Search results for 'sovereignty' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Popular Sovereignty (2001). Popular Sovereignty and Nationalism. Political Theory 29 (4):517-536.score: 120.0
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  2. Matthew Simpson (2006). A Paradox of Sovereignty in Rousseau's Social Contract. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (1):45-56.score: 18.0
    One unique part of Rousseau's Social Contract is his argument that a just society must have a specific constitutional arrangement of powers centred around what he calls the Sovereign and the Prince. This makes his philosophy different from other contractualists, such as Hobbes and Locke, who think that the principles of good government are compatible with any number of institutional structures. Rousseau's constitutional theory is thus significant in a way that has no parallel in Hobbes or Locke. More to the (...)
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  3. Lea Ypi (2008). Sovereignty, Cosmopolitanism and the Ethics of European Foreign Policy. European Journal of Political Theory 7 (3):349-364.score: 18.0
    This article explores the tensions between cosmopolitanism and sovereignty as a means to conceptualize the ethics of European foreign policy. It starts by discussing the claim that, in order for the EU to play a meaningful role as an international actor, a definition of the common ethical values orienting its political conduct is required. The question of a European federation of states and its ethical conceptualization emerges clearly in some of the philosophical writings of the 17th and 18th centuries. (...)
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  4. Bernd Krehoff (2008). Legitimate Political Authority and Sovereignty: Why States Cannot Be the Whole Story. Res Publica 14 (4):283-297.score: 18.0
    States are believed to be the paradigmatic instances of legitimate political authority. But is their prominence justified? The classic concept of state sovereignty predicts the danger of a fatal deadlock among conflicting authorities unless there is an ultimate authority within a given jurisdiction. This scenario is misguided because the notion of an ultimate authority is conceptually unclear. The exercise of authority is multidimensional and multiattributive, and to understand the relations among authorities we need to analyse this complexity into its (...)
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  5. Harold Joseph Laski (1921/2003). The Foundations of Sovereignty and Other Essays. Lawbook Exchange.score: 18.0
    Laski, Harold J. The Foundations of Sovereignty and Other Essays.
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  6. Gabriel Zamosc (2013). The Relation Between Sovereignty and Guilt in Nietzsche's Genealogy. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (S1):E107-e142.score: 18.0
    This paper interprets the relation between sovereignty and guilt in Nietzsche's Genealogy. I argue that, contrary to received opinion, Nietzsche was not opposed to the moral concept of guilt. I analyse Nietzsche's account of the emergence of the guilty conscience out of a pre-moral bad conscience. Drawing attention to Nietzsche's references to many different forms of conscience and analogizing to his account of punishment, I propose that we distinguish between the enduring and the fluid elements of a ‘conscience’, defining (...)
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  7. Charles Barbour & George Pavlich (eds.) (2010). After Sovereignty: On the Question of Political Beginnings. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Addressing the three dominant contemporary attitudes towards sovereignty - Sovereignty Renewed; Sovereignty Rethought; Sovereignty Rejected - After Sovereignty ...
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  8. Cameron Stewart (2011). Futility Determination as a Process: Problems with Medical Sovereignty, Legal Issues and the Strengths and Weakness of the Procedural Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):155-163.score: 18.0
    Futility is not a purely medical concept. Its subjective nature requires a balanced procedural approach where competing views can be aired and in which disputes can be resolved with procedural fairness. Law should play an important role in this process. Pure medical models of futility are based on a false claim of medical sovereignty. Procedural approaches avoid the problems of such claims. This paper examines the arguments for and against the adoption of a procedural approach to futility determination.
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  9. R. Bellamy & D. Castiglione (1997). Building the Union: The Nature of Sovereignty in the Political Architecture of Europe. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 16 (4):421-445.score: 18.0
    The debate on the nature of the European Union has become a test case of the kind of political and institutional arrangements appropriate in an age of globalization. This paper explores three views of the EU. The two main positions that have hitherto confronted each other appeal to either cosmopolitan or communitarian values. Advocates of the former argue for some form of federal structure in Europe and are convinced that the sovereignty of the nation state belongs to the past. (...)
