evidence Into Legal Proceedings. Penn Bioethics Journal 1 (1).score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Sheldon Pollock (2009). Future Philology? The Fate of a Soft Science in a Hard World. Critical Inquiry 35 (4):931-961.score: 150.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Milos Jenicek (2006). The Hard Art of Soft Science: Evidence‐Based Medicine, Reasoned Medicine or Both? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (4):410-419.score: 150.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Ross E. G. Upshur (2006). Evidence‐Based Medicine, Reasoned Medicine or Both? Commentary on Jenicek, M. (2006) 'The Hard Art of Soft Science'Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12, 410–419. [REVIEW] Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (4):420-422.score: 150.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Michael Loughlin (2006). Blinded by 'Science': Commentary on Jenicek, M. (2006) 'The Hard Art of Soft Science'Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12, 410–419. [REVIEW] Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (4):423-426.score: 150.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ross E. G. Upshur B. A. Hons Ma (2006). Jenicek, M.(2006)'The Hard Art of Soft Science'Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12, 410–419. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (4):420-422.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Mike Walsh, Gordon Grant & Zoë Coleman (2008). Action Research—a Necessary Complement to Traditional Health Science? Health Care Analysis 16 (2):127-144.score: 84.0
    There is continuing interest in action research in health care. This is despite action researchers facing major problems getting support for their projects from mainstream sources of R&D funds partly because its validity is disputed and partly because it is difficult to predict or evaluate and is therefore seen as risky. In contrast traditional health science dominates and relies on compliance with strictly defined scientific method and rules of accountability. Critics of scientific health care have highlighted many problems including (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Katharina T. Kraus (2011). Kant and the 'Soft Sciences'. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (4):618-624.score: 76.0
  11. Massimo Pigliucci (2010). Nonsense on Stilts: How to Tell Science From Bunk. University of Chicago Press.score: 72.0
    Introduction : science versus pseudoscience and the "demarcation problem" -- Hard science, soft science -- Almost science -- Pseudoscience -- Blame the media? -- Debates on science : the rise of think tanks and the decline of public intellectuals -- Science and politics : the case of global warming -- Science in the courtroom : the case against intelligent design -- From superstition to natural philosophy -- From natural philosophy to modern (...) -- The science wars I : do we trust science too much? -- The science wars II : do we trust science too little? -- Who's your expert? -- Conclusion : so, what is science after all? (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Anton Moser (2000). The Wisdom of Nature in Integrating Science, Ethics and the Arts. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (3):365-382.score: 64.0
    This paper deals with an approach to the integration of science (with technology and economics), ethics (with religion and mysticism), the arts (aesthetics) and Nature, in order to establish a world-view based on holistic, evolutionary ethics that could help with problem solving. The author suggests that this integration is possible with the aid of “Nature’s wisdom” which is mirrored in the macroscopic pattern of the ecosphere. The corresponding eco-principles represent the basis for unifying soft and hard sciences resulting (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Sheldon Krimsky (2000). Commentary on “the Politics of Certainty” (C. A. Rubino). Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):509-510.score: 58.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Thomas Sturm (2011). Freedom and the Human Sciences: Hume’s Science of Man Versus Kant’s Pragmatic Anthropology. Kant Yearbook 3 (1):23-42.score: 54.0
    In his Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, Kant formulates the idea of the empirical investigation of the human being as a free agent. The notion is puzzling: Does Kant not often claim that, from an empirical point of view, human beings cannot be considered as free? What sense would it make anyway to include the notion of freedom in science? The answer to these questions lies in Kant’s notion of character. While probably all concepts of character are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Giles Oatley, Brian Ewart & John Zeleznikow (2006). Decision Support Systems for Police: Lessons From the Application of Data Mining Techniques to “Soft” Forensic Evidence. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 14 (1-2):35-100.score: 54.0
    The paper sets out the challenges facing the Police in respect of the detection and prevention of the volume crime of burglary. A discussion of data mining and decision support technologies that have the potential to address these issues is undertaken and illustrated with reference the authors’ work with three Police Services. The focus is upon the use of “soft” forensic evidence which refers to modus operandi and the temporal and geographical features of the crime, rather than “hard” evidence (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Simone van der Burg (2011). Taking the “Soft Impacts” of Technology Into Account: Broadening the Discourse in Research Practice. Social Epistemology 23 (3):301-316.score: 54.0