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  10. Matthew Lister (2012). Review of Sovereignty’s Promise: The State as Fiduciary by Evan Fox-Decent. [REVIEW] Ethics 123 (1):150-4.score: 18.0
    In Sovereignty’s Promise: The State as Fiduciary, Evan Fox-Decent uses the idea of fiduciary relationships to explain the legitimate exercise of governmental authority. He makes use of the idea of the state as a fiduciary for the people to ground an account of the duty to obey the law, to explain the proper relationships between colonial (or “settler”) societies and aboriginal populations, the role of agency discretion and judicial review in the administrative state, the rule of law, the relationship (...)
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  11. Matthew Calarco & Steven DeCaroli (eds.) (2007). Giorgio Agamben: Sovereignty and Life. Stanford University Press.score: 18.0
    Giorgio Agamben has come to be recognized in recent years as one of the most provocative and imaginative thinkers in contemporary philosophy and political theory. The essays gathered together in this volume shed light on his extensive body of writings and assess the significance of his work for debates across a wide range of fields, including philosophy, political theory, Jewish studies, and animal studies. The authors discuss material extending across the entire range of Agamben's writings, including such early works as (...)
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  12. Matthew Lister (forthcoming). Four Entries for the Rawls Lexicon: Charles Beitz, H.L.A. Hart, Citizen, Sovereignty. In Jon Mandle & David Reidy (eds.), The Rawls Lexicon. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    These are for entries for the forthcoming _Rawls Lexicon_, edited by Jon Mandle and David Reidy, on H.L.A. Hart, Charles Beitz, Sovereignty, and Citizen.
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  13. Leonid Grinin (2008). Transformation of Sovereignty and Globalization. In Leonid Grinin, Dmitry Beliaev & Andrey Korotayev (eds.), Hierarchy and Power in the History of Civilisations: Political Aspects of Modernity. Librocom.score: 18.0
    . In our opinion, the processes of changing of sovereignty nowadays are among those of much significance. Presumably, if such processes (of course with much fluctuation) gain strength it will surely affect all spheres of life, including change of ideology and social psychology (the moment which is still underestimated by many analysts). Generally speaking, notwithstanding an avalanche of works devoted to the transformation of sovereignty, some topical aspects of the problem mentioned appear to have been disregarded. The present (...)
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  14. John Quiggin (2001). Globalization and Economic Sovereignty. Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (1):56–80.score: 18.0
    In this paper, attention will focus primarily on economic and financial aspects of the globalization debate, and on their implications for public policy. Nevertheless, these issues cannot be separated from their historical and political context. The current discussion of globalization can only be understood in relation to the development of economic and political institutions over the past century. Globalization is frequently discussed as a counterpoint to national sovereignty. It is commonly asserted that globalization has eroded national sovereignty or (...)
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  15. Christine Chwaszcza (2012). The Seat of Sovereignty: Hobbes on the Artificial Person of the Commonwealth or State. Hobbes Studies 25 (2):123-142.score: 18.0
    Is sovereignty in Hobbes the power of a person or of an office? This article defends the thesis that it is the latter. The interpretation is based on an analysis of Hobbes’s version of the social contract in Leviathan . Pace Quentin Skinner, it will be argued that the person whom Hobbes calls “sovereign” is not a person but the office of government.
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  16. Jonathan Havercroft (2011). Captives of Sovereignty. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    A picture of sovereignty holds the study of politics captive. Captives of Sovereignty looks at the historical origins of this picture of politics, critiques its philosophical assumptions and offers a way to move contemporary critiques of sovereignty beyond their current impasse. The first part of the book is diagnostic. Why, despite their best efforts to critique sovereignty, do political scientists who are dissatisfied with the concept continue to reproduce the logic of sovereignty in their thinking? (...)