    Public funding institutions are able to influence what aspects researchers take into account when they consider the future impacts of their research. On the basis of a description of the evaluation systems that public research funding institutes in the Netherlands (STW and SenterNovem) use to estimate the quality of engineering science, this article shows that researchers are now predominantly required to reflect on the intellectual merit of their research and on the usability and marketability of the technology it contributes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. J. Herman (2001). Medicine: The Science and the Art. Medical Humanities 27 (1):42-46.score: 54.0
    Medicine has been said to be both a science and an art. Many practitioners regard this statement as containing an element of “either/or”. A brief look at what scientists and artists have written about their work and their world views, however, suggests that the two fields of endeavour form a complementary part of our attempts to understand ourselves and the world about us. Moreover, on occasion, each can perform some of the other's tasks. This paper quotes from the writings (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Abhaya C. Nayak & Eric Sotnak (1995). Kant on the Impossibility of the "Soft Sciences&Quot;. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):133-151.score: 50.0
  19. Eric Sotnak (1995). Kant on the Impossibility of the “Soft Sciences”. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):133 - 151.score: 50.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jens Erik Fenstad (1959). Notes on the Application of Formal Methods in the Soft Sciences. Inquiry 2 (1-4):34 – 64.score: 50.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Alan Ross Anderson (1960). Review: Hans Skjervheim, Reason in Society and Modern Logic; Jens Erik Fenstad, Notes on the Application of Formal Methods in the Soft Sciences. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 25 (1):81-81.score: 50.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Patrick Suppes (1954). Review: Arne Naess, Philosophers and Research in the Soft Sciences. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 19 (2):150-150.score: 50.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Wayne D. Gray & Wai‐Tat Fu (2004). Soft Constraints in Interactive Behavior: The Case of Ignoring Perfect Knowledge in‐the‐World for Imperfect Knowledge in‐the‐Head*,*. Cognitive Science 28 (3):359-382.score: 48.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Eduardo H. Flichman (1995). Hard and Soft Accidental Uniformities. Philosophy of Science 62 (1):31-43.score: 42.0
    I discuss some aspects of the epistemological distinction between laws of nature and accidental uniformities. In order that the exposition be self-contained I briefly provide a taxonomy proposed in another work for statements that appear in a scientific theory. Once this taxonomy has been presented I attempt to prove two very different types of accidental uniformities: hard and soft. The distinction is fundamental because the latter have frequently been confused with laws of nature. I try to justify why I (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson (1990). Soft Laws. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 15 (1):256-279.score: 42.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. A. J. M. Oerlemans, M. E. C. Hoek, E. Leeuwen, S. Burg & W. J. M. Dekkers (2013). Towards a Richer Debate on Tissue Engineering: A Consideration on the Basis of NEST-Ethics. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):963-981.score: 42.0
    In their 2007 paper, Swierstra and Rip identify characteristic tropes and patterns of moral argumentation in the debate about the ethics of new and emerging science and technologies (or “NEST-ethics”). Taking their NEST-ethics structure as a starting point, we considered the debate about tissue engineering (TE), and argue what aspects we think ought to be a part of a rich and high-quality debate of TE. The debate surrounding TE seems to be predominantly a debate among experts. When considering the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Matthew A. Baum (2007). Soft News and Foreign Policy: How Expanding the Audience Changes the Policies. Japanese Journal of Political Science 8 (1):115-145.score: 42.0
    Since the 1980s, the mass media have changed the way they cover major political stories, like foreign policy crises. As a consequence, what the public learns about these events has changed. More media outlets cover major events than in the past, including the entertainment-oriented soft news media. When they do cover a political story, soft news outlets focus more on than traditional news media and less on the political or strategic context, or substantive nuances, of policy debates. Many (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Mitchell R. Haney (1999). Dynamical Cognition, Soft Laws, and Moral Theorizing. Acta Analytica 22 (22):227-240.score: 42.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. A. J. M. Oerlemans, M. E. C. van Hoek, E. van Leeuwen, S. van der Burg & W. J. M. Dekkers (2013). Towards a Richer Debate on Tissue Engineering: A Consideration on the Basis of NEST-Ethics. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):963-981.score: 42.0
    In their 2007 paper, Swierstra and Rip identify characteristic tropes and patterns of moral argumentation in the debate about the ethics of new and emerging science and technologies (or “NEST-ethics”). Taking their NEST-ethics structure as a starting point, we considered the debate about tissue engineering (TE), and argue what aspects we think ought to be a part of a rich and high-quality debate of TE. The debate surrounding TE seems to be predominantly a debate among experts. When considering the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jon Elster (2011). Hard and Soft Obscurantism in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Diogenes 58 (1-2):159-170.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Miklós Rédei & Michael Stöltzner (2006). Soft Axiomatisation: John von Neumann on Method and von Neumann's Method in the Physical Sciences. In. In Emily Carson & Renate Huber (eds.), Intuition and the Axiomatic Method. Springer. 235--249.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Takashi Inoguchi (2012). Introduction to the Special Issue: Soft Power of Civil Society in International Relations. Japanese Journal of Political Science 13 (4):473-476.score: 36.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Erik Conrad (2011). Soft Architectures for Everyday Life. AI and Society 26 (2):123-128.score: 36.0