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  17. Holly L. Wilson (2010). Divine Sovereignty and The Global Climate Change Debate. Essays in Philosophy 12 (1):8-15.score: 18.0
    Behind the global climate change debate are views of divine sovereignty. Those who believe that God is in charge of everything believe there is no change in the climate, but those who believe that God's sovereignty entails that we are responsible for working with the divine are willing to admit there is global climate change.
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  18. Peter Marneffe (2013). Vice Laws and Self-Sovereignty. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):29-41.score: 18.0
    There is an important moral difference between laws that criminalize drugs and prostitution and laws that make them illegal in other ways: criminalization violates our moral rights in a way that nonlegalization does not. Criminalization is defined as follows. Drugs are criminalized when there are criminal penalties for using or possessing small quantities of drugs. Prostitution is criminalized when there are criminal penalties for selling sex. Legalization is defined as follows. Drugs are legalized when there are no criminal penalties for (...)
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  19. Larry May (2012). Hobbes Against the Jurists: Sovereignty and Artificial Reason. Hobbes Studies 25 (2):223-232.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses sovereignty and examines in detail Hobbes’s debates with the two leading legal theorists of his day, Coke and Hale, both Lord Chief Justices of the King’s Bench. I argue that Hobbes came to change his mind somewhat about the desirability of divided sovereignty by the time, near the end of his life, that he wrote the Dialogue . But I also argue that Hobbes should have developed more than a very thin conception of the rule (...)
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  20. M. Joseph Sirgy, Dong-Jin Lee & Grace B. Yu (2011). Consumer Sovereignty in Healthcare: Fact or Fiction? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (3):459-474.score: 18.0
    We pose the question: Is consumer sovereignty in the healthcare market fact or fiction? Consumer sovereignty in healthcare implies that society benefits at large when healthcare organizations compete to develop high quality healthcare products while reducing the cost of doing business (reflected in low prices), and when consumers choose wisely among healthcare products by purchasing those high quality products at low prices. We develop a theoretical model that encourages systematic empirical research to investigate whether consumer sovereignty in (...)
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  21. Tina D. Beuchelt & Detlef Virchow (2012). Food Sovereignty or the Human Right to Adequate Food: Which Concept Serves Better as International Development Policy for Global Hunger and Poverty Reduction? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):259-273.score: 18.0
    The emerging concept of food sovereignty refers to the right of communities, peoples, and states to independently determine their own food and agricultural policies. It raises the question of which type of food production, agriculture and rural development should be pursued to guarantee food security for the world population. Social movements and non-governmental organizations have readily integrated the concept into their terminology. The concept is also beginning to find its way into the debates and policies of UN organizations and (...)
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  22. Ronnie Lippens (2012). Control Over Emergence: Images of Radical Sovereignty in Pollock, Rothko, and Rebeyrolle. [REVIEW] Human Studies 35 (3):351-364.score: 18.0
    The form of life which has the desire for or will to control over emergence at its core is, if not the dominant, then at least one of the more significant ones in late modern culture. To be in control over emergence requires a considerable degree of sovereignty. In this contribution I have made an attempt to outline and contrast three rather basic images or models of what might be called radical sovereignty, i.e., the vital-reflexive-transgressive one (which is (...)
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  23. Marlene Wind (2009). Challenging Sovereignty? The USA and the Establishment of the International Criminal Court. Ethics and Global Politics 2 (2).score: 18.0
    Does the establishment of a permanent InternationalWar Crimes Tribunal (International Criminal Court - ICC) constitute a challenge to national sovereignty? According to previous US governments and several American observers, the answer is yes. Establishing a world court that acts independently of the states that gave birth to it renders the idea of sovereignty meaningless. This article analyzes the American objections to the ICC and the conception of sovereignty and international law underlying these objections. It first considers the (...)