    Technologies not only change “external reality” but also change our internal consciousness, shaping the way we experience the world. As the reality of intelligent environments is upon us—ushered along with the age of ubiquitous computing—we must be careful that the ideology these technologies embody is not blindly incorporated into the environment. As disciplines, engineering and computer science make implicit assumptions about the world that conflict with traditional modes of cultural production. For example, space is commonly understood to be the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Paul Edwards (1958). Hard and Soft Determinism. In Sidney Hook (ed.), Determinism and Freedom in the Age of Modern Science. Collier-Macmillan. 117--25.score: 36.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Mark C. Hollstein (2005). Matthew A. Baum, Soft News Goes To War, Princeton University Press, 2003, 343 Pp., $49.95, ISBN 0-691-11586–9. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Political Science 6 (3):443-444.score: 36.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Douglas L. Medin, Woo‐Kyoung Ahn, Jeffrey Bettger, Judy Florian, Robert Goldstone, Mary Lassaline, Arthur Markman, Joshua Rubinstein & Edward Wisniewski (1990). Safe Takeoffs—Soft Landings. Cognitive Science 14 (1):169-178.score: 36.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jennifer Culbertson, Paul Smolensky & Colin Wilson (2013). Cognitive Biases, Linguistic Universals, and Constraint‐Based Grammar Learning. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (3):392-424.score: 30.0
    According to classical arguments, language learning is both facilitated and constrained by cognitive biases. These biases are reflected in linguistic typology—the distribution of linguistic patterns across the world's languages—and can be probed with artificial grammar experiments on child and adult learners. Beginning with a widely successful approach to typology (Optimality Theory), and adapting techniques from computational approaches to statistical learning, we develop a Bayesian model of cognitive biases and show that it accounts for the detailed pattern of results of artificial (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Axel Gelfert (2011). Nanotechnology as Ideology: Towards a Critical Theory of ‘Converging Technologies’. Science, Technology and Society 17 (1):143-164.score: 30.0
    The present paper contributes to a growing body of philosophical, sociological, and historical analyses of recent nanoscale science and technology. Through a close examination of the origins of contemporary nanotech efforts, their ambitions, and strategic uses, it also aims to provide the basis for a critical theory of emerging technologies more generally, in particular in relation to their alleged convergence in terms of goals and outcomes. The emergence, allure, and implications of nanotechnology, it is argued, can only be fully (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Massimo Pigliucci (2013). When Science Studies Religion: Six Philosophy Lessons for Science Classes. Science and Education 22 (1):49-67.score: 27.0
    It is an unfortunate fact of academic life that there is a sharp divide between science and philosophy, with scientists often being openly dismissive of philosophy, and philosophers being equally contemptuous of the naivete ́ of scientists when it comes to the philosophical underpinnings of their own discipline. In this paper I explore the possibility of reducing the distance between the two sides by introducing science students to some interesting philosophical aspects of research in evolutionary biology, using biological (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Massimo Pigliucci & Maarten Boudry (2011). Why Machine-Information Metaphors Are Bad for Science and Science Education. Science and Education 20 (453):471.score: 27.0
    Genes are often described by biologists using metaphors derived from computa- tional science: they are thought of as carriers of information, as being the equivalent of ‘‘blueprints’’ for the construction of organisms. Likewise, cells are often characterized as ‘‘factories’’ and organisms themselves become analogous to machines. Accordingly, when the human genome project was initially announced, the promise was that we would soon know how a human being is made, just as we know how to make airplanes and buildings. Impor- (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Nicholas Maxwell (1997). Must Science Make Cosmological Assumptions If It is to Be Rational?,. In T. Kelly (ed.), The Philosophy of Science: Proceedings of the Irish Philosophical Society Spring Conference. Irish Philosophical Society.score: 27.0
    Cosmological speculation about the ultimate nature of the universe, being necessary for science to be possible at all, must be regarded as a part of scientific knowledge itself, however epistemologically unsound it may be in other respects. The best such speculation available is that the universe is comprehensible in some way or other and, more specifically, in the light of the immense apparent success of modern natural science, that it is physically comprehensible. But both these speculations may be (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Sharon Crasnow (2008). Feminist Philosophy of Science: 'Standpoint' and Knowledge. [REVIEW] Science and Education 17 (10):1089-1110.score: 27.0
    Feminist philosophy of science has been criticized on several counts. On the one hand, it is claimed that it results in relativism of the worst sort since the political commitment to feminism is prima facie incompatible with scientific objectivity. On the other hand, when critics acknowledge that there may be some value in work that feminists have done, they comment that there is nothing particularly feminist about their accounts. I argue that both criticisms can be addressed through a better (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Massimo Pigliucci (2014). 5 Questions on Science & Religion. In Gregg D. Caruso (ed.), 5 Questions on Science & Religion. Automatic Press. 163-170.score: 27.0
    Are science and religion compatible when it comes to understanding cosmology (the origin of the universe), biology (the origin of life and of the human species), ethics, and the human mind (minds, brains, souls, and free will)? Do science and religion occupy non-overlapping magisteria? Is Intelligent Design a scientific theory? How do the various faith traditions view the relationship between science and religion? What, if any, are the limits of scientific explanation? What are the most important open (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Thomas Mormann (2013). Topology as an Issue for History of Philosophy of Science. In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao J. Gonzalez, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer. 423--434.score: 27.0
    Since antiquity well into the beginnings of the 20th century geometry was a central topic for philosophy. Since then, however, most philosophers of science, if they took notice of topology at all, considered it as an abstruse subdiscipline of mathematics lacking philosophical interest. Here it is argued that this neglect of topology by philosophy may be conceived of as the sign of a conceptual sea-change in philosophy of science that expelled geometry, and, more generally, mathematics, from the central (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Ave Mets & Piret Kuusk (2009). The Constructive Realist Account of Science and its Application to Ilya Prigogine's Conception of Laws of Nature. Foundations of Science 14 (3):239-248.score: 27.0
    Sciences are often regarded as providing the best, or, ideally, exact, knowledge of the world, especially in providing laws of nature. Ilya Prigogine, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for his theory of non-equilibrium chemical processes—this being also an important attempt to bridge the gap between exact and non-exact sciences [mentioned in the Presentation Speech by Professor Stig Claesson (nobelprize.org, The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1977)]—has had this ideal in mind when trying to formulate a new kind of science. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Babette Babich (2006). Gay Science: Science and Wissenschaft, Leidenschaft and Music. In Keith Ansell-Pearson (ed.), Gay Science: Science and Wissenschaft, Leidenschaft and Music. Blackwell.score: 27.0
    On Nietzsche, science, the oral tradition -- or the troubadours and ancient Greek music drama.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Nicholas Maxwell (2009). The Metaphysics of Science: An Account of Modern Science in Terms of Principles, Laws and Theories. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 23 (2):228 – 232.score: 27.0
    This is a review of Craig Dilworth's The Metaphysics of Science (Dordrecht, Springer, 2007). The book propounds an immensely important idea. Science makes metaphysical presuppositions. Unfortunately, Dilworth ignores work that has been done on this issue which takes the matter much further than he does.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Agnieszka Lekka-Kowalik (2010). Why Science Cannot Be Value-Free. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (1):33-41.score: 27.0
    Against the ideal of value-free science I argue that science is not––and cannot be––value-free and that relevant values are both cognitive and moral. I develop an argument by indicating various aspects of the value-ladenness of science. The recognition of the value-ladenness of science requires rethinking our understanding of the rationality and responsibility of science. Its rationality cannot be seen as merely instrumental––as it was seen by the ideal of value-free science––for this would result in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Paul Hoyningen-Huene (1993). Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy of Science. University of Chicago Press.score: 27.0
    Few philosophers of science have influenced as many readers as Thomas S. Kuhn. Yet no comprehensive study of his ideas has existed--until now. In this volume, Paul Hoyningen-Huene examines Kuhn's work over four decades, from the days before The Structure of Scientific Revolutions to the present, and puts Kuhn's philosophical development in a historical framework. Scholars from disciplines as diverse as political science and art history have offered widely differing interpretations of Kuhn's ideas, appropriating his notions of paradigm (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Monica Aufrecht (2011). The Context Distinction: Controversies Over Feminist Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (3):373-392.score: 27.0
    The “context of discovery” and “context of justification” distinction has been used by Noretta Koertge and Lynn Hankinson Nelson in debates over the legitimacy of feminist approaches to philosophy of science. Koertge uses the context distinction to focus the conversation by barring certain approaches. I contend this focus masks points of true disagreement about the nature of justification. Nonetheless, Koertge raises important questions that have been too quickly set aside by some. I conclude that the context distinction should not (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000