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  24. Daniel R. Block, Noel Chávez, Erika Allen & Dinah Ramirez (2012). Food Sovereignty, Urban Food Access, and Food Activism: Contemplating the Connections Through Examples From Chicago. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):203-215.score: 18.0
    The idea of food sovereignty has its roots primarily in the response of small producers in developing countries to decreasing levels of control over land, production practices, and food access. While the concerns of urban Chicagoans struggling with low food access may seem far from these issues, the authors believe that the ideas associated with food sovereignty will lead to the construction of solutions to what is often called the “food desert” issue that serve and empower communities in (...)
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  25. William H. Meyer (2012). Indigenous Rights, Global Governance, and State Sovereignty. Human Rights Review 13 (3):327-347.score: 18.0
    This article discusses indigenous rights within the context of global governance. I begin by defining the terms “global governance” and “indigenous peoples” and summarizing the rights that are most important to indigenous peoples. The bulk of this article studies the global governance of indigenous rights in three areas. The first example is the creation of the 2007 UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. A second example involves violations of indigenous rights brought before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. (...)
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  26. Carol K. Winkler (2008). Encroachments on State Sovereignty: The Argumentation Strategies of the George W. Bush Administration. [REVIEW] Argumentation 22 (4):473-488.score: 18.0
    As the world has increasingly embraced globalization, temptations to encroach on traditional boundaries of state sovereignty for reasons of self-interest mount. Argumentation studies provide an important lens for examining the public discourse used to justify such moves. This essay examines the Bush administration’s strategic use of the definitional processes of association and dissociation to build its public case for regime change in Afghanistan. After exploring how the Bush administration’s early rhetoric after 9/11 failed to actually provide the Taliban a (...)
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  27. Alison Hope Alkon & Teresa Marie Mares (2012). Food Sovereignty in US Food Movements: Radical Visions and Neoliberal Constraints. Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):347-359.score: 18.0
    Although the concept of food sovereignty is rooted in International Peasant Movements across the global south, activists have recently called for the adoption of this framework among low-income communities of color in the urban United States. This paper investigates on-the-ground processes through which food sovereignty articulates with the work of food justice and community food security activists in Oakland, California, and Seattle, Washington. In Oakland, we analyze a farmers market that seeks to connect black farmers to low-income consumers. (...)
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  28. Larry L. Burmeister & Yong-Ju Choi (2012). Food Sovereignty Movement Activism in South Korea: National Policy Impacts? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):247-258.score: 18.0
    The transnational agrarian movement La Via Campesina (LVC) seeks to reestablish food sovereignty authority within national borders by removing agriculture from the WTO system. The WTO is a membership organization of participating nation-states that have agreed to abide by the rules of the WTO governance regime. Nominally, at least, changes in these governance rules must be approved by the nation-state members. This paper examines the extent to which South Korean affiliate organizations of LVC, the Korean Peasant League and the (...)
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  29. Peter de Marneffe (2013). Vice Laws and Self-Sovereignty. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):29-41.score: 18.0
    There is an important moral difference between laws that criminalize drugs and prostitution and laws that make them illegal in other ways: criminalization violates our moral rights in a way that nonlegalization does not. Criminalization is defined as follows. Drugs are criminalized when there are criminal penalties for using or possessing small quantities of drugs. Prostitution is criminalized when there are criminal penalties for selling sex. Legalization is defined as follows. Drugs are legalized when there are no criminal penalties for (...)
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  30. Lisa Diedrich (2011). Speeding Up Slow Deaths: Medical Sovereignty Circa 2005. Mediatropes 3 (1):1-22.score: 18.0
    In this essay, I take up the question of the time of medicine in relation to two events in the U.S. from 2005—the Terri Schiavo case and Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. I consider both cases as “mediatized medical events,” that is, as events in which the practices of medicine received considerable media attention at a particular historical moment; or, we might say, as events that brought a convergence between media and medical practices. I juxtapose these two events because, placed (...)
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  31. Madeleine Fairbairn (2012). Framing Transformation: The Counter-Hegemonic Potential of Food Sovereignty in the US Context. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):217-230.score: 18.0
    Originally created by the international peasant movement La Vía Campesina, the concept of “food sovereignty” is being used with increasing frequency by agrifood activists and others in the Global North. Using the analytical lens of framing, I explore the effects of this diffusion on the transformative potential of food sovereignty. US agrifood initiatives have recently been the subject of criticism for their lack of transformative potential, whether because they offer market-based solutions rather than demanding political ones or because (...)
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  32. Sofia Naranjo (2012). Enabling Food Sovereignty and a Prosperous Future for Peasants by Understanding the Factors That Marginalise Peasants and Lead to Poverty and Hunger. Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):231-246.score: 18.0
    Dominant development discourse and policy are based on crucial misconceptions about peasants and their livelihoods. Peasants are viewed as inherently poor and hungry and their farming systems are considered inefficient, of low productivity, and sometimes even environmentally degrading. Consequently, dominant development policies have tried to transform peasants into something else: industrialised commercial farmers, wage labourers, urban workers, etc. This article seeks to deconstruct three key misconceptions about peasants by explaining how and why marginalised peasants around the world face poverty and (...)
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  33. Jorge Emilio Núñez (2013). About the Impossibility of Absolute State Sovereignty. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-20.score: 18.0
    State sovereignty is often thought to be absolute, unlimited. This paper argues that there is no such a thing as absolute State sovereignty. Indeed, absolute sovereignty is impossible because all sovereignty is necessarily underpinned by its conditions of possibility—i.e. limited sovereignty is the norm, though the nature of the limitations varies. The article consists of two main sections: (a) the concept of sovereignty: this section is focused on some of the limitations the concept of (...)
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  34. Jorge Emilio Núñez (forthcoming). About the Impossibility of Absolute State Sovereignty: The Middle Ages. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-16.score: 18.0
    State sovereignty is often thought to be and seen as absolute, unlimited. We have seen that there is no such a thing as absolute State sovereignty. Indeed, I maintained in the first article of this series that absolute or unlimited sovereignty is impossible because all sovereignty is necessarily underpinned by its conditions of possibility. The present paper has two main parts. Firstly, I will introduce two different kinds of agents: (a) individuals; and (b) States. The aim (...)
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  35. Otto Hospes (2013). Food Sovereignty: The Debate, the Deadlock, and a Suggested Detour. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values:1-12.score: 18.0
    Whereas hundreds of social movements and NGOs all over the world have embraced the concept of food sovereignty, not many public authorities at the national and international level have adopted the food sovereignty paradigm as a normative basis for alternative agriculture and food policy. A common explanation of the limited role of food sovereignty in food and agriculture policy is that existing power structures are biased towards maintaining the corporatist food regime and neo-liberal thinking about food security. (...)
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  36. Sayed Khatab (2006). The Power of Sovereignty: The Political and Ideological Philosophy of Sayyid Qutb. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The Power of Sovereignty attempts to understand the ideas and thoughts of Sayyid Qut whose corpus of work and, in particular, his theory of hakimiyyah (sovereignty) is viewed as a threat to nationalistic government and peace worldwide. This book provides a detailed perspective Sayyid Qutb's writings and examines: · The relation between the specifics of the concept of hakimiyyah and that of jahiliyyah · The force and intent of these two concepts · How Qutb employs their specifics to (...)
     
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  37. James R. Martel (2012). Divine Violence: Walter Benjamin and the Eschatology of Sovereignty. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Introduction: divine violence and political fetishism -- The political theology of sovereignty -- In the maw of sovereignty -- Benjamin's dissipated eschatology -- Waiting for justice -- Forgiveness, judgment and sovereign decision -- The Hebrew republic -- Conclusion : the anarchist hypothesis.
     
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  38. Thomas R. Rochon (1999). The Netherlands: Negotiating Sovereignty in an Interdependent World. Westview Press.score: 18.0
    Across Europe, national leaders and ordinary citizens alike face the problems and opportunities raised by increasing economic and political interdependence. Interdependence between nations creates new dilemmas in every sphere of activity. In The Netherlands: Negotiating Sovereignty in an Interdependent World, Thomas Rochon offers a comparative focus and a strong conceptualization of small-state issues applied to present the Netherlands experience.Although all countries face issues of sovereignty and adjustment to international forces, the Dutch have addressed these issues more explicitly and (...)
     
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  39. Ned Dobos (2011). Insurrection and Intervention: The Two Faces of Sovereignty. Cambridge University Press.score: 15.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Communal self-determination; 2. Costs and consequences; 3. Asymmetries in jus ad bellum; 4. Asymmetries in jus in bello; 5. Humanitarian intervention and national responsibility; 6. The issue of selectivity; 7. Proper authority and international authorisation; Conclusion.
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  40. Edmund F. Byrne (forthcoming). In Lieu of a Sovereignty Shield, Multinational Corporations Should Be Responsible for the Harm They Cause. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 15.0
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  41. Nitzan Lebovic (2010). The Sovereignty of Modern Times: Different Concepts of Time and the Modernist Perspective. History and Theory 49 (2):281-288.score: 15.0
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  42. Eric Wilson (2007). The VOC, Corporate Sovereignty and the Republican Sub-Text of De Iure Praedae. Grotiana 26 (1):310-340.score: 15.0
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  43. R. A. Eastwood (1929). The Austinian Theories of Law and Sovereignty. London, Methuen & Co. Ltd..score: 15.0
     
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  44. Yung-chi Ho (1935). The Origin of Parliamentary Sovereignty or "Mixed" Monarchy. Shanghai, the Commercial Press, Ltd..score: 15.0
     
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  45. Debiprosad Pal (1962). State Sovereignty at the Cross-Roads: An Analysis of the Reality and Pretension of its Majesty in International Society. S.C. Sarkar.score: 15.0
     
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  46. Milorad Stupar (2003). World Order, Globalization, and the Question of Sovereignty. Filozofija I Drustvo 21:273-294.score: 15.0
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  47. Ian M. Wilson (1973). The Influence of Hobbes and Locke in the Shaping of the Concept of Sovereignty in Eighteenth Century France. Voltaire Foundation, Thorpe Mandeville House.score: 15.0
  48. Patrick Macklem (2008). Humanitarian Intervention and the Distribution of Sovereignty in International Law. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (4):369-393.score: 12.0
    Legal debates about humanitarian intervention—military intervention by one or more states to curb gross human rights violations occurring in another state—tend to assume that its legitimacy is irrelevant to its legality. Debates among philosophers and political theorists often assume the inverse, that the legality of humanitarian intervention is irrelevant to its legitimacy. This paper defends an alternative account, one that sees the legality and legitimacy of humanitarian intervention as intertwined. This account emerges from a conception of international law as a (...)
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  49. Margaret Denike (2008). The Human Rights of Others: Sovereignty, Legitimacy, and "Just Causes" for the "War on Terror". Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 95-121.score: 12.0
    In this essay, Denike assesses the appropriation of international human rights by humanitarian law and policy of "security states." She maps representations of the perpetrators and victims of "tyranny" and "terror, " and their role in providing a "just cause" for the U.S.–led "war on terror. " By examining narratives of progress and human rights heroism Denike shows how human rights discourses, when used together with the pretense of self-defense and preemptive war, do the opposite of what they claim—entrenching the (...)
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  50. Pavlos Eleftheriadis (2010). Law and Sovereignty. Law and Philosophy 29 (5):535-569.score: 12.0
    How is it possible that the idea of sovereignty still features in legal and political philosophy? Most contemporary political philosophers have little use for the idea of ‘unlimited’ or ‘absolute’ power, which is how sovereignty is normally defined. A closer look at sovereignty identifies two possible accounts: sovereignty as the fact of power or sovereignty as a title to govern. The first option, which was pursued by John Austin’s command theory of law, leads to an (...)
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